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2.
Immunity ; 54(10): 2385-2398.e10, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370548

ABSTRACT

Potent neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies often target the spike protein receptor-binding site (RBS), but the variability of RBS epitopes hampers broad neutralization of multiple sarbecoviruses and drifted viruses. Here, using humanized mice, we identified an RBS antibody with a germline VH gene that potently neutralized SARS-related coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 variants. X-ray crystallography revealed coordinated recognition by the heavy chain of non-RBS conserved sites and the light chain of RBS with a binding angle mimicking the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. The minimum footprints in the hypervariable region of RBS contributed to the breadth of neutralization, which was enhanced by immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3) class switching. The coordinated binding resulted in broad neutralization of SARS-CoV and emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. Low-dose therapeutic antibody treatment in hamsters reduced the virus titers and morbidity during SARS-CoV-2 challenge. The structural basis for broad neutralizing activity may inform the design of a broad spectrum of therapeutics and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Binding Sites, Antibody , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/chemistry , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cricetinae , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/chemistry , Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments/metabolism , Immunoglobulin G/chemistry , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Mice , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
3.
Nature ; 596(7872): 417-422, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287811

ABSTRACT

Although two-dose mRNA vaccination provides excellent protection against SARS-CoV-2, there is little information about vaccine efficacy against variants of concern (VOC) in individuals above eighty years of age1. Here we analysed immune responses following vaccination with the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine2 in elderly participants and younger healthcare workers. Serum neutralization and levels of binding IgG or IgA after the first vaccine dose were lower in older individuals, with a marked drop in participants over eighty years old. Sera from participants above eighty showed lower neutralization potency against the B.1.1.7 (Alpha), B.1.351 (Beta) and P.1. (Gamma) VOC than against the wild-type virus and were more likely to lack any neutralization against VOC following the first dose. However, following the second dose, neutralization against VOC was detectable regardless of age. The frequency of SARS-CoV-2 spike-specific memory B cells was higher in elderly responders (whose serum showed neutralization activity) than in non-responders after the first dose. Elderly participants showed a clear reduction in somatic hypermutation of class-switched cells. The production of interferon-γ and interleukin-2 by SARS-CoV-2 spike-specific T cells was lower in older participants, and both cytokines were secreted primarily by CD4 T cells. We conclude that the elderly are a high-risk population and that specific measures to boost vaccine responses in this population are warranted, particularly where variants of concern are circulating.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Autoantibodies/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Immunization, Secondary , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin G/genetics , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-2/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
4.
Mol Cells ; 44(6): 392-400, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249738

ABSTRACT

It has been more than a year since severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) first emerged. Many studies have provided insights into the various aspects of the immune response in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Especially for antibody treatment and vaccine development, humoral immunity to SARS-CoV-2 has been studied extensively, though there is still much that is unknown and controversial. Here, we introduce key discoveries on the humoral immune responses in COVID-19, including the immune dynamics of antibody responses and correlations with disease severity, neutralizing antibodies and their cross-reactivity, how long the antibody and memory B-cell responses last, aberrant autoreactive antibodies generated in COVID-19 patients, and the efficacy of currently available therapeutic antibodies and vaccines against circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants, and highlight gaps in the current knowledge.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antibody-Dependent Enhancement , Autoantibodies/biosynthesis , B-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunoglobulin A/biosynthesis , Immunoglobulin M/biosynthesis , Immunologic Memory , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
5.
Science ; 372(6543): 738-741, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180894

ABSTRACT

Vaccination and infection promote the formation, tissue distribution, and clonal evolution of B cells, which encode humoral immune memory. We evaluated pediatric and adult blood and deceased adult organ donor tissues to determine convergent antigen-specific antibody genes of similar sequences shared between individuals. B cell memory varied for different pathogens. Polysaccharide antigen-specific clones were not exclusive to the spleen. Adults had higher clone frequencies and greater class switching in lymphoid tissues than blood, while pediatric blood had abundant class-switched convergent clones. Consistent with reported serology, prepandemic children had class-switched convergent clones to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 with weak cross-reactivity to other coronaviruses, while adult blood or tissues showed few such clones. These results highlight the prominence of early childhood B cell clonal expansions and cross-reactivity for future responses to novel pathogens.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Coronavirus/immunology , Immunologic Memory , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Child, Preschool , Cross Reactions , Ebolavirus/immunology , Female , Fetal Blood/immunology , Genes, Immunoglobulin , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunoglobulin D/genetics , Immunoglobulin D/immunology , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/genetics , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Infant , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin , Spleen/immunology , Young Adult
6.
J Clin Invest ; 131(7)2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166659

ABSTRACT

Multiple studies have shown loss of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-specific (SARS-CoV-2-specific) antibodies over time after infection, raising concern that humoral immunity against the virus is not durable. If immunity wanes quickly, millions of people may be at risk for reinfection after recovery from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, memory B cells (MBCs) could provide durable humoral immunity even if serum neutralizing antibody titers decline. We performed multidimensional flow cytometric analysis of S protein receptor binding domain-specific (S-RBD-specific) MBCs in cohorts of ambulatory patients with COVID-19 with mild disease (n = 7), and hospitalized patients with moderate to severe disease (n = 7), at a median of 54 days (range, 39-104 days) after symptom onset. We detected S-RBD-specific class-switched MBCs in 13 of 14 participants, failing only in the individual with the lowest plasma levels of anti-S-RBD IgG and neutralizing antibodies. Resting MBCs (rMBCs) made up the largest proportion of S-RBD-specific MBCs in both cohorts. FCRL5, a marker of functional memory on rMBCs, was more dramatically upregulated on S-RBD-specific rMBCs after mild infection than after severe infection. These data indicate that most SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals develop S-RBD-specific, class-switched rMBCs that resemble germinal center-derived B cells induced by effective vaccination against other pathogens, providing evidence for durable B cell-mediated immunity against SARS-CoV-2 after mild or severe disease.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Binding Sites/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Immunologic Memory , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors
7.
Sci Adv ; 7(10)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119272

ABSTRACT

Limited knowledge exists on immune markers associated with disease severity or recovery in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we elucidated longitudinal evolution of SARS-CoV-2 antibody repertoire in patients with acute COVID-19. Differential kinetics was observed for immunoglobulin M (IgM)/IgG/IgA epitope diversity, antibody binding, and affinity maturation in "severe" versus "mild" COVID-19 patients. IgG profile demonstrated immunodominant antigenic sequences encompassing fusion peptide and receptor binding domain (RBD) in patients with mild COVID-19 who recovered early compared with "fatal" COVID-19 patients. In patients with severe COVID-19, high-titer IgA were observed, primarily against RBD, especially in patients who succumbed to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The patients with mild COVID-19 showed marked increase in antibody affinity maturation to prefusion SARS-CoV-2 spike that associated with faster recovery from COVID-19. This study revealed antibody markers associated with disease severity and resolution of clinical disease that could inform development and evaluation of effective immune-based countermeasures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Antibody Affinity/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/blood , HEK293 Cells , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Kinetics , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Load
8.
Immunity ; 53(6): 1136-1150, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978309

ABSTRACT

Activated B cells participate in either extrafollicular (EF) or germinal center (GC) responses. Canonical responses are composed of a short wave of plasmablasts (PBs) arising from EF sites, followed by GC producing somatically mutated memory B cells (MBC) and long-lived plasma cells. However, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and affinity maturation can take place at both sites, and a substantial fraction of MBC are produced prior to GC formation. Infection responses range from GC responses that persist for months to persistent EF responses with dominant suppression of GCs. Here, we review the current understanding of the functional output of EF and GC responses and the molecular switches promoting them. We discuss the signals that regulate the magnitude and duration of these responses, and outline gaps in knowledge and important areas of inquiry. Understanding such molecular switches will be critical for vaccine development, interpretation of vaccine efficacy and the treatment for autoimmune diseases.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Germinal Center/immunology , Immunity/immunology , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching , Infections/etiology , Infections/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Plasma Cells/immunology , Vaccines/immunology
9.
Trends Immunol ; 41(7): 586-600, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-824927

ABSTRACT

Activation-Induced cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates affinity maturation and isotype switching by deaminating deoxycytidines within immunoglobulin genes, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). AID thus potentiates the humoral response to clear pathogens. Marking the 20th anniversary of the discovery of AID, we review the current understanding of AID function. We discuss AID biochemistry and how error-free forms of DNA repair are co-opted to prioritize mutagenesis over accuracy during antibody diversification. We discuss the regulation of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways during CSR. We describe genomic targeting of AID as a multilayered process involving chromatin architecture, cis- and trans-acting factors, and determining mutagenesis - distinct from AID occupancy at loci that are spared from mutation.


Subject(s)
Antibody Diversity , Cytidine Deaminase , Antibody Diversity/genetics , Cytidine Deaminase/metabolism , Genes, Immunoglobulin , Humans , Immunoglobulin Class Switching/genetics , Mutation
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