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1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 5758, 2022 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778630

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causal agent of the COVID-19 pandemic. More than 274 million individuals have suffered from COVID-19 and over five million people have died from this disease so far. Therefore, there is an urgent need for therapeutic drugs. Repurposing FDA approved drugs should be favored since evaluation of safety and efficacy of de-novo drug design are both costly and time consuming. We report that imatinib, an Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, robustly decreases SARS-CoV-2 infection and uncover a mechanism of action. We show that imatinib inhibits the infection of SARS-CoV-2 and its surrogate lentivector pseudotype. In latter, imatinib inhibited both routes of viral entry, endocytosis and membrane-fusion. We utilized a system to quantify in real-time cell-cell membrane fusion mediated by the SARS-CoV-2 surface protein, Spike, and its receptor, hACE2, to demonstrate that imatinib inhibits this process in an Abl1 and Abl2 independent manner. Furthermore, cellular thermal shift assay revealed a direct imatinib-Spike interaction that affects Spike susceptibility to trypsin digest. Collectively, our data suggest that imatinib inhibits Spike mediated viral entry by an off-target mechanism. These findings mark imatinib as a promising therapeutic drug in inhibiting the early steps of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Internalization
3.
Trials ; 23(1): 158, 2022 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a disruptive increase in the number of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a severe, life-threatening medical condition characterized by widespread inflammation and vascular leak in the lungs. Although there is no proven therapy to reduce pulmonary vascular leak in ARDS, recent studies demonstrated that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib reinforces the endothelial barrier and prevents vascular leak in inflammatory conditions, while leaving the immune response intact. METHODS: This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial of intravenous (IV) imatinib mesylate in 90 mechanically ventilated subjects with COVID-19-induced ARDS. Subjects are 18 years or older, admitted to the ICU for mechanical ventilation, meeting the Berlin criteria for moderate-severe ARDS with a positive polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV2. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either imatinib (as mesylate) 200 mg bis in die (b.i.d.) or placebo IV infusion for 7 days, or until ICU discharge or death. The primary study outcome is the change in Extravascular Lung Water Index (EVLWi) between day 1 and day 4. Secondary outcome parameters include changes in oxygenation and ventilation parameters, duration of invasive mechanical ventilation, number of ventilator-free days during the 28-day study period, length of ICU stay, and mortality during 28 days after randomization. Additional secondary parameters include safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics. DISCUSSION: The current study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of IV imatinib in mechanically ventilated subjects with COVID-19-related ARDS. We hypothesize that imatinib decreases pulmonary edema, as measured by extravascular lung water using a PiCCO catheter. The reduction in pulmonary edema may reverse hypoxemic respiratory failure and hasten recovery. As pulmonary edema is an important contributor to ARDS, we further hypothesize that imatinib reduces disease severity, reflected by a reduction in 28-day mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and ICU length of stay. TRIAL STATUS: Protocol version and date: V3.1, 16 April 2021. Recruitment started on 09 March 2021. Estimated recruitment period of approximately 40 weeks. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04794088 . Registered on 11 March 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Multicenter Studies as Topic , RNA, Viral , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
4.
Cell Metab ; 34(3): 424-440.e7, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676683

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a systemic disease that may cause severe metabolic complications in multiple tissues including liver, kidney, and cardiovascular system. However, the underlying mechanisms and optimal treatment remain elusive. Our study shows that impairment of ACE2 pathway is a key factor linking virus infection to its secondary metabolic sequelae. By using structure-based high-throughput virtual screening and connectivity map database, followed with experimental validations, we identify imatinib, methazolamide, and harpagoside as direct enzymatic activators of ACE2. Imatinib and methazolamide remarkably improve metabolic perturbations in vivo in an ACE2-dependent manner under the insulin-resistant state and SARS-CoV-2-infected state. Moreover, viral entry is directly inhibited by these three compounds due to allosteric inhibition of ACE2 binding to spike protein on SARS-CoV-2. Taken together, our study shows that enzymatic activation of ACE2 via imatinib, methazolamide, or harpagoside may be a conceptually new strategy to treat metabolic sequelae of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Metabolic Diseases/drug therapy , Methazolamide/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Down-Regulation/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Male , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Metabolic Diseases/virology , Methazolamide/pharmacology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Obese , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization/drug effects
5.
Nat Med ; 28(1): 39-50, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641982

ABSTRACT

Immune dysregulation is an important component of the pathophysiology of COVID-19. A large body of literature has reported the effect of immune-based therapies in patients with COVID-19, with some remarkable successes such as the use of steroids or anti-cytokine therapies. However, challenges in clinical decision-making arise from the complexity of the disease phenotypes and patient heterogeneity, as well as the variable quality of evidence from immunotherapy studies. This Review aims to support clinical decision-making by providing an overview of the evidence generated by major clinical trials of host-directed therapy. We discuss patient stratification and propose an algorithm to guide the use of immunotherapy strategies in the clinic. This will not only help guide treatment decisions, but may also help to design future trials that investigate immunotherapy in other severe infections.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Complement Inactivating Agents/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , Bradykinin/analogs & derivatives , Bradykinin/therapeutic use , Bradykinin B2 Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydrocortisone/therapeutic use , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Interferon beta-1a/therapeutic use , Interferon beta-1b/therapeutic use , Interferon-gamma/therapeutic use , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Kallikrein-Kinin System , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use
6.
J Cell Biochem ; 123(2): 155-160, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473858

ABSTRACT

Drug repurposing is an attractive option for identifying new treatment strategies, in particular in extraordinary situations of urgent need such as the current coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic. Recently, the World Health Organization announced testing of three drugs as potential Covid-19 therapeutics that are known for their dampening effect on the immune system. Thus, the underlying concept of selecting these drugs is to temper the potentially life-threatening overshooting of the immune system reacting to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This viewpoint discusses the possibility that the impact of these and other drugs on autophagy contributes to their therapeutic effect by hampering the SARS-CoV-2 life cycle.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Artesunate/pharmacology , Autophagy/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Infliximab/pharmacology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Artesunate/therapeutic use , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Drug Development , Endoplasmic Reticulum/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum/physiology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Intracellular Membranes/drug effects , Intracellular Membranes/physiology , Intracellular Membranes/virology , Ivermectin/pharmacology , Macrolides/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Niclosamide/pharmacology , Niclosamide/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication
7.
CPT Pharmacometrics Syst Pharmacol ; 10(12): 1497-1511, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449945

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine whether published pharmacokinetic (PK) models can adequately predict the PK profile of imatinib in a new indication, such as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Total (bound + unbound) and unbound imatinib plasma concentrations obtained from 134 patients with COVID-19 participating in the CounterCovid study and from an historical dataset of 20 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and 85 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were compared. Total imatinib area under the concentration time curve (AUC), maximum concentration (Cmax ) and trough concentration (Ctrough ) were 2.32-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34-3.29), 2.31-fold (95% CI 1.33-3.29), and 2.32-fold (95% CI 1.11-3.53) lower, respectively, for patients with CML/GIST compared with patients with COVID-19, whereas unbound concentrations were comparable among groups. Inclusion of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) concentrations measured in patients with COVID-19 into a previously published model developed to predict free imatinib concentrations in patients with GIST using total imatinib and plasma AAG concentration measurements (AAG-PK-Model) gave an estimated mean (SD) prediction error (PE) of -20% (31%) for total and -7.0% (56%) for unbound concentrations. Further covariate modeling with this combined dataset showed that in addition to AAG; age, bodyweight, albumin, CRP, and intensive care unit admission were predictive of total imatinib oral clearance. In conclusion, high total and unaltered unbound concentrations of imatinib in COVID-19 compared to CML/GIST were a result of variability in acute phase proteins. This is a textbook example of how failure to take into account differences in plasma protein binding and the unbound fraction when interpreting PK of highly protein bound drugs, such as imatinib, could lead to selection of a dose with suboptimal efficacy in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute-Phase Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/blood , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Protein Binding/drug effects , Protein Binding/physiology , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use
8.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(18): 21866-21902, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1417381

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many recent studies have investigated the role of drug interventions for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. However, an important question has been raised about how to select the effective and secure medications for COVID-19 patients. The aim of this analysis was to assess the efficacy and safety of the various medications available for severe and non-severe COVID-19 patients based on randomized placebo-controlled trials (RPCTs). METHODS: We did an updated network meta-analysis. We searched the databases from inception until July 31, 2021, with no language restrictions. We included RPCTs comparing 49 medications and placebo in the treatment of severe and non-severe patients (aged 18 years or older) with COVID-19 infection. We extracted data on the trial and patient characteristics, and the following primary outcomes: all-cause mortality, the ratios of virological cure, and treatment-emergent adverse events. Odds ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as effect estimates. RESULTS: From 3,869 publications, we included 61 articles related to 73 RPCTs (57 in non-severe COVID-19 patients and 16 in severe COVID-19 patients), comprising 20,680 patients. The mean sample size was 160 (interquartile range 96-393) in this study. The median duration of follow-up drugs intervention was 28 days (interquartile range 21-30). For increase in virological cure, we only found that proxalutamide (OR 9.16, 95% CI 3.15-18.30), ivermectin (OR 6.33, 95% CI 1.22-32.86), and low dosage bamlanivimab (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.12-24.99) seemed to be associated with non-severe COVID-19 patients when compared with placebo, in which proxalutamide seemed to be better than low dosage bamlanivimab (OR 5.69, 95% CI 2.43-17.65). For decrease in all-cause mortality, we found that proxalutamide (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.09-0.19), imatinib (OR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25-0.96), and baricitinib (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.42-0.82) seemed to be associated with non-severe COVID-19 patients; however, we only found that immunoglobulin gamma (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.08-0.89) was related to severe COVID-19 patients when compared with placebo. For change in treatment-emergent adverse events, we only found that sotrovimab (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.13-0.34) was associated with non-severe COVID-19 patients; however, we did not find any medications that presented a statistical difference when compared with placebo among severe COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: We conclude that marked variations exist in the efficacy and safety of medications between severe and non-severe patients with COVID-19. It seems that monoclonal antibodies (e.g., low dosage bamlanivimab, baricitinib, imatinib, and sotrovimab) are a better choice for treating severe or non-severe COVID-19 patients. Clinical decisions to use preferentially medications should carefully consider the risk-benefit profile based on efficacy and safety of all active interventions in patients with COVID-19 at different levels of infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Azetidines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/therapeutic use , Network Meta-Analysis , Oxazoles/therapeutic use , Purines/therapeutic use , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thiohydantoins/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
9.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 190: 636-648, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401500

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein undergoes RNA-induced phase separation (LLPS) and sequesters the host key stress granule (SG) proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and 2 (G3BP1 and G3BP2) to inhibit SG formation. This will allow viral packaging and propagation in host cells. Based on a genomic-guided meta-analysis, here we identify upstream regulatory elements modulating the expression of G3BP1 and G3BP2 (collectively called G3BP1/2). Using this strategy, we have identified FOXA1, YY1, SYK, E2F-1, and TGFBR2 as activators and SIN3A, SRF, and AKT-1 as repressors of G3BP1/2 genes. Panels of the activators and repressors were then used to identify drugs that change their gene expression signatures. Two drugs, imatinib, and decitabine have been identified as putative modulators of G3BP1/2 genes and their regulators, suggesting their role as COVID-19 mitigation agents. Molecular docking analysis suggests that both drugs bind to G3BP1/2 with a much higher affinity than the SARS-CoV-2 N protein. This study reports imatinib and decitabine as candidate drugs against N protein and G3BP1/2 protein.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , DNA Helicases/chemistry , Decitabine/chemistry , Imatinib Mesylate/chemistry , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/chemistry , RNA Helicases/chemistry , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/chemistry , RNA-Binding Proteins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/antagonists & inhibitors , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , DNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , DNA Helicases/metabolism , Decitabine/pharmacology , Drug Delivery Systems , Genomics , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Poly-ADP-Ribose Binding Proteins/metabolism , RNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Helicases/metabolism , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA Recognition Motif Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
14.
Antiviral Res ; 193: 105137, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306846

ABSTRACT

Following the emergence of SARS-CoV-2, the search for an effective and rapidly available treatment was initiated worldwide based on repurposing of available drugs. Previous reports described the antiviral activity of certain tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting the Abelson kinase 2 against pathogenic coronaviruses. Imatinib, one of them, has more than twenty years of safe utilization for the treatment of hematological malignancies. In this context, Imatinib was rapidly evaluated in clinical trials against Covid-19. Here, we present the pre-clinical evaluation of imatinib in multiple models. Our results indicated that imatinib and another TKI, the masitinib, exhibit an antiviral activity in VeroE6 cells. However, imatinib was inactive in a reconstructed bronchial human airway epithelium model. In vivo, imatinib therapy failed to impair SARS-CoV-2 replication in a golden Syrian hamster model despite high concentrations in plasma and in the lung. Overall, these results do not support the use of imatinib and similar TKIs as antivirals in the treatment of Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Repositioning , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Epithelium , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Mesocricetus , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288900

ABSTRACT

A group of clinically approved cancer therapeutic tyrosine kinase inhibitors was screened to test their effects on the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the cell surface receptor for SARS-CoV-2. Here, we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib (also known as STI571, Gleevec) can inhibit the expression of the endogenous ACE2 gene at both the transcript and protein levels. Treatment with imatinib resulted in inhibition of cell entry of the viral pseudoparticles (Vpps) in cell culture. In FVB mice orally fed imatinib, tissue expression of ACE2 was reduced, specifically in the lungs and renal tubules, but not in the parenchyma of other organs such as the heart and intestine. Our finding suggests that receptor tyrosine kinases play a role in COVID-19 infection and can be therapeutic targets with combined treatments of the best conventional care of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Genes, Reporter , Humans , Mice , Promoter Regions, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
17.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(9): 957-968, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275790

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The major complication of COVID-19 is hypoxaemic respiratory failure from capillary leak and alveolar oedema. Experimental and early clinical data suggest that the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor imatinib reverses pulmonary capillary leak. METHODS: This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial was done at 13 academic and non-academic teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Hospitalised patients (aged ≥18 years) with COVID-19, as confirmed by an RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2, requiring supplemental oxygen to maintain a peripheral oxygen saturation of greater than 94% were eligible. Patients were excluded if they had severe pre-existing pulmonary disease, had pre-existing heart failure, had undergone active treatment of a haematological or non-haematological malignancy in the previous 12 months, had cytopenia, or were receiving concomitant treatment with medication known to strongly interact with imatinib. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either oral imatinib, given as a loading dose of 800 mg on day 0 followed by 400 mg daily on days 1-9, or placebo. Randomisation was done with a computer-based clinical data management platform with variable block sizes (containing two, four, or six patients), stratified by study site. The primary outcome was time to discontinuation of mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 consecutive hours, while being alive during a 28-day period. Secondary outcomes included safety, mortality at 28 days, and the need for invasive mechanical ventilation. All efficacy and safety analyses were done in all randomised patients who had received at least one dose of study medication (modified intention-to-treat population). This study is registered with the EU Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT 2020-001236-10). FINDINGS: Between March 31, 2020, and Jan 4, 2021, 805 patients were screened, of whom 400 were eligible and randomly assigned to the imatinib group (n=204) or the placebo group (n=196). A total of 385 (96%) patients (median age 64 years [IQR 56-73]) received at least one dose of study medication and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. Time to discontinuation of ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 h was not significantly different between the two groups (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·95 [95% CI 0·76-1·20]). At day 28, 15 (8%) of 197 patients had died in the imatinib group compared with 27 (14%) of 188 patients in the placebo group (unadjusted HR 0·51 [0·27-0·95]). After adjusting for baseline imbalances between the two groups (sex, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) the HR for mortality was 0·52 (95% CI 0·26-1·05). The HR for mechanical ventilation in the imatinib group compared with the placebo group was 1·07 (0·63-1·80; p=0·81). The median duration of invasive mechanical ventilation was 7 days (IQR 3-13) in the imatinib group compared with 12 days (6-20) in the placebo group (p=0·0080). 91 (46%) of 197 patients in the imatinib group and 82 (44%) of 188 patients in the placebo group had at least one grade 3 or higher adverse event. The safety evaluation revealed no imatinib-associated adverse events. INTERPRETATION: The study failed to meet its primary outcome, as imatinib did not reduce the time to discontinuation of ventilation and supplemental oxygen for more than 48 consecutive hours in patients with COVID-19 requiring supplemental oxygen. The observed effects on survival (although attenuated after adjustment for baseline imbalances) and duration of mechanical ventilation suggest that imatinib might confer clinical benefit in hospitalised patients with COVID-19, but further studies are required to validate these findings. FUNDING: Amsterdam Medical Center Foundation, Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek/ZonMW, and the European Union Innovative Medicines Initiative 2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Imatinib Mesylate/administration & dosage , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Capillary Permeability/drug effects , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Placebos/administration & dosage , Placebos/adverse effects , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
18.
Phys Chem Chem Phys ; 23(22): 12549-12558, 2021 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233727

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) enters the host cell after the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the virus spike (S) glycoprotein binds to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2). This binding requires the RBD to undergo a conformational change from a closed to an open state. In the present study, a key pair of salt bridges formed by the side chains of K537 and E619, residues at the interfaces of SD1 and SD2, respectively, was identified to promote the opening of the RBD. Mutations of K537Q and E619D reduced their side chain lengths and eliminated this pair of salt bridges; as a result, the opening of the RBD was not observed in the MD simulations. Thus, blocking the formation of this pair of salt bridges is a promising approach for treating novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). FDA approved drug molecules were screened by their capabilities of blocking the formation of the key pair of salt bridges, achieved by their positional stabilities in the cavity containing the side chains of K537 and E619 formed in the interface between SD1 and SD2. Simeprevir, imatinib, and naldemedine were identified to possess the desired capability with the most favorable interaction energies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Design , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Humans , Imatinib Mesylate/chemistry , Imatinib Mesylate/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Naltrexone/analogs & derivatives , Naltrexone/chemistry , Naltrexone/pharmacology , Protein Domains/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Simeprevir/chemistry , Simeprevir/pharmacology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
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