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1.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6765-6777, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544330

ABSTRACT

Avidity is defined as the binding strength of immunoglobulin G (IgG) toward its target epitope. Avidity is directly related to affinity, as both processes are determined by the best fit of IgG to epitopes. We confirm and extend data on incomplete avidity maturation of IgG toward severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleoprotein (NP), spike protein-1 (S1), and its receptor-binding domain (RBD) in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. In SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals, an initial rise in avidity maturation was ending abruptly, leading to IgG of persistently low or intermediate avidity. Incomplete avidity maturation might facilitate secondary SARS-CoV-2 infections and thus prevent the establishment of herd immunity. Incomplete avidity maturation after infection with SARS-CoV-2 (with only 11.8% of cases showing finally IgG of high avidity, that is, an avidity index > 0.6) was contrasted by regular and rapid establishment of high avidity in SARS-CoV-2 naïve individuals after two vaccination steps with the BioNTech messenger RNA (mRNA) Vaccine (78% of cases with high avidity). One vaccination step was not sufficient for induction of complete avidity maturation in vaccinated SARS-CoV-2 naïve individuals, as it induced high avidity only in 2.9% of cases within 3 weeks. However, one vaccination step was sufficient to induce high avidity in individuals with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Herd/immunology , Immunologic Tests/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6803-6807, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544308

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the Panbio™ COVID-19 Ag Rapid Test Device as a point-of-care diagnostic tool for COVID-19 in 357 patients at a pediatric emergency department. Thirty-four patients tested positive by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, of which 24 were positive by the antigen assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 70.5% and 100%, respectively.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Infant , Male , Nasopharynx/immunology , Nasopharynx/virology , Point-of-Care Testing , Prospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6778-6781, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544295

ABSTRACT

A high-throughput, fully automated antigen detection test for SARS-CoV-2 is a viable alternative to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for mass screening during outbreaks. In this study, we compared RT-qPCR for viral load and the VITROS® SARS-CoV-2 Antigen Test with reference to the results of the LUMIPULSE® SARS-CoV-2 Ag Test. Of 128 nasopharyngeal swab specimens taken from patients suspected of being infected with SARS-CoV-2, 49 were positive and 79 were negative according to RT-qPCR. Consistent dose-dependent detection with VITROS® assay was successfully achieved when using nasopharyngeal swab specimens with Ct values of 32.0 or lesser, whereas the CLEIA-based LUMIPULSE® assay was able to detect lower viral loads compared with the VITROS® assay. Our results show that the performance of the VITROS® assay was satisfactory for the diagnosis of contagious COVID-19 patients in the clinical setting. Highlights The performance of the VITROS® SARS-CoV-2 Antigen Test was sufficient for the diagnosis of contagious COVID-19. This test showed high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in samples with a Ct value of 32 or less.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoenzyme Techniques/methods , Immunologic Tests/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antigens, Viral/genetics , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Nasopharynx/immunology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/immunology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Viral Load/genetics , Viral Load/immunology
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6813-6817, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530183

ABSTRACT

Vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 is necessary to overcome coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the time-dependent vaccine-induced immune response is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 antispike immunoglobulin G (IgG) response. Medical staff participants who received two sequential doses of the BNT162b2 vaccination on days 0 and 21 were recruited prospectively from the Musashino Red Cross Hospital between March and May 2021. The quantitative antispike receptor-binding domain (RBD) IgG antibody responses were measured using the Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgGII Quant assay (cut off ≥50 AU/ml). A total of 59 participants without past COVID-19 history were continuously tracked with serum samples. The median age was 41 (22-75) years, and 14 participants were male (23.7%). The median antispike RBD IgG and seropositivity rates were 0 (0-31.1) AU/ml, 0.3 (0-39.5) AU/ml, 529.1 (48.3-8711.4) AU/ml, 18,836.9 (742.2-57,260.4) AU/ml, and 0%, 0%, 98.3%, and 100% on days 0, 3, 14, and 28 after the first vaccination, respectively. The antispike RBD IgG levels were significantly increased after day 14 from vaccination (p < 0.001) The BNT162b2 vaccination led almost all participants to obtain serum antispike RBD IgG 14 days after the first dose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Vaccination/methods , Young Adult
5.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(21): 23895-23912, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498164

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is presently the most pressing public health concern worldwide. Cytokine storm is an important factor leading to death of patients with COVID-19. This study aims to characterize serum cytokines of patients with severe or critical COVID-19. Clinical records were obtained from 149 patients who were tested at the Sino-French New City Branch of Tongji Hospital from 30 January to 30 March 2020. Data regarding the clinical features of the patients was collected and analyzed. Among the 149, 45 (30.2%) of them had severe conditions and 104 (69.8%) of that presented critical symptoms. In the meantime, 80 (53.7%) of that 149 died during hospitalization. Of all, male patients accounted for 94 (69.1%). Compared with patients in severe COVID-19, those who in critical COVID-19 had significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and IL-10. Moreover, the passed-away patients had considerably higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 than those survived from it. Regression analysis revealed that serum TNF-α level was an independent risk factor for the death of patient with severe conditions. Among the proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-6) analyzed herein, TNF-α was seen as a risk factor for the death of patients with severe or critical COVID-19. This study suggests that anti-TNF-α treatment allows patients with severe or critical COVID-19 pneumonia to recover.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Interleukins/blood , Pneumonia, Viral , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors/therapeutic use
6.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6813-6817, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400917

ABSTRACT

Vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 is necessary to overcome coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the time-dependent vaccine-induced immune response is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 antispike immunoglobulin G (IgG) response. Medical staff participants who received two sequential doses of the BNT162b2 vaccination on days 0 and 21 were recruited prospectively from the Musashino Red Cross Hospital between March and May 2021. The quantitative antispike receptor-binding domain (RBD) IgG antibody responses were measured using the Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgGII Quant assay (cut off ≥50 AU/ml). A total of 59 participants without past COVID-19 history were continuously tracked with serum samples. The median age was 41 (22-75) years, and 14 participants were male (23.7%). The median antispike RBD IgG and seropositivity rates were 0 (0-31.1) AU/ml, 0.3 (0-39.5) AU/ml, 529.1 (48.3-8711.4) AU/ml, 18,836.9 (742.2-57,260.4) AU/ml, and 0%, 0%, 98.3%, and 100% on days 0, 3, 14, and 28 after the first vaccination, respectively. The antispike RBD IgG levels were significantly increased after day 14 from vaccination (p < 0.001) The BNT162b2 vaccination led almost all participants to obtain serum antispike RBD IgG 14 days after the first dose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Vaccination/methods , Young Adult
7.
J Infect Dis ; 224(5): 793-797, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393272

ABSTRACT

We investigated whether the antibody response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccination is similar in women and men. In a community cohort without prior COVID-19, first vaccine dose produced higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and percent inhibition of spike-ACE2 receptor binding, a surrogate measure of virus neutralization, in women compared to men (7.0 µg/mL, 51.6% vs 3.3 µg/mL, 36.4%). After 2 doses, IgG levels remained significantly higher for women (30.4 µg/mL) compared to men (20.6 µg/mL), while percent inhibition was similar (98.4% vs 97.7%). Sex-specific antibody response to mRNA vaccination informs future efforts to understand vaccine protection and side effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination/methods
8.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6778-6781, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281221

ABSTRACT

A high-throughput, fully automated antigen detection test for SARS-CoV-2 is a viable alternative to reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for mass screening during outbreaks. In this study, we compared RT-qPCR for viral load and the VITROS® SARS-CoV-2 Antigen Test with reference to the results of the LUMIPULSE® SARS-CoV-2 Ag Test. Of 128 nasopharyngeal swab specimens taken from patients suspected of being infected with SARS-CoV-2, 49 were positive and 79 were negative according to RT-qPCR. Consistent dose-dependent detection with VITROS® assay was successfully achieved when using nasopharyngeal swab specimens with Ct values of 32.0 or lesser, whereas the CLEIA-based LUMIPULSE® assay was able to detect lower viral loads compared with the VITROS® assay. Our results show that the performance of the VITROS® assay was satisfactory for the diagnosis of contagious COVID-19 patients in the clinical setting. Highlights The performance of the VITROS® SARS-CoV-2 Antigen Test was sufficient for the diagnosis of contagious COVID-19. This test showed high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in samples with a Ct value of 32 or less.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoenzyme Techniques/methods , Immunologic Tests/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antigens, Viral/genetics , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Nasopharynx/immunology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/immunology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Viral Load/genetics , Viral Load/immunology
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4242-4246, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130628

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought a huge impact on global health and the economy. Early diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is essential for epidemic prevention and control. The detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies is an important criterion for diagnosing COVID-19. However, SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing also has certain false positives causing confusion in clinical diagnosis. This article summarizes the causes of false-positive detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in clinical practice. The results indicate that the most common endogenous interferences include rheumatoid factor, heterophile antibodies, human anti-animal antibodies, lysozyme, complement, and cross-antigens. The exogenous interference is mainly incomplete coagulation of the specimen, contamination of the specimen, and insufficient optimization of the diagnostic kit's reaction system.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , False Positive Reactions , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods
11.
Cells ; 10(2)2021 01 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055022

ABSTRACT

Monitoring antigen-specific T cell immunity relies on functional tests that require T cells and antigen presenting cells to be uncompromised. Drawing of blood, its storage and shipment from the clinical site to the test laboratory, and the subsequent isolation, cryopreservation and thawing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before the actual test is performed can introduce numerous variables that may jeopardize the results. Therefore, no T cell test is valid without assessing the functional fitness of the PBMC being utilized. This can only be accomplished through the inclusion of positive controls that actually evaluate the performance of the antigen-specific T cell and antigen presenting cell (APC) compartments. For Caucasians, CEF peptides have been commonly used to this extent. Moreover, CEF peptides only measure CD8 cell functionality. We introduce here universal CD8+ T cell positive controls without any racial bias, as well as positive controls for the CD4+ T cell and APC compartments. In summary, we offer new tools and strategies for the assessment of PBMC functional fitness required for reliable T cell immune monitoring.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Antigen-Presenting Cells/immunology , Antigens/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Peptides/immunology
13.
S Afr Med J ; 110(9): 842-845, 2020 07 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743542

ABSTRACT

Antibody tests for the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV2, have been developed both as rapid diagnostic assays and for high-throughput formal serology platforms. Although these tests may be a useful adjunct to a diagnostic strategy, they have a number of limitations. Because of the antibody and viral dynamics of the coronavirus, their sensitivity can be variable, especially at early time points after symptom onset. Additional data are required on the performance of the tests in the South African population, especially with regard to development and persistence of antibody responses and whether antibodies are protective against reinfection. These tests may, however, be useful in guiding the public health response, providing data for research (including seroprevalence surveys and vaccine initiatives) and development of therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections , Immunologic Tests/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Serologic Tests/methods , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroepidemiologic Studies , South Africa/epidemiology
14.
J Biomed Mater Res A ; 108(10): 1974-1990, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-643515

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has revealed major shortcomings in our ability to mitigate transmission of infectious viral disease and provide treatment to patients, resulting in a public health crisis. Within months of the first reported case in China, the virus has spread worldwide at an unprecedented rate. COVID-19 illustrates that the biomaterials community was engaged in significant research efforts against bacteria and fungi with relatively little effort devoted to viruses. Accordingly, biomaterials scientists and engineers will have to participate in multidisciplinary antiviral research over the coming years. Although tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have historically dominated the field of biomaterials, current research holds promise for providing transformative solutions to viral outbreaks. To facilitate collaboration, it is imperative to establish a mutual language and adequate understanding between clinicians, industry partners, and research scientists. In this article, clinical perspectives are shared to clearly define emerging healthcare needs that can be met by biomaterials solutions. Strategies and opportunities for novel biomaterials intervention spanning diagnostics, treatment strategies, vaccines, and virus-deactivating surface coatings are discussed. Ultimately this review serves as a call for the biomaterials community to become a leading contributor to the prevention and management of the current and future viral outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biocompatible Materials , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Biosensing Techniques , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disinfection/methods , Drug Delivery Systems , Extracorporeal Circulation , Filtration , Humans , Immunologic Tests/instrumentation , Immunologic Tests/methods , Metals , Nanostructures , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/instrumentation , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Protective Devices , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/transmission , Surface-Active Agents , Tissue Engineering , Viral Vaccines
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(1): 441-447, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616154

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread to various regions worldwide. As of 27 April 2020, according to real-time statistics released by the World Health Organization, there have been 84 341 confirmed cases and 4643 deaths in China, with more than 2 979 484 confirmed cases and 206 450 deaths outside China. The detection of antibodies produced during the immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections has become an important laboratory method for the diagnosis of COVID-19. However, at present, a little research on these specific antibodies has been conducted. In this study, a retrospective analysis was used to explore the dynamic changes of serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody and factors affecting diagnostic efficacy, so as to provide a theoretical basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Testing/methods , China , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
16.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 146(1): 35-43, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436447

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection and development of coronavirus disease 2019 presents a major health care challenge of global dimensions. Laboratory diagnostics of infected patients, and the assessment of immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, presents a major cornerstone in handling the pandemic. Currently, there is an increase in demand for antibody testing and a large number of tests are already marketed or are in the late stage of development. However, the interpretation of test results depends on many variables and factors, including sensitivity, specificity, potential cross-reactivity and cross-protectivity, the diagnostic value of antibodies of different isotypes, and the use of antibody testing in identification of acutely ill patients or in epidemiological settings. In this article, the recently established COVID-19 Task Force of the German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL) addresses these issues on the basis of currently available data sets in this rapidly moving field.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Immunologic Tests/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Serologic Tests/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
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