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1.
Molecules ; 27(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613911

ABSTRACT

When developing drugs against SARS-CoV-2, it is important to consider the characteristics of patients with different co-morbidities. People infected with HIV-1 are a particularly vulnerable group, as they may be at a higher risk than the general population of contracting COVID-19 with clinical complications. For such patients, drugs with a broad spectrum of antiviral activity are of paramount importance. Glycyrrhizinic acid (Glyc) and its derivatives are promising biologically active compounds for the development of such broad-spectrum antiviral agents. In this work, derivatives of Glyc obtained by acylation with nicotinic acid were investigated. The resulting preparation, Glycyvir, is a multi-component mixture containing mainly mono-, di-, tri- and tetranicotinates. The composition of Glycyvir was characterized by HPLC-MS/MS and its toxicity assessed in cell culture. Antiviral activity against three strains of SARS-CoV-2 was tested in vitro on Vero E6 cells by MTT assay. Glycyvir was shown to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro (IC502-8 µM) with an antiviral activity comparable to the control drug Remdesivir. In addition, Glycyvir exhibited marked inhibitory activity against HIV pseudoviruses of subtypes B, A6 and the recombinant form CRF63_02A (IC50 range 3.9-27.5 µM). The time-dependence of Glycyvir inhibitory activity on HIV pseudovirus infection of TZM-bl cells suggested that the compound interfered with virus entry into the target cell. Glycyvir is a promising candidate as an agent with low toxicity and a broad spectrum of antiviral action.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glycyrrhizic Acid/chemistry , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV-1/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , HIV Infections/virology , HeLa Cells , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Vero Cells
2.
Cancer Cell ; 40(1): 103-108.e2, 2022 01 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596342

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer are more likely to have impaired immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. We study the breadth of responses against SARS-CoV-2 variants after primary vaccination in 178 patients with a variety of tumor types and after booster doses in a subset. Neutralization of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta SARS-CoV-2 variants is impaired relative to wildtype, regardless of vaccine type. Regardless of viral variant, mRNA1273 is the most immunogenic, followed by BNT162b2, and then Ad26.COV2.S. Neutralization of more variants (breadth) is associated with a greater magnitude of wildtype neutralization, and increases with time since vaccination; advancing age associates with a lower breadth. The concentrations of anti-spike protein antibody are a good surrogate for breadth (positive predictive value of =90% at >1,000 U/mL). Booster SARS-CoV-2 vaccines confer enhanced breadth. These data suggest that achieving a high antibody titer is desirable to achieve broad neutralization; a single booster dose with the current vaccines increases the breadth of responses against variants.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aging/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Immunocompromised Host , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , In Vitro Techniques , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/therapy , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Load
3.
Life Sci Alliance ; 5(3)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1552086

ABSTRACT

Murine neural stem cells (NSCs) were recently shown to release piRNA-containing exosomes/microvesicles (Ex/Mv) for exerting antiviral immunity, but it remains unknown if these Ex/Mv could target SARS-CoV-2 and whether the PIWI-piRNA system is important for these antiviral actions. Here, using in vitro infection models, we show that hypothalamic NSCs (htNSCs) Ex/Mv provided an innate immunity protection against SARS-CoV-2. Importantly, enhanced antiviral actions were achieved by using induced Ex/Mv that were derived from induced htNSCs through twice being exposed to several RNA fragments of SARS-CoV-2 genome, a process that was designed not to involve protein translation of these RNA fragments. The increased antiviral effects of these induced Ex/Mv were associated with increased expression of piRNA species some of which could predictably target SARS-CoV-2 genome. Knockout of piRNA-interacting protein PIWIL2 in htNSCs led to reductions in both innate and induced antiviral effects of Ex/Mv in targeting SARS-CoV-2. Taken together, this study demonstrates a case suggesting Ex/Mv from certain cell types have innate and adaptive immunity against SARS-CoV-2, and the PIWI-piRNA system is important for these antiviral actions.


Subject(s)
Argonaute Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell-Derived Microparticles/metabolism , Exosomes , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Genome, Viral , Humans , Hypothalamus/metabolism , Immune System , Immunity, Innate , In Vitro Techniques , Mice
4.
Cell Rep ; 37(3): 109838, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517083

ABSTRACT

As severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spreads, variants with enhanced virulence and transmissibility have emerged. Although in vitro systems allow rapid characterization, they do not fully recapitulate the dynamic interaction of virions and neutralizing antibodies in the airway. Here, we demonstrate that the N501Y variant permits respiratory infection in unmodified mice. We utilize N501Y to survey in vivo pseudovirus infection dynamics and susceptibility to reinfection with the L452R (Los Angeles), K417N + E484K (South Africa), and L452R + K417N + E484Q (India) variants. Human coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)+ or vaccinated antibody isotypes, titers, variant receptor binding domain (RBD) binding, and neutralization potential are studied, revealing numerous significant correlations. Immune escape of the K417N + E484K variant is observed because infection can be appreciated in the nasopharynx, but not lungs, of mice transferred with low-antibody-tier plasma. Conversely, near-complete protection is observed in animals receiving high-antibody-tier plasma, a phenomenon that can only be appreciated in vivo.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Genetic Variation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immune System , Immunization, Passive/methods , In Vitro Techniques , Mice , Mutation , Nasopharynx/virology , Protein Binding , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
5.
J Clin Invest ; 131(21)2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495789

ABSTRACT

To explore how the immune system controls clearance of SARS-CoV-2, we used a single-cell, mass cytometry-based proteomics platform to profile the immune systems of 21 patients who had recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection without need for admission to an intensive care unit or for mechanical ventilation. We focused on receptors involved in interactions between immune cells and virus-infected cells. We found that the diversity of receptor repertoires on natural killer (NK) cells was negatively correlated with the viral clearance rate. In addition, NK subsets expressing the receptor DNAM1 were increased in patients who more rapidly recovered from infection. Ex vivo functional studies revealed that NK subpopulations with high DNAM1 expression had cytolytic activities in response to target cell stimulation. We also found that SARS-CoV-2 infection induced the expression of CD155 and nectin-4, ligands of DNAM1 and its paired coinhibitory receptor TIGIT, which counterbalanced the cytolytic activities of NK cells. Collectively, our results link the cytolytic immune responses of NK cells to the clearance of SARS-CoV-2 and show that the DNAM1 pathway modulates host-pathogen interactions during SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Receptors, Natural Killer Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/immunology , Cohort Studies , Cytotoxicity, Immunologic , Female , Heterografts , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunophenotyping , In Vitro Techniques , Ligands , Male , Mice , Mice, SCID , Middle Aged , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily D/immunology , Pandemics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Viral Load , Young Adult
6.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480885

ABSTRACT

In our in vitro and in vivo studies, we used Acalypha indica root methanolic extract (AIRME), and investigated their free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Primarily, phytochemical analysis showed rich content of phenols (70.92 mg of gallic acid/g) and flavonoids (16.01 mg of rutin/g) in AIRME. We then performed HR-LC-MS and GC-MS analyses, and identified 101 and 14 phytochemical compounds, respectively. Among them, ramipril glucuronide (1.563%), antimycin A (1.324%), swietenine (1.134%), quinone (1.152%), oxprenolol (1.118%), choline (0.847%), bumetanide (0.847%) and fenofibrate (0.711%) are the predominant phytomolecules. Evidence from in vitro studies revealed that AIRME scavenges DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in a concentration dependent manner (10-50 µg/mL). Similarly, hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation were also remarkably inhibited by AIRME as concentration increases (20-100 µg/mL). In vitro antioxidant activity of AIRME was comparable to ascorbic acid treatment. For in vivo studies, carrageenan (1%, sub-plantar) was injected to rats to induce localized inflammation. Acute inflammation was represented by paw-edema, and significantly elevated (p < 0.05) WBC, platelets and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, AIRME pretreatment (150/300 mg/kg bodyweight) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased edema volume. This was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) reduction of WBC, platelets and CRP with both doses of AIRME. The decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase in paw tissue were restored (p < 0.05 / p < 0.01) with AIRME in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, AIRME attenuated carrageenan-induced neutrophil infiltrations and vascular dilation in paw tissue. For the first time, our findings demonstrated the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of AIRME, which could be considered to develop novel anti-inflammatory drugs.


Subject(s)
Acalypha/chemistry , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Disease Models, Animal , Edema/drug therapy , Edema/enzymology , Edema/pathology , Free Radical Scavengers/chemistry , Free Radical Scavengers/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Male , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Roots/chemistry , Rats , Rats, Wistar
7.
Dis Markers ; 2021: 6803510, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443673

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is currently the most significant public health threat worldwide. Patients with severe COVID-19 usually have pneumonia concomitant with local inflammation and sometimes a cytokine storm. Specific components of the SARS-CoV-2 virus trigger lung inflammation, and recruitment of immune cells to the lungs exacerbates this process, although much remains unknown about the pathogenesis of COVID-19. Our study of lung type II pneumocyte cells (A549) demonstrated that ORF7, an open reading frame (ORF) in the genome of SARS-CoV-2, induced the production of CCL2, a chemokine that promotes the chemotaxis of monocytes, and decreased the expression of IL-8, a chemokine that recruits neutrophils. A549 cells also had an increased level of IL-6. The results of our chemotaxis Transwell assay suggested that ORF7 augmented monocyte infiltration and reduced the number of neutrophils. We conclude that the ORF7 of SARS-CoV-2 may have specific effects on the immunological changes in tissues after infection. These results suggest that the functions of other ORFs of SARS-CoV-2 should also be comprehensively examined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Chemotaxis , Monocytes/pathology , Neutrophils/pathology , Open Reading Frames/physiology , Pneumonia/pathology , Viral Proteins/metabolism , A549 Cells , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Proteins/genetics
8.
Database (Oxford) ; 20212021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387844

ABSTRACT

Understanding the underlying molecular and structural similarities between seemingly heterogeneous sets of drugs can aid in identifying drug repurposing opportunities and assist in the discovery of novel properties of preclinical small molecules. A wealth of information about drug and small molecule structure, targets, indications and side effects; induced gene expression signatures; and other attributes are publicly available through web-based tools, databases and repositories. By processing, abstracting and aggregating information from these resources into drug set libraries, knowledge about novel properties of drugs and small molecules can be systematically imputed with machine learning. In addition, drug set libraries can be used as the underlying database for drug set enrichment analysis. Here, we present Drugmonizome, a database with a search engine for querying annotated sets of drugs and small molecules for performing drug set enrichment analysis. Utilizing the data within Drugmonizome, we also developed Drugmonizome-ML. Drugmonizome-ML enables users to construct customized machine learning pipelines using the drug set libraries from Drugmonizome. To demonstrate the utility of Drugmonizome, drug sets from 12 independent SARS-CoV-2 in vitro screens were subjected to consensus enrichment analysis. Despite the low overlap among these 12 independent in vitro screens, we identified common biological processes critical for blocking viral replication. To demonstrate Drugmonizome-ML, we constructed a machine learning pipeline to predict whether approved and preclinical drugs may induce peripheral neuropathy as a potential side effect. Overall, the Drugmonizome and Drugmonizome-ML resources provide rich and diverse knowledge about drugs and small molecules for direct systems pharmacology applications. Database URL: https://maayanlab.cloud/drugmonizome/.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Databases, Pharmaceutical , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Discovery , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Drug Repositioning , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Machine Learning , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/chemically induced , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Small Molecule Libraries , User-Computer Interface , Virus Replication/drug effects
9.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110436, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386311

ABSTRACT

Dental professionals work closely with patients and present an increased risk of person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, the use of ultrasonic scalers, air-water syringes, and slow and high-speed handpieces, which are common in the dental office, generate spatter and aerosol. The use of preprocedural mouthrinses has been proposed to reduce the viral load in saliva and oropharyngeal tissues, thus decreasing viral load in dental aerosol. Although some mouthrinses demonstrates an antiviral effect, there is limited evidence about the clinical efficacy of any mouthrinse in the reduction of SARS-CoV-2 in the dental aerosol. We hypothesized that mouthrinses may reduce SARS-CoV-2 viral load in the oropharynx and its fluids reducing viral load in dental aerosol. The potential use of mouthrinses is discussed, along with proposal of in vitro and clinical studies, in order to evaluate this hypothesis. If this hypothesis holds true, dental professionals and patients may benefit from the routine use of preprocedural mouthrinses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Models, Biological , Mouthwashes/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load , Aerosols , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dental Auxiliaries , Dentists , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Mouthwashes/chemistry , Oropharynx/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saliva/virology
10.
ACS Nano ; 14(6): 7651-7658, 2020 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387149

ABSTRACT

Layered systems of commonly available fabric materials can be used by the public and healthcare providers in face masks to reduce the risk of inhaling viruses with protection that is about equivalent to or better than the filtration and adsorption offered by 5-layer N95 respirators. Over 70 different common fabric combinations and masks were evaluated under steady-state, forced convection air flux with pulsed aerosols that simulate forceful respiration. The aerosols contain fluorescent virus-like nanoparticles to track transmission through materials that greatly assist the accuracy of detection, thus avoiding artifacts including pore flooding and the loss of aerosol due to evaporation and droplet breakup. Effective materials comprise both absorbent, hydrophilic layers and barrier, hydrophobic layers. Although the hydrophobic layers can adhere virus-like nanoparticles, they may also repel droplets from adjacent absorbent layers and prevent wicking transport across the fabric system. Effective designs are noted with absorbent layers comprising terry cloth towel, quilting cotton, and flannel. Effective designs are noted with barrier layers comprising nonwoven polypropylene, polyester, and polyaramid.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Masks , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Textiles , Aerosols , Air Microbiology , Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Filtration , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Masks/supply & distribution , Nanoparticles/ultrastructure , Particle Size , Permeability , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Water
11.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(12): e1008959, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388958

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 genome annotation revealed the presence of 10 open reading frames (ORFs), of which the last one (ORF10) is positioned downstream of the N gene. It is a hypothetical gene, which was speculated to encode a 38 aa protein. This hypothetical protein does not share sequence similarity with any other known protein and cannot be associated with a function. While the role of this ORF10 was proposed, there is growing evidence showing that the ORF10 is not a coding region. Here, we identified SARS-CoV-2 variants in which the ORF10 gene was prematurely terminated. The disease was not attenuated, and the transmissibility between humans was maintained. Also, in vitro, the strains replicated similarly to the related viruses with the intact ORF10. Altogether, based on clinical observation and laboratory analyses, it appears that the ORF10 protein is not essential in humans. This observation further proves that the ORF10 should not be treated as the protein-coding gene, and the genome annotations should be amended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Genome, Viral , Mutation , Open Reading Frames/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , Virus Replication , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Codon, Nonsense , Female , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Proteins/metabolism
12.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 571: 152-158, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330656

ABSTRACT

Potent neutralizing antibodies (Abs) have been proven with therapeutic efficacy for the intervention against SARS-CoV-2. Majority of these Abs function by directly interfering with the virus entry to host cells. Here, we identified a receptor binding domain (RBD) specific monoclonal Ab (mAb) 82A6 with efficient neutralizing potency against authentic SARS-CoV-2 virus. As most Abs targeting the non-receptor binding motif (RBM) region, 82A6 was incapable to block the RBD-ACE2 interaction. In particular, it actively promoted the S1 subunit shedding from the S protein, which may lead to effective reduction of intact SARS-CoV-2 viruses. Importantly, it could block potential syncytia formation associated with post-infectious cell surface expression of S proteins. Our study evidenced a RBD specific Ab with unique beneficial efficacy against SARS-CoV-2 infection, which might bring informative significance to understand the collective effects of neutralizing Abs elicited in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibody Specificity , Binding Sites/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Giant Cells/immunology , Giant Cells/virology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunization, Passive , In Vitro Techniques , Protein Domains , Protein Subunits , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Virus Shedding
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314666

ABSTRACT

Proinflammatory cytokine production following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV-2) is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Like SARS CoV-1, SARS CoV-2 enters host cells via its spike protein, which attaches to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). As SARS CoV-1 spike protein is reported to induce cytokine production, we hypothesized that this pathway could be a shared mechanism underlying pathogenic immune responses. We herein compared the capabilities of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), SARS CoV-1 and SARS CoV-2 spike proteins to induce cytokine expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We observed that only specific commercial lots of SARS CoV-2 induce cytokine production. Surprisingly, recombinant SARS CoV-2 spike proteins from different vendors and batches exhibited different patterns of cytokine induction, and these activities were not inhibited by blockade of spike protein-ACE2 binding using either soluble ACE2 or neutralizing anti-S1 antibody. Moreover, commercial spike protein reagents contained varying levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which correlated directly with their abilities to induce cytokine production. The LPS inhibitor, polymyxin B, blocked this cytokine induction activity. In addition, SARS CoV-2 spike protein avidly bound soluble LPS in vitro, rendering it a cytokine inducer. These results not only suggest caution in monitoring the purity of SARS CoV-2 spike protein reagents, but they indicate the possibility that interactions of SARS CoV-2 spike protein with LPS from commensal bacteria in virally infected mucosal tissues could promote pathogenic inflammatory cytokine production.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Models, Biological , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects
14.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311204

ABSTRACT

Autoantibodies against IFN-α and IFN-ω (type I IFNs) were recently reported as causative for severe COVID-19 in the general population. Autoantibodies against IFN-α and IFN-ω are present in almost all patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) caused by biallelic deleterious or heterozygous dominant mutations in AIRE. We therefore hypothesized that autoantibodies against type I IFNs also predispose patients with APS-1 to severe COVID-19. We prospectively studied 6 patients with APS-1 between April 1, 2020 and April 1, 2021. Biobanked pre-COVID-19 sera of APS-1 subjects were tested for neutralizing autoantibodies against IFN-α and IFN-ω. The ability of the patients' sera to block recombinant human IFN-α and IFN-ω was assessed by assays quantifying phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) as well as infection-based IFN-neutralization assays. We describe 4 patients with APS-1 and preexisting high titers of neutralizing autoantibodies against IFN-α and IFN-ω who contracted SARS-CoV-2, yet developed only mild symptoms of COVID-19. None of the patients developed dyspnea, oxygen requirement, or high temperature. All infected patients with APS-1 were females and younger than 26 years of age. Clinical penetrance of neutralizing autoantibodies against type I IFNs for severe COVID-19 is not complete.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferon Type I/immunology , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/complications , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , Female , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Interferon-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Male , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Transcription Factors/genetics , Virus Replication/immunology , Young Adult
15.
Nucleosides Nucleotides Nucleic Acids ; 40(8): 790-797, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310863

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a pandemic of the coronavirus disease in 2019. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays an essential role in RNA replication and transcription in SARS-CoV-2. In this study, we focused on the RNA template component of viral RdRp structure and analyzed human microRNAs (miRNAs) targeting specific sequences in this RNA. By examining miRNA databases and using an in vitro RNA-RNA interaction assay, we observed hsa-miR-15b-5p interacting with the RNA component of viral RdRp. Our findings provide evidence that hsa-miR15b-5p may suppresses viral infection and proliferation by targeting the RNA template component of SARS-CoV-2 RdRp.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral , MicroRNAs/physiology , RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Genetic , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcription, Genetic
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304673

ABSTRACT

Macrophages (Mφs) are instrumental regulators of the immune response whereby they acquire diverse functional phenotypes following their exposure to microenvironmental cues that govern their differentiation from monocytes and their activation. The complexity and diversity of the mycobacterial cell wall have empowered mycobacteria with potent immunomodulatory capacities. A heat-killed (HK) whole-cell preparation of Mycobacterium obuense (M. obuense) has shown promise as an adjunctive immunotherapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer. Moreover, HK M. obuense has been shown to trigger the differentiation of human monocytes into a monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) type named Mob-MDM. However, the transcriptomic profile and functional properties of Mob-MDMs remain undefined during an activation state. Here, we characterized cytokine/chemokine release patterns and transcriptomic profiles of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon γ (IFNγ)-activated human MDMs that were differentiated with HK M. obuense (Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)), macrophage colony-stimulating factor M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)), or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)). Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) demonstrated a unique cytokine/chemokine release pattern (interleukin (IL)-10low, IL-12/23p40low, IL-23p19/p40low, chemokine (C-x-C) motif ligand (CXCL)9low) that was distinct from those of M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ). Furthermore, M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) maintained IL-10 production at significantly higher levels compared to GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) despite being activated with M1-Mφ-activating stimuli. Comparative RNA sequencing analysis pointed to a distinct transcriptome profile for Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) relative to both M-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) and GM-MDM(LPS/IFNγ) that comprised 417 transcripts. Functional gene-set enrichment analysis revealed significant overrepresentation of signaling pathways and biological processes that were uniquely related to Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ). Our findings lay a foundation for the potential integration of HK M. obuense in specific cell-based immunotherapeutic modalities such as adoptive transfer of Mφs (Mob-MDM(LPS/IFNγ)) for cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/immunology , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacokinetics , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , In Vitro Techniques , Interferon-gamma/pharmacology , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophage Activation/drug effects , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor/pharmacology , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Transcriptome
17.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 96: 107797, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300822

ABSTRACT

Specific antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 structural protein have a wide range of effects in the diagnose, prevention and treatment of the COVID-19 epidemic. Among them, egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY), which has high safety, high yield, and without inducing antibody-dependent enhancement, is an important biological candidate. In this study, specific IgY against the conservative nucleocapsid protein (NP) of SARS-CoV-2 was obtained by immunizing hens. Through a series of optimized precipitation and ultrafiltration extraction schemes, its purity was increased to 98%. The hyperimmune IgY against NP (N-IgY) at a titer of 1:50,000 showed strong NP binding ability, which laid the foundation of N-IgY's application targeting NP. In an in vitro immunoregulatory study, N-IgY (1 mg/mL) modulated NP-induced immune response by alleviating type II interferon secretion stimulated by NP (20 µg/mL). In summary, N-IgY can be mass produced by achievable method, which endows it with potential value against the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulins/immunology , Immunologic Factors/immunology , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/therapy , Chickens , Drug Development , Egg Yolk/chemistry , Egg Yolk/metabolism , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulins/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Immunomodulation , In Vitro Techniques , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
18.
Sci Signal ; 14(690)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299215

ABSTRACT

Inorganic polyphosphates (polyPs) are linear polymers composed of repeated phosphate (PO4 3-) units linked together by multiple high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds. In addition to being a source of energy, polyPs have cytoprotective and antiviral activities. Here, we investigated the antiviral activities of long-chain polyPs against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In molecular docking analyses, polyPs interacted with several conserved amino acid residues in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the host receptor that facilitates virus entry, and in viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). ELISA and limited proteolysis assays using nano- LC-MS/MS mapped polyP120 binding to ACE2, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed interactions between ACE2 and SARS-CoV-2 RdRp and identified the specific amino acid residues involved. PolyP120 enhanced the proteasomal degradation of both ACE2 and RdRp, thus impairing replication of the British B.1.1.7 SARS-CoV-2 variant. We thus tested polyPs for functional interactions with the virus in SARS-CoV-2-infected Vero E6 and Caco2 cells and in primary human nasal epithelial cells. Delivery of a nebulized form of polyP120 reduced the amounts of viral positive-sense genomic and subgenomic RNAs, of RNA transcripts encoding proinflammatory cytokines, and of viral structural proteins, thereby presenting SARS-CoV-2 infection in cells in vitro.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Polyphosphates/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Administration, Inhalation , Amino Acid Sequence , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Caco-2 Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/chemistry , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Models, Biological , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Polyphosphates/administration & dosage , Polyphosphates/chemistry , Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Proteolysis/drug effects , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
19.
Biochem J ; 478(13): 2465-2479, 2021 07 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290092

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for COVID-19, a human disease that has caused over 2 million deaths, stretched health systems to near-breaking point and endangered economies of countries and families around the world. Antiviral treatments to combat COVID-19 are currently lacking. Remdesivir, the only antiviral drug approved for the treatment of COVID-19, can affect disease severity, but better treatments are needed. SARS-CoV-2 encodes 16 non-structural proteins (nsp) that possess different enzymatic activities with important roles in viral genome replication, transcription and host immune evasion. One key aspect of host immune evasion is performed by the uridine-directed endoribonuclease activity of nsp15. Here we describe the expression and purification of nsp15 recombinant protein. We have developed biochemical assays to follow its activity, and we have found evidence for allosteric behaviour. We screened a custom chemical library of over 5000 compounds to identify nsp15 endoribonuclease inhibitors, and we identified and validated NSC95397 as an inhibitor of nsp15 endoribonuclease in vitro. Although NSC95397 did not inhibit SARS-CoV-2 growth in VERO E6 cells, further studies will be required to determine the effect of nsp15 inhibition on host immune evasion.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Endoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Allosteric Regulation , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endoribonucleases/isolation & purification , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Enzyme Assays , Fluorescence , High-Throughput Screening Assays , In Vitro Techniques , Kinetics , Naphthoquinones/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Solutions , Vero Cells , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/isolation & purification , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
20.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289016

ABSTRACT

We summarize here in vitro evidences of efficacy for convalescent plasma, currently approved vaccines and monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOC: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, P.1, and B.1.617.2), variants of interest (VOI: B.1.427/B.1.429, P.2, B.1.525, P.3, B.1.526, and B.1.671.1), and other strains (B.1.1.298 and B.1.258delta). While waiting from real world clinical efficacy, these data provide guidance for the treating physician.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Plasma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive/standards , In Vitro Techniques , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
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