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1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(51)2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573990

ABSTRACT

The positive impact of meditation on human well-being is well documented, yet its molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. We applied a comprehensive systems biology approach starting with whole-blood gene expression profiling combined with multilevel bioinformatic analyses to characterize the coexpression, transcriptional, and protein-protein interaction networks to identify a meditation-specific core network after an advanced 8-d Inner Engineering retreat program. We found the response to oxidative stress, detoxification, and cell cycle regulation pathways were down-regulated after meditation. Strikingly, 220 genes directly associated with immune response, including 68 genes related to interferon signaling, were up-regulated, with no significant expression changes in the inflammatory genes. This robust meditation-specific immune response network is significantly dysregulated in multiple sclerosis and severe COVID-19 patients. The work provides a foundation for understanding the effect of meditation and suggests that meditation as a behavioral intervention can voluntarily and nonpharmacologically improve the immune response for treating various conditions associated with excessive or persistent inflammation with a dampened immune system profile.


Subject(s)
Immune System/metabolism , Meditation , Transcriptome , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Diet, Vegan , Female , Genome, Human , Humans , Male , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/metabolism , Protein Interaction Maps
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477961

ABSTRACT

Chronic diseases and viral infections have threatened human life over the ages and constitute the main reason for increasing death globally. The rising burden of these diseases extends to negatively affecting the economy and trading globally, as well as daily life, which requires inexpensive, novel, and safe therapeutics. Therefore, scientists have paid close attention to probiotics as safe remedies to combat these morbidities owing to their health benefits and biotherapeutic effects. Probiotics have been broadly adopted as functional foods, nutraceuticals, and food supplements to improve human health and prevent some morbidity. Intriguingly, recent research indicates that probiotics are a promising solution for treating and prophylactic against certain dangerous diseases. Probiotics could also be associated with their essential role in animating the immune system to fight COVID-19 infection. This comprehensive review concentrates on the newest literature on probiotics and their metabolism in treating life-threatening diseases, including immune disorders, pathogens, inflammatory and allergic diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal dysfunctions, and COVID-19 infection. The recent information in this report will particularly furnish a platform for emerging novel probiotics-based therapeutics as cheap and safe, encouraging researchers and stakeholders to develop innovative treatments based on probiotics to prevent and treat chronic and viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/therapy , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/therapy
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477960

ABSTRACT

A viral infection involves entry and replication of viral nucleic acid in a host organism, subsequently leading to biochemical and structural alterations in the host cell. In the case of SARS-CoV-2 viral infection, over-activation of the host immune system may lead to lung damage. Albeit the regeneration and fibrotic repair processes being the two protective host responses, prolonged injury may lead to excessive fibrosis, a pathological state that can result in lung collapse. In this review, we discuss regeneration and fibrosis processes in response to SARS-CoV-2 and provide our viewpoint on the triggering of alveolar regeneration in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Lung/physiology , Regeneration , COVID-19/virology , Epigenomics , Fibrosis , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Signal Transduction
4.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390789

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 uses ACE2 and TMPRSS2 to gain entry into the cell. However, recent studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 may use additional host factors that are required for the viral lifecycle. Here we used publicly available datasets, CoV-associated genes, and machine learning algorithms to explore the SARS-CoV-2 interaction landscape in different tissues. We found that in general a small fraction of cells express ACE2 in the different tissues, including nasal, bronchi, and lungs. We show that a small fraction of immune cells (including T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells) found in tissues also express ACE2. We show that healthy circulating immune cells do not express ACE2 and TMPRSS2. However, a small fraction of circulating immune cells (including dendritic cells, monocytes, T cells) in the PBMC of COVID-19 patients express ACE2 and TMPRSS2. Additionally, we found that a large spectrum of cells (in tissues and circulation) in both healthy and COVID-19-positive patients were significantly enriched for SARS-CoV-2 factors, such as those associated with RHOA and RAB GTPases, mRNA translation proteins, COPI- and COPII-mediated transport, and integrins. Thus, we propose that further research is needed to explore if SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect tissue and circulating immune cells to better understand the virus' mechanism of action.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization , COVID-19/blood , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis
5.
Front Immunol ; 11: 631743, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389175

ABSTRACT

The concept of trained immunity has recently emerged as a mechanism contributing to several immune mediated inflammatory conditions. Trained immunity is defined by the immunological memory developed in innate immune cells after a primary non-specific stimulus that, in turn, promotes a heightened inflammatory response upon a secondary challenge. The most characteristic changes associated to this process involve the rewiring of cell metabolism and epigenetic reprogramming. Under physiological conditions, the role of trained immune cells ensures a prompt response. This action is limited by effective resolution of inflammation and tissue repair in order to restore homeostasis. However, unrestrained activation of innate immune cells contributes to the development of chronic inflammation and tissue destruction through the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, proteases and growth factors. Therefore, interventions aimed at reversing the changes induced by trained immunity provide potential therapeutic approaches to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We review cellular approaches that target metabolism and the epigenetic reprogramming of dendritic cells, macrophages, natural killer cells, and other trained cells in the context of autoimmune inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmunity/drug effects , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Immune System/drug effects , Inflammation/drug therapy , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Energy Metabolism/drug effects , Epigenesis, Genetic/drug effects , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Memory/drug effects , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Signal Transduction
6.
Curr Med Chem ; 28(22): 4499-4530, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The identification of vulnerable subgroups and risk factors associated with the susceptibility to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV- 2) infection and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is of utmost importance in a pandemic scenario. Potential interactions between renin-angiotensin system (RAS), immune markers and COVID-19 play a role in disease outcome in specific groups of patients. OBJECTIVE: This review aimed to describe the particularities of the RAS and the immune system profile of particular subgroups of patients. METHODS: This non-systematic review summarizes evidence on SARS-CoV-2 infection in specific subgroups of patients and possible relationships between immune system, RAS and the pathophysiology of COVID-19. RESULTS: The RAS and the immune system exert a role in the pathogenesis and prognosis of COVID-19, mainly in cases of hypertension, diabetes, obesity and other chronic diseases. The overactivation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis and the enhancement of inflammation contribute to deleterious effects of COVID-19. Likewise, pregnant women and elderly patients usually display immune responses that are less effective in withstanding exposition to viruses, while children are relatively protected against severe complications of COVID-19. Women, conversely, exhibit stronger antiviral responses and are less sensitive to the effects of increased Ang II. Future Perspectives: The recognition of vulnerable subgroups and risk factors for disease severity is essential to better understand the pandemic. Precision medicine tools, including proteomics and metabolomics approaches, identified metabolic patterns of the severe form of disease and might be the alternative to diagnose, evaluate and predict the prognosis and the efficiency of therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Renin-Angiotensin System , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Child , Female , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 681449, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314554

ABSTRACT

Immunosenescence is a process associated with aging that leads to dysregulation of cells of innate and adaptive immunity, which may become dysfunctional. Consequently, older adults show increased severity of viral and bacterial infections and impaired responses to vaccinations. A better understanding of the process of immunosenescence will aid the development of novel strategies to boost the immune system in older adults. In this review, we focus on major alterations of the immune system triggered by aging, and address the effect of chronic viral infections, effectiveness of vaccination of older adults and strategies to improve immune function in this vulnerable age group.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Immunity , Virus Diseases/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Age Factors , Animals , Clinical Decision-Making , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immunity, Innate , Virus Diseases/therapy , Virus Diseases/virology
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288899

ABSTRACT

Viral-associated respiratory infectious diseases are one of the most prominent subsets of respiratory failures, known as viral respiratory infections (VRI). VRIs are proceeded by an infection caused by viruses infecting the respiratory system. For the past 100 years, viral associated respiratory epidemics have been the most common cause of infectious disease worldwide. Due to several drawbacks of the current anti-viral treatments, such as drug resistance generation and non-targeting of viral proteins, the development of novel nanotherapeutic or nano-vaccine strategies can be considered essential. Due to their specific physical and biological properties, nanoparticles hold promising opportunities for both anti-viral treatments and vaccines against viral infections. Besides the specific physiological properties of the respiratory system, there is a significant demand for utilizing nano-designs in the production of vaccines or antiviral agents for airway-localized administration. SARS-CoV-2, as an immediate example of respiratory viruses, is an enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the coronaviridae family. COVID-19 can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, similarly to other members of the coronaviridae. Hence, reviewing the current and past emerging nanotechnology-based medications on similar respiratory viral diseases can identify pathways towards generating novel SARS-CoV-2 nanotherapeutics and/or nano-vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Drug Carriers/chemistry , Nanomedicine , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Viral Vaccines/chemistry , Virus Diseases/pathology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/therapy
9.
Pharm Biol ; 59(1): 696-703, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263613

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that causes a severe infection in the respiratory system. Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae) is an annual flowering plant used traditionally as a natural food supplement and multipurpose medicinal agent. OBJECTIVE: The possible beneficial effects of N. sativa, and its constituent, thymoquinone (TQ) on COVID-19 were reviewed. METHODS: The key words including, COVID-19, N. sativa, thymoquinone, antiviral effects, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in different databases such as Web of Science (ISI), PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched from 1990 up to February 2021. RESULTS: The current literature review showed that N. sativa and TQ reduced the level of pro-inflammatory mediators including, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-12, while enhancing IFN-γ. Nigella sativa and TQ increased the serum levels of IgG1 and IgG2a, and improved pulmonary function tests in restrictive respiratory disorders. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary data of molecular docking, animal, and clinical studies propose N. sativa and TQ might have beneficial effects on the treatment or control of COVID-19 due to antiviral, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties as well as bronchodilatory effects. The efficacy of N. sativa and TQ on infected patients with COVID-19 in randomize clinical trials will be suggested.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Benzoquinones/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Nigella sativa , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Benzoquinones/isolation & purification , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Nigella sativa/chemistry , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
10.
Nat Rev Cardiol ; 18(9): 666-682, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220034

ABSTRACT

Thrombosis is the most feared complication of cardiovascular diseases and a main cause of death worldwide, making it a major health-care challenge. Platelets and the coagulation cascade are effectively targeted by antithrombotic approaches, which carry an inherent risk of bleeding. Moreover, antithrombotics cannot completely prevent thrombotic events, implicating a therapeutic gap due to a third, not yet adequately addressed mechanism, namely inflammation. In this Review, we discuss how the synergy between inflammation and thrombosis drives thrombotic diseases. We focus on the huge potential of anti-inflammatory strategies to target cardiovascular pathologies. Findings in the past decade have uncovered a sophisticated connection between innate immunity, platelet activation and coagulation, termed immunothrombosis. Immunothrombosis is an important host defence mechanism to limit systemic spreading of pathogens through the bloodstream. However, the aberrant activation of immunothrombosis in cardiovascular diseases causes myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism. The clinical relevance of aberrant immunothrombosis, referred to as thromboinflammation, is supported by the increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with inflammatory diseases but also during infections, including in COVID-19. Clinical trials in the past 4 years have confirmed the anti-ischaemic effects of anti-inflammatory strategies, backing the concept of a prothrombotic function of inflammation. Targeting inflammation to prevent thrombosis leaves haemostasis mainly unaffected, circumventing the risk of bleeding associated with current approaches. Considering the growing number of anti-inflammatory therapies, it is crucial to appreciate their potential in covering therapeutic gaps in cardiovascular diseases.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Immune System/drug effects , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Signal Transduction , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology
11.
Autoimmunity ; 54(4): 213-224, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201340

ABSTRACT

Currently, the novel coronavirus pneumonia has been widespread globally, and there is no specific medicine. In response to the emergency, we employed bioinformatics methods to investigate the virus's pathogenic mechanism, finding possible control methods. We speculated in previous studies that E protein was associated with viral infectivity. The present study adopted the domain search techniques to analyse the E protein. According to the results, the E protein could bind iron or haem. The iron and haem bound by the E protein came from the attacked haemoglobin and phagocytes. When E protein was attached to haem, it synthesised oxygen and water into superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. When the iron-bound E protein and the haem-bound E protein worked together, they converted superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. These were the "ROS attack" and "ROS escape" of the virus. "ROS attack" damaged the tissues or cells exposed on the surface of the virus, and "ROS escape" decomposed the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide that attacked the virus. When NK cells were exposed to infected cells, viruses that had not shed from the infected cells' surface damaged them through "ROS attack". In addition, lymphocytes such as T cells and B cells, which could be close to the antigen of the virus surface, were also easily damaged or killed by the "ROS attack", generating a decrease in lymphocytes. When memory B cells were exposed to the virus's surface antigen, they were also damaged by "ROS attack", resulting in the patient's re-infection. The virus applied the "ROS escape" to decompose hydrogen peroxide released by phagocytes into oxygen and water. The surrounding cells were replenished with oxygen, and the patient was in a "happy hypoxia" state. When the phagocytes swallowed the virus, the E protein converted superoxide anions into oxygen and water. In this way, the virus parasitized in the vesicles of the phagocyte. While virus was in the lysosome, the E protein generated ROS to damage nearby hydrolases. In this way, the virus parasitized the lysosome. Excessive hydroxyl free radicals destroyed the membrane structure of the lysosome, causing the hydrolase release from lysosome, autophagy of phagocytic cells and subsequent cell death. As a result, the colonizing phagocytes of the virus was associated with asymptomatic infection or retest-positive. Briefly, the virus inhibited the immune system through "ROS escape", and damaged the immune system by "ROS attack". The destruction instigated a strong cytokine storm, leading to organ failure and complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Iron/metabolism , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Amino Acid Sequence , Catalysis , Computational Biology/methods , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune System/pathology , Models, Molecular , Protein Conformation , Structure-Activity Relationship , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism
12.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1554, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194588

ABSTRACT

The RNase T2 family consists of evolutionarily conserved endonucleases that express in many different species, including animals, plants, protozoans, bacteria, and viruses. The main biological roles of these ribonucleases are cleaving or degrading RNA substrates. They preferentially cleave single-stranded RNA molecules between purine and uridine residues to generate two nucleotide fragments with 2'3'-cyclic phosphate adenosine/guanosine terminus and uridine residue, respectively. Accumulating studies have revealed that RNase T2 is critical for the pathophysiology of inflammation and cancer. In this review, we introduce the distribution, structure, and functions of RNase T2, its differential roles in inflammation and cancer, and the perspective for its research and related applications in medicine.


Subject(s)
Disease Susceptibility , Endoribonucleases/genetics , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/metabolism , Neoplasms/etiology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Animals , Biomarkers , Cellular Microenvironment/immunology , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Endoribonucleases/chemistry , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immunomodulation , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/pathology , Structure-Activity Relationship
13.
Scand J Immunol ; 94(4): e13044, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192682

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a large family of respiratory viruses which can cause mild to moderate upper respiratory tract infections. Recently, new coronavirus named as Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified which is a major threat to public health. Innate immune responses play a vital role in a host's defence against viruses. Interestingly, CoVs have evolved elaborate strategies to evade the complex system of sensors and signalling molecules to suppress host immunity. SARS-CoV-2 papain-like protease (PLpro), as an important coronavirus enzyme, regulates viral spread and innate immune responses. SCoV-2 PLpro is multifunctional enzyme with deubiquitinating (DUB) and deISGylating activity. The PLpro can interact with key regulators in signalling pathways such as STING, NF-κB, cytokine production, MAPK and TGF-ß and hijack those to block the immune responses. Therefore, the PLpro can be as an important target for the treatment of COVID-19. Until now, several drugs or compounds have been identified that can inhibit PLpro activity. Here we discuss about the dysregulation effects of PLpro on immune system and drugs that have potential inhibitors for SCoV-2 PLpro.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Immune System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , NF-kappa B/immunology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Protein Binding/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Proteins/metabolism
14.
Anat Rec (Hoboken) ; 304(6): 1185-1193, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184569

ABSTRACT

Estrogen is an important hormone for health in both genders. It is indispensable to glucose homeostasis, immune robustness, bone health, cardiovascular health, and neural functions. The main way that estrogen acts in the cells is through estrogen receptors (ERs). The presence of specific estrogen receptors is required for estrogen to have its characteristic ubiquitous action in almost all tissues. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERß) are the major isoforms of estrogen that are highly specific in humans and enable selective hormonal actions in different tissues. This article reviews some of the observed estrogen actions and effects in different tissues and cells through these specific receptors. This ubiquitous, almost ordinary hormone may reveal itself as a significant factor that helped us to better understand the complexity of the human immune system response against respiratory infections, including the COVID-19, and especially in the current state of this painful pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Estrogen Receptor alpha/immunology , Estrogen Receptor beta/immunology , Immune System/immunology , Respiratory System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , Estrogen Receptor alpha/metabolism , Estrogen Receptor beta/metabolism , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory System/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
15.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 596518, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156116

ABSTRACT

Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT04365634. Context: Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased severity and mortality of disease in COVID-19 pneumonia. So far the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) or hyperglycemia on the immune system among COVID-19 disease has remained unclear. Objective: We aim to explore the clinical and immunological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among COVID-19 patients. Design and Methods: In this retrospective study, the clinical and immunological characteristics of 306 hospitalized confirmed COVID-19 patients (including 129 diabetic and 177 non-diabetic patients) were analyzed. The serum concentrations of laboratory parameters including cytokines and numbers of immune cells were measured and compared between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Results: Compared with non-diabetic group, diabetic cases more frequently had lymphopenia and hyperglycemia, with higher levels of urea nitrogen, myoglobin, D-dimer and ferritin. Diabetic cases indicated the obviously elevated mortality and the higher levels of cytokines IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, as well as the distinctly reduced Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios compared with non-diabetic cases. The longitudinal assays showed that compared to that at week 1, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly elevated at week 2 after admission in non-survivors of diabetic cases, whereas there were greatly reductions from week 1 to week 2 in survivors of diabetic cases. Compared with survival diabetic patients, non-survival diabetic cases displayed distinct higher serum concentrations of IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and lower Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios at week 2. Samples from a subset of participants were evaluated by flow cytometry for the immune cells. The counts of peripheral total T lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells were markedly lower in diabetic cases than in non-diabetic cases. The non-survivors showed the markedly declined counts of CD8+ T cells and NK cells than survivors. Conclusion: The elevated cytokines, imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios and reduced of peripheral numbers of CD8+ T cells and NK cells might contribute to the pathogenic mechanisms of high mortality of COVID-19 patients with T2DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , China/epidemiology , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/immunology , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/complications , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th1 Cells/pathology , Th2 Cells/pathology
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(6)2021 Mar 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143520

ABSTRACT

The recent pandemic Sars-CoV2 infection and studies on previous influenza epidemic have drawn attention to the association between the obesity and infectious diseases susceptibility and worse outcome. Metabolic complications, nutritional aspects, physical inactivity, and a chronic unbalance in the hormonal and adipocytokine microenvironment are major determinants in the severity of viral infections in obesity. By these pleiotropic mechanisms obesity impairs immune surveillance and the higher leptin concentrations produced by adipose tissue and that characterize obesity substantially contribute to such immune response dysregulation. Indeed, leptin not only controls energy balance and body weight, but also plays a regulatory role in the interplay between energy metabolism and immune system. Since leptin receptor is expressed throughout the immune system, leptin may exert effects on cells of both innate and adaptive immune system. Chronic inflammatory states due to metabolic (i.e., obesity) as well as infectious diseases increase leptin concentrations and consequently lead to leptin resistance further fueling inflammation. Multiple factors, including inflammation and ER stress, contribute to leptin resistance. Thus, if leptin is recognized as one of the adipokines responsible for the low grade inflammation found in obesity, on the other hand, impairments of leptin signaling due to leptin resistance appear to blunt the immunologic effects of leptin and possibly contribute to impaired vaccine-induced immune responses. However, many aspects concerning leptin interactions with inflammation and immune system as well as the therapeutical approaches to overcome leptin resistance and reduced vaccine effectiveness in obesity remain a challenge for future research.


Subject(s)
Leptin/immunology , Leptin/metabolism , Obesity/complications , Obesity/virology , Virus Diseases/complications , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Energy Metabolism/immunology , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Obesity/immunology , Obesity/metabolism , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(1)2020 Dec 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067750

ABSTRACT

Recently, there has been a growing interest in the medical applications of Cannabis plants. They owe their unique properties to a group of secondary metabolites known as phytocannabinoids, which are specific for this genus. Phytocannabinoids, and cannabinoids generally, can interact with cannabinoid receptors being part of the endocannabinoid system present in animals. Over the years a growing body of scientific evidence has been gathered, suggesting that these compounds have therapeutic potential. In this article, we review the classification of cannabinoids, the molecular mechanisms of their interaction with animal cells as well as their potential application in the treatment of human diseases. Specifically, we focus on the research concerning the anticancer potential of cannabinoids in preclinical studies, their possible use in cancer treatment and palliative medicine, as well as their influence on the immune system. We also discuss their potential as therapeutic agents in infectious, autoimmune, and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. We postulate that the currently ongoing and future clinical trials should be accompanied by research focused on the cellular and molecular response to cannabinoids and Cannabis extracts, which will ultimately allow us to fully understand the mechanism, potency, and safety profile of cannabinoids as single agents and as complementary drugs.


Subject(s)
Cannabinoids/pharmacology , Cannabinoids/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use , Apoptosis/drug effects , Cannabinoids/chemistry , Cannabis/chemistry , Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases/microbiology , Communicable Diseases/virology , Humans , Immune System/drug effects , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Receptors, Cannabinoid/metabolism
19.
J Biol Rhythms ; 36(1): 23-34, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044068

ABSTRACT

Circadian rhythms are evolutionarily conserved anticipatory systems that allow the host to prepare and respond to threats in its environment. This article summarizes a European Biological Rhythms Society (EBRS) workshop held in July 2020 to review current knowledge of the interplay between the circadian clock and viral infections to inform therapeutic strategies against SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19. A large body of work supports the role of the circadian clock in regulating various aspects of viral replication, host responses, and associated pathogenesis. We review the evidence describing the multifaceted role of the circadian clock, spanning host susceptibility, antiviral mechanisms, and host resilience. Finally, we define the most pressing research questions and how our knowledge of chronobiology can inform key translational research priorities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Circadian Clocks/physiology , Circadian Rhythm/physiology , Immune System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/immunology
20.
Mol Biol Rep ; 48(2): 1925-1934, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043084

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory syndrome, reported at the end of 2019 in China originally and immediately spread affecting over ten million world population to date. This pandemic is more lethal for the older population and those who previously suffered from other ailments such as cardiovascular diseases, respiratory disorders, and other immune system affecting abnormalities including cancers. Lung cancer is an important comorbidity of COVID-19. In this review, we emphasized the impact of lung tumor microenvironment (TME) on the possibility of enhanced severity of infection caused by the SARS-Co-V2. The compromised lung TME is further susceptible to the attack of viruses. The lung cells are also abundant in the virus entry receptors. Several SARS-Co-V2 proteins can modulate the lung TME by disrupting the fragile immune mechanisms contributing to cytokine storming and cellular metabolic variations. We also discussed the impact of medication used for lung cancer in the scenario of this infection. Since other respiratory infections can be a risk factor for lung cancer, COVID-19 recovered patients should be monitored for tumor development, especially if there is genetic susceptibility or it involves exposure to other risk factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tumor Microenvironment , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immune System/immunology , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Lung Neoplasms/metabolism , Lung Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
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