Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 35
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(6)2022 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765732

ABSTRACT

Formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) is a two-faced innate host defense mechanism, which, on the one hand, can counteract microbial infections, but on the other hand, can contribute to massive detrimental effects on the host. Cholesterol depletion from the cellular membrane by Methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MßCD) is known as one of the processes initiating NET formation. Since neutrophils mainly act in an inflammatory environment with decreased, so-called hypoxic, oxygen conditions, we aimed to study the effect of oxygen and the oxygen stress regulator hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α on cholesterol-dependent NET formation. Thus, murine bone marrow-derived neutrophils from wild-type and HIF-knockout mice or human neutrophils were stimulated with MßCD under normoxic (21% O2) compared to hypoxic (1% O2) conditions, and the formation of NETs were studied by immunofluorescence microscopy. We found significantly induced NET formation after treatment with MßCD in murine neutrophils derived from wild-type as well as HIF-1α KO mice at both hypoxic (1% O2) as well as normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Similar observations were made in freshly isolated human neutrophils after stimulation with MßCD or statins, which block the HMG-CoA reductase as the key enzyme in the cholesterol metabolism. HPLC was used to confirm the reduction of cholesterol in treated neutrophils. In summary, we were able to show that NET formation via MßCD or statin-treatment is oxygen and HIF-1α independent.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Traps , Animals , Cholesterol/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Mice , Neutrophils/metabolism , Oxygen/metabolism
2.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol ; 44(2): 141-146, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671877

ABSTRACT

Over the last twenty months, the attention of the world has been focusing on managing the unprecedented and devastating wave of COVID-19 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV 2) and mitigating its impacts. Recent findings indicated that high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are leading cause of poor prognosis in severely ill COVID-19 patients. Presently, the multiple variants and highly contagious nature of virus makes challenge humongous. The shortage and vaccine hesitancy also prompted to develop antiviral therapeutic agents to manage this pandemic. Nanocurcumin has potential antiviral activities and also beneficial in post COVID inflammatory complications. We have developed nanocurcumin based formulation using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) which protects cardio-pulmonary function and mitochondrial homeostasis in hypobaric hypoxia induced right ventricular hypertrophy in animal model and human ventricular cardiomyocytes. Nanocurcumin based formulation (NCF) with improved bioavailability, has proven several holistic therapeutic effects including myocardial protection, and prevents edema formation, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, maintaining metabolic and mitochondrial homeostasis under hypoxic condition. The post COVID-inflammatory syndrome also reported to cause impaired heart function, lung injuries and increased C-reactive protein level in severely ill patients. Thus, we speculate that NCF could be a new treatment option to manage post COVID-19 inflammatory syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/metabolism , Mitochondria , Pandemics
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 825358, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662589

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) raises the issue of how hypoxia destroys normal physiological function and host immunity against pathogens. However, there are few or no comprehensive omics studies on this effect. From an evolutionary perspective, animals living in complex and changeable marine environments might develop signaling pathways to address bacterial threats under hypoxia. In this study, the ancient genomic model animal Takifugu obscurus and widespread Vibrio parahaemolyticus were utilized to study the effect. T. obscurus was challenged by V. parahaemolyticus or (and) exposed to hypoxia. The effects of hypoxia and infection were identified, and a theoretical model of the host critical signaling pathway in response to hypoxia and infection was defined by methods of comparative metabolomics and proteomics on the entire liver. The changing trends of some differential metabolites and proteins under hypoxia, infection or double stressors were consistent. The model includes transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathways, and the consistent changing trends indicated that the host liver tended toward cell proliferation. Hypoxia and infection caused tissue damage and fibrosis in the portal area of the liver, which may be related to TGF-ß1 signal transduction. We propose that LRG (leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein) is widely involved in the transition of the TGF-ß1/Smad signaling pathway in response to hypoxia and pathogenic infection in vertebrates as a conserved molecule.


Subject(s)
Hypoxia/metabolism , Signal Transduction/physiology , Takifugu/metabolism , Takifugu/microbiology , Vibrio Infections/metabolism , Vibrio parahaemolyticus/pathogenicity , Animals , Epidermal Growth Factor/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Metabolomics/methods , Proteomics/methods , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Vibrio Infections/microbiology
4.
EBioMedicine ; 75: 103812, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thromboembolism is a life-threatening manifestation of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We investigated a dysfunctional phenotype of vascular endothelial cells in the lungs during COVID-19. METHODS: We obtained the lung specimens from the patients who died of COVID-19. The phenotype of endothelial cells and immune cells was examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. We tested the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the endothelium using IHC and electron microscopy. FINDINGS: The autopsy lungs of COVID-19 patients exhibited severe coagulation abnormalities, immune cell infiltration, and platelet activation. Pulmonary endothelial cells of COVID-19 patients showed increased expression of procoagulant von Willebrand factor (VWF) and decreased expression of anticoagulants thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR). In the autopsy lungs of COVID-19 patients, the number of macrophages, monocytes, and T cells was increased, showing an activated phenotype. Despite increased immune cells, adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, and P-selectin were downregulated in pulmonary endothelial cells of COVID-19 patients. Notably, decreased thrombomodulin expression in endothelial cells was associated with increased immune cell infiltration in the COVID-19 patient lungs. There were no SARS-CoV-2 particles detected in the lung endothelium of COVID-19 patients despite their dysfunctional phenotype. Meanwhile, the autopsy lungs of COVID-19 patients showed SARS-CoV-2 virions in damaged alveolar epithelium and evidence of hypoxic injury. INTERPRETATION: Pulmonary endothelial cells become dysfunctional during COVID-19, showing a loss of thrombomodulin expression related to severe thrombosis and infiltration, and endothelial cell dysfunction might be caused by a pathologic condition in COVID-19 patient lungs rather than a direct infection with SARS-CoV-2. FUNDING: This work was supported by the Johns Hopkins University, the American Heart Association, and the National Institutes of Health.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Down-Regulation , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Thrombomodulin/biosynthesis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/ultrastructure , Endothelium, Vascular/ultrastructure , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/pathology , Lung/ultrastructure , Male , Middle Aged
5.
Bull Exp Biol Med ; 172(3): 283-287, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611428

ABSTRACT

We studied laboratory parameters of patients with COVID-19 against the background of chronic pathologies (cardiovascular pathologies, obesity, type 2 diabetes melitus, and cardiovascular pathologies with allergy to statins). A decrease in pH and a shift in the electrolyte balance of blood plasma were revealed in all studied groups and were most pronounced in patients with cardiovascular pathologies with allergy to statin. It was found that low pH promotes destruction of lipid components of the erythrocyte membranes in patients with chronic pathologies, which was seen from a decrease in Na+/K+-ATPase activity and significant hyponatrenemia. In patients with cardiovascular pathologies and allergy to statins, erythrocyte membranes were most sensitive to a decrease in pH, while erythrocyte membranes of obese patients showed the greatest resistance to low pH and oxidative stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hyponatremia/etiology , Hypoxia/complications , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/physiology , Aged , COVID-19/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Case-Control Studies , Chronic Disease , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Drug Hypersensitivity/complications , Drug Hypersensitivity/metabolism , Drug Hypersensitivity/virology , Erythrocyte Membrane/metabolism , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Female , Fluid Shifts/physiology , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Hyponatremia/metabolism , Hyponatremia/virology , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lipid Peroxidation/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/virology , Oxidative Stress/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sodium/metabolism , Stress, Physiological/physiology
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(23)2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542583

ABSTRACT

Alternative branches of the classical renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS) represent an important cascade in which angiotensin 2 (AngII) undergoes cleavage via the action of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) with subsequent production of Ang(1-7) and other related metabolites eliciting its effects via Mas receptor activation. Generally, this branch of the RAS system is described as its non-canonical alternative arm with counterbalancing actions to the classical RAS, conveying vasodilation, anti-inflammatory, anti-remodeling and anti-proliferative effects. The implication of this branch was proposed for many different diseases, ranging from acute cardiovascular conditions, through chronic respiratory diseases to cancer, nonetheless, hypoxia is one of the most prominent common factors discussed in conjugation with the changes in the activity of alternative RAS branches. The aim of this review is to bring complex insights into the mechanisms behind the various forms of hypoxic insults on the activity of alternative RAS branches based on the different duration of stimuli and causes (acute vs. intermittent vs. chronic), localization and tissue (heart vs. vessels vs. lungs) and clinical relevance of studied phenomenon (experimental vs. clinical condition). Moreover, we provide novel insights into the future strategies utilizing the alternative RAS as a diagnostic tool as well as a promising pharmacological target in serious hypoxia-associated cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary diseases.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19 , Hypoxia/metabolism , Myocardial Infarction , Renin-Angiotensin System , Angiotensin I , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Animals , Humans , Lung , Peptide Fragments , SARS-CoV-2
7.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258856, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542176

ABSTRACT

Hypoxia is a common pathway to the progression of end-stage kidney disease. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) encodes an RNA helicase that recognizes viruses including SARS-CoV2, which is responsible for the production of interferon (IFN)-α/ß to prevent the spread of viral infection. Recently, RIG-I activation was found under hypoxic conditions, and klotho deficiency was shown to intensify the activation of RIG-I in mouse brains. However, the roles of these functions in renal inflammation remain elusive. Here, for in vitro study, the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß was examined in normal rat kidney (NRK)-52E cells incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2). Next, siRNA targeting RIG-I or scramble siRNA was transfected into NRK52E cells to examine the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß under hypoxic conditions. We also investigated the expression levels of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß in 33 human kidney biopsy samples diagnosed with IgA nephropathy. For in vivo study, we induced renal hypoxia by clamping the renal artery for 10 min in wild-type mice (WT mice) and Klotho-knockout mice (Kl-/- mice). Incubation under hypoxic conditions increased the expression of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß in NRK52E cells. Their upregulation was inhibited in NRK52E cells transfected with siRNA targeting RIG-I. In patients with IgA nephropathy, immunohistochemical staining of renal biopsy samples revealed that the expression of RIG-I was correlated with that of IFN-α/ß (r = 0.57, P<0.001, and r = 0.81, P<0.001, respectively). The expression levels of RIG-I and IFN-α/ß were upregulated in kidneys of hypoxic WT mice and further upregulation was observed in hypoxic Kl-/- mice. These findings suggest that hypoxia induces the expression of IFN-α/ß through the upregulation of RIG-I, and that klotho deficiency intensifies this hypoxia-induced expression in kidneys.


Subject(s)
Glucuronidase/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Interferon-alpha/metabolism , Kidney/metabolism , RNA Helicases/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Animals , Glucuronidase/genetics , Hypoxia/genetics , Mice , Mice, Knockout , RNA, Small Interfering , Rats
8.
Neurobiol Dis ; 161: 105561, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510138

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). COVID-19 pathogenesis causes vascular-mediated neurological disorders via elusive mechanisms. SARS-CoV-2 infects host cells via the binding of viral Spike (S) protein to transmembrane receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Although brain pericytes were recently shown to abundantly express ACE2 at the neurovascular interface, their response to SARS-CoV-2 S protein is still to be elucidated. Using cell-based assays, we found that ACE2 expression in human brain vascular pericytes was increased upon S protein exposure. Pericytes exposed to S protein underwent profound phenotypic changes associated with an elongated and contracted morphology accompanied with an enhanced expression of contractile and myofibrogenic proteins, such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), fibronectin, collagen I, and neurogenic locus notch homolog protein-3 (NOTCH3). On the functional level, S protein exposure promoted the acquisition of calcium (Ca2+) signature of contractile ensheathing pericytes characterized by highly regular oscillatory Ca2+ fluctuations. Furthermore, S protein induced lipid peroxidation, oxidative and nitrosative stress in pericytes as well as triggered an immune reaction translated by activation of nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, which was potentiated by hypoxia, a condition associated with vascular comorbidities that exacerbate COVID-19 pathogenesis. S protein exposure combined to hypoxia enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in immune cell activation and trafficking, namely macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Using transgenic mice expressing the human ACE2 that recognizes S protein, we observed that the intranasal infection with SARS-CoV-2 rapidly induced hypoxic/ischemic-like pericyte reactivity in the brain of transgenic mice, accompanied with an increased vascular expression of ACE2. Moreover, we found that SARS-CoV-2 S protein accumulated in the intranasal cavity reached the brain of mice in which the nasal mucosa is deregulated. Collectively, these findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 S protein impairs the vascular and immune regulatory functions of brain pericytes, which may account for vascular-mediated brain damage. Our study provides a better understanding for the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular disorders in COVID-19, paving the way to develop new therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Pericytes/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Actins/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Brain/blood supply , COVID-19/physiopathology , Calcium Signaling , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Fibronectins/metabolism , Humans , Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain/physiopathology , Lipid Peroxidation/drug effects , Lipid Peroxidation/genetics , Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors/drug effects , Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/cytology , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/metabolism , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/cytology , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/metabolism , Myofibroblasts , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Nasal Mucosa , Nitrosative Stress , Oxidative Stress , Pericytes/cytology , Pericytes/drug effects , Phenotype , Receptor, Notch3/metabolism , Receptors, Coronavirus/drug effects , Receptors, Coronavirus/genetics , Receptors, Coronavirus/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology
9.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0247414, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facemasks are recommended to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, but concern about inadequate gas exchange is an often cited reason for non-compliance. RESEARCH QUESTION: Among adult volunteers, do either cloth masks or surgical masks impair oxygenation or ventilation either at rest or during physical activity? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: With IRB approval and informed consent, we measured heart rate (HR), transcutaneous carbon dioxide (CO2) tension and oxygen levels (SpO2) at the conclusion of six 10-minute phases: sitting quietly and walking briskly without a mask, sitting quietly and walking briskly while wearing a cloth mask, and sitting quietly and walking briskly while wearing a surgical mask. Brisk walking required at least a 10bpm increase in heart rate. Occurrences of hypoxemia (decrease in SpO2 of ≥3% from baseline to a value of ≤94%) and hypercarbia (increase in CO2 tension of ≥5 mmHg from baseline to a value of ≥46 mmHg) in individual subjects were collected. Wilcoxon signed-rank was used for pairwise comparisons among values for the whole cohort (e.g. walking without a mask versus walking with a cloth mask). RESULTS: Among 50 adult volunteers (median age 33 years; 32% with a co-morbidity), there were no episodes of hypoxemia or hypercarbia (0%; 95% confidence interval 0-1.9%). In paired comparisons, there were no statistically significant differences in either CO2 or SpO2 between baseline measurements without a mask and those while wearing either kind of mask mask, both at rest and after walking briskly for ten minutes. INTERPRETATION: The risk of pathologic gas exchange impairment with cloth masks and surgical masks is near-zero in the general adult population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Masks , Oxygen/metabolism , Pulmonary Ventilation/physiology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Carbon Dioxide/metabolism , Exercise/physiology , Female , Heart Rate/physiology , Humans , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/metabolism , Male , Masks/adverse effects , N95 Respirators/adverse effects , Rest/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Walking/physiology
10.
Virology ; 563: 74-81, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373295

ABSTRACT

The levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription of FOXP3, IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6 and COX-2 from both COVID-19 infected and control subjects were evaluated using SYBRTM green real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Severe/critical cases showed significantly lower lymphocyte counts and higher neutrophil counts than the mild or moderate cases. There were significantly lower levels of mRNA expressions of IFN-γ, TNFα and FOXP3 in COVID-19 patients than in the control group. On the other hand, IL-6 and COX-2 expressions were significantly higher in patients suffering from severe disease. FOXP3 expressions were correlated with the severities of hypoxia and were excellent in predicting the disease severity. This was followed by the IL-6, COX-2 and TNFα expressions. FOXP3 expression was the only biomarker to show a significant correlation with patient mortality. It was concluded that SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with the downregulation of FOXP3 and upregulations of IL-6 and COX-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Forkhead Transcription Factors/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e930776, 2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344551

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, patients presented with COVID-19 pneumonia of varying severity. The phenomenon of severe hypoxemia without signs of respiratory distress is also known as silent or hidden hypoxemia. Although silent hypoxemia is not unique to pneumonia due to SARS-CoV-2 infection, this phenomenon is now recognized to be associated with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Proper management of critically ill patients is the key to reducing mortality. Herein, we summarize the possible and rare factors contributing to silent hypoxemia in patients with COVID-19. Microvascular thrombosis causes dead space ventilation in the lungs, and the flow of pulmonary capillaries is reduced, which leads to an imbalance in the V/Q ratio. The dissociation curve of oxyhemoglobin shifts to the left and limits the release of oxygen to the tissue. SARS-CoV-2 interferes with the synthesis of hemoglobin and reduces the ability to carry oxygen. The accumulation of endogenous carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin will reduce the total oxygen carrying capacity and interfere with pulse oxygen saturation readings. There are also some non-specific factors that cause the difference between pulse oximetry and oxygen partial pressure. We propose some potentially more effective clinical alternatives and recommendations for optimizing the clinical management processes of patients with COVID-19. This review aims to describe the prevalence of silent hypoxemia in COVID-19 pneumonia, to provide an update on what is known of the pathophysiology, and to highlight the importance of diagnosing silent hypoxemia in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Hypoxia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hypoxia/epidemiology , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lung/cytology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Microvessels/metabolism , Oximetry , Oxygen/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology
12.
Life Sci ; 281: 119718, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271709

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hypoxia, a pathophysiological condition, is profound in several cardiopulmonary diseases (CPD). Every individual's lethality to a hypoxia state differs in terms of hypoxia exposure time, dosage units and dependent on the individual's genetic makeup. Most of the proposed markers for CPD were generally aim to distinguish disease samples from normal samples. Although, as per the 2018 GOLD guidelines, clinically useful biomarkers for several cardio pulmonary disease patients in stable condition have yet to be identified. We attempt to address these key issues through the identification of Dynamic Network Biomarkers (DNB) to detect hypoxia induced early warning signals of CPD before the catastrophic deterioration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The human microvascular endothelial tissues microarray datasets (GSE11341) of lung and cardiac expose to hypoxia (1% O2) for 3, 24 and 48 h were retrieved from the public repository. The time dependent differentially expressed genes were subjected to tissue specificity and promoter analysis to filtrate the noise levels in the networks and to dissect the tissue specific hypoxia induced genes. These filtered out genes were used to construct the dynamic segmentation networks. The hypoxia induced dynamic differentially expressed genes were validated in the lung and heart tissues of male rats. These rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (simulated altitude of 25,000 or PO2 - 282 mm of Hg) progressively for 3, 24 and 48 h. KEY FINDINGS: To identify the temporal key genes regulated in hypoxia, we ranked the dominant genes based on their consolidated topological features from tissue specific networks, time dependent networks and dynamic networks. Overall topological ranking described VEGFA as a single node dynamic hub and strongly communicated with tissue specific genes to carry forward their tissue specific information. We named this type of VEGFAcentric dynamic networks as "V-DNBs". As a proof of principle, our methodology helped us to identify the V-DNBs specific for lung and cardiac tissues namely V-DNBL and V-DNBC respectively. SIGNIFICANCE: Our experimental studies identified VEGFA, SLC2A3, ADM and ENO2 as the minimum and sufficient candidates of V-DNBL. The dynamic expression patterns could be readily exploited to capture the pre disease state of hypoxia induced pulmonary vascular remodelling. Whereas in V-DNBC the minimum and sufficient candidates are VEGFA, SCL2A3, ADM, NDRG1, ENO2 and BHLHE40. The time dependent single node expansion indicates V-DNBC could also be the pre disease state pathological hallmark for hypoxia-associated cardiovascular remodelling. The network cross-talk and expression pattern between V-DNBL and V-DNBC are completely distinct. On the other hand, the great clinical advantage of V-DNBs for pre disease predictions, a set of samples during the healthy condition should suffice. Future clinical studies might further shed light on the predictive power of V-DNBs as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers for CPD.


Subject(s)
Heart Diseases/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lung Diseases/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , Clinical Deterioration , Gene Expression Regulation , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/pathology , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/genetics , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/pathology , Male , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
14.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(4): 3863-3869, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198481

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a severe health issue, especially to the patients who develop silent hypoxia condition after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Due to the lack of dyspnoea and extremely low oxygen saturation level, these patients are at exceptionally higher risk. Although the prevalence of silent hypoxia in COVID-19 patients has been evident in several cases, the underlying pathomechanism behind this condition is still unclear. Silent hypoxia in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients can be diagnosed with the help of a pulse oximeter, blood gas levels, and a 6-min walking test. While the clinicians and researchers figure out the exact reason for this phenomenon, the patients must be under strict day-to-day monitoring. In this article, we aim to provide comprehensive insights into the underlying symptoms, mechanism, and possible factors behind the occurrence of silent hypoxia among COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Blood Gas Analysis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Oximetry , Practice Guidelines as Topic
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1443-1448, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196454

ABSTRACT

Our study intended to longitudinally explore the prediction effect of immunoglobulin A (IgA) on pulmonary exudation progression in COVID-19 patients. The serum IgA was tested with chemiluminescence method. Autoregressive moving average model was used to extrapolate the IgA levels before hospital admission. The positive rate of IgA and IgG in our cohort was 97% and 79.0%, respectively. In this study, the IgA levels peaks within 10-15 days after admission, while the IgG levels peaks at admission. We found that the time difference between their peaks was about 10 days. Viral RNA detection results showed that the positive rate in sputum and feces were the highest. Blood gas analysis showed that deterioration of hypoxia with the enlargement of pulmonary exudation area. And alveolar-arterial oxygen difference and oxygenation index were correlated with IgA and IgG. The results of biopsy showed that the epithelium of lung was exfoliated and the mucosa was edematous. In severe COVID-19 patients, the combination of IgA and IgG can predict the progress of pulmonary lesions and is closely related to hypoxemia and both also play an important defense role in invasion and destruction of bronchial and alveolar epithelium by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Sputum/virology , Aged , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Bronchi/metabolism , Bronchi/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/metabolism , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane/metabolism , Mucous Membrane/virology , Oxygen/metabolism , Pulmonary Alveoli/metabolism , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
16.
Chronobiol Int ; 38(8): 1120-1134, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180371

ABSTRACT

The influence of low intensity electromagnetic fields on circadian clocks of cells and tissues has gained increasing scientific interest, either as a therapeutic tool or as a potential environmental hazard. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) refers to the property of certain atomic nuclei to absorb the energy of radio waves under a corresponding magnetic field. NMR forms the basis for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and, in a low-intensity form, for NMR therapy (tNMR). Since the circadian clock is bi-directionally intertwined with hypoxic signaling in vertebrates and mammals, we hypothesized that low intensity electromagnetic fields, such as tNMR, might not only affect circadian clocks but also Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α). As master regulator of the hypoxic signaling pathway, HIF-1α is known to dampen the circadian amplitude under reduced oxygen availability, while the hypoxic response of cells and organisms, itself, is tightly clock controlled. In a first experiment, we investigated if tNMR is able to act as Zeitgeber for the core clock mechanism of unsynchronized zebrafish and mouse fibroblast cells, using direct light irradiation and treatment with the glucocorticoid Dexamethasone as references. tNMR significantly affected the cell autonomous clocks of unsynchronized mouse fibroblast cells NIH3-T3, but did not act as a Zeitgeber. Similar to light irradiation and in contrast to treatment with Dexamethasone, tNMR did not synchronize expression profiles of murine clock genes. However, irradiation with tNMR as well as light significantly altered mRNA and protein expression levels of Cryptochrome1, Cryptochrome2 and Clock1 for more than 24 h. Changes in mRNA and protein after different treatment durations, namely 6 and 12 h, appeared to be nonlinear. A nonlinear dose-response relationship is known as hallmark of electromagnetic field induced effects on biological systems. The most prominent alterations were detected in murine HIF-1α protein, again in a nonlinear dose-response. In contrast to murine cells, zebrafish fibroblasts did not respond to tNMR at all. Light, a potent Zeitgeber for the peripheral clocks of fish, led to the expected synchronized clock gene oscillations of high amplitude, as did Dexamethasone. Hence, we conclude, mammalian peripheral clocks are more susceptible to tNMR than the direct light entrainable fish fibroblasts. Although light and tNMR did not act as Zeitgebers for the circadian clocks of unsynchronized murine cells, the significant observed effects might indicate downstream cell-physiological ramifications, which are worth future investigation. However, beside the effects tNMR exerts on the core clock mechanism of mammalian cells, the technology might be the first non-pharmacological approach to modify HIF-1α protein in cells and tissues. HIF-1α and the associated circadian clock play key roles in diseases with underlying ischemic background, such as infarct, stroke, and cancer and, also infectious diseases, such as Covid-19. Hence, low intensity magnetic fields such as tNMR might be of significant medical interest.


Subject(s)
Circadian Clocks , Electromagnetic Fields , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , 3T3 Cells , Animals , Circadian Rhythm , Electromagnetic Fields/adverse effects , Fibroblasts , Humans , Hypoxia/metabolism , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/adverse effects , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/adverse effects , Mice , Time Factors , Zebrafish
17.
Respir Res ; 22(1): 99, 2021 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pneumonia has been associated with severe acute hypoxia, sepsis-like states, thrombosis and chronic sequelae including persisting hypoxia and fibrosis. The molecular hypoxia response pathway has been associated with such pathologies and our recent observations on anti-hypoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of whole aqueous extract of Adhatoda Vasica (AV) prompted us to explore its effects on relevant preclinical mouse models. METHODS: In this study, we tested the effect of whole aqueous extract of AV, in murine models of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis, Cecum Ligation and Puncture (CLP) induced sepsis, and siRNA induced hypoxia-thrombosis phenotype. The effect on lung of AV treated naïve mice was also studied at transcriptome level. We also determined if the extract may have any effect on SARS-CoV2 replication. RESULTS: Oral administration AV extract attenuates increased airway inflammation, levels of transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGF-ß1), IL-6, HIF-1α and improves the overall survival rates of mice in the models of pulmonary fibrosis and sepsis and rescues the siRNA induced inflammation and associated blood coagulation phenotypes in mice. We observed downregulation of hypoxia, inflammation, TGF-ß1, and angiogenesis genes and upregulation of adaptive immunity-related genes in the lung transcriptome. AV treatment also reduced the viral load in Vero cells infected with SARS-CoV2. CONCLUSION: Our results provide a scientific rationale for this ayurvedic herbal medicine in ameliorating the hypoxia-hyperinflammation features and highlights the repurposing potential of AV in COVID-19-like conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Justicia , Lung/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Sepsis/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Bleomycin , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cecum/microbiology , Cecum/surgery , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/genetics , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Proline Dioxygenases/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Justicia/chemistry , Ligation , Lung/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Pneumonia/genetics , Pneumonia/metabolism , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/metabolism , Sepsis/microbiology , Transcriptome
18.
Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol ; 253: 110849, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116507

ABSTRACT

Sequential diving by wild marine mammals results in a lifetime of rapid physiological transitions between lung collapse-reinflation, bradycardia-tachycardia, vasoconstriction-vasodilation, and oxygen store depletion-restoration. The result is a cycle of normoxia and hypoxia in which blood oxygen partial pressures can decline to <20-30 mmHg during a dive, a level considered injurious to oxygen-dependent human tissues (i.e., brain, heart). Safeguards in the form of enhanced on-board oxygen stores, selective oxygen transport, and unique tissue buffering capacities enable marine-adapted mammals to maintain physiological homeostasis and energy metabolism even when breathing and pulmonary gas exchange cease. This stands in stark contrast to the vulnerability of oxygen-sensitive tissues in humans that may undergo irreversible damage within minutes of ischemia and tissue hypoxia. Recently, these differences in protection against hypoxic injury have become evident in the systemic, multi-organ physiological failure during COVID-19 infection in humans. Prolonged recoveries in some patients have led to delays in the return to normal exercise levels and cognitive function even months later. Rather than a single solution to this problem, we find that marine mammals rely on a unique, integrative assemblage of protections to avoid the deleterious impacts of hypoxia on tissues. Built across evolutionary time, these solutions provide a natural template for identifying the potential for tissue damage when oxygen is lacking, and for guiding management decisions to support oxygen-deprived tissues in other mammalian species, including humans, challenged by hypoxia.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Physiological/physiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Diving/physiology , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Mammals/physiology , Oxygen/metabolism , Respiration , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hypoxia/metabolism , Mammals/classification , Mammals/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
19.
Front Immunol ; 11: 604944, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058416

ABSTRACT

Hypoxia and inflammation often coincide in pathogenic conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and chronic lung diseases, which are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality for the general population. For example, the recent global outbreak of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has placed viral infection-induced ARDS under the spotlight. Moreover, chronic lung disease ranks the third leading cause of death in the United States. Hypoxia signaling plays a diverse role in both acute and chronic lung inflammation, which could partially be explained by the divergent function of downstream target pathways such as adenosine signaling. Particularly, hypoxia signaling activates adenosine signaling to inhibit the inflammatory response in ARDS, while in chronic lung diseases, it promotes inflammation and tissue injury. In this review, we discuss the role of adenosine at the interphase of hypoxia and inflammation in ARDS and chronic lung diseases, as well as the current strategy for therapeutic targeting of the adenosine signaling pathway.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/metabolism , Hypoxia/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/therapy , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Inflammation/etiology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Receptors, Purinergic P1/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Signal Transduction
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 2169, 2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049973

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the predictive effect of T-lymphoid subsets on the conversion of common covid-19 to severe. The laboratory data were collected retrospectively from common covid-19 patients in the First People's Hospital of Zaoyang, Hubei Province, China and the Third People's Hospital of Kunming, Yunnan Province, China, between January 20, 2020 and March 15, 2020 and divided into training set and validation set. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to investigate the risk factors for the conversion of common covid-19 to severe in the training set, the prediction model was established and verified externally in the validation set. 60 (14.71%) of 408 patients with common covid-19 became severe in 6-10 days after diagnosis. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that lactate (P = 0.042, OR = 1097.983, 95% CI 1.303, 924,798.262) and CD8+ T cells (P = 0.010, OR = 0.903, 95% CI 0.835, 0.975) were independent risk factors for general type patients to turn to severe type. The area under ROC curve of lactate and CD8+ T cells was 0.754 (0.581, 0.928) and 0.842 (0.713, 0.970), respectively. The actual observation value was highly consistent with the prediction model value in curve fitting. The established prediction model was verified in 78 COVID-19 patients in the verification set, the area under the ROC curve was 0.906 (0.861, 0.981), and the calibration curve was consistent. CD8+ T cells, as an independent risk factor, could predict the transition from common covid-19 to severe.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/blood , Disease Progression , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adult , Algorithms , COVID-19/pathology , China , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Oxygen/chemistry , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Regression Analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Ritonavir/administration & dosage
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL