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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(6)2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760651

ABSTRACT

PDCoV is an emerging enteropathogenic coronavirus that mainly causes acute diarrhea in piglets, seriously affecting pig breeding industries worldwide. To date, the molecular mechanisms of PDCoV-induced immune and inflammatory responses or host responses in LLC-PK cells in vitro are not well understood. HSP90 plays important roles in various viral infections. In this study, HSP90AB1 knockout cells (HSP90AB1KO) were constructed and a comparative transcriptomic analysis between PDCoV-infected HSP90AB1WT and HSP90AB1KO cells was conducted using RNA sequencing to explore the effect of HSP90AB1 on PDCoV infection. A total of 1295 and 3746 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in PDCoV-infected HSP90AB1WT and HSP90AB1KO cells, respectively. Moreover, most of the significantly enriched pathways were related to immune and inflammatory response-associated pathways upon PDCoV infection. The DEGs enriched in NF-κB pathways were specifically detected in HSP90AB1WT cells, and NF-κB inhibitors JSH-23, SC75741 and QNZ treatment reduced PDCoV infection. Further research revealed most cytokines associated with immune and inflammatory responses were upregulated during PDCoV infection. Knockout of HSP90AB1 altered the upregulated levels of some cytokines. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into the host response to PDCoV infection from the transcriptome perspective, which will contribute to illustrating the molecular basis of the interaction between PDCoV and HSP90AB1.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Deltacoronavirus , Gene Expression Profiling , HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Immunity/genetics , Swine Diseases/etiology , Transcriptome , Animals , Computational Biology/methods , Disease Susceptibility , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Gene Ontology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Swine
2.
Cell Death Dis ; 13(2): 137, 2022 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683990

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is triggered by various aetiological factors such as trauma, sepsis and respiratory viruses including SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A virus. Immune profiling of severe COVID-19 patients has identified a complex pattern of cytokines including granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-5, which are significant mediators of viral-induced hyperinflammation. This strong response has prompted the development of therapies that block GM-CSF and other cytokines individually to limit inflammation related pathology. The common cytokine binding site of the human common beta (ßc) receptor signals for three inflammatory cytokines: GM-CSF, IL-5 and IL-3. In this study, ßc was targeted with the monoclonal antibody (mAb) CSL311 in engineered mice devoid of mouse ßc and ßIL-3 and expressing human ßc (hßcTg mice). Direct pulmonary administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused ARDS-like lung injury, and CSL311 markedly reduced lung inflammation and oedema, resulting in improved oxygen saturation levels in hßcTg mice. In a separate model, influenza (HKx31) lung infection caused viral pneumonia associated with a large influx of myeloid cells into the lungs of hßcTg mice. The therapeutic application of CSL311 potently decreased accumulation of monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils without altering lung viral loads. Furthermore, CSL311 treatment did not limit the viral-induced expansion of NK and NKT cells, or the tissue expression of type I/II/III interferons needed for efficient viral clearance. Simultaneously blocking GM-CSF, IL-5 and IL-3 signalling with CSL311 may represent an improved and clinically applicable strategy to reducing hyperinflammation in the ARDS setting.


Subject(s)
Cytokine Receptor Common beta Subunit/genetics , Cytokine Receptor Common beta Subunit/physiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Cytokine Receptor Common beta Subunit/immunology , Cytokines , Eosinophils/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Immunity/physiology , Inflammation/immunology , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Neutrophils/metabolism , Receptors, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor , Receptors, Interleukin-3 , Receptors, Interleukin-5 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology
3.
Cells ; 11(3)2022 01 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667057

ABSTRACT

The global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is still ongoing, as is research on the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular infection by coronaviruses, with the hope of developing therapeutic agents against this pandemic. Other important respiratory viruses such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 and H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV), influenza A viruses, are also responsible for a possible outbreak due to their respiratory susceptibility. However, the interaction of these viruses with host cells and the regulation of post-transcriptional genes remains unclear. In this study, we detected and analyzed the comparative transcriptome profiling of SARS-CoV-2, panH1N1 (A/California/07/2009), and H7N9 (A/Shanghai/1/2013) infected cells. The results showed that the commonly upregulated genes among the three groups were mainly involved in autophagy, pertussis, and tuberculosis, which indicated that autophagy plays an important role in viral pathogenicity. There are three groups of commonly downregulated genes involved in metabolic pathways. Notably, unlike panH1N1 and H7N9, SARS-CoV-2 infection can inhibit the m-TOR pathway and activate the p53 signaling pathway, which may be responsible for unique autophagy induction and cell apoptosis. Particularly, upregulated expression of IRF1 was found in SARS-CoV-2, panH1N1, and H7N9 infection. Further analysis showed SARS-CoV-2, panH1N1, and H7N9 infection-induced upregulation of lncRNA-34087.27 could serve as a competitive endogenous RNA to stabilize IRF1 mRNA by competitively binding with miR-302b-3p. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of influenza A virus and SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , RNA/immunology , Transcriptome/immunology , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/physiology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , MicroRNAs/immunology , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/immunology , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA-Seq/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Transcriptome/genetics
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 807134, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604257

ABSTRACT

ORF8 is a viral immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain protein encoded by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA genome. It tends to evolve rapidly and interfere with immune responses. However, the structural characteristics of various coronavirus ORF8 proteins and their subsequent effects on biological functions remain unclear. Herein, we determined the crystal structures of SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 (S84) (one of the epidemic isoforms) and the bat coronavirus RaTG13 ORF8 variant at 1.62 Å and 1.76 Å resolution, respectively. Comparison of these ORF8 proteins demonstrates that the 62-77 residues in Ig-like domain of coronavirus ORF8 adopt different conformations. Combined with mutagenesis assays, the residue Cys20 of ORF8 is responsible for forming the covalent disulfide-linked dimer in crystal packing and in vitro biochemical conditions. Furthermore, immune cell-binding assays indicate that various ORF8 (SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 (L84), ORF8 (S84), and RaTG13 ORF8) proteins have different interaction capabilities with human CD14+ monocytes in human peripheral blood. These results provide new insights into the specific characteristics of various coronavirus ORF8 and suggest that ORF8 variants may influence disease-related immune responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Chiroptera/immunology , Immunity/immunology , Immunoglobulin Domains/immunology , Viral Proteins/immunology , Animals , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chiroptera/genetics , Chiroptera/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Immunoglobulin Domains/genetics , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/immunology , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Mutation , Protein Binding , Species Specificity , Viral Proteins/classification , Viral Proteins/genetics
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 789317, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593957

ABSTRACT

Background: The recent emergence of COVID-19, rapid worldwide spread, and incomplete knowledge of molecular mechanisms underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection have limited development of therapeutic strategies. Our objective was to systematically investigate molecular regulatory mechanisms of COVID-19, using a combination of high throughput RNA-sequencing-based transcriptomics and systems biology approaches. Methods: RNA-Seq data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy persons, mild and severe 17 COVID-19 patients were analyzed to generate a gene expression matrix. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was used to identify co-expression modules in healthy samples as a reference set. For differential co-expression network analysis, module preservation and module-trait relationships approaches were used to identify key modules. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, based on co-expressed hub genes, were constructed to identify hub genes/TFs with the highest information transfer (hub-high traffic genes) within candidate modules. Results: Based on differential co-expression network analysis, connectivity patterns and network density, 72% (15 of 21) of modules identified in healthy samples were altered by SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, SARS-CoV-2 caused systemic perturbations in host biological gene networks. In functional enrichment analysis, among 15 non-preserved modules and two significant highly-correlated modules (identified by MTRs), 9 modules were directly related to the host immune response and COVID-19 immunopathogenesis. Intriguingly, systemic investigation of SARS-CoV-2 infection identified signaling pathways and key genes/proteins associated with COVID-19's main hallmarks, e.g., cytokine storm, respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute lung injury (ALI), lymphopenia, coagulation disorders, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications, as well as comorbidities associated with COVID-19, e.g., asthma, diabetic complications, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), liver disorders and acute kidney injury (AKI). Topological analysis with betweenness centrality (BC) identified 290 hub-high traffic genes, central in both co-expression and PPI networks. We also identified several transcriptional regulatory factors, including NFKB1, HIF1A, AHR, and TP53, with important immunoregulatory roles in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Moreover, several hub-high traffic genes, including IL6, IL1B, IL10, TNF, SOCS1, SOCS3, ICAM1, PTEN, RHOA, GDI2, SUMO1, CASP1, IRAK3, HSPA5, ADRB2, PRF1, GZMB, OASL, CCL5, HSP90AA1, HSPD1, IFNG, MAPK1, RAB5A, and TNFRSF1A had the highest rates of information transfer in 9 candidate modules and central roles in COVID-19 immunopathogenesis. Conclusion: This study provides comprehensive information on molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2-host interactions and identifies several hub-high traffic genes as promising therapeutic targets for the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Signal Transduction/genetics , Transcription Factors/genetics , Transcriptome/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cluster Analysis , Gene Ontology , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Models, Genetic , Pandemics , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 724936, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592205

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an urgent situation throughout the globe. Therefore, it is necessary to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in COVID-19 patients to understand disease pathogenesis and the genetic factor(s) responsible for inter-individual variability. The DEGs will help understand the disease's potential underlying molecular mechanisms and genetic characteristics, including the regulatory genes associated with immune response elements and protective immunity. This study aimed to determine the DEGs in mild and severe COVID-19 patients versus healthy controls. The Agilent-085982 Arraystar human lncRNA V5 microarray GEO dataset (GSE164805 dataset) was used for this study. We used statistical tools to identify the DEGs. Our 15 human samples dataset was divided into three groups: mild, severe COVID-19 patients and healthy control volunteers. We compared our result with three other published gene expression studies of COVID-19 patients. Along with significant DEGs, we developed an interactome map, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) pattern, a cluster analysis of the PPI network, and pathway enrichment analysis. We also performed the same analyses with the top-ranked genes from the three other COVID-19 gene expression studies. We also identified differentially expressed lncRNA genes and constructed protein-coding DEG-lncRNA co-expression networks. We attempted to identify the regulatory genes related to immune response elements and protective immunity. We prioritized the most significant 29 protein-coding DEGs. Our analyses showed that several DEGs were involved in forming interactome maps, PPI networks, and cluster formation, similar to the results obtained using data from the protein-coding genes from other investigations. Interestingly we found six lncRNAs (TALAM1, DLEU2, and UICLM CASC18, SNHG20, and GNAS) involved in the protein-coding DEG-lncRNA network; which might be served as potential biomarkers for COVID-19 patients. We also identified three regulatory genes from our study and 44 regulatory genes from the other investigations related to immune response elements and protective immunity. We were able to map the regulatory genes associated with immune elements and identify the virogenomic responses involved in protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 infection during COVID-19 development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Gene Expression Regulation , Immunity/genetics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Gene Ontology , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Protein Interaction Maps/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology
7.
Infect Genet Evol ; 98: 105207, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590809

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) acts as a key receptor for the spike of SARS-CoV-2. Two main microRNAs (miRs), miR-200c-3p and miR-421-5p, are considered to modulate the expression of ACE2 gene and alterations in the expression of these miRNAs may influence the outcomes of COVID-19 infection. Accordingly, we examined whether miRNAs directing ACE2 expression altered in the SARS-CoV-2 infection. 30 patients with COVID-19 included in the study. At the time of admission and discharge, the expression of miR-200c-3p and miR-421-5p, inflammatory cytokine IL-6, and regulatory T cells' expression profiles (CD4, CD25, and Foxp3) were examined using quantitative real-time PCR method. At the time of admission, the expression levels of miR-200c-3p and miR-421-5p as well as CD4, CD25, and Foxp3 significantly decreased while IL-6 expression notably enhanced. However, by the time of discharge, the expression levels of the genes were opposite to the time of admission. Moreover, Pearson correlation analysis indicated that IL-6 expression negatively correlated with Foxp3 and miR-200c-3p expressions despite miR-421-5p and miR-200c-3p positively correlated at admission time. By manipulating miR-200c-3p and miR-421-5p expressions and controlling the ACE2 level, it is plausible to modulate the inflammation by reducing IL-6 and maintenance tolerance hemostasis during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged
8.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580414

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a severe global pandemic. Mice models are essential to investigate infection pathology, antiviral drugs, and vaccine development. However, wild-type mice lack the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) that mediates SARS-CoV-2 entry into human cells and consequently are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. hACE2 transgenic mice could provide an efficient COVID-19 model, but are not always readily available, and practically restricted to specific strains. Therefore, there is a dearth of additional mouse models for SARS-CoV-2 infection. We applied lentiviral vectors to generate hACE2 expression in interferon receptor knock-out (IFNAR1-/-) mice. Lenti-hACE2 transduction supported SARS-CoV-2 replication in vivo, simulating mild acute lung disease. Gene expression analysis revealed two modes of immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection: one in response to the exposure of mouse lungs to SARS-CoV-2 particles in the absence of productive viral replication, and the second in response to productive SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our results infer that immune response to immunogenic elements on incoming virus or in productively infected cells stimulate diverse immune effectors, even in absence of type I IFN signaling. Our findings should contribute to a better understanding of the immune response triggered by SARS-CoV-2 and to further elucidate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Lentivirus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , Transduction, Genetic , Virus Replication
9.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(16): 3788-3793, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512989

ABSTRACT

As the world is racing to develop perpetual immunity to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The emergence of new viral strains, together with vaccination and reinfections, are all contributing to a long-term immunity against the deadly virus that has taken over the world since its introduction to humans in late December 2019. The discovery that more than 95 percent of people who recovered from COVID-19 had long-lasting immunity and that asymptomatic people have a different immune response to SARS-CoV-2 than symptomatic people has shifted attention to how our immune system initiates such diverse responses. These findings have provided reason to believe that SARS-CoV-2 days are numbered. Hundreds of research papers have been published on the causes of long-lasting immune responses and variations in the numbers of different immune cell types in COVID 19 survivors, but the main reason of these differences has still not been adequately identified. In this article, we focus on the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which initiates molecular processes that allow our immune system to generate antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. To establish lasting immunity to SARS-CoV-2, we suggest that AID could be the key to unlocking it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytidine Deaminase/genetics , Immunity/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytidine/genetics , Cytidine/immunology , Cytidine Deaminase/immunology , Deamination/immunology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 712722, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394761

ABSTRACT

The activating immune receptor natural killer group member D (NKG2D) and its cognate ligands represent a fundamental surveillance system of cellular distress, damage or transformation. Signaling through the NKG2D receptor-ligand axis is critical for early detection of viral infection or oncogenic transformation and the presence of functional NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L) is associated with tumor rejection and viral clearance. Many viruses and tumors have developed mechanisms to evade NKG2D recognition via transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational interference with NKG2D-L, supporting the concept that circumventing immune evasion of the NKG2D receptor-ligand axis may be an attractive therapeutic avenue for antiviral therapy or cancer immunotherapy. To date, the complexity of the NKG2D receptor-ligand axis and the lack of specificity of current NKG2D-targeting therapies has not allowed for the precise manipulation required to optimally harness NKG2D-mediated immunity. However, with the discovery of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, novel opportunities have arisen in the realm of locus-specific gene editing and regulation. Here, we give a brief overview of the NKG2D receptor-ligand axis in humans and discuss the levels at which NKG2D-L are regulated and dysregulated during viral infection and oncogenesis. Moreover, we explore the potential for CRISPR-based technologies to provide novel therapeutic avenues to improve and maximize NKG2D-mediated immunity.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , Gene Editing , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily K/genetics , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily K/metabolism , Disease Resistance , Disease Susceptibility , Epigenesis, Genetic , Gene Editing/methods , Genetic Therapy , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Ligands , Neoplasms/etiology , Protein Binding , Virus Diseases/etiology
11.
Immunity ; 54(4): 753-768.e5, 2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385739

ABSTRACT

Viral infections induce a conserved host response distinct from bacterial infections. We hypothesized that the conserved response is associated with disease severity and is distinct between patients with different outcomes. To test this, we integrated 4,780 blood transcriptome profiles from patients aged 0 to 90 years infected with one of 16 viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, Ebola, chikungunya, and influenza, across 34 cohorts from 18 countries, and single-cell RNA sequencing profiles of 702,970 immune cells from 289 samples across three cohorts. Severe viral infection was associated with increased hematopoiesis, myelopoiesis, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We identified protective and detrimental gene modules that defined distinct trajectories associated with mild versus severe outcomes. The interferon response was decoupled from the protective host response in patients with severe outcomes. These findings were consistent, irrespective of age and virus, and provide insights to accelerate the development of diagnostics and host-directed therapies to improve global pandemic preparedness.


Subject(s)
Immunity/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Antigen Presentation/genetics , Cohort Studies , Hematopoiesis/genetics , Humans , Interferons/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/pathology , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index , Systems Biology , Transcriptome , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/classification , Virus Diseases/genetics , Viruses/classification , Viruses/pathogenicity
12.
Expert Rev Mol Med ; 23: e7, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338496

ABSTRACT

Recent epidemiological studies analysing sex-disaggregated patient data of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across the world revealed a distinct sex bias in the disease morbidity as well as the mortality - both being higher for the men. Similar antecedents have been known for the previous viral infections, including from coronaviruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and middle-east respiratory syndrome (MERS). A sound understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to the biological sex bias in the survival outcomes of the patients in relation to COVID-19 will act as an essential requisite for developing a sex-differentiated approach for therapeutic management of this disease. Recent studies which have explored molecular mechanism(s) behind sex-based differences in COVID-19 pathogenesis are scarce; however, existing evidence, for other respiratory viral infections, viz. SARS, MERS and influenza, provides important clues in this regard. In attempt to consolidate the available knowledge on this issue, we conducted a systematic review of the existing empirical knowledge and recent experimental studies following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The qualitative analysis of the collected data unravelled multiple molecular mechanisms, such as evolutionary and genetic/epigenetic factors, sex-linkage of viral host cell entry receptor and immune response genes, sex hormone and gut microbiome-mediated immune-modulation, as the possible key reasons for the sex-based differences in patient outcomes in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Immunity/genetics , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Epigenesis, Genetic , Female , Humans , Male , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Sex Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
Genome Med ; 13(1): 118, 2021 07 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318291

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, has been associated with neurological and neuropsychiatric illness in many individuals. We sought to further our understanding of the relationship between brain tropism, neuro-inflammation, and host immune response in acute COVID-19 cases. METHODS: Three brain regions (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medulla oblongata, and choroid plexus) from 5 patients with severe COVID-19 and 4 controls were examined. The presence of the virus was assessed by western blot against viral spike protein, as well as viral transcriptome analysis covering > 99% of SARS-CoV-2 genome and all potential serotypes. Droplet-based single-nucleus RNA sequencing (snRNA-seq) was performed in the same samples to examine the impact of COVID-19 on transcription in individual cells of the brain. RESULTS: Quantification of viral spike S1 protein and viral transcripts did not detect SARS-CoV-2 in the postmortem brain tissue. However, analysis of 68,557 single-nucleus transcriptomes from three distinct regions of the brain identified an increased proportion of stromal cells, monocytes, and macrophages in the choroid plexus of COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, differential gene expression, pseudo-temporal trajectory, and gene regulatory network analyses revealed transcriptional changes in the cortical microglia associated with a range of biological processes, including cellular activation, mobility, and phagocytosis. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the absence of detectable SARS-CoV-2 in the brain at the time of death, the findings suggest significant and persistent neuroinflammation in patients with acute COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Immunity/genetics , Immunity/immunology , Transcriptome , Choroid Plexus/metabolism , Gene Expression , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Inflammation , Microglia , Prefrontal Cortex/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 595150, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311373

ABSTRACT

As one of the current global health conundrums, COVID-19 pandemic caused a dramatic increase of cases exceeding 79 million and 1.7 million deaths worldwide. Severe presentation of COVID-19 is characterized by cytokine storm and chronic inflammation resulting in multi-organ dysfunction. Currently, it is unclear whether extrapulmonary tissues contribute to the cytokine storm mediated-disease exacerbation. In this study, we applied systems immunology analysis to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in lung, liver, kidney, and heart tissues and the potential contribution of these tissues to cytokines production. Notably, genes associated with neutrophil-mediated immune response (e.g. CXCL1) were particularly upregulated in lung, whereas genes associated with eosinophil-mediated immune response (e.g. CCL11) were particularly upregulated in heart tissue. In contrast, immune responses mediated by monocytes, dendritic cells, T-cells and B-cells were almost similarly dysregulated in all tissue types. Focused analysis of 14 cytokines classically upregulated in COVID-19 patients revealed that only some of these cytokines are dysregulated in lung tissue, whereas the other cytokines are upregulated in extrapulmonary tissues (e.g. IL6 and IL2RA). Investigations of potential mechanisms by which SARS-CoV-2 modulates the immune response and cytokine production revealed a marked dysregulation of NF-κB signaling particularly CBM complex and the NF-κB inhibitor BCL3. Moreover, overexpression of mucin family genes (e.g. MUC3A, MUC4, MUC5B, MUC16, and MUC17) and HSP90AB1 suggest that the exacerbated inflammation activated pulmonary and extrapulmonary tissues remodeling. In addition, we identified multiple sets of immune response associated genes upregulated in a tissue-specific manner (DCLRE1C, CHI3L1, and PARP14 in lung; APOA4, NFASC, WIPF3, and CD34 in liver; LILRA5, ISG20, S100A12, and HLX in kidney; and ASS1 and PTPN1 in heart). Altogether, these findings suggest that the cytokines storm triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection is potentially the result of dysregulated cytokine production by inflamed pulmonary and extrapulmonary (e.g. liver, kidney, and heart) tissues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Kidney/immunology , Liver/immunology , Lung/immunology , Myocardium/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Monocytes/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Transcriptome , Up-Regulation/genetics
15.
Cell ; 184(15): 3915-3935.e21, 2021 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283262

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence indicates a fundamental role for the epigenome in immunity. Here, we mapped the epigenomic and transcriptional landscape of immunity to influenza vaccination in humans at the single-cell level. Vaccination against seasonal influenza induced persistently diminished H3K27ac in monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs), which was associated with impaired cytokine responses to Toll-like receptor stimulation. Single-cell ATAC-seq analysis revealed an epigenomically distinct subcluster of monocytes with reduced chromatin accessibility at AP-1-targeted loci after vaccination. Similar effects were observed in response to vaccination with the AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 pandemic influenza vaccine. However, this vaccine also stimulated persistently increased chromatin accessibility at interferon response factor (IRF) loci in monocytes and mDCs. This was associated with elevated expression of antiviral genes and heightened resistance to the unrelated Zika and Dengue viruses. These results demonstrate that vaccination stimulates persistent epigenomic remodeling of the innate immune system and reveal AS03's potential as an epigenetic adjuvant.


Subject(s)
Epigenomics , Immunity/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/genetics , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcription, Genetic , Vaccination , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antigens, CD34/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cellular Reprogramming , Chromatin/metabolism , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Drug Combinations , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/drug effects , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Male , Myeloid Cells/metabolism , Polysorbates/pharmacology , Squalene/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Transcription Factor AP-1/metabolism , Transcriptome/genetics , Young Adult , alpha-Tocopherol/pharmacology
16.
Nature ; 596(7872): 417-422, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287811

ABSTRACT

Although two-dose mRNA vaccination provides excellent protection against SARS-CoV-2, there is little information about vaccine efficacy against variants of concern (VOC) in individuals above eighty years of age1. Here we analysed immune responses following vaccination with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine2 in elderly participants and younger healthcare workers. Serum neutralization and levels of binding IgG or IgA after the first vaccine dose were lower in older individuals, with a marked drop in participants over eighty years old. Sera from participants above eighty showed lower neutralization potency against the B.1.1.7 (Alpha), B.1.351 (Beta) and P.1. (Gamma) VOC than against the wild-type virus and were more likely to lack any neutralization against VOC following the first dose. However, following the second dose, neutralization against VOC was detectable regardless of age. The frequency of SARS-CoV-2 spike-specific memory B cells was higher in elderly responders (whose serum showed neutralization activity) than in non-responders after the first dose. Elderly participants showed a clear reduction in somatic hypermutation of class-switched cells. The production of interferon-γ and interleukin-2 by SARS-CoV-2 spike-specific T cells was lower in older participants, and both cytokines were secreted primarily by CD4 T cells. We conclude that the elderly are a high-risk population and that specific measures to boost vaccine responses in this population are warranted, particularly where variants of concern are circulating.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Autoantibodies/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Immunization, Secondary , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-2/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
17.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 72: 116-125, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228006

ABSTRACT

Population genetic studies have clearly indicated that immunity and host defense are among the functions most frequently subject to natural selection, and increased our understanding of the biological relevance of the corresponding genes and their contribution to variable immune traits and diseases. Herein, we will focus on some recently studied forms of human adaptation to infectious agents, including hybridization with now-extinct hominins, such as Neanderthals and Denisovans, and admixture between modern human populations. These studies, which are partly enabled by the technological advances in the sequencing of DNA from ancient remains, provide new insight into the sources of immune response variation in contemporary humans, such as the recently reported link between Neanderthal heritage and susceptibility to severe COVID-19 disease. Furthermore, ancient DNA analyses, in both humans and pathogens, allow to measure the action of natural selection on immune genes across time and to reconstruct the impact of past epidemics on the evolution of human immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Evolution, Molecular , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetics, Population , Genomics , Hominidae , Humans
18.
FEBS J ; 288(17): 5021-5041, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221577

ABSTRACT

Inborn errors of immunity (IEIs) are a group of genetically defined disorders leading to defective immunity. Some IEIs have been linked to mutations of immune receptors or signaling molecules, resulting in defective signaling of respective cascades essential for combating specific pathogens. However, it remains incompletely understood why in selected IEIs, such as X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP-2), hypo-immune response to specific pathogens results in persistent inflammation. Moreover, mechanisms underlying the generation of anticytokine autoantibodies are mostly unknown. Recently, IEIs have been associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), with a small proportion of patients that contract severe COVID-19 displaying loss-of-function mutations in genes associated with type I interferons (IFNs). Moreover, approximately 10% of patients with severe COVID-19 possess anti-type I IFN-neutralizing autoantibodies. Apart from IEIs that impair immune responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), SARS-CoV-2 encodes several proteins that suppress early type I IFN production. One primary consequence of the lack of type I IFNs during early SARS-CoV-2 infection is the increased inflammation associated with COVID-19. In XLP-2, resolution of inflammation rescued experimental subjects from infection-induced mortality. Recent studies also indicate that targeting inflammation could alleviate COVID-19. In this review, we discuss infection-induced inflammation in IEIs, using XLP-2 and COVID-19 as examples. We suggest that resolving inflammation may represent an effective therapeutic approach to these diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , Metabolism, Inborn Errors/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Metabolism, Inborn Errors/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Diseases/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology
19.
Arch Virol ; 166(8): 2089-2108, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209235

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has become one of the most serious health concerns globally. Although multiple vaccines have recently been approved for the prevention of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an effective treatment is still lacking. Our knowledge of the pathogenicity of this virus is still incomplete. Studies have revealed that viral factors such as the viral load, duration of exposure to the virus, and viral mutations are important variables in COVID-19 outcome. Furthermore, host factors, including age, health condition, co-morbidities, and genetic background, might also be involved in clinical manifestations and infection outcome. This review focuses on the importance of variations in the host genetic background and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2. We will discuss the significance of polymorphisms in the ACE-2, TMPRSS2, vitamin D receptor, vitamin D binding protein, CD147, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4), neuropilin-1, heme oxygenase, apolipoprotein L1, vitamin K epoxide reductase complex 1 (VKORC1), and immune system genes for the clinical outcome of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , Basigin/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/genetics , Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Heme Oxygenase-1/genetics , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Patient Outcome Assessment , Polymorphism, Genetic , Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Vitamin D-Binding Protein/genetics , Vitamin K Epoxide Reductases/genetics
20.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 72: 87-93, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187725

ABSTRACT

Over the past few years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been increasingly applied to identify host genetic factors influencing clinical and laboratory traits related to immunity and infection, and to understand the interplay between the host and the microbial genomes. By screening large cohorts of individuals suffering from various infectious diseases, GWAS explored resistance against infection, natural history of the disease, development of life-threatening clinical signs, and innate and adaptive immune responses. These efforts provided fundamental insight on the role of major genes in the interindividual variability in the response to infection and on the mechanisms of the immune response against human pathogens both at the individual and population levels.


Subject(s)
Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genome-Wide Association Study , Infections/etiology , Animals , Biomarkers , Disease Resistance/genetics , Disease Resistance/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Immunity/immunology
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