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3.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 23(7): 79, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384599

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have improved the survival of several cancers. However, they may cause a wide range of immune-related adverse events (irAEs). While most irAEs are manageable with temporary cessation of ICI and immunosuppression, cardiovascular toxicity can be associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. As ICIs evolve to include high-risk patients with preexisting cardiovascular risk factors and disease, the risk and relevance of ICI-associated cardiotoxicity may be even higher. RECENT FINDINGS: Several cardiovascular toxicities such as myocarditis, stress cardiomyopathy, and pericardial disease have been reported in association with ICIs. Recent findings also suggest an increased risk of atherosclerosis with ICI use. ICI-associated myocarditis usually occurs early after initiation and can be fulminant. A high index of suspicion is required for timely diagnosis. Prompt treatment with high-dose corticosteroids is shown to improve outcomes. Although the overall incidence is rare, ICI cardiotoxicity, particularly myocarditis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, making it a major therapy-limiting adverse event. Early recognition and prompt treatment with the cessation of ICI therapy and initiation of high-dose corticosteroids are crucial to improve outcomes. Cardio-oncologists will need to play an important role not just in the management of acute cardiotoxicity but also to reduce the risk of long-term sequelae.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/diagnosis , Cardiotoxicity/diagnosis , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Atherosclerosis/chemically induced , Atherosclerosis/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cardiotoxicity/etiology , Cardiotoxicity/immunology , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/immunology , Myocarditis/chemically induced , Myocarditis/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
4.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 51(7): e13604, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388253

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a concern that influenza vaccination may increase the incidence of immune-related adverse events in patients receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the available data on the safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination in cancer patients receiving ICIs. METHODS: Studies reporting safety and efficacy outcomes of influenza vaccination in cancer patients receiving ICIs were included. Only descriptive statistics were conducted to obtain a pooled rate of immune-related adverse events in vaccinated patients. RESULTS: Ten studies assessing the safety and eight assessing the efficacy of influenza vaccination in cancer patients receiving ICIs were identified, for a total of 1124 and 986 vaccinated patients, respectively. Most patients had melanoma or lung cancer and received a single agent anti-PD-1, but also other tumour types and immunotherapy combinations were represented. No severe vaccination-related toxicities were reported. The pooled incidence of any grade immune checkpoint inhibitor-related adverse events was 28.9%. In the 6 studies specifying the incidence of grade 3-4 toxicities, the pooled incidence was 7.5%. No grade 5 toxicities were reported. No pooled descriptive analysis was conducted in studies reporting efficacy outcomes due to the heterogeneity of endpoints and data reporting. Nevertheless, among the eight studies included, seven reported positive efficacy outcomes of influenza vaccination. CONCLUSION: The results of this systematic review support the safety and efficacy of influenza vaccination in cancer patients receiving ICIs. These results are particularly relevant in the context of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Drug Interactions , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Sci Adv ; 7(34)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365116

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has spread worldwide, yet the role of antiviral T cell immunity during infection and the contribution of immune checkpoints remain unclear. By prospectively following a cohort of 292 patients with melanoma, half of which treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), we identified 15 patients with acute or convalescent COVID-19 and investigated their transcriptomic, proteomic, and cellular profiles. We found that ICI treatment was not associated with severe COVID-19 and did not alter the induction of inflammatory and type I interferon responses. In-depth phenotyping demonstrated expansion of CD8 effector memory T cells, enhanced T cell activation, and impaired plasmablast induction in ICI-treated COVID-19 patients. The evaluation of specific adaptive immunity in convalescent patients showed higher spike (S), nucleoprotein (N), and membrane (M) antigen-specific T cell responses and similar induction of spike-specific antibody responses. Our findings provide evidence that ICI during COVID-19 enhanced T cell immunity without exacerbating inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/immunology , Melanoma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunologic Memory/drug effects , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Melanoma/complications , Melanoma/drug therapy , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/virology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 679425, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344264

ABSTRACT

Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in adults. Despite the fact that they are relatively rare, they cause significant morbidity and mortality. High-grade gliomas or glioblastomas are rapidly progressing tumors with a very poor prognosis. The presence of an intrinsic immune system in the central nervous system is now more accepted. During the last decade, there has been no major progress in glioma therapy. The lack of effective treatment for gliomas can be explained by the strategies that cancer cells use to escape the immune system. This being said, immunotherapy, which involves blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitors, has improved patients' survival in different cancer types. This novel cancer therapy appears to be one of the most promising approaches. In the present study, we will start with a review of the general concept of immune response within the brain and glioma microenvironment. Then, we will try to decipher the role of various immune checkpoint inhibitors within the glioma microenvironment. Finally, we will discuss some promising therapeutic pathways, including immune checkpoint blockade and the body's effective anti-glioma immune response.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/drug therapy , Brain Neoplasms/pathology , Glioma/drug therapy , Glioma/pathology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Tumor Microenvironment/drug effects , Biomarkers, Tumor , Brain/drug effects , Brain/immunology , Brain/metabolism , Brain/pathology , Brain Neoplasms/etiology , Brain Neoplasms/mortality , Disease Susceptibility , Glioma/etiology , Glioma/mortality , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immune Checkpoint Proteins/genetics , Immune Checkpoint Proteins/metabolism , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Prognosis , Treatment Outcome , Tumor Microenvironment/genetics , Tumor Microenvironment/immunology
8.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1087, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333934

ABSTRACT

The introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitors has demonstrated significant improvements in survival for subsets of cancer patients. However, they carry significant and sometimes life-threatening toxicities. Prompt prediction and monitoring of immune toxicities have the potential to maximise the benefits of immune checkpoint therapy. Herein, we develop a digital nanopillar SERS platform that achieves real-time single cytokine counting and enables dynamic tracking of immune toxicities in cancer patients receiving immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment - broader applications are anticipated in other disease indications. By analysing four prospective cytokine biomarkers that initiate inflammatory responses, the digital nanopillar SERS assay achieves both highly specific and highly sensitive cytokine detection down to attomolar level. Significantly, we report the capability of the assay to longitudinally monitor 10 melanoma patients during immune inhibitor blockade treatment. Here, we show that elevated cytokine concentrations predict for higher risk of developing severe immune toxicities in our pilot cohort of patients.


Subject(s)
Immunotherapy/methods , Melanoma/therapy , Monitoring, Immunologic/methods , Spectrum Analysis, Raman/methods , Chemokine CX3CL1/immunology , Chemokine CX3CL1/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/metabolism , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Ipilimumab/adverse effects , Ipilimumab/immunology , Ipilimumab/therapeutic use , Melanoma/immunology , Melanoma/metabolism , Microscopy, Confocal/methods , Pilot Projects , Reproducibility of Results
9.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(7)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317020

ABSTRACT

The clinical and immunologic implications of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic for patients with cancer receiving systemic anticancer therapy have introduced a multitude of clinical challenges and academic controversies. This review summarizes the current evidence, discussion points, and recommendations regarding the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in patients with cancer during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, with a focus on patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). More specifically, we summarize the theoretical concepts and available objective data regarding the relationships between ICIs and the antiviral immune response, along with recommended clinical approaches to the management of melanoma and RCC patient cohorts receiving ICIs throughout the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional insights regarding the use of ICIs in the setting of current and upcoming COVID-19 vaccines and broader implications toward future pandemics are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/immunology , Kidney Neoplasms/immunology , Melanoma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/therapy , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy/methods , Kidney Neoplasms/therapy , Melanoma/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
10.
J Hematol Oncol ; 14(1): 86, 2021 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249562

ABSTRACT

Vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 provides significant protection against the infection in the general population. However, only limited data exist for patients with cancer under systemic therapy. Based on this, our site has initiated a study evaluating safety and efficacy of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in patients with solid and hematological malignancies under several systemic therapies. The initial results of the cohort of 59 patients receiving Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors are presented here. Despite no new safety issues have been noticed, the levels of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies are significantly lower in comparison to matched healthy volunteers up to day 22 post the first dose. These results should be taken into consideration for the patients under treatment.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/blood , Neoplasms/immunology , Vaccination
11.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(4)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209683

ABSTRACT

The clinically indistinguishable overlap between pneumonitis caused due to immune checkpoint inhibition (ICI) and pneumonia associated with COVID-19 has posed considerable challenges for patients with cancer and oncologists alike. The cancer community continues to face the challenges that lay at the complex immunological intersection of immune-based cancer therapy and immune dysregulation that results from COVID-19. Is there compounded immune dysregulation that could lead to poor outcomes? Could ICIs, in fact, ameliorate SARS-CoV-2-driven T-cell exhaustion?A little more is known about the kinetics of the viral replication in immunocompromised patients now as compared with earlier during the pandemic. Working knowledge of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuances of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with active cancers, issues related to viability and replication potential of the virus, unclear role of corticosteroids among those with diminished or dysfunctional effector T-cell repertoire, and the type of immunotherapy with differential risk of pneumonitis will inform decision making related to immunotherapy choices and decision for ICI continuation in the era of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Neoplasms/immunology , Pneumonia/chemically induced , Pneumonia/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
12.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 132, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166915

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic has created unique challenges to healthcare systems throughout the world. Ensuring subjects' safety is mandatory especially in oncology, in consideration of cancer patients' particular frailty. We examined the proportion of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) IgM and/or IgG positive subjects in three different groups from Istituto Nazionale Tumori - IRCCS "Fondazione G. Pascale" in Naples (Campania region, Italy): cancer patients treated with Innovative Immunotherapy (Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors, ICIs), cancer patients undergoing standard Chemotherapies (CHTs) and healthcare providers. 9 out of 287 (3.1%) ICIs patients resulted positive, with a significant lower percentage in respect to CHTs patients (39 positive subjects out of 598, 6.5%) (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference between ICIs cohort and healthcare providers, 48 out of 1050 resulting positive (4.6%). Performing a Propensity Score Matching based on gender and tumor stage, the effect of treatment on seropositivity was analyzed through a regression logistic model and the ICIs treatment resulted to be the only protective factor significantly (p = 0.03) associated with positivity (odds ratio-OR: 0.41; 95% confidence interval-CI 0.18-0.91). According to these preliminary data, ICIs would appear to be a protective factor against the onset of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/immunology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
14.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(3)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143073

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients are highly vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infections due to frequent contacts with the healthcare system, immunocompromised state from cancer or its therapies, supportive medications such as steroids and most importantly their advanced age and comorbidities. Patients with lung cancer have consistently been reported to suffer from an increased risk of death compared with other cancers. This is possibly due to the combination of specific pathophysiological aspects, including underlying pulmonary compromise due to smoking history and the increased specific pressures on respiratory healthcare services caused by the related pandemic. Rationally and safely treating patients with lung cancer during the pandemic has become a continuous challenge over the last year. Deciding whether to offer, modify, postpone or even cancel treatments for this particular patient's population has become the crucial recurrent dilemma for lung cancer professionals. Chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted agents represent distinct risks factors in the context of COVID-19 that should be balanced with the short-term and long-term consequences of delaying cancer care. Despite the rapid and persistent trend of the pandemic, declared by WHO on March 11, 2020, and still ongoing at the time of writing (January 2021), various efforts were made by oncologists worldwide to understand the impact of COVID-19 on patients with cancer. Adapted recommendations of our evidence-based practice guidelines have been developed for all stakeholders. Different small and large-scale registries, such as the COVID-19 and Cancer Consortium (CCC19) and Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration quickly collected data, supporting cancer care decisions under the challenging circumstance created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Several recommendations were developed as guidance for prioritizing the various aspects of lung cancer care in order to mitigate the adverse effects of the COVID-19 healthcare crisis, potentially reducing the morbidity and mortality of our patients from COVID-19 and from cancer. These recommendations helped inform decisions about treatment of established disease, continuation of clinical research and lung cancer screening. In this review, we summarize available evidence regarding the direct and indirect impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on lung cancer care and patients.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/physiopathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonectomy , Radiotherapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , China , Humans , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Mortality , Netherlands , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/complications , United Kingdom , United States
16.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(3)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133309

ABSTRACT

While vaccines directed against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein will have varying degrees of effectiveness in preventing SARS-CoV-2 infections, the severity of infection will be determined by multiple host factors including the ability of immune cells to lyse virus-infected cells. This review will discuss the complexity of both adaptive and innate immunomes and how a flow-based assay can detect up to 158 distinct cell subsets in the periphery. This assay has been employed to show the effect of age on differences in specific immune cell subsets, and the differences in the immunome between healthy donors and age-matched cancer patients. Also reviewed are the numerous soluble factors, in addition to cytokines, that may vary in the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infections and may also be employed to help define the effectiveness of a given vaccine or other antiviral agents. Various steroids have been employed in the management of autoimmune adverse events in cancer patients receiving immunotherapeutics and may be employed in the management of SARS-CoV-2 infections. The influence of steroids on multiple immune cells subsets will also be discussed.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Age Factors , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , CD40 Ligand/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Cytokines/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Granzymes/immunology , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunosenescence/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , Proteome , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily, Member 7/immunology
17.
Endocrinol Diabetes Metab ; 4(3): e00246, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122029

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is currently a major pandemic challenge, and cancer patients are at a heightened risk of severity and mortality from this infection. In recent years, immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) use to treat multiple cancers has increased in oncology, but equally has raised the question of whether ICI therapy and its side-effects is harmful or beneficial during this pandemic. Methods: A combination of published literature in PubMed between January 2010 and December 2020, recommended guidelines in non-cancer patients, and clinical experience was utilized to outline recommendations on glucocorticoid timing and dosing regimens in ICI-treated patients presenting with AI during this COVID-19 pandemic. Results: The potential immune interaction between ICIs and COVID-19 require major consideration because these agents act at the intersection between effective cancer immunotherapy and increasing patient susceptibility, severity and complications from the SARS-CoV-2 sepsis. Furthermore, ICI use can induce autoimmune adrenal insufficiency (AI) that further increases infection susceptibility. Thus, ICI-treated cancer patients with AI may be at greater risk of COVID-19 infection. Glucocorticoids are the cornerstone for replacement therapy, and for treatment and mitigation of adrenal crisis and relief of mass effects in ICI-related hypophysitis. High-dose glucocorticoids have also been used with cytotoxic chemotherapy as part of cancer treatment, and iatrogenic AI may arise after glucocorticoid discontinuation that increases the risk of adrenal crisis. Furthermore, in patients who develop the "long COVID-19" syndrome, when to discontinue glucocorticoid therapy becomes crucial to avoid unnecessary prolongation of therapy and the development of iatrogenic hypercortisolemia. Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, much of cancer care have been impacted and an important clinical question is how to optimally manage ICI-related AI during these unprecedented times. Herein, we suggest practical recommendations on the timing and dosing regimens of glucocorticoids in different clinical scenarios of ICI-treated cancer patients presenting with AI during this COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Insufficiency/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adrenal Insufficiency/chemically induced , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pandemics
18.
Immunotherapy ; 13(6): 509-525, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102464

ABSTRACT

In recent years, immune-checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have represented one of the major breakthroughs in advanced non-small cell lung cancer treatment scenario. However, enrollment in registering clinical trials is usually restricted, since frail patients (i.e., elderly, individuals with poor performance status and/or active brain metastases), as well as patients with chronic infections or who take concurrent medications, such as steroids, are routinely excluded. Thus, safety and efficacy of ICIs for these subgroups have not been adequately assessed in clinical trials, although these populations often occur in clinical practice. We reviewed the available data regarding the use of ICIs in these 'special' populations, including a focus on the issues raised by the administration of immunotherapy in lung cancer patients infected with Sars-Cov-2.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Vulnerable Populations , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immunotherapy , Patient Selection
19.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(2)2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In ambulatory patients with cancer with asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection, the safety of targeted therapies (TTs), chemotherapy (CT) or immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) therapy is still unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From the start of the first epidemic wave of SARS-CoV-2 in Bergamo, Italy, we have prospectively screened all consecutive outpatients who presented for treatment to the Oncology Division of the Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo for SARS-CoV-2 antigen expression. We identified patients treated with ICIs and compared these to patients with the same cancer subtypes treated with TTs or CT. RESULTS: Between March 5 and May 18, 293 consecutive patients (49% melanoma, 34% non-small cell lung cancer, 9% renal cell carcinoma, 8% other) were included in this study: 159 (54%), 50 (17%) and 84 (29%) received ICIs, CT or TTs, respectively. Overall 89 patients (30.0%) were SARS-CoV-2 positive. Mortality of SARS-CoV-2-positive patients was statistically significantly higher compared with SARS-CoV-2 negative patients (8/89 vs 3/204, respectively, Fisher's exact test p=0.004). All deaths were due to COVID-19. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were more frequent in SARS-CoV-2-positive patients compared with SARS-CoV-2-negative cases (Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) test p=0.0008). The incidence of SAEs in SARS-CoV-2 positive compared with SARS-CoV-2 negative patients was similar in ICI and CT patients (17.3% and 3.7% for positive and negative patients in ICIs and 15.4% and 2.7% in CT, Breslow-Day test p=0.891). No COVID-19-related SAEs were observed in the TTs patients. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of SAEs was higher for SARS-CoV-2-positive patients treated with ICIs and CT, mostly in advanced disease. No SAEs were observed in patients treated with TTs. SAEs were COVID-19 related rather than treatment related. Treatment with ICIs does not appear to significantly increase risk of SAEs compared with CT. This information should be considered when determining treatment options for patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gastrointestinal Diseases/chemically induced , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/mortality , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Rate
20.
Oncologist ; 26(4): 288-e541, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068692

ABSTRACT

LESSONS LEARNED: Despite the initial optimism for using immune checkpoint inhibition in the treatment of multiple myeloma, subsequent clinical studies have been disappointing. Preclinical studies have suggested that priming the immune system with various modalities in addition to checkpoint inhibition may overcome the relative T-cell exhaustion or senescence; however, in this small data set, radiotherapy with checkpoint inhibition did not appear to activate the antitumor immune response. BACKGROUND: Extramedullary disease (EMD) is recognized as an aggressive subentity of multiple myeloma (MM) with a need for novel therapeutic approaches. We therefore designed a proof-of-principle pilot study to evaluate the synergy between the combination of the anti-PD-L1, avelumab, and concomitant hypofractionated radiotherapy. METHODS: This was a single-arm phase II Simon two-stage single center study that was prematurely terminated because of the COVID-19 pandemic after enrolling four patients. Key eligibility included patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) who had exhausted or were not candidates for standard therapy and had at least one lesion amenable to radiotherapy. Patients received avelumab until progression or intolerable toxicity and hypofractionated radiotherapy to a focal lesion in cycle 2. Radiotherapy was delayed until cycle 2 to allow the avelumab to reach a study state, given the important observation from previous studies that concomitant therapy is needed for the abscopal effect. RESULTS: At a median potential follow-up of 10.5 months, there were no objective responses, one minimal response, and two stable disease as best response. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.5-7.1 months), and no deaths occurred. There were no grade ≥3 and five grade 1-2 treatment-related adverse events. CONCLUSION: Avelumab in combination with radiotherapy for patients with RRMM and EMD was associated with very modest systemic clinical benefit; however, patients did benefit as usual from local radiotherapy. Furthermore, the combination was very well tolerated compared with historical RRMM treatment regimens.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Multiple Myeloma , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/drug therapy , Multiple Myeloma/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Pilot Projects
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