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1.
N Engl J Med ; 385(1): 11-22, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence is urgently needed to support treatment decisions for children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. METHODS: We performed an international observational cohort study of clinical and outcome data regarding suspected MIS-C that had been uploaded by physicians onto a Web-based database. We used inverse-probability weighting and generalized linear models to evaluate intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) as a reference, as compared with IVIG plus glucocorticoids and glucocorticoids alone. There were two primary outcomes: the first was a composite of inotropic support or mechanical ventilation by day 2 or later or death; the second was a reduction in disease severity on an ordinal scale by day 2. Secondary outcomes included treatment escalation and the time until a reduction in organ failure and inflammation. RESULTS: Data were available regarding the course of treatment for 614 children from 32 countries from June 2020 through February 2021; 490 met the World Health Organization criteria for MIS-C. Of the 614 children with suspected MIS-C, 246 received primary treatment with IVIG alone, 208 with IVIG plus glucocorticoids, and 99 with glucocorticoids alone; 22 children received other treatment combinations, including biologic agents, and 39 received no immunomodulatory therapy. Receipt of inotropic or ventilatory support or death occurred in 56 patients who received IVIG plus glucocorticoids (adjusted odds ratio for the comparison with IVIG alone, 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33 to 1.82) and in 17 patients who received glucocorticoids alone (adjusted odds ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.22 to 1.33). The adjusted odds ratios for a reduction in disease severity were similar in the two groups, as compared with IVIG alone (0.90 for IVIG plus glucocorticoids and 0.93 for glucocorticoids alone). The time until a reduction in disease severity was similar in the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that recovery from MIS-C differed after primary treatment with IVIG alone, IVIG plus glucocorticoids, or glucocorticoids alone, although significant differences may emerge as more data accrue. (Funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Program and others; BATS ISRCTN number, ISRCTN69546370.).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Confidence Intervals , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Propensity Score , Regression Analysis , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
2.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-14, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575050

ABSTRACT

Of all the nutrients, vitamin A has been the most extensively evaluated for its impact on immunity. There are three main forms of vitamin A, retinol, retinal and retinoic acid (RA) with the latter being most biologically active and all-trans-RA (ATRA) its main derivative. Vitamin A is a key regulator of the functions of various innate and adaptive immune cells and promotes immune-homeostasis. Importantly, it augments the interferon-based innate immune response to RNA viruses decreasing RNA virus replication. Several clinical trials report decreased mortality in measles and Ebola with vitamin A supplementation.During the Covid-19 pandemic interventions such as convalescent plasma, antivirals, monoclonal antibodies and immunomodulator drugs have been tried but most of them are difficult to implement in resource-limited settings. The current review explores the possibility of mega dose vitamin A as an affordable adjunct therapy for Covid-19 illness with minimal reversible side effects. Insight is provided into the effect of vitamin A on ACE-2 expression in the respiratory tract and its association with the prognosis of Covid-19 patients. Vitamin A supplementation may aid the generation of protective immune response to Covid-19 vaccines. An overview of the dosage and safety profile of vitamin A is presented along with recommended doses for prophylactic/therapeutic use in randomised controlled trials in Covid-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vitamin A/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Immunity/drug effects , Immunomodulation/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vitamin A/analysis
3.
Chem Biol Interact ; 352: 109776, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568541

ABSTRACT

Boosting or suppressing our immune system represents an attractive adjunct in the treatment of infections including SARS-CoV-2, cancer, AIDS, malnutrition, age related problems and some inflammatory disorders. Thus, there has been a growing interest in exploring and developing novel drugs, natural or synthetic, that can manipulate our defence mechanism. Many of such studies, reported till date, have been designed to explore effect of the therapeutic on function of macrophages, being a key component in innate immune system. Indeed, RAW264.7, J774A.1, THP-1 and U937 cell lines act as ideal model systems for preliminary investigation and selection of dose for in vivo studies. Several bioassays have been standardized so far where many techniques require high throughput instruments, cost effective reagents and technical assistance that may hinder many scholars to perform a method demanding compilation of available protocols. In this review, we have taken an attempt for the first time to congregate commonly used in vitro immune-modulating techniques explaining their principles. The study detected that among about 40 different assays and more than 150 sets of primers, the methods of cell proliferation by MTT, phagocytosis by neutral red, NO detection by Griess reaction and estimation of expression of TLRs, COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1ß by PCR have been the most widely used to screen the therapeutics under investigation.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunomodulation/immunology , Animals , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/physiology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Phagocytosis/immunology
4.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 63-81, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544343

ABSTRACT

Although significant research has been done to find effective drugs against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), no definite effective drug exists. Thus, research has now shifted towards immunomodulatory agents other than antivirals. In this review, we aim to describe the latest findings on the role of type I interferon (IFN)-mediated innate antiviral response against SARS-CoV-2 and discuss the use of IFNs as a medication for COVID-19. A growing body of evidence has indicated a promoting active but delayed IFNs response to SARS-CoV-2 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in infected bronchial epithelial cells. Studies have demonstrated that IFNs' administration before the viral peak and the inflammatory phase of disease could offer a highly protective effect. However, IFNs' treatment during the inflammatory and severe stages of the disease causes immunopathology and long-lasting harm for patients. Therefore, it is critical to note the best time window for IFNs' administration. Further investigation of the clinical effectiveness of interferon for patients with mild to severe COVID-19 and its optimal timing and route of administration can be beneficial in finding a safe and effective antiviral therapy for the COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Interferon Type I/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation/drug effects
5.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518359

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) are bioactive particles that evoke beneficial responses in recipient cells. We identified a role for MSC-EV in immune modulation and cellular salvage in a model of SARS-CoV-2 induced acute lung injury (ALI) using pulmonary epithelial cells and exposure to cytokines or the SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD). Whereas RBD or cytokine exposure caused a pro-inflammatory cellular environment and injurious signaling, impairing alveolar-capillary barrier function, and inducing cell death, MSC-EVs reduced inflammation and reestablished target cell health. Importantly, MSC-EV treatment increased active ACE2 surface protein compared to RBD injury, identifying a previously unknown role for MSC-EV treatment in COVID-19 signaling and pathogenesis. The beneficial effect of MSC-EV treatment was confirmed in an LPS-induced rat model of ALI wherein MSC-EVs reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and respiratory dysfunction associated with disease. MSC-EV administration was dose-responsive, demonstrating a large effective dose range for clinical translation. These data provide direct evidence of an MSC-EV-mediated improvement in ALI and contribute new insights into the therapeutic potential of MSC-EVs in COVID-19 or similar pathologies of respiratory distress.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/complications , Acute Lung Injury/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Extracellular Vesicles/ultrastructure , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Models, Biological , Pneumonia/pathology , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction , THP-1 Cells
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716940, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1507125

ABSTRACT

At present, the global COVID-19 epidemic is still in a state of anxiety, and increasing the cure rate of critically ill patients is an important means to defeat the virus. From an immune perspective, ARDS driven by an inflammatory storm is still the direct cause of death in severe COVID-19 patients. Although some experience has been gained in the treatment of COVID-19, and intensive COVID-19 vaccination has been carried out recently, it is still effective to save lives to develop more effective programs to alleviate the inflammatory storm and ARDS in patients with SARS-CoV-2 or emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2. In reorganizing the ARDS-related inflammatory storm formation program in COVID-19 patients, we highlighted the importance of the vicious circle of inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory cell death, which is aggravated by blood circulation to form multi-system inflammation. Summarizes the interlocking and crisscrossing of inflammatory response and inflammatory cell death mechanisms including NETs, pyrolysis, apoptosis and PANoptosis in severe COVID-19. More importantly, in response to the inflammatory storm formation program we described, and on the premise of following ethical and clinical experimental norms, we propose a three-dimensional integrated program for future research based on boosting antiviral immune response at the initial stage, inhibiting inflammatory cytokine signaling at the exacerbation stage and inhibiting cell death before it's worse to prevent and alleviate ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Protocols , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Immunity , Immunomodulation , Inflammation , Signal Transduction
7.
Front Biosci (Landmark Ed) ; 26(10): 948-961, 2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1498509

ABSTRACT

Background: Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by severe respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The primary pathogenesis is over-activation of the immune system. SARS-CoV-2 continues to mutate and spread rapidly and no effective treatment options are yet available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to induce anti-inflammatory macrophages, regulatory T cells and dendritic cells. There are a rapidly increasing number of clinical investigations of cell-based therapy approaches for COVID-19. Objective: To summarize the pathogenic mechanism of SARS-CoV-2, and systematically formulated the immunomodulation of COVID-19 by MSCs and their exosomes, as well as research progress. Method: Searching PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov and Chictr.cn for eligible studies to be published or registered by May 2021. Main keywords and search strategies were as follows: ((Mesenchymal stem cells) OR (MSCs)) AND (COVID-19). Results: MSCs regulate the immune system to prevent cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and to promote endogenous repair by releasing various paracrine factors and exosomes. Conclusions: MSC therapy is thus a promising candidate for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Exosomes/transplantation , Immunomodulation/immunology , Lung Injury/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Exosomes/immunology , Exosomes/metabolism , Humans , Lung Injury/physiopathology , Lung Injury/virology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Regeneration/immunology , Regeneration/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
Stem Cells Transl Med ; 10(11): 1482-1490, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490914

ABSTRACT

As our life expectancy increases, specific medical conditions appear, and new challenges are met in terms of global health. Frailty has become a medical and scientific concept to define pathologies where inflammation, depressed immune system, cellular senescence, and molecular aging converge. But more importantly, frailty is the ultimate cause of death that limits our life span and deteriorates health in an increasing proportion of the world population. The difficulty of tackling this problem is the combination of factors that influence frailty appearance, such as stem cells exhaustion, inflammation, loss of regeneration capability, and impaired immunomodulation. To date, multiple research fields have found mechanisms participating in this health condition, but to make progress, science will need to investigate frailty with an interdisciplinary approach. This article summarizes the current efforts to understand frailty from their processes mediated by inflammation, aging, and stem cells to provide a new perspective that unifies the efforts in producing advanced therapies against medical conditions in the context of frailty. We believe this approach against frailty is particularly relevant to COVID-19, since people in a state of frailty die more frequently due to the hyperinflammatory process associated with this infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Inflammation/complications , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Aging/physiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Frailty/etiology , Frailty/therapy , Humans , Immunomodulation/physiology , Inflammation/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/trends , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/physiology , Regeneration/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction/physiology
9.
Mediators Inflamm ; 2021: 9924542, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450632

ABSTRACT

Compared with other deadly diseases, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is highly infectious with a relatively low mortality rate. Although critical cases account for only 5% of cases, the mortality rate for the same is nearly 50%. Therefore, the key to the COVID-19 treatment is to effectively treat severe patients and reduce the transition from severe to critical cases. A retrospective study was carried out to evaluate outcomes of treatment in patients with severe and critical COVID-19 admitted to a COVID-19 special hospital in Wuhan, China. A total of 75 severe and critical COVID-19 patients were admitted and treated with immunomodulation as the main strategy combined with anti-inflammatory therapy and appropriate anticoagulation. Leukocyte levels in patients with 7-14 days of onset to diagnosis were significantly lower than in those with >14 days. Higher levels of globulin and D-dimer and lower lymphocyte levels were found in the older age group (>65 years) than in the middle-aged group (50-64 years). Patients with comorbidity had higher levels of inflammatory indicators. After treatment, 65 (86.67%) patients were cured, 7 (9.33%) had improved, and 3 (4.00%) had died. Median hospitalization duration was 23 days. Fatal cases showed continuously increased levels of globulin, dehydrogenase (LDH), hypersensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), D-dimer, and cytokines during treatment. Time from onset to diagnosis, age, and comorbidity are important influencing factors on treatment effects. The occurrence of immunosuppression, "cytokine storm," and thrombosis may be an important cause of death in severely infected cases. In conclusion, high cure rate and low mortality suggested that immunomodulation combined with anti-inflammatory therapy and appropriate anticoagulant therapy is a good strategy for treatment of patients with severe and critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Pharmacotherapy ; 40(5): 416-437, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449937

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has evolved into an emergent global pandemic. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can manifest on a spectrum of illness from mild disease to severe respiratory failure requiring intensive care unit admission. As the incidence continues to rise at a rapid pace, critical care teams are faced with challenging treatment decisions. There is currently no widely accepted standard of care in the pharmacologic management of patients with COVID-19. Urgent identification of potential treatment strategies is a priority. Therapies include novel agents available in clinical trials or through compassionate use, and other drugs, repurposed antiviral and immunomodulating therapies. Many have demonstrated in vitro or in vivo potential against other viruses that are similar to SARS-CoV-2. Critically ill patients with COVID-19 have additional considerations related to adjustments for organ impairment and renal replacement therapies, complex lists of concurrent medications, limitations with drug administration and compatibility, and unique toxicities that should be evaluated when utilizing these therapies. The purpose of this review is to summarize practical considerations for pharmacotherapy in patients with COVID-19, with the intent of serving as a resource for health care providers at the forefront of clinical care during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunomodulation , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Azetidines/administration & dosage , Azetidines/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Drug Combinations , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Immunization, Passive , Interferon-alpha/administration & dosage , Interferon-alpha/adverse effects , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Nelfinavir/administration & dosage , Nelfinavir/adverse effects , Nitro Compounds , Pandemics , Purines , Pyrazoles , Ribavirin/administration & dosage , Ribavirin/adverse effects , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Ritonavir/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfonamides/administration & dosage , Sulfonamides/adverse effects , Thiazoles/administration & dosage , Thiazoles/adverse effects
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716084, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430699

ABSTRACT

A binary model for the classification of chronic diseases has formerly been proposed. The model classifies chronic diseases as "high Treg" or "low Treg" diseases according to the extent of regulatory T cells (Treg) activity (frequency or function) observed. The present paper applies this model to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The model correctly predicts the efficacy or inefficacy of several immune-modulating drugs in the treatment of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease. It also correctly predicts the class of pathogens mostly associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The clinical implications are the following: (a) any search for new immune-modulating drugs for the treatment of COVID-19 should exclude candidates that do not induce "high Treg" immune reaction or those that do not spare CD8+ T cells; (b) immune-modulating drugs, which are effective against SARS-CoV-2, may not be effective against any variant of the virus that does not induce "low Treg" reaction; (c) any immune-modulating drug, which is effective in treating COVID-19, will also alleviate most coinfections; and (d) severe COVID-19 patients should avoid contact with carriers of "low Treg" pathogens.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunomodulation/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Chronic Disease/classification , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sirolimus/therapeutic use
12.
Arch Immunol Ther Exp (Warsz) ; 69(1): 25, 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411512

ABSTRACT

The term host defense peptides arose at the beginning to refer to those peptides that are part of the host's immunity. Because of their broad antimicrobial capacity and immunomodulatory activity, nowadays, they emerge as a hope to combat resistant multi-drug microorganisms and emerging viruses, such as the case of coronaviruses. Since the beginning of this century, coronaviruses have been part of different outbreaks and a pandemic, and they will be surely part of the next pandemics, this review analyses whether these peptides and their derivatives are ready to be part of the treatment of the next coronavirus pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemical synthesis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemical synthesis , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/immunology , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Immunomodulation , Respiratory Tract Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology
13.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411083

ABSTRACT

Type I Interferons (IFN-I) are a family of potent antiviral cytokines that act through the direct restriction of viral replication and by enhancing antiviral immunity. However, these powerful cytokines are a caged lion, as excessive and sustained IFN-I production can drive immunopathology during infection, and aberrant IFN-I production is a feature of several types of autoimmunity. As specialized producers of IFN-I plasmacytoid (p), dendritic cells (DCs) can secrete superb quantities and a wide breadth of IFN-I isoforms immediately after infection or stimulation, and are the focus of this review. Notably, a few days after viral infection pDCs tune down their capacity for IFN-I production, producing less cytokines in response to both the ongoing infection and unrelated secondary stimulations. This process, hereby referred to as "pDC exhaustion", favors viral persistence and associates with reduced innate responses and increased susceptibility to secondary opportunistic infections. On the other hand, pDC exhaustion may be a compromise to avoid IFN-I driven immunopathology. In this review we reflect on the mechanisms that initially induce IFN-I and subsequently silence their production by pDCs during a viral infection. While these processes have been long studied across numerous viral infection models, the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has brought their discussion back to the fore, and so we also discuss emerging results related to pDC-IFN-I production in the context of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Interferon Type I/biosynthesis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunomodulation , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
14.
Cell ; 181(5): 969-977, 2020 05 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385208

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection is mild in the majority of individuals but progresses into severe pneumonia in a small proportion of patients. The increased susceptibility to severe disease in the elderly and individuals with co-morbidities argues for an initial defect in anti-viral host defense mechanisms. Long-term boosting of innate immune responses, also termed "trained immunity," by certain live vaccines (BCG, oral polio vaccine, measles) induces heterologous protection against infections through epigenetic, transcriptional, and functional reprogramming of innate immune cells. We propose that induction of trained immunity by whole-microorganism vaccines may represent an important tool for reducing susceptibility to and severity of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Immunomodulation , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS Virus/physiology , Animals , BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Virus Replication
17.
Turk J Ophthalmol ; 51(4): 231-242, 2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380043

ABSTRACT

Immunomodulatory agents are often used in the systemic treatment of non-infectious uveitis. These drugs consist of corticosteroids, conventional immunosuppressives, and biological agents. As it is known that they suppress the immune system, the most important concern associated with immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) is the increased risk of infection. The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Although severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection may develop in all people, patients who receive IMT may be at higher risk in terms of both the transmission of the infection and more severe disease course. Therefore, guidelines on the management of patients receiving IMT due to uveitis during the pandemic are needed. In this review, we examined the immunomodulatory drugs used in the treatment of uveitis in terms of infectious complications and the data of patients who received IMT during the COVID-19 pandemic and discussed recommendations for the use of these drugs. According to the latest information, patients who receive IMT may continue their treatment as long as there are no disruptions in regular complete blood count (especially white blood cell count >4,000/µL) and liver and kidney function tests. Patients diagnosed with COVID-19 should be managed with a multidisciplinary approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Uveitis/drug therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Decision-Making , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , Kidney Function Tests , Leukocyte Count , Liver Function Tests , Ophthalmology , Risk Assessment
18.
Clin Immunol ; 231: 108842, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372923

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 causes coronavirus disease 2019, a pandemic which was originated from Wuhan city of China. The pandemic has affected millions of people worldwide. The pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 is characterized by a cytokine storm in the blood (cytokinemia) and tissues, especially the lungs. One of the major repercussions of this inflammatory process is the endothelial injury-causing intestinal bleeding, coagulopathy, and thromboembolism which result in various sudden and unexpected post-COVID complications including kidney failure, myocardial infarction, or multiorgan failure. In this review, we have summarized the immune responses, biochemical changes, and inflammatory responses in the human body after infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The increased amount of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and involvement of complement proteins in inflammatory reaction increase the risk of occurrence of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Immunomodulation , Immunotherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation/therapy
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716407, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359193

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a new strain of coronavirus and the causative agent of the current global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). There are currently no FDA-approved antiviral drugs for COVID-19 and there is an urgent need to develop treatment strategies that can effectively suppress SARS-CoV-2 infection. Numerous approaches have been researched so far, with one of them being the emerging exosome-based therapies. Exosomes are nano-sized, lipid bilayer-enclosed structures, share structural similarities with viruses secreted from all types of cells, including those lining the respiratory tract. Importantly, the interplay between exosomes and viruses could be potentially exploited for antiviral drug and vaccine development. Exosomes are produced by virus-infected cells and play crucial roles in mediating communication between infected and uninfected cells. SARS-CoV-2 modulates the production and composition of exosomes, and can exploit exosome formation, secretion, and release pathways to promote infection, transmission, and intercellular spread. Exosomes have been exploited for therapeutic benefits in patients afflicted with various diseases including COVID-19. Furthermore, the administration of exosomes loaded with immunomodulatory cargo in combination with antiviral drugs represents a novel intervention for the treatment of diseases such as COVID-19. In particular, exosomes derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are used as cell-free therapeutic agents. Mesenchymal stem cell derived exosomes reduces the cytokine storm and reverse the inhibition of host anti-viral defenses associated with COVID-19 and also enhances mitochondrial function repair lung injuries. We discuss the role of exosomes in relation to transmission, infection, diagnosis, treatment, therapeutics, drug delivery, and vaccines, and present some future perspectives regarding their use for combating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Drug Carriers/therapeutic use , Exosomes/metabolism , Immunomodulation/immunology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/transmission , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
20.
Neurol Neurochir Pol ; 55(4): 357-368, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341885

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The global pandemic of COVID-19 began in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Research into effective therapies has been conducted worldwide. Currently, there is no antiviral treatment and many patients develop a severe course of the disease, including severe respiratory failure. Due to similar pathomechanisms of inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) and COVID-19, immunomodulatory drugs that are registered for the treatment of MS are under study in the SARS-CoV-2 infection in clinical trials. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using clinicaltrials.gov, we found information related to ongoing clinical studies on potential drugs for COVID-19 which are also used in MS therapy. The outcomes of several trials were published on pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. RESULTS: There were 18 clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness and safety of interferon-ß, fingolimod, or leflunomide in COVID-19. Some trial outcomes available at pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov suggested an association of these drug treatments with improvements in signs and symptoms, and the disease course. CONCLUSION: The administration of immunomodulatory drugs in COVID-19 may result in potential beneficial effects probably associated with their anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. Further research is warranted to confirm the long-term effects of immunomodulatory therapies in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Immunomodulation , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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