Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 46
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
2.
Lipids Health Dis ; 20(1): 126, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448237

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At present, the COVID-19 has been prevalent worldwide for more than a year and caused more than four million deaths. Liver injury was frequently observed in patients with COVID-19. Recently, a new definition of metabolic dysfunction associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) was proposed by a panel of international experts, and the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 has been actively investigated. Several previous studies indicated that the patients with MAFLD had a higher prevalence of COVID-19 and a tendency to develop severe type of respiratory infection, and others indicated that liver injury would be exacerbated in the patients with MAFLD once infected with COVID-19. The mechanism underlying the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 infection has not been thoroughly investigated, and recent studies indicated that multifactorial mechanisms, such as altered host angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor expression, direct viral attack, disruption of cholangiocyte function, systemic inflammatory reaction, drug-induced liver injury, hepatic ischemic and hypoxic injury, and MAFLD-related glucose and lipid metabolic disorders, might jointly contribute to both of the adverse hepatic and respiratory outcomes. In this review, we discussed the relationship between MAFLD and COVID-19 based on current available literature, and summarized the recommendations for clinical management of MAFLD patients during the pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/complications , Hypoxia/complications , Liver/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Age Factors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/drug therapy , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/pathology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Dipeptides/therapeutic use , Gene Expression Regulation , Glucose/metabolism , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Liver/drug effects , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/virology , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index
3.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(3): 353-359, 2021 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444370

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The early identification of factors that predict the length of hospital stay (HS) in patients affected by coronavirus desease (COVID-19) might assist therapeutic decisions and patient flow management. METHODOLOGY: We collected, at the time of admission, routine clinical, laboratory, and imaging parameters of hypoxia, lung damage, inflammation, and organ dysfunction in a consecutive series of 50 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Respiratory Disease and Infectious Disease Units of the University Hospital of Sassari (North-Sardinia, Italy) and alive on discharge. RESULTS: Prolonged HS (PHS, >21 days) patients had significantly lower PaO2/FiO2 ratio and lymphocytes, and significantly higher Chest CT severity score, C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) when compared to non-PHS patients. In univariate logistic regression, Chest CT severity score (OR = 1.1891, p = 0.007), intensity of care (OR = 2.1350, p = 0.022), PaO2/FiO2 ratio (OR = 0.9802, p = 0.007), CRP (OR = 1.0952, p = 0.042) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (OR = 1.0039, p = 0.036) were significantly associated with PHS. However, in multivariate logistic regression, only the PaO2/FiO2 ratio remained significantly correlated with PHS (OR = 0.9164; 95% CI 0.8479-0.9904, p = 0.0275). In ROC curve analysis, using a threshold of 248, the PaO2/FiO2 ratio predicted PHS with sensitivity and specificity of 60% and 91%, respectively (AUC = 0.780, 95% CI 0.637-0.886 p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: The PaO2/FiO2 ratio on admission is independently associated with PHS in COVID-19 patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/virology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
4.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 120, 2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since fall 2019, SARS-CoV-2 spread world-wide, causing a major pandemic with estimated ~ 220 million subjects affected as of September 2021. Severe COVID-19 is associated with multiple organ failure, particularly of lung and kidney, but also grave neuropsychiatric manifestations. Overall mortality reaches > 2%. Vaccine development has thrived in thus far unreached dimensions and will be one prerequisite to terminate the pandemic. Despite intensive research, however, few treatment options for modifying COVID-19 course/outcome have emerged since the pandemic outbreak. Additionally, the substantial threat of serious downstream sequelae, called 'long COVID' and 'neuroCOVID', becomes increasingly evident. Among candidates that were suggested but did not yet receive appropriate funding for clinical trials is recombinant human erythropoietin. Based on accumulating experimental and clinical evidence, erythropoietin is expected to (1) improve respiration/organ function, (2) counteract overshooting inflammation, (3) act sustainably neuroprotective/neuroregenerative. Recent counterintuitive findings of decreased serum erythropoietin levels in severe COVID-19 not only support a relative deficiency of erythropoietin in this condition, which can be therapeutically addressed, but also made us coin the term 'hypoxia paradox'. As we review here, this paradox is likely due to uncoupling of physiological hypoxia signaling circuits, mediated by detrimental gene products of SARS-CoV-2 or unfavorable host responses, including microRNAs or dysfunctional mitochondria. Substitution of erythropoietin might overcome this 'hypoxia paradox' caused by deranged signaling and improve survival/functional status of COVID-19 patients and their long-term outcome. As supporting hints, embedded in this review, we present 4 male patients with severe COVID-19 and unfavorable prognosis, including predicted high lethality, who all profoundly improved upon treatment which included erythropoietin analogues. SHORT CONCLUSION: Substitution of EPO may-among other beneficial EPO effects in severe COVID-19-circumvent downstream consequences of the 'hypoxia paradox'. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial for proof-of-concept is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Erythropoietin/genetics , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Erythropoietin/analogs & derivatives , Erythropoietin/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoxia/genetics , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pandemics , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
6.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e930776, 2021 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344551

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, patients presented with COVID-19 pneumonia of varying severity. The phenomenon of severe hypoxemia without signs of respiratory distress is also known as silent or hidden hypoxemia. Although silent hypoxemia is not unique to pneumonia due to SARS-CoV-2 infection, this phenomenon is now recognized to be associated with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Proper management of critically ill patients is the key to reducing mortality. Herein, we summarize the possible and rare factors contributing to silent hypoxemia in patients with COVID-19. Microvascular thrombosis causes dead space ventilation in the lungs, and the flow of pulmonary capillaries is reduced, which leads to an imbalance in the V/Q ratio. The dissociation curve of oxyhemoglobin shifts to the left and limits the release of oxygen to the tissue. SARS-CoV-2 interferes with the synthesis of hemoglobin and reduces the ability to carry oxygen. The accumulation of endogenous carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin will reduce the total oxygen carrying capacity and interfere with pulse oxygen saturation readings. There are also some non-specific factors that cause the difference between pulse oximetry and oxygen partial pressure. We propose some potentially more effective clinical alternatives and recommendations for optimizing the clinical management processes of patients with COVID-19. This review aims to describe the prevalence of silent hypoxemia in COVID-19 pneumonia, to provide an update on what is known of the pathophysiology, and to highlight the importance of diagnosing silent hypoxemia in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Hypoxia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Asymptomatic Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hypoxia/epidemiology , Hypoxia/metabolism , Lung/cytology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Microvessels/metabolism , Oximetry , Oxygen/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/virology
8.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 224, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286832

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies reporting the causes of death in patients with severe COVID-19 have provided conflicting results. The objective of this study was to describe the causes and timing of death in patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We performed a retrospective study in eight ICUs across seven French hospitals. All consecutive adult patients (aged ≥ 18 years) admitted to the ICU with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and acute respiratory failure were included in the analysis. The causes and timing of ICU deaths were reported based on medical records. RESULTS: From March 1, 2020, to April 28, 287 patients were admitted to the ICU for SARS-CoV-2 related acute respiratory failure. Among them, 93 patients died in the ICU (32%). COVID-19-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was the leading cause of death (37%). Secondary infection-related MODS accounted for 26% of ICU deaths, with a majority of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Refractory hypoxemia/pulmonary fibrosis was responsible for death in 19% of the cases. Fatal ischemic events (venous or arterial) occurred in 13% of the cases. The median time from ICU admission to death was 15 days (25th-75th IQR, 7-27 days). COVID-19-related MODS had a median time from ICU admission to death of 14 days (25th-75th IQR: 7-19 days), while only one death had occurred during the first 3 days since ICU admission. CONCLUSIONS: In our multicenter observational study, COVID-19-related MODS and secondary infections were the two leading causes of death, among severe COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Cause of Death , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoxia/mortality , Hypoxia/virology , Intensive Care Units , Ischemia/mortality , Ischemia/virology , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/mortality , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/mortality , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Aerosol Med Pulm Drug Deliv ; 34(4): 262-264, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276115

ABSTRACT

Despite the various parenchymal presentation of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia, the involvement of the vascular component, the reduction of perfusion in noninjured part of the lung and secondary right to left shunt play an important role in the genesis of the respiratory insufficiency. We present the case of a 72-year-old woman admitted to Livorno Hospital for severe respiratory insufficiency due to SARS-CoV-2 infection unresponsive to noninvasive in whom administration of nebulized phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor enoximone was able to improve oxygenation avoiding tracheal intubation. Intravenous infusions of phosphodiesterase inhibitors are commonly used as pulmonary vasodilators in the management of pulmonary hypertension. This is the first case showing that inhaled route administration of PDE3 inhibitor enoximone could be important in the management of COVID-19 hypoxemia, to restore perfusion in noninjured part of the lung, improving oxygenation and avoiding risks of systemic infusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Enoximone/administration & dosage , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Lung/blood supply , Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pulmonary Circulation/drug effects , Administration, Inhalation , Aerosols , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Hypoxia/virology , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Treatment Outcome
10.
Acta Pharmacol Sin ; 41(12): 1539-1546, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269381

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its pathogen, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have become the greatest current threat to global public health. The highly infectious SARS-CoV-2 virus primarily attacks pulmonary tissues and impairs gas exchange leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and systemic hypoxia. The current pharmacotherapies for COVID-19 largely rely on supportive and anti-thrombi treatment and the repurposing of antimalarial and antiviral drugs such as hydroxychloroquine and remdesivir. For a better mechanistic understanding of COVID-19, our present review focuses on its primary pathophysiologic features: hypoxia and cytokine storm, which are a prelude to multiple organ failure and lethality. We discussed a possible link between the activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and cell entry of SARS-CoV-2, since HIF-1α is shown to suppress the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and upregulate disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17). In addition, the protein targets of HIF-1α are involved with the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and the subsequent inflammatory process. Furthermore, we hypothesized a potential utility of so-called "hypoxic conditioning" to activate HIF-1α-induced cytoprotective signaling for reduction of illness severity and improvement of vital organ function in patients with COVID-19. Taken together, we would propose further investigations into the hypoxia-related molecular mechanisms, from which novel targeted therapies can be developed for the improved management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Animals , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Drug Development , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/virology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem ; 36(1): 1230-1235, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254219

ABSTRACT

The ongoing Covid-19 is a contagious disease, and it is characterised by different symptoms such as fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Rising concerns about Covid-19 have severely affected the healthcare system in all countries as the Covid-19 outbreak has developed at a rapid rate all around the globe. Intriguing, a clinically used drug, acetazolamide (a specific inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase, CA, EC 4.2.1.1), is used to treat high-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE), showing a high degree of clinical similarities with the pulmonary disease caused by Covid-19. In this context, this preliminary study aims to provide insights into some factors affecting the Covid-19 patients, such as hypoxaemia, hypoxia as well as the blood CA activity. We hypothesise that patients with Covid-19 problems could show a dysregulated acid-base status influenced by CA activity. These preliminary results suggest that the use of CA inhibitors as a pharmacological treatment for Covid-19 may be beneficial.


Subject(s)
Acetazolamide/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Carbonic Anhydrases/blood , Acid-Base Equilibrium/drug effects , Altitude Sickness/blood , Altitude Sickness/drug therapy , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Bicarbonates/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/virology , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Cough/blood , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/pathology , Cough/virology , Drug Repositioning , Dyspnea/blood , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/pathology , Dyspnea/virology , Fever/blood , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/pathology , Fever/virology , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hypertension, Pulmonary/blood , Hypertension, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Hypoxia/blood , Hypoxia/drug therapy , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Oximetry , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
12.
Physiol Meas ; 42(6)2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246679

ABSTRACT

Respiratory rate (RR) is routinely used to monitor patients with infectious, cardiac and respiratory diseases and is a component of early warning scores used to predict patient deterioration. However, it is often measured visually with considerable bias and inaccuracy.Objectives. Firstly, to compare distribution and accuracy of electronically measured RR (EMRR) and visually measured RR (VMRR). Secondly, to determine whether, and how far in advance, continuous electronic RR monitoring can predict oncoming hypoxic and pyrexic episodes in infectious respiratory disease.Approach.A retrospective cohort study analysing the difference between EMRR and VMRR was conducted using patient data from a large tertiary hospital. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine whether continuous, EMRR measurements could predict oncoming hypoxic (SpO2 < 92%) and pyrexic (temperature >38 °C) episodes.Main results.Data were gathered from 34 COVID-19 patients, from which a total of 3445 observations of VMRR (independent of Hawthorne effect), peripheral oxygen saturation and temperature and 729 117 observations of EMRR were collected. VMRR had peaks in distribution at 18 and 20 breaths per minute. 70.9% of patients would have had a change of treatment during their admission based on the UK's National Early Warning System if EMRR was used in place of VMRR. An elevated EMRR was predictive of hypoxic (hazard ratio: 1.8 (1.05-3.07)) and pyrexic (hazard ratio: 9.7 (3.8-25)) episodes over the following 12 h.Significance.Continuous EMRR values are systematically different to VMRR values, and results suggest it is a better indicator of true RR as it has lower kurtosis, higher variance, a lack of peaks at expected values (18 and 20) and it measures a physiological component of breathing directly (abdominal movement). Results suggest EMRR is a strong marker of oncoming hypoxia and is highly predictive of oncoming pyrexic events in the following 12 h. In many diseases, this could provide an early window to escalate care prior to deterioration, potentially preventing morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fever/diagnosis , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Monitoring, Physiologic , Respiratory Rate , COVID-19/diagnosis , Fever/virology , Humans , Hypoxia/virology , Retrospective Studies
13.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(4): 3863-3869, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198481

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a severe health issue, especially to the patients who develop silent hypoxia condition after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Due to the lack of dyspnoea and extremely low oxygen saturation level, these patients are at exceptionally higher risk. Although the prevalence of silent hypoxia in COVID-19 patients has been evident in several cases, the underlying pathomechanism behind this condition is still unclear. Silent hypoxia in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients can be diagnosed with the help of a pulse oximeter, blood gas levels, and a 6-min walking test. While the clinicians and researchers figure out the exact reason for this phenomenon, the patients must be under strict day-to-day monitoring. In this article, we aim to provide comprehensive insights into the underlying symptoms, mechanism, and possible factors behind the occurrence of silent hypoxia among COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Blood Gas Analysis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia/pathology , Hypoxia/virology , Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism , Oximetry , Practice Guidelines as Topic
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(16): e25619, 2021 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195757

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak was first reported in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. Specific information about critically ill COVID-19 patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is rare.To describe the clinical course and complications of critically ill patients with COVID-19 who received IMV and were successfully weaned from it.This retrospective study included patients admitted to 3 intensive care units (ICUs) and 1 sub-ICU of Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University and Wuhan Jin Yin-tan Hospital between December 24, 2019, and March 12, 2020. Eleven patients who had been diagnosed with critically ill COVID-19 according to the World Health Organization interim guidance, received invasive ventilation, and were finally successfully weaned from it, were enrolled in our study. Their presenting symptoms, comorbidity conditions, laboratory values, ICU course, ventilator parameters, treatments, and relative complications were recorded.Of 108 critically ill COVID-19 patients who received invasive ventilation, 11 patients who underwent tracheal extubation or terminal weaning were included. The mean age of the 11 patients was 52.8 years (range, 38-70 years), 8 (72.7%) were male, and 2 were health care workers. The median time from onset of symptoms to dyspnea was 6.6 days (range, 3-13 days), and the median duration of IMV was 15.7 days (range, 6-29 days). All 11 patients presented with acute severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and received IMV, and 1 patient switched to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation assistance. A lung-protective strategy with lower tidal volume ventilation and proper driving pressure is the main strategy of IMV. All patients had extrapulmonary manifestations, including acute kidney injury, hepatic dysfunction, myocardial damage, and/or lymphopenia. Hospital-acquired infections occurred in 7 (63.6%) patients.Critical COVID-19 illness is characterized by acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and subsequent dysfunction of other organs with a high mortality rate. Correct ventilation strategies and other clinical strategies to improve oxygenation based on the skilled trained group and the availability of equipment are the key methods to rescue lives.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Respiration, Artificial , Ventilator Weaning , Adult , Aged , China , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/therapy , Hypoxia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Retrospective Studies
15.
EBioMedicine ; 66: 103319, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Host determinants of severe coronavirus disease 2019 include advanced age, comorbidities and male sex. Virologic factors may also be important in determining clinical outcome and transmission rates, but limited patient-level data is available. METHODS: We conducted an observational cohort study at seven public hospitals in Singapore. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and compared between individuals infected with different SARS-CoV-2 clades. Firth's logistic regression was used to examine the association between SARS-CoV-2 clade and development of hypoxia, and quasi-Poisson regression to compare transmission rates. Plasma samples were tested for immune mediator levels and the kinetics of viral replication in cell culture were compared. FINDINGS: 319 patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection had clinical and virologic data available for analysis. 29 (9%) were infected with clade S, 90 (28%) with clade L/V, 96 (30%) with clade G (containing D614G variant), and 104 (33%) with other clades 'O' were assigned to lineage B.6. After adjusting for age and other covariates, infections with clade S (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0·030 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0·0002-0·29)) or clade O (B·6) (aOR 0·26 (95% CI 0·064-0·93)) were associated with lower odds of developing hypoxia requiring supplemental oxygen compared with clade L/V. Patients infected with clade L/V had more pronounced systemic inflammation with higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. No significant difference in the severity of clade G infections was observed (aOR 0·95 (95% CI: 0·35-2·52). Though viral loads were significantly higher, there was no evidence of increased transmissibility of clade G, and replicative fitness in cell culture was similar for all clades. INTERPRETATION: Infection with clades L/V was associated with increased severity and more systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Infection with clade G was not associated with changes in severity, and despite higher viral loads there was no evidence of increased transmissibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/transmission , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/therapy , Hypoxia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Singapore/epidemiology , Viral Load
16.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 91(2)2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119587

ABSTRACT

This case-report describes severe acute respiratory failure in a patient with a COVID-19 positive nasopharyngeal swab that spontaneously resolved within a few hours. It is speculated that the virus may have caused a fleeting pulmonary vasospasm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hypoxia/virology , Raynaud Disease/virology , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Raynaud Disease/diagnosis
17.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 80, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Respiratory failure due to COVID-19 pneumonia is associated with high mortality and may overwhelm health care systems, due to the surge of patients requiring advanced respiratory support. Shortage of intensive care unit (ICU) beds required many patients to be treated outside the ICU despite severe gas exchange impairment. Helmet is an effective interface to provide continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) noninvasively. We report data about the usefulness of helmet CPAP during pandemic, either as treatment, a bridge to intubation or a rescue therapy for patients with care limitations (DNI). METHODS: In this observational study we collected data regarding patients failing standard oxygen therapy (i.e., non-rebreathing mask) due to COVID-19 pneumonia treated with a free flow helmet CPAP system. Patients' data were recorded before, at initiation of CPAP treatment and once a day, thereafter. CPAP failure was defined as a composite outcome of intubation or death. RESULTS: A total of 306 patients were included; 42% were deemed as DNI. Helmet CPAP treatment was successful in 69% of the full treatment and 28% of the DNI patients (P < 0.001). With helmet CPAP, PaO2/FiO2 ratio doubled from about 100 to 200 mmHg (P < 0.001); respiratory rate decreased from 28 [22-32] to 24 [20-29] breaths per minute, P < 0.001). C-reactive protein, time to oxygen mask failure, age, PaO2/FiO2 during CPAP, number of comorbidities were independently associated with CPAP failure. Helmet CPAP was maintained for 6 [3-9] days, almost continuously during the first two days. None of the full treatment patients died before intubation in the wards. CONCLUSIONS: Helmet CPAP treatment is feasible for several days outside the ICU, despite persistent impairment in gas exchange. It was used, without escalating to intubation, in the majority of full treatment patients after standard oxygen therapy failed. DNI patients could benefit from helmet CPAP as rescue therapy to improve survival. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04424992.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Disease Outbreaks , Hypoxia/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/virology , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Noninvasive Ventilation , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Treatment Outcome
18.
Stem Cell Res Ther ; 12(1): 91, 2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a fatal complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). There are a few reports of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a potential treatment for ARDS. In this phase 1 clinical trial, we present the safety, feasibility, and tolerability of the multiple infusions of high dose MSCs, which originated from the placenta and umbilical cord, in critically ill COVID-19-induced ARDS patients. METHODS: A total of 11 patients diagnosed with COVID-19-induced ARDS who were admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) of two hospitals enrolled in this study. The patients were critically ill with severe hypoxemia and required mechanical ventilation. The patients received three intravenous infusions (200 × 106 cells) every other day for a total of 600 × 106 human umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs; 6 cases) or placental MSCs (PL-MSCs; 5 cases). FINDINGS: There were eight men and three women who were 42 to 66 years of age. Of these, six (55%) patients had comorbidities of diabetes, hypertension, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and cardiomyopathy (CMP). There were no serious adverse events reported 24-48 h after the cell infusions. We observed reduced dyspnea and increased SpO2 within 48-96 h after the first infusion in seven patients. Of these seven patients, five were discharged from the ICU within 2-7 days (average: 4 days), one patient who had signs of acute renal and hepatic failure was discharged from the ICU on day 18, and the last patient suddenly developed cardiac arrest on day 7 of the cell infusion. Significant reductions in serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α; P < 0.01), IL-8 (P < 0.05), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (P < 0.01) were seen in all six survivors. IL-6 levels decreased in five (P = 0.06) patients and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels decreased in four (P = 0.14) patients. Four patients who had signs of multi-organ failure or sepsis died in 5-19 days (average: 10 days) after the first MSC infusion. A low percentage of lymphocytes (< 10%) and leukocytosis were associated with poor outcome (P = 0.02). All six survivors were well with no complaints of dyspnea on day 60 post-infusion. Radiological parameters of the lung computed tomography (CT) scans showed remarkable signs of recovery. INTERPRETATION: We suggest that multiple infusions of high dose allogeneic prenatal MSCs are safe and can rapidly improve respiratory distress and reduce inflammatory biomarkers in some critically ill COVID-19-induced ARDS cases. Patients that develop sepsis or multi-organ failure may not be good candidates for stem cell therapy. Large randomized multicenter clinical trials are needed to discern the exact therapeutic potentials of MSC in COVID-19-induced ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Comorbidity , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/virology , Inflammation , Intensive Care Units , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Middle Aged , Patient Safety , Placenta/cytology , Pregnancy , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Sepsis/virology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transplantation, Homologous , Treatment Outcome , Umbilical Cord/cytology
20.
BMC Pulm Med ; 20(1): 324, 2020 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It had been shown that High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is an effective initial support strategy for patients with acute respiratory failure. However, the efficacy of HFNC for patients with COVID-19 has not been established. This study was performed to assess the efficacy of HFNC for patients with COVID-19 and describe early predictors of HFNC treatment success in order to develop a prediction tool that accurately identifies the need for upgrade respiratory support therapy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with COVID-19 treated by HFNC in respiratory wards of 2 hospitals in Wuhan between 1 January and 1 March 2020. Overall clinical outcomes, the success rate of HFNC strategy and related respiratory variables were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 105 patients were analyzed. Of these, 65 patients (61.9%) showed improved oxygenation and were successfully withdrawn from HFNC. The PaO2/FiO2 ratio, SpO2/FiO2 ratio and ROX index (SpO2/FiO2*RR) at 6h, 12h and 24h of HFNC initiation were closely related to the prognosis. The ROX index after 6h of HFNC initiation (AUROC, 0.798) had good predictive capacity for outcomes of HFNC. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, young age, gender of female, and lower SOFA score all have predictive value, while a ROX index greater than 5.55 at 6 h after initiation was significantly associated with HFNC success (OR, 17.821; 95% CI, 3.741-84.903 p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicated that HFNC was an effective way of respiratory support in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. The ROX index after 6h after initiating HFNC had good predictive capacity for HFNC outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hypoxia/therapy , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Oxygen/blood , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cannula , Female , Humans , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Hypoxia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Partial Pressure , Respiratory Rate , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...