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1.
Vaccine ; 40(4): 650-655, 2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625605

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic was responsible for the death of millions of people around the world, which accelerated the study of vaccines. The BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 is a messenger RNA vaccine that encodes the spike protein of the virus. However, the duration of the protection conferred by this vaccine and factors associated with immune responses require validation in large cohorts. METHODS: Here, we present data of humoral immune response to vaccination in4264 healthcare workers, tested before (T0) and 15 and 90 days (T1 and T2, respectively) following vaccination.Peripheral blood was collected for immunological analysis using the Quant SARS-CoV-2 IgG II Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA) to determine anti-spike IgG, receptor binding domain (RBD), S1 subunit of SARS-CoV-2. FINDINGS: At T0, 96·8% (n = 4129) of participants had IgG antibodies non-reactive to anti-SARS-CoV-2. Fifteen days after completing the vaccination, the IgG overall median titer was significantly elevated (21·7x103AU/mL). Both for uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses women presented higher antibody levels than men, independent of age. Titers were significantly altered among age groups, decreasing by each increase in 10-year of age. At 3 months after completing the vaccination, anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG titers were 6·3-fold diminished. This real-world post-vaccination data confirmed production of a frequent and elevated anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG titers, associated with high protection rates. Females and younger participants had higher titer 15 days after vaccination, and despite the significant reduction from 15-to-90 days, those with higher pre-vaccination titers maintained higher levels throughout the remaining timepoints. INTERPRETATION: These findings support the need to track humoral immunity kinetics to uncover viral susceptibility and eventually implement re-vaccination, particularly in groups prone to lower humoral immune response. FUNDING: No external funding was received to conduct this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic
2.
Cell Rep ; 37(13): 110169, 2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616407

ABSTRACT

The importance of pre-existing immune responses to seasonal endemic coronaviruses (HCoVs) for the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the course of COVID-19 is the subject of an ongoing scientific debate. Recent studies postulate that immune responses to previous HCoV infections can either have a slightly protective or no effect on SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis and, consequently, be neglected for COVID-19 risk stratification. Challenging this notion, we provide evidence that pre-existing, anti-nucleocapsid antibodies against endemic α-coronaviruses and S2 domain-specific anti-spike antibodies against ß-coronavirus HCoV-OC43 are elevated in patients with COVID-19 compared to pre-pandemic donors. This finding is particularly pronounced in males and in critically ill patients. Longitudinal evaluation reveals that antibody cross-reactivity or polyclonal stimulation by SARS-CoV-2 infection are unlikely to be confounders. Thus, specific pre-existing immunity to seasonal coronaviruses may increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 and predispose individuals to an adverse COVID-19 outcome, guiding risk management and supporting the development of universal coronavirus vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Antibodies/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/immunology , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Cross Reactions/immunology , Female , Germany , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Seasons , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 797919, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608316

ABSTRACT

Persistence of protective immunity for SARS-CoV-2 is important against reinfection. Knowledge on SARS-CoV-2 immunity in pediatric patients is currently lacking. We opted to assess the SARS-CoV-2 adaptive immunity in recovered children and adolescents, addressing the pediatrics specific immunity towards COVID-19. Two independent assays were performed to investigate humoral and cellular immunological memory in pediatric convalescent COVID-19 patients. Specifically, RBD IgG, CD4+, and CD8+ T cell responses were identified and quantified in recovered children and adolescents. SARS-CoV-2-specific RBD IgG detected in recovered patients had a half-life of 121.6 days and estimated duration of 7.9 months compared with baseline levels in controls. The specific T cell response was shown to be independent of days after diagnosis. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells showed robust responses not only to spike (S) peptides (a main target of vaccine platforms) but were also similarly activated when stimulated by membrane (M) and nuclear (N) peptides. Importantly, we found the differences in the adaptive responses were correlated with the age of the recovered patients. The CD4+ T cell response to SARS-CoV-2 S peptide in children aged <12 years correlated with higher SARS-CoV-2 RBD IgG levels, suggesting the importance of a T cell-dependent humoral response in younger children under 12 years. Both cellular and humoral immunity against SARS-CoV-2 infections can be induced in pediatric patients. Our important findings provide fundamental knowledge on the immune memory responses to SARS-CoV-2 in recovered pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 798276, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606542

ABSTRACT

Effects of initiation of programmed-death-protein 1 (PD1) blockade during active SARS-CoV-2 infection on antiviral immunity, COVID-19 course, and underlying malignancy are unclear. We report on the management of a male in his early 40s presenting with highly symptomatic metastatic lung cancer and active COVID-19 pneumonia. After treatment initiation with pembrolizumab, carboplatin, and pemetrexed, the respiratory situation initially worsened and high-dose corticosteroids were initiated due to suspected pneumonitis. After improvement and SARS-CoV-2 clearance, anti-cancer treatment was resumed without pembrolizumab. Immunological analyses with comparison to otherwise healthy SARS-CoV-2-infected ambulatory patients revealed a strong humoral immune response with higher levels of SARS-CoV-2-reactive IgG and neutralizing serum activity. Additionally, sustained increase of Tfh as well as activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was observed. Sequential CT scans showed regression of tumor lesions and marked improvement of the pulmonary situation, with no signs of pneumonitis after pembrolizumab re-challenge as maintenance. At the latest follow-up, the patient is ambulatory and in ongoing partial remission on pembrolizumab. In conclusion, anti-PD1 initiation during active COVID-19 pneumonia was feasible and cellular and humoral immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 appeared enhanced in our hospitalized patient. However, distinguishing COVID-19-associated changes from anti-PD1-associated immune-related pneumonitis posed a considerable clinical, radiographic, and immunologic challenge.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/immunology , Male , Neoplasm Metastasis , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Pneumonia/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 801609, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604379

ABSTRACT

As of November 17, 2021, SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus 2), the causative agent of COVID-19 (COronaVIrus Disease 19), has infected ~250 million people worldwide, causing around five million deaths. Titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies were relatively stable for at least 9 months in a population-based study conducted in Wuhan, China, both in symptomatic and in asymptomatic individuals. In the mass screening campaign conducted in the town of Ariano Irpino (Avellino, Italy) in May, 2020, 5.7% (95% CI: 5.3-6-1) of the 13,444 asymptomatic citizens screened were positive for anti-nucleocapsid antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. Among these, 422 citizens were re-tested for anti SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in January, 2021 and/or in April, 2021 and enrolled in this longitudinal observational study. Median (interquartile range) age of the study cohort was 46 years (29-59), with 47 (11.1%) participants of minor age, while 217 (51.4%) participants were females. There was no evidence of re-infection in any of the subjects included. Presence of anti-nuclear antibodies antibodies (Elecysis, Roche) was reported in 95.7 and 93.7% of evaluable participants in January and April, 2021. Multiple logistic regression analysis used to explore associations between age, sex and seroprevalence showed that adults vs. minors had significantly lower odds of having anti-S1 antibodies (Biorad) both in January, 2021 and in April, 2021. Our findings showed that antibodies remained detectable at least 11.5 months after infection in >90% of never symptomatic cases. Further investigation is required to establish duration of immunity against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Middle Aged , Seroepidemiologic Studies
6.
JCI Insight ; 6(24)2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598468

ABSTRACT

mRNA vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 have shown exceptional clinical efficacy, providing robust protection against severe disease. However, our understanding of transcriptional and repertoire changes following full vaccination remains incomplete. We used scRNA-Seq and functional assays to compare humoral and cellular responses to 2 doses of mRNA vaccine with responses observed in convalescent individuals with asymptomatic disease. Our analyses revealed enrichment of spike-specific B cells, activated CD4+ T cells, and robust antigen-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T cell responses following vaccination. On the other hand, although clonally expanded CD8+ T cells were observed following both vaccination and natural infection, CD8+ T cell responses were relatively weak and variable. In addition, TCR gene usage was variable, reflecting the diversity of repertoires and MHC polymorphism in the human population. Natural infection induced expansion of CD8+ T cell clones that occupy distinct clusters compared to those induced by vaccination and likely recognize a broader set of viral antigens of viral epitopes presented by the virus not seen in the mRNA vaccine. Our study highlights a coordinated adaptive immune response in which early CD4+ T cell responses facilitate the development of the B cell response and substantial expansion of effector CD8+ T cells, together capable of contributing to future recall responses.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , /therapeutic use , Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antigens, Viral , B-Lymphocytes , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Carrier State , Convalescence , Epitopes , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/genetics , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunologic Memory , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Cell Analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Th1 Cells , Th17 Cells , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/therapeutic use , Young Adult , /therapeutic use
7.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(12): e1010162, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595940

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19 disease, has killed over five million people worldwide as of December 2021 with infections rising again due to the emergence of highly transmissible variants. Animal models that faithfully recapitulate human disease are critical for assessing SARS-CoV-2 viral and immune dynamics, for understanding mechanisms of disease, and for testing vaccines and therapeutics. Pigtail macaques (PTM, Macaca nemestrina) demonstrate a rapid and severe disease course when infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), including the development of severe cardiovascular symptoms that are pertinent to COVID-19 manifestations in humans. We thus proposed this species may likewise exhibit severe COVID-19 disease upon infection with SARS-CoV-2. Here, we extensively studied a cohort of SARS-CoV-2-infected PTM euthanized either 6- or 21-days after respiratory viral challenge. We show that PTM demonstrate largely mild-to-moderate COVID-19 disease. Pulmonary infiltrates were dominated by T cells, including CD4+ T cells that upregulate CD8 and express cytotoxic molecules, as well as virus-targeting T cells that were predominantly CD4+. We also noted increases in inflammatory and coagulation markers in blood, pulmonary pathologic lesions, and the development of neutralizing antibodies. Together, our data demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 infection of PTM recapitulates important features of COVID-19 and reveals new immune and viral dynamics and thus may serve as a useful animal model for studying pathogenesis and testing vaccines and therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Models, Animal , Macaca nemestrina , Monkey Diseases/virology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Male , Monkey Diseases/immunology , Monkey Diseases/pathology , Monkey Diseases/physiopathology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
8.
J Exp Med ; 219(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594167

ABSTRACT

In rare instances, pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection results in a novel immunodysregulation syndrome termed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We compared MIS-C immunopathology with severe COVID-19 in adults. MIS-C does not result in pneumocyte damage but is associated with vascular endotheliitis and gastrointestinal epithelial injury. In MIS-C, the cytokine release syndrome is characterized by IFNγ and not type I interferon. Persistence of patrolling monocytes differentiates MIS-C from severe COVID-19, which is dominated by HLA-DRlo classical monocytes. IFNγ levels correlate with granzyme B production in CD16+ NK cells and TIM3 expression on CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells. Single-cell TCR profiling reveals a skewed TCRß repertoire enriched for TRBV11-2 and a superantigenic signature in TIM3+/CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells. Using NicheNet, we confirm IFNγ as a central cytokine in the communication between TIM3+/CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells, CD16+ NK cells, and patrolling monocytes. Normalization of IFNγ, loss of TIM3, quiescence of CD16+ NK cells, and contraction of patrolling monocytes upon clinical resolution highlight their potential role in MIS-C immunopathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adolescent , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Blood Vessels/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Proliferation , Child , Cohort Studies , Complement Activation , Cytokines/metabolism , Enterocytes/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Inflammation/pathology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interleukin-15/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Superantigens/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology
9.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 146, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the end of 2019, the world witnessed the emergence and ravages of a viral infection induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Also known as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it has been identified as a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) by the World Health Organization (WHO) because of its severity. METHODS: The gene data of 51 samples were extracted from the GSE150316 and GSE147507 data set and then processed by means of the programming language R, through which the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that meet the standards were screened. The Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed on the selected DEGs to understand the functions and approaches of DEGs. The online tool STRING was employed to construct a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of DEGs and, in turn, to identify hub genes. RESULTS: A total of 52 intersection genes were obtained through DEG identification. Through the GO analysis, we realized that the biological processes (BPs) that have the deepest impact on the human body after SARS-CoV-2 infection are various immune responses. By using STRING to construct a PPI network, 10 hub genes were identified, including IFIH1, DDX58, ISG15, EGR1, OASL, SAMD9, SAMD9L, XAF1, IFITM1, and TNFSF10. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will hopefully provide guidance for future studies on the pathophysiological mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Lung/pathology , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Ontology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Lung/virology , Neutrophil Activation/genetics , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome/genetics
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 760249, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581341

ABSTRACT

Background: The humoral and cellular immune responses to SARS-COV-2 vaccination remain to be elucidated in hemodialysis (HD) patients and kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), considering their baseline immunosuppressed status. The aim of our study was to assess the associations of vaccine-induced antibody responses with circulating lymphocytes sub-populations and their respective patterns of alterations in maintenance HD patients and KTRs. Materials and Methods: We included 34 HD patients and 54 KTRs who received two doses of the mRNA-vaccine BNT162b2. Lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry before vaccination (T0), before the second vaccine dose (T1) and 2 weeks after the second dose (T2). The anti-SARS-CoV2 antibody response was assessed at T1 and at T2. Results: 31 HD patients (91.8%) and 16 KTRs (29.6%) became seropositive at T2. HD patients who became seropositive following the first dose displayed higher CD19+ B lymphocytes compared to their seronegative HD counterparts. A positive correlation was established between CD19+ B cells counts and antibody titers at all time-points in both groups (p < 0.001). KTRs showed higher naïve CD4+CD45RA+ T helper cells compared to HD patients at baseline and T2 whereas HD patients displayed higher memory CD45RO+ T cells compared to KTRs at T2. The naïve CD4+CD45RA to memory CD4+CD45RO+ T helper cells fraction was negatively associated with antibody production in both groups. Conclusions: Our study provides a potential conceptual framework for monitoring vaccination efficacy in HD patients and KTRs considering the correlation established between CD19+ B cells, generation of memory CD4+ T helper cells and anti SARS-CoV2 antibody response to vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibody Formation/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , Immunocompromised Host , Immunologic Memory , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Biomarkers , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Kidney Transplantation , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 789905, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581321

ABSTRACT

Facing the imminent need for vaccine candidates with cross-protection against globally circulating severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) mutants, we present a conserved antigenic peptide RBD9.1 with both T-cell and B-cell epitopes. RBD9.1 can be recognized by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent serum, particularly for those with high neutralizing potency. Immunization with RBD9.1 can successfully induce the production of the receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific antibodies in Balb/c mice. Importantly, the immunized sera exhibit sustained neutralizing efficacy against multiple dominant SARS-CoV-2 variant strains, including B.1.617.2 that carries a point mutation (SL452R) within the sequence of RBD9.1. Specifically, SY451 and SY454 are identified as the key amino acids for the binding of the induced RBD-specific antibodies to RBD9.1. Furthermore, we have confirmed that the RBD9.1 antigenic peptide can induce a S448-456 (NYNYLYRLF)-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Both RBD9.1-specific B cells and the S448-456-specific T cells can still be activated more than 3 months post the last immunization. This study provides a potential vaccine candidate that can generate long-term protective efficacy over SARS-CoV-2 variants, with the unique functional mechanism of activating both humoral and cellular immunity.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology
12.
J Neuroimmunol ; 362: 577788, 2022 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587199

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To report clinical outcome, development of humoral and T-cell mediated immunity in convalescent COVID-19 people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) treated with ofatumumab in the ALITHIOS study from a single center. METHODS: Testing for SARS-Cov2 IgG antibodies was performed on two occasions with at least three months apart between the two testing. During the second antibody testing, interferon-γ ELISpot was used to assess cellular immunity. RESULTS: All four subjects had mild COVID-19 infection without any sequelae. In all subjects except subject 2, COVID-19 was confirmed with PCR. Subjects 1, 2 and 4 had normal levels of IgM and IgG without measurable counts of CD19 cells prior to COVID-19. Subject 3 administered the last dose of ofatumumab 24 days prior to COVID-19 symptoms, but had a gap of 28 weeks of ofatumumab application beforehand due to low IgM levels. Subject 4 received COVID-19 vaccinations before second testing, so second testing and T-cell immunity testing were not performed. Subjects who were CD19 depleted did not had measurable levels of SARS-Cov2 IgG antibodies. Subject 3 had first and second SARS-COV2 titer of 118 U/ml and > 250 U/ml, respectively. All three pwMS showed T cell immunity against SARS-CoV-2. Quotient of basal spots divided by interferon-γ secreting spot forming units were 4, 8 and 14.7 SI in subjects 1, 2 and 3, respectively (>3 considered reactive). CONCLUSION: While no antibody response was observed in pwMS who were CD19+ lymphocyte depleted, T cell immunity against SARS-CoV-2 was observed in all three pwMS treated with ofatumumab.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/complications , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Male
13.
Commun Biol ; 4(1): 1389, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585764

ABSTRACT

In light of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants potentially undermining humoral immunity, it is important to understand the fine specificity of the antiviral antibodies. We screened 20 COVID-19 patients for antibodies against 9 different SARS-CoV-2 proteins observing responses against the spike (S) proteins, the receptor-binding domain (RBD), and the nucleocapsid (N) protein which were of the IgG1 and IgG3 subtypes. Importantly, mutations which typically occur in the B.1.351 "South African" variant, significantly reduced the binding of anti-RBD antibodies. Nine of 20 patients were critically ill and were considered high-risk (HR). These patients showed significantly higher levels of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-ß) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and lower levels of CD4+ T cells expressing LAG-3 compared to standard-risk (SR) patients. HR patients evidenced significantly higher anti-S1/RBD IgG antibody levels and an increased neutralizing activity. Importantly, a large proportion of S protein-specific antibodies were glycosylation-dependent and we identified a number of immunodominant linear epitopes within the S1 and N proteins. Findings derived from this study will not only help us to identify the most relevant component of the anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral immune response but will also enable us to design more meaningful immunomonitoring methods for anti-COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/metabolism
14.
Virulence ; 13(1): 30-45, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585280

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has spread throughout the world. To eradicate it, it is crucial to acquire a strong and long-lasting anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity, by either natural infection or vaccination. We collected blood samples 12-305 days after positive polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) from 35 recovered individuals infected by SARS-CoV-2. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with SARS-CoV-2-derived peptide pools, such as the spike (S), nucleocapsid (N) and membrane (M) proteins, and we quantified anti-S immunoglobulins in plasma. After 10 months post-infection, we observed a sustained SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T-cell response directed against M-protein, but responses against S- or N-proteins were lost over time. Besides, we demonstrated that O-group individuals presented significantly lower frequencies of specific CD4+ T-cell responses against Pep-M than non O-group individuals. The non O-group subjects also needed longer to clear the virus, and they lost cellular immune responses over time, compared to the O-group individuals, who showed a persistent specific immune response against SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, the S-specific immune response was lost over time, and individual factors might determine the sustainability of the body's defenses, which must be considered in the future design of vaccines to achieve continuous anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , COVID-19/blood , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
15.
Int Immunol ; 33(10): 529-540, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575943

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused millions of deaths, and serious consequences to public health, economies and societies. Rapid responses in vaccine development have taken place since the isolation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the release of the viral genome sequence. By 21 May 2021, 101 vaccines were under clinical trials, and published data were available for 18 of them. Clinical study results from some vaccines indicated good immunogenicity and acceptable reactogenicity. Here, we focus on these 18 vaccines that had published clinical data to dissect the induced humoral and cellular immune responses as well as their safety profiles and protection efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Animals , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
19.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(9): 999-1009, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concurrent with the Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine roll-out in Israel initiated on Dec 19, 2020, we assessed the early antibody responses and antibody kinetics after each vaccine dose in health-care workers of different ages and sexes, and with different comorbidities. METHODS: We did a prospective, single-centre, longitudinal cohort study at the Sheba Medical Centre (Tel-Hashomer, Israel). Eligible participants were health-care workers at the centre who had a negative anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG assay before receiving the first dose of the intramuscular vaccine, and at least one serological antibody test after the first dose of the vaccine. Health-care workers with a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test before vaccination, a positive anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG serology test before vaccination, or infection with COVID-19 after vaccination were excluded from the study. Participants were followed up weekly for 5 weeks after the first vaccine dose; a second dose was given at week 3. Serum samples were obtained at baseline and at each weekly follow-up, and antibodies were tested at 1-2 weeks after the first vaccine dose, at week 3 with the administration of the second vaccine dose, and at weeks 4-5 (ie, 1-2 weeks after the second vaccine dose). Participants with comorbidities were approached to participate in an enriched comorbidities subgroup, and at least two neutralising assays were done during the 5 weeks of follow-up in those individuals. IgG assays were done for the entire study population, whereas IgM, IgA, and neutralising antibody assays were done only in the enriched comorbidities subgroup. Concentrations of IgG greater than 0·62 sample-to-cutoff (s/co) ratio and of IgA greater than 1·1 s/co, and titres of neutralising antibodies greater than 10 were considered positive. Scatter plot and correlation analyses, logistic and linear regression analyses, and linear mixed models were used to investigate the longitudinal antibody responses. FINDINGS: Between Dec 19, 2020, and Jan 30, 2021, we obtained 4026 serum samples from 2607 eligible, vaccinated participants. 342 individuals were included in the enriched comorbidities subgroup. The first vaccine dose elicited positive IgG and neutralising antibody responses at week 3 in 707 (88·0%) of 803 individuals, and 264 (71·0%) of 372 individuals, respectively, which were rapidly increased at week 4 (ie, 1 week after the second vaccine dose) in 1011 (98·4%) of 1027 and 357 (96·5%) of 370 individuals, respectively. Over 4 weeks of follow-up after vaccination, a high correlation (r=0·92) was detected between IgG against the receptor-binding domain and neutralising antibody titres. First-dose induced IgG response was significantly lower in individuals aged 66 years and older (ratio of means 0·25, 95% CI 0·19-0·31) and immunosuppressed individuals (0·21, 0·14-0·31) compared with individuals aged 18·00-45·99 years and individuals with no immunosuppression, respectively. This disparity was partly abrogated following the second dose. Overall, endpoint regression analysis showed that lower antibody concentrations were consistently associated with male sex (ratio of means 0·84, 95% CI 0·80-0·89), older age (ie, ≥66 years; 0·64, 0·58-0·71), immunosuppression (0·44, 0·33-0·58), and other specific comorbidities: diabetes (0·88, 0·79-0·98), hypertension (0·90, 0·82-0·98), heart disease (0·86, 0·75-1·00), and autoimmune diseases (0·82, 0·73-0·92). INTERPRETATION: BNT162b2 vaccine induces a robust and rapid antibody response. The significant correlation between receptor-binding domain IgG antibodies and neutralisation titres suggests that IgG antibodies might serve as a correlate of neutralisation. The second vaccine dose is particularly important for older and immunosuppressed individuals, highlighting the need for timely second vaccinations and potentially a revaluation of the long gap between doses in some countries. Antibody responses were reduced in susceptible populations and therefore they might be more prone to breakthrough infections. FUNDING: Sheba Medical Center, Israel Ministry of Health.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Israel/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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