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1.
Med Sci Monit ; 29: e939797, 2023 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The Indonesian Chronic Disease Management Program (PROLANIS) is a government program that aims to improve the health outcomes of patients with chronic diseases, including hypertension. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the health outcomes of hypertension patients in rural areas who were enrolled in PROLANIS. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study used data from 4 PROLANIS groups in East Java province. The data were collected from participants' 6-month evaluations at 3 time points: before the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2019 (T0), during the COVID-19 pandemic in June 2020 (T1), and in December 2020 (T2). Evaluated parameters were body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipid (LDL), high-density lipid (HDL), triglyceride (TG), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). RESULTS There were 91 patients included in the analyses. Compared to T0, BMI, blood pressure, eGFR, and TC had significantly deteriorated at T1, but LDL, HDL, and TG showed no marked changes. At T2, BMI, DBP, and TC were similar to T0. On the other hand, SBP and eGFR did not improve, while HDL significantly deteriorated. Stratified based on age, worsening of DBP, TC, and LDL at T1 and eGFR at T1 and T2 was only observed in those aged 60 years and older. CONCLUSIONS This preliminary study showed that the health outcomes of hypertension patients in rural areas who were enrolled in PROLANIS were negatively impacted during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the elderly being the most affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Triglycerides , Blood Pressure/physiology , Disease Management , Cholesterol, HDL
2.
Med Care ; 61(Suppl 1): S62-S69, 2023 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284121

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Community health centers (CHCs) pivoted to using telehealth to deliver chronic care during the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic. While care continuity can improve care quality and patients' experiences, it is unclear whether telehealth supported this relationship. OBJECTIVE: We examine the association of care continuity with diabetes and hypertension care quality in CHCs before and during COVID-19 and the mediating effect of telehealth. RESEARCH DESIGN: This was a cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Electronic health record data from 166 CHCs with n=20,792 patients with diabetes and/or hypertension with ≥2 encounters/year during 2019 and 2020. METHODS: Multivariable logistic regression models estimated the association of care continuity (Modified Modified Continuity Index; MMCI) with telehealth use and care processes. Generalized linear regression models estimated the association of MMCI and intermediate outcomes. Formal mediation analyses assessed whether telehealth mediated the association of MMCI with A1c testing during 2020. RESULTS: MMCI [2019: odds ratio (OR)=1.98, marginal effect=0.69, z=165.50, P<0.001; 2020: OR=1.50, marginal effect=0.63, z=147.73, P<0.001] and telehealth use (2019: OR=1.50, marginal effect=0.85, z=122.87, P<0.001; 2020: OR=10.00, marginal effect=0.90, z=155.57, P<0.001) were associated with higher odds of A1c testing. MMCI was associated with lower systolic (ß=-2.90, P<0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (ß=-1.44, P<0.001) in 2020, and lower A1c values (2019: ß=-0.57, P=0.007; 2020: ß=-0.45, P=0.008) in both years. In 2020, telehealth use mediated 38.7% of the relationship between MMCI and A1c testing. CONCLUSIONS: Higher care continuity is associated with telehealth use and A1c testing, and lower A1c and blood pressure. Telehealth use mediates the association of care continuity and A1c testing. Care continuity may facilitate telehealth use and resilient performance on process measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Telemedicine , Humans , Cohort Studies , Glycated Hemoglobin , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Community Health Centers
3.
J Glob Health ; 13: 06006, 2023 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250749

ABSTRACT

Background: During the COVID-19 pandemic, access to health care for people living with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has been significantly disrupted. Calls have been made to adapt health systems and innovate service delivery models to improve access to care. We identified and summarized the health systems adaptions and interventions implemented to improve NCD care and their potential impact on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Methods: We comprehensively searched Medline/PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Global Health, PsycINFO, Global Literature on coronavirus disease, and Web of Science for relevant literature published between January 2020 and December 2021. While we targeted articles written in English, we also included papers published in French with abstracts written in English. Results: After screening 1313 records, we included 14 papers from six countries. We identified four unique health systems adaptations/interventions for restoring, maintaining, and ensuring continuity of care for people living with NCDs: telemedicine or teleconsultation strategies, NCD medicine drop-off points, decentralization of hypertension follow-up services and provision of free medication to peripheral health centers, and diabetic retinopathy screening with a handheld smartphone-based retinal camera. We found that the adaptations/interventions enhanced continuity of NCD care during the pandemic and helped bring health care closer to patients using technology and easing access to medicines and routine visits. Telephonic aftercare services appear to have saved a significant amount of patients' time and funds. Hypertensive patients recorded better blood pressure controls over the follow-up period. Conclusions: Although the identified measures and interventions for adapting health systems resulted in potential improvements in access to NCD care and better clinical outcomes, further exploration is needed to establish the feasibility of these adaptations/interventions in different settings given the importance of context in their successful implementation. Insights from such implementation studies are critical for ongoing health systems strengthening efforts to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 and future global health security threats for people living with NCDs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Developing Countries , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Government Programs/organization & administration , Government Programs/standards , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Internationality
4.
Trials ; 24(1): 221, 2023 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268764

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Perirenal fat plays a key role in sustaining pathological high blood pressure. We aim to investigate the efficacy of intervention for perirenal fat mediated by focused power ultrasound (FPU) on primary hypertension. METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled, double-blinded trial will be implemented in 200 participants with mild to moderate hypertension. All enrolled participants will be randomly allocated to perirenal fat modification (PFM) intervention using FPU or sham-procedure at a ratio of 1:1 and will be followed up at 24 h, 14 days, 30 days, and 90 days after the intervention. The primary endpoint is changes in office systolic blood pressure (SBP) at 30 days compared with baseline. The secondary endpoints include the changes in office SBP from baseline to 90 days, changes in 24-h mean SBP from baseline to 30 days and 90 days, and changes in heart rate from baseline to 30 days. Safety endpoint is defined as any severe adverse events related to the intervention. DISCUSSION: The present study is the first to use noninvasive FPU to intervene in perirenal fat to achieve the goal of reducing blood pressure for patients with essential hypertension. Our study is expected to provide a new treatment strategy to control high blood pressure. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov. NCT05049096. Registered on September 7, 2021. PROTOCOL VERSION: Version 1.3.1, data 23 August 2021. SPONSOR: Prof. Xiangqing Kong is the principal investigator of this trial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Kidney/diagnostic imaging , Hypertension/diagnostic imaging , Hypertension/therapy , Essential Hypertension , Treatment Outcome , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Multicenter Studies as Topic
5.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 12(6): e027296, 2023 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268328

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted traditional health care; one fallout was a drastic decrease in blood pressure (BP) assessment. We analyzed the pandemic's impact on our existing remote hypertension management program's effectiveness and adaptability. Methods and Results This retrospective observational analysis evaluated BP control in an entirely remote management program before and during the pandemic. A team of pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physicians, and nonlicensed navigators used an evidence-based clinical algorithm to optimize hypertensive treatment. The algorithm was adapted during the pandemic to simplify BP control. Overall, 1256 patients (605 enrolled in the 6 months before the pandemic shutdown in March 2020 and 651 in the 6 months after) were a median age of 63 years old, 57% female, and 38.2% non-White. Among enrolled patients with sustained hypertension, 51.1% reached BP goals. Within this group, rates of achieving goal BP improved to 94.6% during the pandemic from 75.8% prepandemic (P<0.0001). Mean baseline home BP was 141.7/81.9 mm Hg during the pandemic and 139.8/82.2 prepandemic, and fell ≈16/9 mm Hg in both periods (P<0.0001). Maintenance during the pandemic was achieved earlier (median 11.8 versus 19.6 weeks, P<0.0001), with more frequent monthly calls (8.2 versus 3.1, P<0.0001) and more monthly home BP recordings per patient (32.4 versus 18.9, P<0.0001), compared with the prepandemic period. Conclusions A remote clinical management program was successfully adapted and delivered significant improvements in BP control and increased home BP monitoring despite a nationally observed disruption of traditional hypertension care. Such programs have the potential to transform hypertension management and care delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Blood Pressure/physiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Hypertension/drug therapy , Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 25: e42134, 2023 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2266078

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypertension and diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Telemedicine is an accessible and cost-effective means of supporting hypertension and diabetes management, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the adoption of technological solutions for care. However, to date, no review has examined the contextual factors that influence the implementation of telemedicine interventions for hypertension or diabetes worldwide. OBJECTIVE: We adopted a comprehensive implementation research perspective to synthesize the barriers to and facilitators of implementing telemedicine interventions for the management of hypertension, diabetes, or both. METHODS: We performed a scoping review involving searches in Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar to identify studies published in English from 2017 to 2022 describing barriers and facilitators related to the implementation of telemedicine interventions for hypertension and diabetes management. The coding and synthesis of barriers and facilitators were guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. RESULTS: Of the 17,687 records identified, 35 (0.2%) studies were included in our scoping review. We found that facilitators of and barriers to implementation were dispersed across the constructs of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Barriers related to cost, patient needs and resources (eg, lack of consideration of language needs, culture, and rural residency), and personal attributes of patients (eg, demographics and priorities) were the most common. Facilitators related to the design and packaging of the intervention (eg, user-friendliness), patient needs and resources (eg, personalized information that leveraged existing strengths), implementation climate (eg, intervention embedded into existing infrastructure), knowledge of and beliefs about the intervention (eg, convenience of telemedicine), and other personal attributes (eg, technical literacy) were the most common. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the successful implementation of telemedicine interventions for hypertension and diabetes requires comprehensive efforts at the planning, execution, engagement, and reflection and evaluation stages of intervention implementation to address challenges at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, and environmental levels.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Health Services Accessibility , Hypertension , Implementation Science , Telemedicine , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Hypertension/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/standards
7.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 11: e43675, 2023 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258544

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Even modest reductions in blood pressure (BP) can have an important impact on population-level morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. There are 2 promising approaches: the SaltSwitch smartphone app, which enables users to scan the bar code of a packaged food using their smartphone camera and receive an immediate, interpretive traffic light nutrition label on-screen alongside a list of healthier, lower-salt options in the same food category; and reduced-sodium salts (RSSs), which are an alternative to regular table salt that are lower in sodium and higher in potassium but have a similar mouthfeel, taste, and flavor. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine whether a 12-week intervention with a sodium-reduction package comprising the SaltSwitch smartphone app and an RSS could reduce urinary sodium excretion in adults with high BP. METHODS: A 2-arm parallel randomized controlled trial was conducted in New Zealand (target n=326). Following a 2-week baseline period, adults who owned a smartphone and had high BP (≥140/85 mm Hg) were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention (SaltSwitch smartphone app + RSS) or control (generic heart-healthy eating information from The Heart Foundation of New Zealand). The primary outcome was 24-hour urinary sodium excretion at 12 weeks estimated via spot urine. Secondary outcomes were urinary potassium excretion, BP, sodium content of food purchases, and intervention use and acceptability. Intervention effects were assessed blinded using intention-to-treat analyses with generalized linear regression adjusting for baseline outcome measures, age, and ethnicity. RESULTS: A total of 168 adults were randomized (n=84, 50% per group) between June 2019 and February 2020. Challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and smartphone technology detrimentally affected recruitment. The adjusted mean difference between groups was 547 (95% CI -331 to 1424) mg for estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, 132 (95% CI -1083 to 1347) mg for urinary potassium excretion, -0.66 (95% CI -3.48 to 2.16) mm Hg for systolic BP, and 73 (95% CI -21 to 168) mg per 100 g for the sodium content of food purchases. Most intervention participants reported using the SaltSwitch app (48/64, 75%) and RSS (60/64, 94%). SaltSwitch was used on 6 shopping occasions, and approximately 1/2 tsp per week of RSS was consumed per household during the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized controlled trial of a salt-reduction package, we found no evidence that dietary sodium intake was reduced in adults with high BP. These negative findings may be owing to lower-than-anticipated engagement with the trial intervention package. However, implementation and COVID-19-related challenges meant that the trial was underpowered, and it is possible that a real effect may have been missed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12619000352101; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=377044 and Universal Trial U1111-1225-4471.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Mobile Applications , Humans , Adult , Sodium Chloride, Dietary , Pandemics , Australia , Hypertension/therapy , Sodium
8.
BMJ Open ; 13(3): e068204, 2023 03 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258773

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted on the delivery of clinical trials in the UK, posing complicated organisational challenges and requiring adaptations, especially to exercise intervention studies based in the community. We aim to identify the challenges of public involvement, recruitment, consent, follow-up, intervention and the healthcare professional delivery aspects of a feasibility study of exercise in hypertensive primary care patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. While these challenges elicited many reactive changes which were specific to, and only relevant in the context of 'lockdown' requirements, some of the protocol developments that came about during this unprecedented period have great potential to inform more permanent practices for carrying out this type of research. To this end, we detail the necessary adaptations to many elements of the feasibility study and critically reflect on our approach to redesigning and amending this ongoing project in order to maintain its viability to date. Some of the more major protocol adaptations, such as moving the study to remote means wherever possible, had further unforeseen and undesirable outcomes (eg, additional appointments) with regards to extra resources required to deliver the study. However, other changes improved the efficiency of the study, such as the remote informed consent and the direct advertising with prescreening survey. The adaptations to the study have clear links to the UK Plan for the future of research delivery. It is intended that this specific documentation and critical evaluation will help those planning or delivering similar studies to do so in a more resource efficient and effective way. In conclusion, it is essential to reflect and respond with protocol changes in the current climate in order to deliver clinical research successfully, as in the case of this particular study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Feasibility Studies , Exercise , Hypertension/therapy
9.
Am J Manag Care ; 29(1): 42-49, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2226759

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated telemedicine use nationally, but differences across health systems are understudied. We examine telemedicine use for adults with diabetes and/or hypertension across 10 health systems and analyze practice and patient characteristics associated with greater use. STUDY DESIGN: Encounter-level data from the AMGA Optum Data Warehouse for March 13, 2020, to December 31, 2020, were analyzed, which included 3,016,761 clinical encounters from 764,521 adults with diabetes and/or hypertension attributed to 1 of 1207 practice sites with at least 50 system-attributed patients. METHODS: Linear spline regression estimated whether practice size and ownership were associated with telemedicine during the adoption (weeks 0-4), de-adoption (weeks 5-12), and maintenance (weeks 13-42) periods, controlling for patient socioeconomic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: Telemedicine use peaked at 11% to 42% of weekly encounters after 4 weeks. In adjusted analyses, small practices had lower telemedicine use for adults with diabetes during the maintenance period compared with larger practices. Practice ownership was not associated with telemedicine use. Practices with higher proportions of Black patients continued to expand telemedicine use during the de-adoption and maintenance periods. CONCLUSIONS: Practice ownership was not associated with telemedicine use during first months of the pandemic. Small practices de-adopted telemedicine to a greater degree than medium and large practices. Technical support for small practices, irrespective of their ownership, could enable telemedicine use for adults with diabetes and/or hypertension.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Telemedicine , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Hypertension/therapy
10.
Indian J Public Health ; 66(4): 466-472, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2201814

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk of mortality among patients with noncommunicable diseases. Maintaining a good metabolic control, lifestyle modification along with improved self-care practices are not only associated with less severe COVID-19 infections but also with a high recovery rate. Objectives: This research article explores the changes in lifestyle habits, self-care practices, and metabolic control among patients enrolled in the HealthRise program. The study compares behavioral changes, before COVID-19 pandemic and during COVID-19 pandemic, between intervention and control arms in Shimla and Udaipur. Methods: A quasi-experimental study design was employed for program implementation in select villages of Shimla district, and Udaipur district. A total of 459 patients from Shimla and 309 patients from Udaipur with diabetes mellitus or hypertension or with both were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Results: Metabolic control in Shimla intervention arm was 2.6 times higher than in control arm (P = 0.001) before COVID-19 pandemic. During COVID-19 pandemic, Odds of metabolic control in Shimla intervention was 1.5 times higher when compared with control arm (P = 0.03). In Udaipur, metabolic control before COVID-19 pandemic was comparable between control and intervention arms. During the pandemic, metabolic control in intervention arm of Udaipur was 5 times higher when compared to the control arm ((P = 0.001). Conclusion: Participants exposed to support, appreciate, learn, and transfer-community life competence process (SALT-CLCP) intervention maintained metabolic control during the COVID-19 pandemic with improved behavioral and self-care practices. Community-based interventions such as SALT-CLCP method bring ownership and empower community in achieving the better health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Self Care , India/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Life Style , Habits
11.
Eur J Med Res ; 28(1): 22, 2023 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196463

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Healthcare concepts for chronic diseases based on tele-monitoring have become increasingly important during COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To study the effectiveness of a novel integrated care concept (NICC) that combines tele-monitoring with the support of a call centre in addition to guideline therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or treatment-resistant hypertension. DESIGN: A prospective, parallel-group, open-label, randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: Between December 2017 and August 2019 at the Rostock University Medical Center (Germany). PARTICIPANTS: Including 960 patients with either atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or treatment-resistant hypertension. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to either NICC (n = 478) or standard-of-care (SoC) (n = 482) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients in the NICC group received a combination of tele-monitoring and intensive follow-up and care through a call centre. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Three primary endpoints were formulated: (1) composite of all-cause mortality, stroke, and myocardial infarction; (2) number of inpatient days; (3) the first plus cardiac decompensation, all measured at 12-months follow-up. Superiority was evaluated using a hierarchical multiple testing strategy for the 3 primary endpoints, where the first step is to test the second primary endpoint (hospitalization) at two-sided 5%-significance level. In case of a non-significant difference between the groups for the rate of hospitalization, the superiority of NICC over SoC is not shown. RESULTS: The first primary endpoint occurred in 1.5% of NICC and 5.2% of SoC patients (OR: 3.3 [95%CI 1.4-8.3], p = 0.009). The number of inpatient treatment days did not differ significantly between both groups (p = 0.122). The third primary endpoint occurred in 3.6% of NICC and 8.1% of SoC patients (OR: 2.2 [95%CI 1.2-4.2], p = 0.016). Four patients died of all-cause death in the NICC and 23 in the SoC groups (OR: 4.4 [95%CI 1.6-12.6], p = 0.006). Based on the prespecified hierarchical statistical analysis protocol for multiple testing, the trial did not meet its primary outcome measure. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or treatment-resistant hypertension, the NICC approach was not superior over SoC, despite a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiac decompensation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03317951.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Hypertension , Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , Humans , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Atrial Fibrillation/therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Chronic Disease , Hypertension/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy
12.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(4)2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2193820

ABSTRACT

Non-communicable diseases have overtaken communicable diseases as the most common cause of death worldwide, with the majority of these deaths in low-income and middle-income countries. Hypertension alone causes over nine million deaths per year.Since 2017, around 750 000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence in Myanmar into Cox's Bazar District in Bangladesh. We describe a quality improvement project focused on the management of hypertension in Rohingya refugees in three primary health facilities within the Rohingya refugee camps. The aim of the project was to create a sustainable hypertension service within existing primary care services.A number of plan-do-study-act cycles were performed to improve care, with methods including: creating a specialised clinic, writing a treatment algorithm, training of pharmacists, engaging community health workers and educational programmes for staff and patients.In 2020, 554 patients were engaged in the new hypertension service. Of these, 358 (64.6%) returned for follow-up at least once. Mean systolic blood pressure (BP) was 141.7 (SD 60.0) mm Hg and mean diastolic BP was 88.1 (SD 11.1) mm Hg. Patients engaged in treatment had a significant reduction of BP of 8.2 (95% CI 5.4 to 11.0)/6.0 (95% CI 4.1 to 7.9) mm Hg (p<0.0001).Our project shows that it is possible to create a hypertension service in a challenging humanitarian crisis, which can successfully improve the control of hypertension, although retention in care can be difficult.


Subject(s)
Hypertension , Refugees , Humans , Refugee Camps , Hypertension/therapy , Bangladesh , Poverty
13.
J Hum Hypertens ; 36(11): 945-951, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2151012

ABSTRACT

Out-of-office blood pressure (BP) measurement is considered an integral component of the diagnostic algorithm and management of hypertension. In the era of digitalization, a great deal of wearable BP measuring devices has been developed. These digital blood pressure monitors allow frequent BP measurements with minimal annoyance to the patient while they do promise radical changes regarding the diagnostic accuracy, as the importance of making an accurate diagnosis of hypertension has become evident. By increasing the number of BP measurements in different conditions, these monitors allow accurate identification of different clinical phenotypes, such as masked hypertension and pathological BP variability, that seem to have a negative impact on cardiovascular prognosis. Frequent measurements of BP and the incorporation of new features in BP variability, both enable well-rounded interpretation of BP data in the context of real-life settings. This article is a review of all different technologies and wearable BP monitoring devices.


Subject(s)
Hypertension , Wearable Electronic Devices , Humans , Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory , Blood Pressure/physiology , Reproducibility of Results , Blood Pressure Determination , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/therapy
14.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 19: E81, 2022 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2155713

ABSTRACT

Telehealth is a promising intervention for hypertension management and control and was rapidly adopted by health systems to ensure continuity of care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Rapid evaluations of telehealth strategies at 2 US health systems explored how telehealth affected health care access and blood pressure outcomes among populations disproportionately affected by hypertension. Both health systems implemented telehealth strategies to maintain continuity of health care services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The evaluations used a mixed-method approach; qualitative interviews were conducted with key staff, and quantitative analyses were performed on patient electronic health record data. Both health systems exhibited similar trends in telehealth use, which allowed for continued access to health care for some patients but hindered other patients who had limited access to the internet or the equipment needed. Telehealth provides opportunities for blood pressure control and management. Further evaluation is needed to understand the role of broadband internet access as a social determinant of health and its impact on equitable patient access to health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Government Programs , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy
15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2295, 2022 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153554

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled hypertension is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To ensure continuity of care, community health centers (CHCs) nationwide implemented virtual care (telehealth) during the pandemic. CHCs use the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) 165v8 Controlling High Blood Pressure measure to report blood pressure (BP) control performance. CMS 165v8 specifications state that if no BP is documented during the measurement period, the patient's BP is assumed uncontrolled. METHODS: To examine trends in BP documentation and control rates in CHCs as telehealth use increased during the pandemic compared with pre-pandemic period, we assessed documentation of BP measurement and BP control rates from December 2019 - October 2021 among persons ages 18-85 with a diagnosis of hypertension who had an in-person or telehealth encounter in 11 CHCs. Rates were compared between CHCs that did and did not implement self-measured BP monitoring (SMBP). RESULTS: The percent of patients with hypertension with no documented BP measurement was 0.5% in December 2019 and increased to 15.2% (overall), 25.6% (non-SMBP CHCs), and 11.2% (SMBP CHCs) by October 2021. BP control using CMS 165v8 was 63.5% in December 2019 and decreased to 54.9% (overall), 49.1% (non-SMBP), and 57.2% (SMBP) by October 2021. When assessing BP control only in patients with documented BP measurements, CHCs largely maintained BP control rates (63.8% in December 2019; 64.8% (overall), 66.0% (non-SMBP), and 64.4% (SMBP) by October 2021). CONCLUSIONS: The transition away from in-person to telehealth visits during the pandemic likely increased the number of patients with hypertension lacking a documented BP measurement, subsequently negatively impacting BP control using CMS 165v8. There is an urgent need to enhance the flexibility of virtual care, improve EHR data capture capabilities for patient-generated data, and implement expanded policy and systems-level changes for SMBP, an evidence-based strategy that can build patient trust, increase healthcare engagement, and improve hypertension outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Aged , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Pressure , COVID-19/epidemiology , Medicare , Community Health Centers , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy
16.
J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 37(5): 475-481, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087884

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension eating plan is an evidence-based treatment of hypertension; however, adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension is low. To improve adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension among adults with hypertension, we designed Nourish, a 2-arm, 12-month randomized controlled trial. The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a change from in-person to remotely delivered visits, requiring substantial protocol modifications to measure blood pressure accurately and safely for secondary outcome data. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of an at-home blood pressure measurement protocol for the Nourish trial. CONCLUSION: Our investigator team and study staff developed and implemented a robust and feasible blood pressure measurement protocol to be executed within an at-home format. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The described blood pressure measurement protocol provides a framework for use in future clinical trials and clinical settings in which a remote visit is preferred or required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Adult , Blood Pressure , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
17.
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak ; 22(1): 217, 2022 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Primary care providers face challenges in recognizing and controlling hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to aid clinicians in identifying patients who could benefit from medication changes. This study designed an alert to control hypertension in CKD patients using an iterative human-centered design process. METHODS: In this study, we present a human-centered design process employing multiple methods for gathering user requirements and feedback on design and usability. Initially, we conducted contextual inquiry sessions to gather user requirements for the CDS. This was followed by group design sessions and one-on-one formative think-aloud sessions to validate requirements, obtain feedback on the design and layout, uncover usability issues, and validate changes. RESULTS: This study included 20 participants. The contextual inquiry produced 10 user requirements which influenced the initial alert design. The group design sessions revealed issues related to several themes, including recommendations and clinical content that did not match providers' expectations and extraneous information on the alerts that did not provide value. Findings from the individual think-aloud sessions revealed that participants disagreed with some recommended clinical actions, requested additional information, and had concerns about the placement in their workflow. Following each step, iterative changes were made to the alert content and design. DISCUSSION: This study showed that participation from users throughout the design process can lead to a better understanding of user requirements and optimal design, even within the constraints of an EHR alerting system. While raising awareness of design needs, it also revealed concerns related to workflow, understandability, and relevance. CONCLUSION: The human-centered design framework using multiple methods for CDS development informed the creation of an alert to assist in the treatment and recognition of hypertension in patients with CKD.


Subject(s)
Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Hypertension , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Feedback , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/therapy , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy , Workflow
18.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 19: E47, 2022 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1975268

ABSTRACT

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but 3 of 4 US adults do not have their blood pressure adequately controlled. Million Hearts (US Department of Health and Human Services) is a national initiative that promotes a set of priorities and interventions to optimize delivery of evidence-based strategies to manage cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. The COVID-19 pandemic, however, has disrupted routine care and preventive service delivery. We identified examples of clinical and health organizations that adapted services and care processes to continue a focus on monitoring and controlling hypertension during the pandemic. Eight Hypertension Control Exemplars were identified and interviewed. They reported various adapted care strategies including telemedicine, engaging patients in self-measured blood pressure monitoring, adapting or implementing medication management services, activating partnerships to respond to patient needs or expand services, and implementing unique patient outreach approaches. Documenting these hypertension control strategies can help increase adoption of adaptive approaches during public health emergencies and routine care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Adult , Blood Pressure , Blood Pressure Determination , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control
19.
Curr Hypertens Rev ; 18(1): 78-84, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902800

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a leading risk factor for morbidity and mortality around the world. Preventing this health problem is considered an important priority. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive factors for care and control of hypertension (CCH) according to the health belief model (HBM), in patients with hypertension during the COVID-19 epidemic in Sirjan, Iran. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, participants were chosen by simple random sampling. Data were collected by a valid and reliable researcher-made questionnaire from 200 patients with high blood pressure aged 30-60 years. Data were analyzed by SPSS21 and analysis based on descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients, and linear regression was conducted. RESULTS: The results of Pearson correlation coefficients showed that there was a significant correlation among almost all constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM), but the strongest correlations were between self-efficacy and perceived susceptibility (r = 0.940, P ≤ 0.001), and between perceived barriers with perceived benefits (r = -0.615, P ≤ 0.001). According to linear regression, perceived barriers (ß = -0.291), cues to action (ß = -0.590), and knowledge (ß = 0.973) predicted more than 26% of CCH variability. Knowledge had a stronger role than other variables. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show that the constructs of the Health Belief Model can predict CCH in hypertensive patients. This model can be used as a tool for designing and implementing educational interventions to increase CCH among hypertensive patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Belief Model , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/therapy , Iran/epidemiology
20.
Nutrients ; 14(11)2022 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1869718

ABSTRACT

'Living Better', a self-administered web-based intervention, designed to facilitate lifestyle changes, has already shown positive short- and medium-term health benefits in patients with an obesity-hypertension phenotype. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine the long-term (3-year) evolution of a group of hypertensive overweight or obese patients who had already followed the 'Living Better' program; (2) to analyze the effects of completing this program a second time (reintervention) during the COVID-19 pandemic. A quasi-experimental design was used. We recruited 29 individuals from the 105 who had participated in our first study. We assessed and compared their systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), body mass index (BMI), eating behavior, and physical activity (PA) level (reported as METs-min/week), at Time 0 (first intervention follow-up), Time 1 (before the reintervention), and Time 2 (post-reintervention). Our results showed significant improvements between Time 1 and Time 2 in SBP (-4.7 (-8.7 to -0.7); p = 0.017), DBP (-3.5 (-6.2 to -0.8); p = 0.009), BMI (-0.7 (-1.0 to -0.4); p < 0.001), emotional eating (-2.8 (-5.1 to -0.5); p = 0.012), external eating (-1.1 (-2.1 to -0.1); p = 0.039), and PA (Time 1: 2308 ± 2266; Time 2: 3203 ± 3314; p = 0.030, Z = -2.17). Statistical analysis showed no significant differences in SPB, DBP, BMI, and eating behavior between Time 0 and Time 1 (p > 0.24). Implementation of the 'Living Better' program maintained positive long-term (3-year) health benefits in patients with an obesity-hypertension phenotype. Moreover, a reintervention with this program during the COVID-19 pandemic produced significant improvements in blood pressure, BMI, eating behavior, and PA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Body Mass Index , Humans , Hypertension/therapy , Internet , Life Style , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Overweight/epidemiology , Overweight/therapy , Pandemics
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