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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 827889, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731779

ABSTRACT

It is well established that pregnancy induces deep changes in the immune system. This is part of the physiological adaptation of the female organism to the pregnancy and the immunological tolerance toward the fetus. Indeed, over the three trimesters, the suppressive T regulatory lymphocytes are progressively more represented, while the expression of co-stimulatory molecules decreases overtime. Such adaptations relate to an increased risk of infections and progression to severe disease in pregnant women, potentially resulting in an altered generation of long-lived specific immunological memory of infection contracted during pregnancy. How potent is the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 in infected pregnant women and how long the specific SARS-CoV-2 immunity might last need to be urgently addressed, especially considering the current vaccinal campaign. To address these questions, we analyzed the long-term immunological response upon SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women from delivery to a six-months follow-up. In particular, we investigated the specific antibody production, T cell memory subsets, and inflammation profile. Results show that 80% developed an anti-SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG response, comparable with the general population. While IgG were present only in 50% of the asymptomatic subjects, the antibody production was elicited by infection in all the mild-to-critical patients. The specific T-cell memory subsets rebalanced over-time, and the pro-inflammatory profile triggered by specific SARS-CoV-2 stimulation faded away. These results shed light on SARS-CoV-2-specific immunity in pregnant women; understanding the immunological dynamics of the immune system in response to SARS-CoV-2 is essential for defining proper obstetric management of pregnant women and fine tune gender-specific vaccinal plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vero Cells , Young Adult
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 804808, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731770

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a serious global threat until we identify the effective preventive and therapeutic strategies. SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by various immunopathological consequences including lymphocyte activation and dysfunction, lymphopenia, cytokine storm, increased level of neutrophils, and depletion and exhaustion of lymphocytes. Considering the low level of antibody-mediated protection during coronavirus infection, understanding the role of T cell for long-term protection is decisive. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response is imperative for cell-mediated immune response during COVID-19. However, the level of CD8+ T cell response reduced to almost half as compared to CD4+ after 6 months of infection. The long-term protection is mediated via generation of immunological memory response during COVID-19. The presence of memory CD4+ T cells in all the severely infected and recovered individuals shows that the memory response is predominated by CD4+ T cells. Prominently, the antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are specifically observed during day 0 to day 28 in COVID-19-vaccinated individuals. However, level of antigen-specific T memory cells in COVID-19-vaccinated individuals defines the long-term protection against forthcoming outbreaks of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , /immunology , Animals , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Humans
3.
Front Immunol ; 13: 817905, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699973

ABSTRACT

The duration of humoral and cellular immune memory following SARS-CoV-2 infection in populations in least developed countries remains understudied but is key to overcome the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Sixty-four Cambodian individuals with laboratory-confirmed infection with asymptomatic or mild/moderate clinical presentation were evaluated for Spike (S)-binding and neutralizing antibodies and antibody effector functions during acute phase of infection and at 6-9 months follow-up. Antigen-specific B cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were characterized, and T cells were interrogated for functionality at late convalescence. Anti-S antibody titers decreased over time, but effector functions mediated by S-specific antibodies remained stable. S- and nucleocapsid (N)-specific B cells could be detected in late convalescence in the activated memory B cell compartment and are mostly IgG+. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune memory was maintained to S and membrane (M) protein. Asymptomatic infection resulted in decreased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and frequency of SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cells at late convalescence. Whereas anti-S antibodies correlated with S-specific B cells, there was no correlation between T cell response and humoral immune memory. Hence, all aspects of a protective immune response are maintained up to nine months after SARS-CoV-2 infection and in the absence of re-infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cambodia , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
4.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 147: 112614, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682939

ABSTRACT

Post-Covid pulmonary fibrosis is evident following severe COVID-19. There is an urgent need to identify the cellular and pathophysiological characteristics of chronic lung squeals of Covid-19 for the development of future preventive and/or therapeutic interventions. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells can mediate local immune protection against infections and cancer. Less beneficially, lung TRM cells cause chronic airway inflammation and fibrosis by stimulating pathologic inflammation. The effects of Janus kinase (JAK), an inducer pathway of cytokine storm, inhibition on acute Covid-19 cases have been previously evaluated. Here, we propose that Tofacitinib by targeting the CD8+ TRM cells could be a potential candidate for the treatment of chronic lung diseases induced by acute SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Injury/drug therapy , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung Injury/etiology , Lung Injury/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 799896, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662583

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection results in rapid T lymphocytopenia and functional impairment of T cells. The underlying mechanism, however, remains incompletely understood. In this study, we focused on characterizing the phenotype and kinetics of T-cell subsets with mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) by multicolor flow cytometry and investigating the association between MD and T-cell functionality. While 73.9% of study subjects displayed clinical lymphocytopenia upon hospital admission, a significant reduction of CD4 or CD8 T-cell frequency was found in all asymptomatic, symptomatic, and convalescent cases. CD4 and CD8 T cells with increased MD were found in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients within the first week of symptom onset. Lower proportion of memory CD8 T cell with MD was found in severe patients than in mild ones at the stage of disease progression. Critically, the frequency of T cells with MD in symptomatic patients was preferentially associated with CD4 T-cell loss and CD8 T-cell hyperactivation, respectively. Patients bearing effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells with the phenotype of high MD exhibited poorer T-cell responses upon either phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin or SARS-CoV-2 peptide stimulation than those with low MD. Our findings demonstrated an MD-associated mechanism underlying SARS-CoV-2-induced T lymphocytopenia and functional impairment during the acute phase of infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Lymphopenia/complications , Lymphopenia/etiology , Mitochondrial Diseases/etiology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Ionomycin/therapeutic use , Lymphopenia/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Mitochondria/immunology , Mitochondrial Diseases/immunology , Phosphorylcholine/analogs & derivatives , Phosphorylcholine/therapeutic use , Polymethacrylic Acids/therapeutic use
6.
Cells ; 11(1)2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580993

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is an unprecedented epochal event on at least two fronts. Firstly, in terms of the rapid spread and the magnitude of the outbreak, and secondly, on account of the equally swift response of the scientific community that has galvanized itself into action and has successfully developed, tested and deployed highly effective and novel vaccines in record time to combat the virus. The sophistication and diversification of the scientific toolbox we now have at our disposal has enabled us to interrogate both the breadth and the depth of the immune response to a degree that is unparalleled in recent memory. In terms of our understanding of what is critical to contain the virus and mitigate the effects the pandemic, neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 garner most of the attention, however, it is essential to recognize that it is the quality and the fitness of the virus-specific T cell and B cell response that lays the foundation and the backdrop for an effective neutralizing antibody response. In this report, we will review some of the key findings that have helped define and delineate some of the essential attributes of T and B cell responses in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
7.
Nat Immunol ; 23(1): 50-61, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545628

ABSTRACT

NP105-113-B*07:02-specific CD8+ T cell responses are considered among the most dominant in SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals. We found strong association of this response with mild disease. Analysis of NP105-113-B*07:02-specific T cell clones and single-cell sequencing were performed concurrently, with functional avidity and antiviral efficacy assessed using an in vitro SARS-CoV-2 infection system, and were correlated with T cell receptor usage, transcriptome signature and disease severity (acute n = 77, convalescent n = 52). We demonstrated a beneficial association of NP105-113-B*07:02-specific T cells in COVID-19 disease progression, linked with expansion of T cell precursors, high functional avidity and antiviral effector function. Broad immune memory pools were narrowed postinfection but NP105-113-B*07:02-specific T cells were maintained 6 months after infection with preserved antiviral efficacy to the SARS-CoV-2 Victoria strain, as well as Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Delta variants. Our data show that NP105-113-B*07:02-specific T cell responses associate with mild disease and high antiviral efficacy, pointing to inclusion for future vaccine design.


Subject(s)
HLA-B7 Antigen/immunology , Immunodominant Epitopes/immunology , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Aged , Amino Acid Sequence , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Affinity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line, Transformed , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Vaccinia virus/genetics , Vaccinia virus/immunology , Vaccinia virus/metabolism
8.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258743, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511818

ABSTRACT

BCG vaccination is known to induce innate immune memory, which confers protection against heterologous infections. However, the effect of BCG vaccination on the conventional adaptive immune cells subsets is not well characterized. We investigated the impact of BCG vaccination on the frequencies of T cell subsets and common gamma c (γc) cytokines in a group of healthy elderly individuals (age 60-80 years) at one month post vaccination as part of our clinical study to examine the effect of BCG on COVID-19. Our results demonstrate that BCG vaccination induced enhanced frequencies of central (p<0.0001) and effector memory (p<0.0001) CD4+ T cells and diminished frequencies of naïve (p<0.0001), transitional memory (p<0.0001), stem cell memory (p = 0.0001) CD4+ T cells and regulatory T cells. In addition, BCG vaccination induced enhanced frequencies of central (p = 0.0008), effector (p<0.0001) and terminal effector memory (p<0.0001) CD8+ T cells and diminished frequencies of naïve (p<0.0001), transitional memory (p<0.0001) and stem cell memory (p = 0.0034) CD8+T cells. BCG vaccination also induced enhanced plasma levels of IL-7 (p<0.0001) and IL-15 (p = 0.0020) but diminished levels of IL-2 (p = 0.0033) and IL-21 (p = 0.0020). Thus, BCG vaccination was associated with enhanced memory T cell subsets as well as memory enhancing γc cytokines in elderly individuals, suggesting its ability to induce non-specific adaptive immune responses.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukins/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Vaccination/methods
9.
Sci Immunol ; 6(66): eabm3131, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483985

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has caused morbidity and mortality across the globe. As the virus spreads, new variants are arising that show enhanced capacity to bypass preexisting immunity. To understand the memory response to SARS-CoV-2, here, we monitored SARS-CoV-2­specific T and B cells in a longitudinal study of infected and recovered golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). We demonstrated that engagement of the innate immune system after SARS-CoV-2 infection was delayed but was followed by a pronounced adaptive response. Moreover, T cell adoptive transfer conferred a reduction in virus levels and rapid induction of SARS-CoV-2­specific B cells, demonstrating that both lymphocyte populations contributed to the overall response. Reinfection of recovered animals with a SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern showed that SARS-CoV-2­specific T and B cells could effectively control the infection that associated with the rapid induction of neutralizing antibodies but failed to block transmission to both naïve and seroconverted animals. These data suggest that the adaptive immune response to SARS-CoV-2 is sufficient to provide protection to the host, independent of the emergence of variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Immunologic Memory/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/virology , Cricetinae , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Mesocricetus , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology , Virus Replication/genetics
10.
Nature ; 600(7890): 701-706, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483135

ABSTRACT

Following severe adverse reactions to the AstraZeneca ChAdOx1-S-nCoV-19 vaccine1,2, European health authorities recommended that patients under the age of 55 years who received one dose of ChAdOx1-S-nCoV-19 receive a second dose of the Pfizer BNT162b2 vaccine as a booster. However, the effectiveness and the immunogenicity of this vaccination regimen have not been formally tested. Here we show that the heterologous ChAdOx1-S-nCoV-19 and BNT162b2 combination confers better protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection than the homologous BNT162b2 and BNT162b2 combination in a real-world observational study of healthcare workers (n = 13,121). To understand the underlying mechanism, we conducted a longitudinal survey of the anti-spike immunity conferred by each vaccine combination. Both combinations induced strong anti-spike antibody responses, but sera from heterologous vaccinated individuals displayed a stronger neutralizing activity regardless of the SARS-CoV-2 variant. This enhanced neutralizing potential correlated with increased frequencies of switched and activated memory B cells that recognize the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain. The ChAdOx1-S-nCoV-19 vaccine induced a weaker IgG response but a stronger T cell response than the BNT162b2 vaccine after the priming dose, which could explain the complementarity of both vaccines when used in combination. The heterologous vaccination regimen could therefore be particularly suitable for immunocompromised individuals.


Subject(s)
/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , /immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitals, University , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Incidence , Male , /immunology , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 758154, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477831

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has severely impacted daily life all over the world. Any measures to slow down the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and to decrease disease severity are highly requested. Recent studies have reported inverse correlations between plasma levels of vitamin D and susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 severity. Therefore, it has been proposed to supplement the general population with vitamin D to reduce the impact of COVID-19. However, by studying the course of COVID-19 and the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 in a family with a mutated, non-functional vitamin D receptor, we here demonstrate that vitamin D signaling was dispensable for mounting an efficient adaptive immune response against SARS-CoV-2 in this family. Although these observations might not directly be transferred to the general population, they question a central role of vitamin D in the generation of adaptive immunity against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets/genetics , Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/genetics , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
12.
J Immunol Methods ; 499: 113159, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440195

ABSTRACT

In general, the method of choice for evaluating immunity against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is detection of antibodies against the virus in patient sera. However, this is not feasible in patients who do not produce antibodies, either due to a primary immunodeficiency or secondary to treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. Assessment of the antiviral T cell response is an alternative to serological tests, but most T cell assays are labor-intensive and unsuitable for a clinical routine laboratory. We developed a flow cytometry-based assay for T cell proliferative responses against SARS-CoV-2, based on the detection of blast transformation of activated cells. The assay was validated on previously SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals and healthy seronegative blood donors, displaying 74% sensitivity and 96% specificity for previous infection with SARS-CoV-2. The usefulness of the assay was demonstrated in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency with a history of COVID-19. The described T-cell assay is a clinically relevant complement to serology in the evaluation of cellular immunity against SARS-CoV-2, which can be emulated by any routine lab with flow cytometric competence.


Subject(s)
Flow Cytometry , Immunologic Memory/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adult , Aged , Cell Proliferation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
13.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0059021, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434909

ABSTRACT

To assess the persistence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies produced by natural infection and describe the serological characteristics over 7 months after symptom onset among coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients by age and severity group, we followed up COVID-19 convalescent patients confirmed from 1 January to 20 March 2020 in Jiangsu, China and collected serum samples for testing IgM/IgG and neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 between 26 August and 28 October 2020. In total, 284 recovered participants with COVID-19 were enrolled in our study. Patients had a mean age of 46.72 years (standard deviation [SD], 17.09), and 138 (48.59%) were male. The median follow-up time after symptom onset was 225.5 (interquartile range [IQR], 219 to 232) days. During the follow-up period (162 to 282 days after symptom onset), the seropositive rate of IgM fluctuated around 25.70% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.72% to 31.20%) and that of IgG fluctuated around 79.93% (95% CI, 74.79% to 84.43%). Of the 284 patients, 64 participants were tested when discharged from hospital. Compared with that at the acute phase, the IgM/IgG antibody levels and IgM seropositivity have decreased; however, the seropositivity of IgG was not significantly lower at this follow-up (78.13% versus 82.81%). Fifty percent inhibitory dilution (ID50) titers of neutralizing antibody for samples when discharged from hospital (geometric mean titer [GMT], 82; 95% CI, 56 to 121) were significantly higher than those at 6 to 7 months after discharge (GMT, 47; 95% CI, 35 to 63) (P < 0.001). After 7 months from symptom onset, the convalescent COVID-19 patients continued to have high IgG seropositive; however, many plasma samples decreased neutralizing activity. IMPORTANCE The long-term characteristics of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among COVID-19 patients remain largely unclear. Tracking the longevity of these antibodies can provide a forward-looking reference for monitoring COVID-19. We conducted a comprehensive assessment combining the kinetics of specific and neutralizing antibodies over 7 months with age and disease severity and revealed influencing factors of the protection period of convalescent patients. By observing the long-term antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 and comparing antibody levels at two time points after symptom onset, we found that the convalescent COVID-19 patients continued to have a high IgG seropositive rate; however, their plasma samples decreased neutralizing activity. These findings provide evidence supporting that the neutralizing activity of SARS-CoV-2-infected persons should be monitored and the administration of vaccine may be needed.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
14.
Front Immunol ; 11: 559382, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389163

ABSTRACT

Eliciting durable and protective T cell-mediated immunity in the respiratory mucosa remains a significant challenge. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-based cationic pathogen-like particles (PLPs) loaded with TLR agonists mimic biophysical properties of microbes and hence, simulate pathogen-pattern recognition receptor interactions to safely and effectively stimulate innate immune responses. We generated micro particle PLPs loaded with TLR4 (glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant, GLA) or TLR9 (CpG) agonists, and formulated them with and without a mucosal delivery enhancing carbomer-based nanoemulsion adjuvant (ADJ). These adjuvants delivered intranasally to mice elicited high numbers of influenza nucleoprotein (NP)-specific CD8+ and CD4+ effector and tissue-resident memory T cells (TRMs) in lungs and airways. PLPs delivering TLR4 versus TLR9 agonists drove phenotypically and functionally distinct populations of effector and memory T cells. While PLPs loaded with CpG or GLA provided immunity, combining the adjuvanticity of PLP-GLA and ADJ markedly enhanced the development of airway and lung TRMs and CD4 and CD8 T cell-dependent immunity to influenza virus. Further, balanced CD8 (Tc1/Tc17) and CD4 (Th1/Th17) recall responses were linked to effective influenza virus control. These studies provide mechanistic insights into vaccine-induced pulmonary T cell immunity and pave the way for the development of a universal influenza and SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Influenza A virus/immunology , Intraepithelial Lymphocytes/immunology , Animals , Cell Line , Dogs , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Polylactic Acid-Polyglycolic Acid Copolymer/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/immunology
15.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374306

ABSTRACT

The cellular immune response plays an important role in COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2. This feature makes use of in vitro models' useful tools to evaluate vaccines and biopharmaceutical effects. Here, we developed a two-step model to evaluate the cellular immune response after SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced or spike protein stimulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both unexposed and COVID-19 (primo-infected) individuals (Step1). Moreover, the supernatants of these cultures were used to evaluate its effects on lung cell lines (A549) (Step2). When PBMC from the unexposed were infected by SARS-CoV-2, cytotoxic natural killer and nonclassical monocytes expressing inflammatory cytokines genes were raised. The supernatant of these cells can induce apoptosis of A549 cells (mock vs. Step2 [mean]: 6.4% × 17.7%). Meanwhile, PBMCs from primo-infected presented their memory CD4+ T cells activated with a high production of IFNG and antiviral genes. Supernatant from past COVID-19 subjects contributed to reduce apoptosis (mock vs. Step2 [ratio]: 7.2 × 1.4) and to elevate the antiviral activity (iNOS) of A549 cells (mock vs. Step2 [mean]: 31.5% × 55.7%). Our findings showed features of immune primary cells and lung cell lines response after SARS-CoV-2 or spike protein stimulation that can be used as an in vitro model to study the immunity effects after SARS-CoV-2 antigen exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Cellular , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Virus Replication/physiology , Young Adult
16.
Bioessays ; 43(2): e2000232, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372696

ABSTRACT

Immunity against SARS-CoV-2 that is acquired by convalescent COVID-19 patients is examined in reference to (A) the Th17 cell generation system in psoriatic epidermis and (B) a recently discovered phenomenon in which Th17 cells are converted into tissue-resident memory T (TRM ) cells with Th1 phenotype. Neutrophils that are attracted to the site of infection secrete IL-17A, which stimulates lung epithelial cells to express CCL20. Natural Th17 (nTh17) cells are recruited to the infection site by CCL20 and expand in the presence of IL-23. These nTh17 cells are converted to TRM cells upon encounter with SARS-CoV-2 and continue to exist as ex-Th17 cells, which exert Th1-like immunity during a memory response. G-CSF can induce nTh17 cell accumulation at the infection site because it promotes neutrophil egress from the bone marrow. Hence, G-CSF may be effective against COVID-19. Administration of G-CSF to patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 is worth a clinical trial.


Subject(s)
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/therapeutic use , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokine CCL20/metabolism , Humans , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-23 Subunit p19/immunology , Neutrophils/drug effects , Th17 Cells/drug effects
17.
J Infect Dis ; 224(4): 586-594, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The duration of humoral and T and B cell response after the infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains unclear. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study to assess the virus-specific antibody and memory T and B cell responses in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients up to 343 days after infection. Neutralizing antibodies and antibodies against the receptor-binding domain, spike, and nucleoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 were measured. Virus-specific memory T and B cell responses were analyzed. RESULTS: We enrolled 59 patients with COVID-19, including 38 moderate, 16 mild, and 5 asymptomatic patients; 31 (52.5%) were men and 28 (47.5%) were women. The median age was 41 years (interquartile range, 30-55). The median day from symptom onset to enrollment was 317 days (range 257 to 343 days). We found that approximately 90% of patients still have detectable immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies against spike and nucleocapsid proteins and neutralizing antibodies against pseudovirus, whereas ~60% of patients had detectable IgG antibodies against receptor-binding domain and surrogate virus-neutralizing antibodies. The SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG+ memory B cell and interferon-γ-secreting T cell responses were detectable in more than 70% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-specific immune memory response persists in most patients approximately 1 year after infection, which provides a promising sign for prevention from reinfection and vaccination strategy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Adult , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
18.
Sci Adv ; 7(34)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365116

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has spread worldwide, yet the role of antiviral T cell immunity during infection and the contribution of immune checkpoints remain unclear. By prospectively following a cohort of 292 patients with melanoma, half of which treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), we identified 15 patients with acute or convalescent COVID-19 and investigated their transcriptomic, proteomic, and cellular profiles. We found that ICI treatment was not associated with severe COVID-19 and did not alter the induction of inflammatory and type I interferon responses. In-depth phenotyping demonstrated expansion of CD8 effector memory T cells, enhanced T cell activation, and impaired plasmablast induction in ICI-treated COVID-19 patients. The evaluation of specific adaptive immunity in convalescent patients showed higher spike (S), nucleoprotein (N), and membrane (M) antigen-specific T cell responses and similar induction of spike-specific antibody responses. Our findings provide evidence that ICI during COVID-19 enhanced T cell immunity without exacerbating inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/immunology , Melanoma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adaptive Immunity/drug effects , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Immunologic Memory/drug effects , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Melanoma/complications , Melanoma/drug therapy , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/virology
19.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(9): 1437-1453.e8, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347535

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has affected more than 185 million people worldwide resulting in over 4 million deaths. To contain the pandemic, there is a continued need for safe vaccines that provide durable protection at low and scalable doses and can be deployed easily. Here, AAVCOVID-1, an adeno-associated viral (AAV), spike-gene-based vaccine candidate demonstrates potent immunogenicity in mouse and non-human primates following a single injection and confers complete protection from SARS-CoV-2 challenge in macaques. Peak neutralizing antibody titers are sustained at 1 year and complemented by functional memory T cell responses. The AAVCOVID vector has no relevant pre-existing immunity in humans and does not elicit cross-reactivity to common AAVs used in gene therapy. Vector genome persistence and expression wanes following injection. The single low-dose requirement, high-yield manufacturability, and 1-month stability for storage at room temperature may make this technology well suited to support effective immunization campaigns for emerging pathogens on a global scale.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Dependovirus/genetics , Dependovirus/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Macaca fascicularis , Macaca mulatta , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Transgenes/genetics , Vaccination/methods , Viral Load/immunology
20.
J Immunol ; 207(2): 376-379, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341797

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Neutralizing Abs target the receptor binding domain of the spike (S) protein, a focus of successful vaccine efforts. Concerns have arisen that S-specific vaccine immunity may fail to neutralize emerging variants. We show that vaccination with a human adenovirus type 5 vector expressing the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein can establish protective immunity, defined by reduced weight loss and viral load, in both Syrian hamsters and K18-hACE2 mice. Challenge of vaccinated mice was associated with rapid N-specific T cell recall responses in the respiratory mucosa. This study supports the rationale for including additional viral Ags in SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, even if they are not a target of neutralizing Abs, to broaden epitope coverage and immune effector mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Female , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Vaccination , Vero Cells
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