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1.
Expert Opin Drug Saf ; 21(1): 1-8, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735444

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ustekinumab is a human IgG1 kappa monoclonal antibody that targets the p40 subunit of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 and blocks the binding of these cytokines to the IL-12Rß1 chain of their receptors. Ustekinumab is approved for treating moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC). AREAS COVERED: We reviewed the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of ustekinumab. Future challenges for optimizing UC treatment with ustekinumab are discussed. EXPERT OPINION: Ustekinumab has favorable clinical efficacy and safety profiles for moderately-to-severely active UC. Ustekinumab is the first biologic for targeting IL-12/IL-23 pathways. Therefore, ustekinumab can be a therapeutic option following the failure of other biologics, including anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists and anti-α4ß7 integrin antagonists. However, the positioning of ustekinumab in the therapeutic strategy for UC remains unclear. The efficacy of combinations of ustekinumab and immunomodulators over ustekinumab monotherapy has not been supported in studies. Ustekinumab is a human immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody with low immunogenicity. Therefore, ustekinumab monotherapy, which should be safe, could be sufficient for treating UC. Further studies are required to understand the efficacy and safety of ustekinumab in patients with UC, particularly in special situations, and to optimize UC treatment with ustekinumab.


Subject(s)
Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Ustekinumab/administration & dosage , Animals , Colitis, Ulcerative/immunology , Colitis, Ulcerative/physiopathology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Interleukin-12/immunology , Interleukin-23/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Ustekinumab/adverse effects
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 748103, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555317

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-specific vaccines are efficient prophylactic weapons against SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, boosting innate responses may represent an innovative way to immediately fight future emerging viral infections or boost vaccines. MV130 is a mucosal immunotherapy, based on a mixture of whole heat-inactivated bacteria, that has shown clinical efficacy against recurrent viral respiratory infections. Herein, we show that the prophylactic intranasal administration of this immunotherapy confers heterologous protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in susceptible K18-hACE2 mice. Furthermore, in C57BL/6 mice, prophylactic administration of MV130 improves the immunogenicity of two different COVID-19 vaccine formulations targeting the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, inoculated either intramuscularly or intranasally. Independently of the vaccine candidate and vaccination route used, intranasal prophylaxis with MV130 boosted S-specific responses, including CD8+-T cell activation and the production of S-specific mucosal IgA antibodies. Therefore, the bacterial mucosal immunotherapy MV130 protects against SARS-CoV-2 infection and improves COVID-19 vaccines immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Administration, Mucosal , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Immunity, Heterologous , Immunity, Innate , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Mice , Vaccination
5.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 522-532, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Elevated proinflammatory cytokines are associated with greater COVID-19 severity. We aimed to assess safety and efficacy of sarilumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor, in patients with severe (requiring supplemental oxygen by nasal cannula or face mask) or critical (requiring greater supplemental oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or extracorporeal support) COVID-19. METHODS: We did a 60-day, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational phase 3 trial at 45 hospitals in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Russia, and Spain. We included adults (≥18 years) admitted to hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and pneumonia, who required oxygen supplementation or intensive care. Patients were randomly assigned (2:2:1 with permuted blocks of five) to receive intravenous sarilumab 400 mg, sarilumab 200 mg, or placebo. Patients, care providers, outcome assessors, and investigators remained masked to assigned intervention throughout the course of the study. The primary endpoint was time to clinical improvement of two or more points (seven point scale ranging from 1 [death] to 7 [discharged from hospital]) in the modified intention-to-treat population. The key secondary endpoint was proportion of patients alive at day 29. Safety outcomes included adverse events and laboratory assessments. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04327388; EudraCT, 2020-001162-12; and WHO, U1111-1249-6021. FINDINGS: Between March 28 and July 3, 2020, of 431 patients who were screened, 420 patients were randomly assigned and 416 received placebo (n=84 [20%]), sarilumab 200 mg (n=159 [38%]), or sarilumab 400 mg (n=173 [42%]). At day 29, no significant differences were seen in median time to an improvement of two or more points between placebo (12·0 days [95% CI 9·0 to 15·0]) and sarilumab 200 mg (10·0 days [9·0 to 12·0]; hazard ratio [HR] 1·03 [95% CI 0·75 to 1·40]; log-rank p=0·96) or sarilumab 400 mg (10·0 days [9·0 to 13·0]; HR 1·14 [95% CI 0·84 to 1·54]; log-rank p=0·34), or in proportions of patients alive (77 [92%] of 84 patients in the placebo group; 143 [90%] of 159 patients in the sarilumab 200 mg group; difference -1·7 [-9·3 to 5·8]; p=0·63 vs placebo; and 159 [92%] of 173 patients in the sarilumab 400 mg group; difference 0·2 [-6·9 to 7·4]; p=0·85 vs placebo). At day 29, there were numerical, non-significant survival differences between sarilumab 400 mg (88%) and placebo (79%; difference +8·9% [95% CI -7·7 to 25·5]; p=0·25) for patients who had critical disease. No unexpected safety signals were seen. The rates of treatment-emergent adverse events were 65% (55 of 84) in the placebo group, 65% (103 of 159) in the sarilumab 200 mg group, and 70% (121 of 173) in the sarilumab 400 mg group, and of those leading to death 11% (nine of 84) were in the placebo group, 11% (17 of 159) were in the sarilumab 200 mg group, and 10% (18 of 173) were in the sarilumab 400 mg group. INTERPRETATION: This trial did not show efficacy of sarilumab in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 and receiving supplemental oxygen. Adequately powered trials of targeted immunomodulatory therapies assessing survival as a primary endpoint are suggested in patients with critical COVID-19. FUNDING: Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , International Cooperation , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
6.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 511-521, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Global randomised controlled trials of the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 have shown conflicting results but potential decreases in time to discharge and burden on intensive care. Tocilizumab reduced progression to mechanical ventilation and death in a trial population enriched for racial and ethnic minorities. We aimed to investigate whether tocilizumab treatment could prevent COVID-19 progression in the first multicentre randomised controlled trial of tocilizumab done entirely in a lower-middle-income country. METHODS: COVINTOC is an open-label, multicentre, randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial done at 12 public and private hospitals across India. Adults (aged ≥18 years) admitted to hospital with moderate to severe COVID-19 (Indian Ministry of Health grading) confirmed by positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR result were randomly assigned (1:1 block randomisation) to receive tocilizumab 6 mg/kg plus standard care (the tocilizumab group) or standard care alone (the standard care group). The primary endpoint was progression of COVID-19 (from moderate to severe or from severe to death) up to day 14 in the modified intention-to-treat population of all participants who had at least one post-baseline assessment for the primary endpoint. Safety was assessed in all randomly assigned patients. The trial is completed and registered with the Clinical Trials Registry India (CTRI/2020/05/025369). FINDINGS: 180 patients were recruited between May 30, 2020, and Aug 31, 2020, and randomly assigned to the tocilizumab group (n=90) or the standard care group (n=90). One patient randomly assigned to the standard care group inadvertently received tocilizumab at baseline and was included in the tocilizumab group for all analyses. One patient randomly assigned to the standard care group withdrew consent after the baseline visit and did not receive any study medication and was not included in the modified intention-to-treat population but was still included in safety analyses. 75 (82%) of 91 in the tocilizumab group and 68 (76%) of 89 in the standard care group completed 28 days of follow-up. Progression of COVID-19 up to day 14 occurred in eight (9%) of 91 patients in the tocilizumab group and 11 (13%) of 88 in the standard care group (difference -3·71 [95% CI -18·23 to 11·19]; p=0·42). 33 (36%) of 91 patients in the tocilizumab group and 22 (25%) of 89 patients in the standard care group had adverse events; 18 (20%) and 15 (17%) had serious adverse events. The most common adverse event was acute respiratory distress syndrome, reported in seven (8%) patients in each group. Grade 3 adverse events were reported in two (2%) patients in the tocilizumab group and five (6%) patients in the standard care group. There were no grade 4 adverse events. Serious adverse events were reported in 18 (20%) patients in the tocilizumab group and 15 (17%) in the standard care group; 13 (14%) and 15 (17%) patients died during the study. INTERPRETATION: Routine use of tocilizumab in patients admitted to hospital with moderate to severe COVID-19 is not supported. However, post-hoc evidence from this study suggests tocilizumab might still be effective in patients with severe COVID-19 and so should be investigated further in future studies. FUNDING: Medanta Institute of Education and Research, Roche India, Cipla India, and Action COVID-19 India.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Drug Monitoring/methods , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , India , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
7.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211059677, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533223

ABSTRACT

Oral booster-single strain probiotic bifidobacteria could be a potential strategy for SARS-CoV-2. This study aims to evaluate the role of oral probiotic Bifidobacterium on moderate/severe SARS-CoV-2 inpatients. In this single-center study, we analyzed data of 44 moderate/severe inpatients with diagnosed COVID-19 in Istanbul Maltepe University Medical Faculty Hospital, 2020 from 1 November 2020 to 15 December 2020. Clinical and medication features were compared and analyzed between patients with or without probiotic. In result, 19 of the 44 patients (43.18%) who were administrated with oral booster-single strain probiotic were discharged with the median inpatient day of 7.6 days which were significantly shorter than those of patients without probiotic. There were significant differences in inpatient days, radiological improvement at day 6 and week 3, and reduction in interleukin-6 levels in those receiving oral probiotic therapy. Although the mortality rate was 5% in the probiotic group, it was 25% in the non-probiotic group. Booster-single strain probiotic bifidobacteria could be an effective treatment strategy for moderate/severe SARS-CoV-2 inpatients to reduce the mortality and length of stay in hospital.


Subject(s)
Bifidobacterium , COVID-19 , Interleukin-6/blood , Probiotics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Probiotics/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Turkey/epidemiology
8.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Nov 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502477

ABSTRACT

Beta-glucans comprise a group of polysaccharides of natural origin found in bacteria, algae, and plants, e.g., cereal seeds, as well as microfungi and macrofungi (mushrooms), which are characterized by diverse structures and functions. They are known for their metabolic and immunomodulatory properties, including anticancer, antibacterial, and antiviral. Recent reports suggest a potential of beta-glucans in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. In contrast to ß-glucans from other sources, ß-glucans from mushrooms are characterized by ß-1,3-glucans with short ß-1,6-side chains. This structure is recognized by receptors located on the surface of immune cells; thus, mushroom ß-glucans have specific immunomodulatory properties and gained BRM (biological response modifier) status. Moreover, mushroom beta-glucans also owe their properties to the formation of triple helix conformation, which is one of the key factors influencing the bioactivity of mushroom beta-glucans. This review summarizes the latest findings on biological and health-promoting potential of mushroom beta-glucans for the treatment of civilization and viral diseases, with particular emphasis on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Agaricales/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diet, Healthy , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , beta-Glucans/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Carbohydrate Conformation , Humans , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Nutritive Value , Structure-Activity Relationship , beta-Glucans/immunology , beta-Glucans/metabolism
9.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 145: 112243, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432984

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this pilot clinical study, we report the beneficial effects of beta glucans derived from two strains AFO-202 and N-163 of a black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans on the biomarkers for cytokine storm and coagulopathy in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 24 RT-PCR positive COVID-19 patients were recruited and randomly divided into three groups (Gr): Gr. 1 control (n = 8) - Standard treatment; Gr. 2: Standard treatment + AFO-202 beta glucan (n = 8); and Gr. 3, Standard treatment + combination of AFO-202 and N-163 beta glucans (n = 8) for 30 days. RESULTS: There was no mortality or requirement of ventilation of the subjects in any of the groups. There was a decrease in D-Dimer values (751 ng/ml to 143.89 ng/ml) and IL-6 values (7.395-3.16 pg/ml) in Gr. 1 in 15 days but the levels increased to abnormal levels on day 30 (D-Dimer: 202.5 ng/ml; IL-6 55.37 pg/ml); which steadily decreased up to day 30 in groups 2 (D-dimer: 560.99 ng/dl to 79.615; IL-6: 26.18-3.41 pg/ml) and 3 (D-dimer: 1614 ng/dl to 164.25 ng/dl; IL-6: 6.25-0.5 pg/ml). The same trend was observed with ESR. LCR and LeCR increased while NLR decreased significantly in Gr. 3. CD4 + and CD8 + T cell count showed relatively higher increase in Gr.3. There was no difference in CRP within the groups. CONCLUSION: As these beta glucans are well known food supplements with a track record for safety, larger multi-centric clinical studies are recommended to validate their use as an adjunct in the management of COVID-19 and the ensuing long COVID-19 syndrome.


Subject(s)
Aureobasidium , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Interleukin-6/analysis , beta-Glucans/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Complementary Therapies/methods , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Dietary Supplements , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol ; 21(6): 597-601, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429314

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: As of June 2021, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) exceeded 180 million reported cases and was responsible for almost 4 million deaths globally. Asthma affects approximately 262 million people worldwide and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Presently, it appears asthma is neither associated with an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 nor with a risk of severe COVID-19 or COVID-19 related death. Regarding the severe asthma patients on biologics, questions remain. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence regarding the relationship between asthma, biologics and COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: The available evidence does not suggest that severe asthmatics on treatment with biologics have a higher risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection compared to the general population. It does not appear that they have a higher risk of severe disease or COVID-19 related death either. SUMMARY: This review suggests that treatment with biologics for severe asthma is safe and should be maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, more studies are needed to address this question and the role of biological therapy on different asthma phenotypes.


Subject(s)
Asthma/drug therapy , Biological Products/adverse effects , COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Asthma/diagnosis , Asthma/immunology , Biological Products/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(5)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on people with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease (MOGAD). METHODS: The COVID-19 Infections in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Related Diseases (COViMS) Registry collected data on North American patients with MS and related diseases with laboratory-positive or highly suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. Deidentified data were entered into a web-based registry by health care providers. Data were analyzed using t-tests, Pearson χ2 tests, or Fisher exact tests for categorical variables. Univariate logistic regression models examined effects of risk factors and COVID-19 clinical severity. RESULTS: As of June 7, 2021, 77 patients with NMOSD and 20 patients with MOGAD were reported in the COViMS Registry. Most patients with NMOSD were laboratory positive for SARS-CoV-2 and taking rituximab at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis. Most patients with NMOSD were not hospitalized (64.9% [95% CI: 53.2%-75.5%]), whereas 15.6% (95% CI: 8.3%-25.6%) were hospitalized only, 9.1% (95% CI: 3.7%-17.8%) were admitted to the ICU and/or ventilated, and 10.4% (95% CI: 4.6%-19.5%) died. In patients with NMOSD, having a comorbidity was the sole factor identified for poorer COVID-19 outcome (OR = 6.0, 95% CI: 1.79-19.98). Most patients with MOGAD were laboratory positive for SARS-CoV-2, and almost half were taking rituximab. Among patients with MOGAD, 75.0% were not hospitalized, and no deaths were recorded; no factors were different between those not hospitalized and those hospitalized, admitted to the ICU, or ventilated. DISCUSSION: Among the reported patients with NMOSD, a high mortality rate was observed, and the presence of comorbid conditions was associated with worse COVID-19 outcome. There were no deaths reported in the patients with MOGAD, although these observations are limited due to small sample size.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein/immunology , Neuromyelitis Optica/mortality , Registries , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neuromyelitis Optica/drug therapy , North America/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Respiration, Artificial , Rituximab/administration & dosage
13.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol ; 43(5): 507-518, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rituximab is a FDA-approved monoclonal antibody for adults with moderate to severe potentially life-threatening pemphigus vulgaris. Recent studies have focused on assessments of efficacy and safety of low-dose rituximab (<2 gram in each cycle). METHOD: Databases were searched from 2010 to 2020 (last update: 1 June 2020). RESULT: Nine studies were entered; including180 cases (92: women, 88: men, age range: 9-83 years). The dosages of each Rituximab cycle varied between ultra-low-dose (≤500 mg for a cycle, either multiple infusions or a single infusion), low-dose (2 × 375 mg/m2 or 2 × 500 mg) and modified-dose (3 × 375 mg/m2 or 3 × 500 mg). The efficacy and safety of Rituximab in the studies are known by the recovery time, relapse time, and side events. According to the studies, 2 × 500 can lead to complete remission in a broad range, from 35 to 82%. These differences might be explained by different end-points and variable cumulative corticosteroid dosage after RTX administration. Although the studies showed that low dose RTX is efficient, there are some controversies regarding the choosing low-dose for severe patients. CONCLUSION: Considering the effectiveness of low-dose, intermediate dose, and ultra-low-dose protocols of Rituximab in inducing remission in pemphigus disease and considering factors such as cost of therapy, and the need to induce a minimum of immunosuppression for a minimum duration in the COVID-19 pandemic, suggested to use low-dose Rituximab protocol (2 infusions of 500 mg Rituximab: interval of 2 weeks) to induce the remission in mild-to-moderate pemphigus patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Pemphigus/drug therapy , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Child , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pemphigus/diagnosis , Pemphigus/immunology , Remission Induction , Risk Factors , Rituximab/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(7)2020 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291917
15.
Adv Drug Deliv Rev ; 178: 113848, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283843

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2, and the ensuing global pandemic, has resulted in an unprecedented response to identify therapies that can limit uncontrolled inflammation observed in patients with moderate to severe COVID-19. The immune pathology behind COVID-19 is complex and involves the activation and interaction of multiple systems including, but not limited to, complement, inflammasomes, endothelial as well as innate and adaptive immune cells to bring about a convoluted profile of inflammation, coagulation and tissue damage. To date, therapeutic approaches have focussed on inhibition of coagulation, untargeted immune suppression and/or cytokine-directed blocking agents. Regardless of recently achieved improvements in individual patient outcomes and survival rates, improved and focussed approaches targeting individual systems involved is needed to further improve prognosis and wellbeing. This review summarizes the current understanding of molecular and cellular systems involved in the pathophysiology of COVID-19, and their contribution to pathogen clearance and damage to then discuss possible therapeutic options involving immunomodulatory drug delivery systems as well as summarising the complex interplay between them.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Inflammasomes/antagonists & inhibitors , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Animals , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Complement Activation/drug effects , Complement Activation/immunology , Drug Delivery Systems/trends , Humans , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Inflammasomes/immunology
16.
J Neuroimmune Pharmacol ; 16(3): 519-530, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283811

ABSTRACT

This brief report collects the program and abstracts of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology (SNIP) COVID-19 Virtual Workshop held on April 9, 2021. The workshop consisted of four symposia: Symposium 1: Molecular approaches to COVID-19 pathogenesis and underlying mechanisms; Symposium 2: Therapeutic and vaccine approaches to COVID-19; Symposium 3: Early Career Investigator talks; and Symposium 4: Diversity and Inclusion SNIP Committee (DISC) program: Well-being and reflections. The workshop also featured four special talks on COVID-19 and funding opportunities from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA); COVID-19 and funding opportunities from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); opportunities from NIH for early career investigator (ECI) fellows; and neurologic and psychiatric complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Presenters included NIH officials, SNIP members, and non-member scientists whose abstracts were submitted and accepted for inclusion in the virtual event hosted by the University of Nebraska Medical Center via Zoom webinar. A special theme issue of SNIP's official journal, the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (JNIP), will collect select papers from the workshop along with other related manuscripts in a special theme issue titled "Neuroimmune Pharmacology of SARS-CoV-2."


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Education/trends , Neuroimmunomodulation/immunology , Societies, Scientific/trends , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Education/methods , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Neuroimmunomodulation/drug effects
17.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 904: 174193, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230460

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading rapidly in the world and is still taking a heavy toll. Studies show that cytokine storms and imbalances in T-helper (Th)1/Th2 play a significant role in most acute cases of the disease. A number of medications have been suggested to treat or control the disease but have been discontinued due to their side effects. Melatonin, as an intrinsic molecule, possesses pharmacological anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that decreases in concentration with age; as a result, older people are more prone to various diseases. In this study, patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were given a melatonin adjuvant (9 mg daily, orally) for fourteen days. In order to measure markers of Th1 and Th2 inflammatory cytokines (such as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ) as well as the expression of Th1 and Th2 regulatory genes (signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)4, STAT6, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3), and T-box expressed in T cell (T-bet)), blood samples were taken from patients at the beginning and end of the treatment. Adjuvant therapy with melatonin controlled and reduced inflammatory cytokines in patients with COVID-19. Melatonin also controlled and modulated the dysregulated genes that regulate the humoral and cellular immune systems mediated by Th1 and Th2. In this study, it was shown for the first time that melatonin can be used as a medicinal adjuvant with anti-inflammatory mechanism to reduce and control inflammatory cytokines by regulating the expression of Th1 and Th2 regulatory genes in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines/blood , Melatonin , Signal Transduction , Th1 Cells , Th2 Cells , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Melatonin/administration & dosage , Melatonin/immunology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology , Th1 Cells/drug effects , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology , Treatment Outcome
18.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 183, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Choosing a safe disease modifying therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic is challenging. This case series study was conducted to determine the incidence rate and the course of Covid-19 infection in MS/NMOSD patients treated with Rituximab. METHODS: In this study, we designed a web-based questionnaire. Baseline information such as patient- reported walking disability, total number of Rituximab infusions received, delayed injections, occurrence of any relapse, and the use of corticosteroids during the pandemic were collected. Also, information regarding the Covid-19 pandemic such as adherence to self-isolation, any recent exposure to an infected individual and the presence of suggestive symptoms were collected. In case of positive test results, patients were grouped into 2 categories; mild to moderate and seriously ill and outcomes were evaluated as favorable (improved/ discharged) and unfavorable (expired). RESULTS: Two hundred fifty-eight patients with Multiple Sclerosis were enrolled in this study, 9 of the subjects (3.4%) were confirmed positive for Covid-19, five of which required hospitalizations (55.5%), two patients required ICU admission (22.2%) and 2 two patients died (22.2%). None of these patients ever mentioned using corticosteroids during the pandemic. In comparison to MS patients who were not receiving disease modifying therapy (DMT), our study indicated a higher incidence of Covid-19 infection, higher ratio of serious illness and a higher fatality ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Rituximab seems not to be safe enough during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Rituximab/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Male , Recurrence , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Young Adult
19.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(2): 504-507, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202813

ABSTRACT

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) which can cause significant mortality is a thrombotic microangiopathy due to deficiency of VWF cleaving protease ADAMTS13 and as per medical literature there are examples that TTP can be caused by COVID 19 infection. A 35 years old female after admission with right sided weakness and slurring of speech was found to be COVID positive and diagnosed as a case of TTP. Patient had absent ADAMTS13 level on day 1. Treatment was started with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) later injection Vincristine and Rituximab was given after 4th TPE as it was suspected as refractory case. Finally patient received 16 TPE procedures with cryo poor plasma as exchange fluid and gradually her platelet count started to maintain normal and she was discharged. Specific management and such association of this type of cases need to be studied more judiciously.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein , COVID-19 , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic , Rituximab/administration & dosage , Vincristine/administration & dosage , ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , ADAMTS13 Protein/deficiency , Adult , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Plasma Exchange/methods , Platelet Count/methods , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/blood , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/diagnosis , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Treatment Outcome
20.
Anesthesiology ; 134(5): 792-808, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202432

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is characterized by hypoxemia, altered alveolar-capillary permeability, and neutrophil-dominated inflammatory pulmonary edema. Despite decades of research, an effective drug therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome remains elusive. The ideal pharmacotherapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome should demonstrate antiprotease activity and target injurious inflammatory pathways while maintaining host defense against infection. Furthermore, a drug with a reputable safety profile, low possibility of off-target effects, and well-known pharmacokinetics would be desirable. The endogenous 52-kd serine protease α1-antitrypsin has the potential to be a novel treatment option for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The main function of α1-antitrypsin is as an antiprotease, targeting neutrophil elastase in particular. However, studies have also highlighted the role of α1-antitrypsin in the modulation of inflammation and bacterial clearance. In light of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the identification of a treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome is even more pertinent, and α1-antitrypsin has been implicated in the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Neutrophils/drug effects , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/administration & dosage , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/enzymology , Lung/immunology , Neutrophils/enzymology , Neutrophils/immunology , Proteinase Inhibitory Proteins, Secretory/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/enzymology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/immunology
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