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1.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258856, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542176

ABSTRACT

Hypoxia is a common pathway to the progression of end-stage kidney disease. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) encodes an RNA helicase that recognizes viruses including SARS-CoV2, which is responsible for the production of interferon (IFN)-α/ß to prevent the spread of viral infection. Recently, RIG-I activation was found under hypoxic conditions, and klotho deficiency was shown to intensify the activation of RIG-I in mouse brains. However, the roles of these functions in renal inflammation remain elusive. Here, for in vitro study, the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß was examined in normal rat kidney (NRK)-52E cells incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2). Next, siRNA targeting RIG-I or scramble siRNA was transfected into NRK52E cells to examine the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß under hypoxic conditions. We also investigated the expression levels of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß in 33 human kidney biopsy samples diagnosed with IgA nephropathy. For in vivo study, we induced renal hypoxia by clamping the renal artery for 10 min in wild-type mice (WT mice) and Klotho-knockout mice (Kl-/- mice). Incubation under hypoxic conditions increased the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß in NRK52E cells. Their upregulation was inhibited in NRK52E cells transfected with siRNA targeting RIG-I. In patients with IgA nephropathy, immunohistochemical staining of renal biopsy samples revealed that the expression of RIG-I was correlated with that of IFN-α/ß (r = 0.57, P<0.001, and r = 0.81, P<0.001, respectively). The expression levels of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß were upregulated in kidneys of hypoxic WT mice and further upregulation was observed in hypoxic Kl-/- mice. These findings suggest that hypoxia induces the expression of IFN-α/ß through the upregulation of RIG-I, and that klotho deficiency intensifies this hypoxia-induced expression in kidneys.


Subject(s)
Glucuronidase/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Kidney/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Animals , Glucuronidase/genetics , Hypoxia/genetics , Mice , Mice, Knockout , RNA, Small Interfering , Rats
3.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 120, 2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since fall 2019, SARS-CoV-2 spread world-wide, causing a major pandemic with estimated ~ 220 million subjects affected as of September 2021. Severe COVID-19 is associated with multiple organ failure, particularly of lung and kidney, but also grave neuropsychiatric manifestations. Overall mortality reaches > 2%. Vaccine development has thrived in thus far unreached dimensions and will be one prerequisite to terminate the pandemic. Despite intensive research, however, few treatment options for modifying COVID-19 course/outcome have emerged since the pandemic outbreak. Additionally, the substantial threat of serious downstream sequelae, called 'long COVID' and 'neuroCOVID', becomes increasingly evident. Among candidates that were suggested but did not yet receive appropriate funding for clinical trials is recombinant human erythropoietin. Based on accumulating experimental and clinical evidence, erythropoietin is expected to (1) improve respiration/organ function, (2) counteract overshooting inflammation, (3) act sustainably neuroprotective/neuroregenerative. Recent counterintuitive findings of decreased serum erythropoietin levels in severe COVID-19 not only support a relative deficiency of erythropoietin in this condition, which can be therapeutically addressed, but also made us coin the term 'hypoxia paradox'. As we review here, this paradox is likely due to uncoupling of physiological hypoxia signaling circuits, mediated by detrimental gene products of SARS-CoV-2 or unfavorable host responses, including microRNAs or dysfunctional mitochondria. Substitution of erythropoietin might overcome this 'hypoxia paradox' caused by deranged signaling and improve survival/functional status of COVID-19 patients and their long-term outcome. As supporting hints, embedded in this review, we present 4 male patients with severe COVID-19 and unfavorable prognosis, including predicted high lethality, who all profoundly improved upon treatment which included erythropoietin analogues. SHORT CONCLUSION: Substitution of EPO may-among other beneficial EPO effects in severe COVID-19-circumvent downstream consequences of the 'hypoxia paradox'. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial for proof-of-concept is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Erythropoietin/genetics , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Erythropoietin/analogs & derivatives , Erythropoietin/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pandemics , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376804

ABSTRACT

Humans on earth inhabit a wide range of environmental conditions and some environments are more challenging for human survival than others. However, many living beings, including humans, have developed adaptive mechanisms to live in such inhospitable, harsh environments. Among different difficult environments, high-altitude living is especially demanding because of diminished partial pressure of oxygen and resulting chronic hypobaric hypoxia. This results in poor blood oxygenation and reduces aerobic oxidative respiration in the mitochondria, leading to increased reactive oxygen species generation and activation of hypoxia-inducible gene expression. Genetic mechanisms in the adaptation to high altitude is well-studied, but there are only limited studies regarding the role of epigenetic mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to understand the epigenetic mechanisms behind high-altitude adaptive and maladaptive phenotypes. Hypobaric hypoxia is a form of cellular hypoxia, which is similar to the one suffered by critically-ill hypoxemia patients. Thus, understanding the adaptive epigenetic signals operating in in high-altitude adjusted indigenous populations may help in therapeutically modulating signaling pathways in hypoxemia patients by copying the most successful epigenotype. In addition, we have summarized the current information about exosomes in hypoxia research and prospects to use them as diagnostic tools to study the epigenome of high-altitude adapted healthy or maladapted individuals.


Subject(s)
Exosomes , Exposome , Adaptation, Physiological/genetics , Altitude , Epigenesis, Genetic , Exosomes/genetics , Humans , Hypoxia/genetics
6.
Life Sci ; 281: 119718, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271709

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hypoxia, a pathophysiological condition, is profound in several cardiopulmonary diseases (CPD). Every individual's lethality to a hypoxia state differs in terms of hypoxia exposure time, dosage units and dependent on the individual's genetic makeup. Most of the proposed markers for CPD were generally aim to distinguish disease samples from normal samples. Although, as per the 2018 GOLD guidelines, clinically useful biomarkers for several cardio pulmonary disease patients in stable condition have yet to be identified. We attempt to address these key issues through the identification of Dynamic Network Biomarkers (DNB) to detect hypoxia induced early warning signals of CPD before the catastrophic deterioration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The human microvascular endothelial tissues microarray datasets (GSE11341) of lung and cardiac expose to hypoxia (1% O2) for 3, 24 and 48 h were retrieved from the public repository. The time dependent differentially expressed genes were subjected to tissue specificity and promoter analysis to filtrate the noise levels in the networks and to dissect the tissue specific hypoxia induced genes. These filtered out genes were used to construct the dynamic segmentation networks. The hypoxia induced dynamic differentially expressed genes were validated in the lung and heart tissues of male rats. These rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (simulated altitude of 25,000 or PO2 - 282 mm of Hg) progressively for 3, 24 and 48 h. KEY FINDINGS: To identify the temporal key genes regulated in hypoxia, we ranked the dominant genes based on their consolidated topological features from tissue specific networks, time dependent networks and dynamic networks. Overall topological ranking described VEGFA as a single node dynamic hub and strongly communicated with tissue specific genes to carry forward their tissue specific information. We named this type of VEGFAcentric dynamic networks as "V-DNBs". As a proof of principle, our methodology helped us to identify the V-DNBs specific for lung and cardiac tissues namely V-DNBL and V-DNBC respectively. SIGNIFICANCE: Our experimental studies identified VEGFA, SLC2A3, ADM and ENO2 as the minimum and sufficient candidates of V-DNBL. The dynamic expression patterns could be readily exploited to capture the pre disease state of hypoxia induced pulmonary vascular remodelling. Whereas in V-DNBC the minimum and sufficient candidates are VEGFA, SCL2A3, ADM, NDRG1, ENO2 and BHLHE40. The time dependent single node expansion indicates V-DNBC could also be the pre disease state pathological hallmark for hypoxia-associated cardiovascular remodelling. The network cross-talk and expression pattern between V-DNBL and V-DNBC are completely distinct. On the other hand, the great clinical advantage of V-DNBs for pre disease predictions, a set of samples during the healthy condition should suffice. Future clinical studies might further shed light on the predictive power of V-DNBs as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers for CPD.


Subject(s)
Heart Diseases/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lung Diseases/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , Clinical Deterioration , Gene Expression Regulation , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/pathology , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/genetics , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/pathology , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
7.
Physiol Rep ; 9(9): e14854, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229494

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 uptake by lung epithelial cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. Viral entry is dependent on the binding of the viral spike protein to the angiotensin converting enzyme II protein (ACE2) on the host cell surface, followed by proteolytic cleavage by a host serine protease such as TMPRSS2. Infection of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the distal lung is a key feature in progression to the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that AEC expression of ACE2 is induced by hypoxia. In a murine model of hypoxic stress (12% FiO2), the total lung Ace2 mRNA and protein expression was significantly increased after 24 hours in hypoxia compared to normoxia (21% FiO2). In experiments with primary murine type II AEC, we found that exposure to hypoxia either in vivo (prior to isolation) or in vitro resulted in greatly increased AEC expression of both Ace2 (mRNA and protein) and of Tmprss2. However, when isolated type II AEC were maintained in culture over 5 days, with loss of type II cell characteristics and induction of type I cell features, Ace2 expression was greatly reduced, suggesting that this expression was a feature of only this subset of AEC. Finally, in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC), ACE2 mRNA and protein expression were also induced by hypoxia, as was binding to purified spike protein. Hypoxia-induced increase in ACE2 expression in type II AEC may provide an explanation of the extended temporal course of human patients who develop ARDS in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/enzymology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/enzymology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/enzymology , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic , Hypoxia/enzymology , Acute Lung Injury/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , Cells, Cultured , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/genetics , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL
8.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 99, 2021 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pneumonia has been associated with severe acute hypoxia, sepsis-like states, thrombosis and chronic sequelae including persisting hypoxia and fibrosis. The molecular hypoxia response pathway has been associated with such pathologies and our recent observations on anti-hypoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of whole aqueous extract of Adhatoda Vasica (AV) prompted us to explore its effects on relevant preclinical mouse models. METHODS: In this study, we tested the effect of whole aqueous extract of AV, in murine models of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis, Cecum Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis, and siRNA induced hypoxia-thrombosis phenotype. The effect on lung of AV treated naïve mice was also studied at transcriptome level. We also determined if the extract may have any effect on SARS-CoV2 replication. RESULTS: Oral administration AV extract attenuates increased airway inflammation, levels of transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), IL-6, HIF-1α and improves the overall survival rates of mice in the models of pulmonary fibrosis and sepsis and rescues the siRNA induced inflammation and associated blood coagulation phenotypes in mice. We observed downregulation of hypoxia, inflammation, TGF-ß1, and angiogenesis genes and upregulation of adaptive immunity-related genes in the lung transcriptome. AV treatment also reduced the viral load in Vero cells infected with SARS-CoV2. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a scientific rationale for this ayurvedic herbal medicine in ameliorating the hypoxia-hyperinflammation features and highlights the repurposing potential of AV in COVID-19-like conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Justicia , Lung/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Sepsis/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Bleomycin , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cecum/microbiology , Cecum/surgery , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Justicia/chemistry , Ligation , Lung/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Pneumonia/genetics , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/microbiology , Transcriptome
9.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(3): e2177, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-815925

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel human respiratory viral infection that has rapidly progressed into a pandemic, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Blood clotting disorders and acute respiratory failure have surfaced as the major complications among the severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Remarkably, more than 70% of deaths related to COVID-19 are attributed to clotting-associated complications such as pulmonary embolism, strokes and multi-organ failure. These vascular complications have been confirmed by autopsy. This study summarizes the current understanding and explains the possible mechanisms of the blood clotting disorder, emphasizing the role of (1) hypoxia-related activation of coagulation factors like tissue factor, a significant player in triggering coagulation cascade, (2) cytokine storm and activation of neutrophils and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps and (3) immobility and ICU related risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/genetics , Hypoxia/genetics , Pulmonary Embolism/genetics , Respiratory Insufficiency/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Extracellular Traps/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/blood , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/genetics , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/pathology , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/pathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Thromboplastin/genetics , Thromboplastin/metabolism
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