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1.
N Engl J Med ; 387(1): 21-34, 2022 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1890356

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The protection conferred by natural immunity, vaccination, and both against symptomatic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection with the BA.1 or BA.2 sublineages of the omicron (B.1.1.529) variant is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a national, matched, test-negative, case-control study in Qatar from December 23, 2021, through February 21, 2022, to evaluate the effectiveness of vaccination with BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) or mRNA-1273 (Moderna), natural immunity due to previous infection with variants other than omicron, and hybrid immunity (previous infection and vaccination) against symptomatic omicron infection and against severe, critical, or fatal coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). RESULTS: The effectiveness of previous infection alone against symptomatic BA.2 infection was 46.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.5 to 51.9). The effectiveness of vaccination with two doses of BNT162b2 and no previous infection was negligible (-1.1%; 95% CI, -7.1 to 4.6), but nearly all persons had received their second dose more than 6 months earlier. The effectiveness of three doses of BNT162b2 and no previous infection was 52.2% (95% CI, 48.1 to 55.9). The effectiveness of previous infection and two doses of BNT162b2 was 55.1% (95% CI, 50.9 to 58.9), and the effectiveness of previous infection and three doses of BNT162b2 was 77.3% (95% CI, 72.4 to 81.4). Previous infection alone, BNT162b2 vaccination alone, and hybrid immunity all showed strong effectiveness (>70%) against severe, critical, or fatal Covid-19 due to BA.2 infection. Similar results were observed in analyses of effectiveness against BA.1 infection and of vaccination with mRNA-1273. CONCLUSIONS: No discernable differences in protection against symptomatic BA.1 and BA.2 infection were seen with previous infection, vaccination, and hybrid immunity. Vaccination enhanced protection among persons who had had a previous infection. Hybrid immunity resulting from previous infection and recent booster vaccination conferred the strongest protection. (Funded by Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar and others.).


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 , Immunity, Innate , Immunization , SARS-CoV-2 , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/therapeutic use , BNT162 Vaccine/immunology , BNT162 Vaccine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunization, Secondary , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination
2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 837524, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731784

ABSTRACT

Effectively treating infectious diseases often requires a multi-step approach to target different components involved in disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the COVID-19 pandemic has become a global health crisis that requires a comprehensive understanding of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection to develop effective therapeutics. One potential strategy to instill greater immune protection against COVID-19 is boosting the innate immune system. This boosting, termed trained immunity, employs immune system modulators to train innate immune cells to produce an enhanced, non-specific immune response upon reactivation following exposure to pathogens, a process that has been studied in the context of in vitro and in vivo clinical studies prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Evaluation of the underlying pathways that are essential to inducing protective trained immunity will provide insight into identifying potential therapeutic targets that may alleviate the COVID-19 crisis. Here we review multiple immune training agents, including Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), ß-glucan, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the two most popular cell types involved in trained immunity, monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, and compare the signaling pathways involved in innate immunity. Additionally, we discuss COVID-19 trained immunity clinical trials, emphasizing the potential of trained immunity to fight SARS-CoV-2 infection. Understanding the mechanisms by which training agents activate innate immune cells to reprogram immune responses may prove beneficial in developing preventive and therapeutic targets against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
3.
J Virol ; 94(13)2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723544

ABSTRACT

Genetic variability across the three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes (human leukocyte antigen A [HLA-A], -B, and -C genes) may affect susceptibility to and severity of the disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We performed a comprehensive in silico analysis of viral peptide-MHC class I binding affinity across 145 HLA-A, -B, and -C genotypes for all SARS-CoV-2 peptides. We further explored the potential for cross-protective immunity conferred by prior exposure to four common human coronaviruses. The SARS-CoV-2 proteome was successfully sampled and was represented by a diversity of HLA alleles. However, we found that HLA-B*46:01 had the fewest predicted binding peptides for SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that individuals with this allele may be particularly vulnerable to COVID-19, as they were previously shown to be for SARS (M. Lin, H.-T. Tseng, J. A. Trejaut, H.-L. Lee, et al., BMC Med Genet 4:9, 2003, https://bmcmedgenet.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2350-4-9). Conversely, we found that HLA-B*15:03 showed the greatest capacity to present highly conserved SARS-CoV-2 peptides that are shared among common human coronaviruses, suggesting that it could enable cross-protective T-cell-based immunity. Finally, we reported global distributions of HLA types with potential epidemiological ramifications in the setting of the current pandemic.IMPORTANCE Individual genetic variation may help to explain different immune responses to a virus across a population. In particular, understanding how variation in HLA may affect the course of COVID-19 could help identify individuals at higher risk from the disease. HLA typing can be fast and inexpensive. Pairing HLA typing with COVID-19 testing where feasible could improve assessment of severity of viral disease in the population. Following the development of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, individuals with high-risk HLA types could be prioritized for vaccination.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Histocompatibility Testing/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Amino Acid Sequence , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Genetic Variation , Genotype , Haplotypes , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
4.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(5): 2509-2521, 2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722548

ABSTRACT

Upon SARS-CoV-2 infection, viral intermediates specifically activate the IFN response through MDA5-mediated sensing and accordingly induce ADAR1 p150 expression, which might lead to viral A-to-I RNA editing. Here, we developed an RNA virus-specific editing identification pipeline, surveyed 7622 RNA-seq data from diverse types of samples infected with SARS-CoV-2, and constructed an atlas of A-to-I RNA editing sites in SARS-CoV-2. We found that A-to-I editing was dynamically regulated, varied between tissue and cell types, and was correlated with the intensity of innate immune response. On average, 91 editing events were deposited at viral dsRNA intermediates per sample. Moreover, editing hotspots were observed, including recoding sites in the spike gene that affect viral infectivity and antigenicity. Finally, we provided evidence that RNA editing accelerated SARS-CoV-2 evolution in humans during the epidemic. Our study highlights the ability of SARS-CoV-2 to hijack components of the host antiviral machinery to edit its genome and fuel its evolution, and also provides a framework and resource for studying viral RNA editing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , RNA Editing/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , Adenosine Deaminase/immunology , Adenosine Deaminase/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Base Sequence , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Expression/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , Mutation , Protein Binding , RNA Editing/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
5.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 53-54, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719338

ABSTRACT

While all groups are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the elderly, underrepresented minorities, and those with underlying medical conditions are at the greatest risk. The high rate of consumption of diets high in saturated fats, sugars, and refined carbohydrates (collectively called Western diet, WD) worldwide, contribute to the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, and could place these populations at an increased risk for severe COVID-19 pathology and mortality. WD consumption activates the innate immune system and impairs adaptive immunity, leading to chronic inflammation and impaired host defense against viruses. Furthermore, peripheral inflammation caused by COVID-19 may have long-term consequences in those that recover, leading to chronic medical conditions such as dementia and neurodegenerative disease, likely through neuroinflammatory mechanisms that can be compounded by an unhealthy diet. Thus, now more than ever, wider access to healthy foods should be a top priority and individuals should be mindful of healthy eating habits to reduce susceptibility to and long-term complications from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diet, Western/statistics & numerical data , Inflammation/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Diet , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/epidemiology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/immunology , Nutritional Status , Obesity/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(5)2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715409

ABSTRACT

We propose a new hypothesis that explains the maintenance and evolution of MHC polymorphism. It is based on two phenomena: the constitution of the repertoire of naive T lymphocytes and the evolution of the pathogen and its impact on the immune memory of T lymphocytes. Concerning the latter, pathogen evolution will have a different impact on reinfection depending on the MHC allomorph. If a mutation occurs in a given region, in the case of MHC allotypes, which do not recognize the peptide in this region, the mutation will have no impact on the memory repertoire. In the case where the MHC allomorph binds to the ancestral peptides and not to the mutated peptide, that individual will have a higher chance of being reinfected. This difference in fitness will lead to a variation of the allele frequency in the next generation. Data from the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic already support a significant part of this hypothesis and following up on these data may enable it to be confirmed. This hypothesis could explain why some individuals after vaccination respond less well than others to variants and leads to predict the probability of reinfection after a first infection depending upon the variant and the HLA allomorph.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , HLA Antigens/immunology , Polymorphism, Genetic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Frequency , HLA Antigens/genetics , HLA Antigens/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Mutation/genetics , Mutation/immunology , Pandemics , Peptides/immunology , Peptides/metabolism , Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
7.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263468, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mass vaccination is the key element in controlling current COVID-19 pandemic. Studies comparing immunogenicity of different COVID-19 vaccines are largely lacking. We aimed at measuring anti-S antibody (Ab) levels in individuals fully vaccinated with BNT162b2, BBIBP-CorV and Gam-COVID-Vac, as well as in COVID-19 convalescents. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, serum was collected from 400 age- and sex-matched participants, 100 fully vaccinated with BNT162b2, 100 with BBIBP-CorV and 100 with Gam-COVID-Vac on the 28th day after the second vaccine dose, and 100 recovered from COVID-19 at least 28 days after symptom(s) resolution. Sera were analyzed using the LIAISON SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG assay (DiaSorin, Saluggia, Italy). Wilcoxon rank-sum or Kruskal-Wallis tests was used for comparison of Ab levels. RESULTS: Highest mean value (210.11, SD = 100.42) was measured in the BNT162b2 group, followed by Gam-COVID-Vac (171.11, SD = 120.69) and BBIBP-CorV (68.50, SD = 72.78) AU/mL (p<0.001). Significant differences in antibody levels were found between BNT162b2 and BBIBP-CorV (p<0.001), BNT162b2 and Gam-COVID-Vac (p = 0.001), as well as BBIBP-CorV and Gam-COVID-Vac groups (p<0.001). Percentage of seropositive was 81% in the convalescent group, 83% in BBIBP-CorV vaccinated and 100% in BNT162b2 and Gam-COVID-Vac. When comparing measured antibody levels in vaccinated to those in COVID-19 recovered, significantly higher antibody levels were found for vaccinated with BNT162b2 (p<0.001), and with Gam-COVID-Vac (p<0.001), while for BBIBP-CorV there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.641). CONCLUSIONS: All three investigated vaccines, BNT162b2, BBIBP-CorV and Gam-COVID-Vac, provide robust immune response 28 days after the second dose of vaccine, in the majority of participants. All individuals vaccinated with BNT162b2 and Gam-COVID-Vac seroconverted, while in vaccinated with BBIBP-CorV and COVID-19 recovered seroconversion rates were lower. Although less potent compared to other two vaccines, immune response after BBIBP-CorV was similar to response measured in convalescents. Challenge still remains to examine dynamics and durability of immunoprotection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Adult , Antibodies/analysis , Antibodies/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Convalescence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serbia , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
8.
Cells ; 11(4)2022 02 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686622

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogenic agent of Coronavirus-Induced Disease-2019 (COVID-19), a multi-organ syndrome which primarily targets the respiratory system. In this review, considering the large amount of data pointing out the role of the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) in the inflammatory response and in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity, we describe some mechanisms that strongly suggest its involvement in the management of COVID-19's inflammatory framework. It regulates both the expression of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-2 (ACE-2) and its stabilizing partner, the Broad neutral Amino acid Transporter 1 (B0AT1). It induces Indolamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO-1), the enzyme which, starting from Tryptophan (Trp), produces Kynurenine (Kyn, Beta-Anthraniloyl-L-Alanine). The accumulation of Kyn and the depletion of Trp arrest T cell growth and induce apoptosis, setting up an immune-tolerant condition, whereas AhR and interferon type I (IFN-I) build a mutual inhibitory loop that also involves NF-kB and limits the innate response. AhR/Kyn binding boosts the production of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), thus reinforcing the inflammatory state and counteracting the IDO-dependent immune tolerance in the later stage of COVID-19. Taken together, these data depict a framework where sufficient clues suggest the possible participation of AhR in the management of COVID-19 inflammation, thus indicating an additional therapeutic target for this disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/metabolism , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/physiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase/metabolism , Inflammation/immunology , Kynurenine/metabolism , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Tryptophan/metabolism
9.
Front Immunol ; 13: 807454, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686483

ABSTRACT

Background: Innate immunity, armed with pattern recognition receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLR), is critical for immune cell activation and the connection to anti-microbial adaptive immunity. However, information regarding the impact of age on the innate immunity in response to SARS-CoV2 adenovirus vector vaccines and its association with specific immune responses remains scarce. Methods: Fifteen subjects between 25-35 years (the young group) and five subjects between 60-70 years (the older adult group) were enrolled before ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AZD1222) vaccination. We determined activation markers and cytokine production of monocyte, natural killer (NK) cells and B cells ex vivo stimulated with TLR agonist (poly (I:C) for TLR3; LPS for TLR4; imiquimod for TLR7; CpG for TLR9) before vaccination and 3-5 days after each jab with flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV2 neutralization antibody titers (surrogate virus neutralization tests, sVNTs) were measured using serum collected 2 months after the first jab and one month after full vaccination. Results: The older adult vaccinees had weaker vaccine-induced sVNTs than young vaccinees after 1st jab (47.2±19.3% vs. 21.2±22.2%, p value<0.05), but this difference became insignificant after the 2nd jab. Imiquimod, LPS and CpG strongly induced CD86 expression in IgD+CD27- naïve and IgD-CD27+ memory B cells in the young group. In contrast, only the IgD+ CD27- naïve B cells responded to these TLR agonists in the older adult group. Imiquimode strongly induced the CD86 expression in CD14+ monocytes in the young group but not in the older adult group. After vaccination, the young group had significantly higher IFN-γ expression in CD3- CD56dim NK cells after the 1st jab, whilst the older adult group had significantly higher IFN-γ and granzyme B expression in CD56bright NK cells after the 2nd jab (all p value <0.05). The IFN-γ expression in CD56dim and CD56bright NK cells after the first vaccination and CD86 expression in CD14+ monocyte and IgD-CD27-double-negative B cells after LPS and imiquimod stimulation correlated with vaccine-induced antibody responses. Conclusions: The innate immune responses after the first vaccination correlated with the neutralizing antibody production. Older people may have defective innate immune responses by TLR stimulation and weak or delayed innate immune activation profile after vaccination compared with young people.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Imiquimod/pharmacology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunosenescence/immunology , Interferon-gamma/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Poly I-C/administration & dosage , Poly I-C/immunology , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Vaccination
10.
Front Immunol ; 13: 780839, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686482

ABSTRACT

Macrophages are essential innate immune cells that contribute to host defense during infection. An important feature of macrophages is their ability to respond to extracellular cues and to adopt different phenotypes and functions in response to these stimuli. The evidence accumulated in the last decade has highlighted the crucial role of metabolic reprogramming during macrophage activation in infectious context. Thus, understanding and manipulation of macrophage immunometabolism during infection could be of interest to develop therapeutic strategies. In this review, we focus on 5 major metabolic pathways including glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid oxidation and synthesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acid metabolism and discuss how they sustain and regulate macrophage immune function in response to parasitic, bacterial and viral infections as well as trained immunity. At the end, we assess whether some drugs including those used in clinic and in development can target macrophage immunometabolism for potential therapy during infection with an emphasis on SARS-CoV2 infection.


Subject(s)
Infections/immunology , Infections/metabolism , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Cells ; 11(3)2022 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674518

ABSTRACT

This review is a comprehensive analysis of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on Unconventional T cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). COVID-19 affected patients show dysregulation of their adaptive immune systems, but many questions remain unsolved on the behavior of Unconventional cells and ILCs during infection, considering their role in maintaining homeostasis in tissue. Therefore, we highlight the differences that exist among the studies in cohorts of patients who in general were categorized considering symptoms and hospitalization. Moreover, we make a critical analysis of the presence of particular clusters of cells that express activation and exhausted markers for each group in order to bring out potential diagnostic factors unconsidered before now. We also focus our attention on studies that take into consideration recovered patients. Indeed, it could be useful to determine Unconventional T cells' and ILCs' frequencies and functions in longitudinal studies because it could represent a way to monitor the immune status of SARS-CoV-2-infected subjects. Possible changes in cell frequencies or activation profiles could be potentially useful as prognostic biomarkers and for future therapy. Currently, there are no efficacious therapies for SARS-CoV-2 infection, but deep studies on involvement of Unconventional T cells and ILCs in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 could be promising for targeted therapies.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Homeostasis/immunology , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Front Immunol ; 12: 816745, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662588

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 patients show heterogeneous and dynamic immune features which determine the clinical outcome. Here, we built a single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) dataset for dissecting these complicated immune responses through a longitudinal survey of COVID-19 patients with various categories of outcomes. The data reveals a highly fluctuating peripheral immune landscape in severe COVID-19, whereas the one in asymptomatic/mild COVID-19 is relatively steady. Then, the perturbed immune landscape in peripheral blood returned to normal state in those recovered from severe COVID-19. Importantly, the imbalance of the excessively strong innate immune response and delayed adaptive immunity in the early stage of viral infection accelerates the progression of the disease, indicated by a transient strong IFN response and weak T/B-cell specific response. The proportion of abnormal monocytes appeared early and rose further throughout the severe disease. Our data indicate that a dynamic immune landscape is associated with the progression and recovery of severe COVID-19, and have provided multiple immune biomarkers for early warning of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferons/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
13.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 440, 2022 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1641960

ABSTRACT

Dysregulated immune responses against the SARS-CoV-2 virus are instrumental in severe COVID-19. However, the immune signatures associated with immunopathology are poorly understood. Here we use multi-omics single-cell analysis to probe the dynamic immune responses in hospitalized patients with stable or progressive course of COVID-19, explore V(D)J repertoires, and assess the cellular effects of tocilizumab. Coordinated profiling of gene expression and cell lineage protein markers shows that S100Ahi/HLA-DRlo classical monocytes and activated LAG-3hi T cells are hallmarks of progressive disease and highlights the abnormal MHC-II/LAG-3 interaction on myeloid and T cells, respectively. We also find skewed T cell receptor repertories in expanded effector CD8+ clones, unmutated IGHG+ B cell clones, and mutated B cell clones with stable somatic hypermutation frequency over time. In conclusion, our in-depth immune profiling reveals dyssynchrony of the innate and adaptive immune interaction in progressive COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Cells, Cultured , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Male , RNA-Seq/methods , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 767726, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639598

ABSTRACT

Infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has generated a public health crisis worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection and virus-host interactions are still unclear. In this study, we identified four unique microRNA-like small RNAs encoded by SARS-CoV-2. SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-1-3p and SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p play an important role in evasion of type I interferon response through targeting several genes in type I interferon signaling pathway. Particularly worth mentioning is that highly expressed SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p inhibits some key genes in the host innate immune response, such as IRF7, IRF9, STAT2, OAS1, and OAS2. SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p has also been found to mediate allelic differential expression of COVID-19-susceptible gene OAS1. In conclusion, these results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 uses its miRNAs to evade the type I interferon response and links the functional viral sequence to the susceptible genetic background of the host.


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , STAT2 Transcription Factor/genetics
15.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625756

ABSTRACT

Bats are reservoirs of a large number of viruses of global public health significance, including the ancestral virus for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although bats are natural carriers of multiple pathogenic viruses, they rarely display signs of disease. Recent insights suggest that bats have a more balanced host defense and tolerance system to viral infections that may be linked to the evolutionary adaptation to powered flight. Therefore, a deeper understanding of bat immune system may provide intervention strategies to prevent zoonotic disease transmission and to identify new therapeutic targets. Similar to other eutherian mammals, bats have both innate and adaptive immune systems that have evolved to detect and respond to invading pathogens. Bridging these two systems are innate lymphocytes, which are highly abundant within circulation and barrier tissues. These cells share the characteristics of both innate and adaptive immune cells and are poised to mount rapid effector responses. They are ideally suited as the first line of defense against early stages of viral infections. Here, we will focus on the current knowledge of innate lymphocytes in bats, their function, and their potential role in host-pathogen interactions. Moreover, given that studies into bat immune systems are often hindered by a lack of bat-specific research tools, we will discuss strategies that may aid future research in bat immunity, including the potential use of organoid models to delineate the interplay between innate lymphocytes, bat viruses, and host tolerance.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Animals , Chiroptera/virology , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/transmission , Viruses/pathogenicity
16.
Immunohorizons ; 6(1): 1-7, 2022 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625744

ABSTRACT

The perpetuation of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has permitted the continued evolution of mutations, many of which appear to promote infectivity, transmission, and immune evasion. Critically, several derivative lineages defined as variants of concern (VOCs) and variants of interest (VOIs) have emerged in the last year that possess a constellation of highly adaptive mutations that have resulted in unprecedented propagation. To better understand the significance of these mutations, we analyzed their molecular and immunological consequences against the immunogenetic profile of the United States population using immunoinformatics to analyze in silico data. Our findings indicate that several evolving mutations in the VOCs and VOIs appear to confer immune evasion properties leading to antigenic drift, specifically for Ab-mediated and Th cell-mediated immune recognition, whereas mutations leading to evasion from innate immune mechanisms are less common in the more successful VOC strains compared with the VOIs. Importantly, several of these mutations raise concerns for the effectiveness of anamnestic responses achieved through natural infection and vaccination as well as for the utility of Ab-based therapeutic interventions. The emergence of such adaptations underscores the need for vaccine enhancements as well as the continued need to for preventative hygiene measures to help minimize transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Evasion/immunology , Immunogenetic Phenomena/physiology , Mutation/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , United States , Vaccination/methods
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 785355, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594099

ABSTRACT

The lungs are constantly exposed to non-sterile air which carries harmful threats, such as particles and pathogens. Nonetheless, this organ is equipped with fast and efficient mechanisms to eliminate these threats from the airways as well as prevent pathogen invasion. The respiratory tract is densely innervated by sensory neurons, also known as nociceptors, which are responsible for the detection of external stimuli and initiation of physiological and immunological responses. Furthermore, expression of functional innate receptors by nociceptors have been reported; however, the influence of these receptors to the lung function and local immune response is poorly described. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the importance of coordinated and competent pulmonary immunity for the prevention of pathogen spread as well as prevention of excessive tissue injury. New findings suggest that lung nociceptors can be a target of SARS-CoV-2 infection; what remains unclear is whether innate receptor trigger sensory neuron activation during SARS-CoV-2 infection and what is the relevance for the outcomes. Moreover, elderly individuals often present with respiratory, neurological and immunological dysfunction. Whether aging in the context of sensory nerve function and innate receptors contributes to the disorders of these systems is currently unknown. Here we discuss the expression of innate receptors by nociceptors, particularly in the lungs, and the possible impact of their activation on pulmonary immunity. We then demonstrate recent evidence that suggests lung sensory neurons as reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 and possible viral recognition via innate receptors. Lastly, we explore the mechanisms by which lung nociceptors might contribute to disturbance in respiratory and immunological responses during the aging process.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Lung/immunology , Nociceptors/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transient Receptor Potential Channels/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Lung/innervation , Lung/virology , Nociceptors/metabolism , Nociceptors/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sensory Receptor Cells/immunology , Sensory Receptor Cells/metabolism , Sensory Receptor Cells/virology , Transient Receptor Potential Channels/metabolism
18.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001065, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594053

ABSTRACT

The pandemic spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), represents an ongoing international health crisis. A key symptom of SARS-CoV-2 infection is the onset of fever, with a hyperthermic temperature range of 38 to 41°C. Fever is an evolutionarily conserved host response to microbial infection that can influence the outcome of viral pathogenicity and regulation of host innate and adaptive immune responses. However, it remains to be determined what effect elevated temperature has on SARS-CoV-2 replication. Utilizing a three-dimensional (3D) air-liquid interface (ALI) model that closely mimics the natural tissue physiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the respiratory airway, we identify tissue temperature to play an important role in the regulation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Respiratory tissue incubated at 40°C remained permissive to SARS-CoV-2 entry but refractory to viral transcription, leading to significantly reduced levels of viral RNA replication and apical shedding of infectious virus. We identify tissue temperature to play an important role in the differential regulation of epithelial host responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection that impact upon multiple pathways, including intracellular immune regulation, without disruption to general transcription or epithelium integrity. We present the first evidence that febrile temperatures associated with COVID-19 inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in respiratory epithelia. Our data identify an important role for tissue temperature in the epithelial restriction of SARS-CoV-2 independently of canonical interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral immune defenses.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/immunology , Hot Temperature , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology , Adolescent , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , RNA-Seq/methods , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tissue Culture Techniques , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology
19.
Nature ; 602(7897): 487-495, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585830

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern suggests viral adaptation to enhance human-to-human transmission1,2. Although much effort has focused on the characterization of changes in the spike protein in variants of concern, mutations outside of spike are likely to contribute to adaptation. Here, using unbiased abundance proteomics, phosphoproteomics, RNA sequencing and viral replication assays, we show that isolates of the Alpha (B.1.1.7) variant3 suppress innate immune responses in airway epithelial cells more effectively than first-wave isolates. We found that the Alpha variant has markedly increased subgenomic RNA and protein levels of the nucleocapsid protein (N), Orf9b and Orf6-all known innate immune antagonists. Expression of Orf9b alone suppressed the innate immune response through interaction with TOM70, a mitochondrial protein that is required for activation of the RNA-sensing adaptor MAVS. Moreover, the activity of Orf9b and its association with TOM70 was regulated by phosphorylation. We propose that more effective innate immune suppression, through enhanced expression of specific viral antagonist proteins, increases the likelihood of successful transmission of the Alpha variant, and may increase in vivo replication and duration of infection4. The importance of mutations outside the spike coding region in the adaptation of SARS-CoV-2 to humans is underscored by the observation that similar mutations exist in the N and Orf9b regulatory regions of the Delta and Omicron variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Mitochondrial Precursor Protein Import Complex Proteins/metabolism , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Proteomics , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development
20.
Int Immunol ; 33(10): 507-513, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575069

ABSTRACT

Understanding the precise nature and durability of protective immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is essential in order to gain insight into the pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to develop novel treatment strategies to this disease. Here, I succinctly summarize what is currently known and unknown about the immune response during COVID-19 and discuss whether natural infections can lead to herd immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Herd/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Animals , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
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