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1.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e057963, 2022 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784832

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are the front lines during the COVID-19 pandemic. They are more exposed to COVID-19 than other professions. Studies from other countries have shown that the mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of HCWs were affected during this pandemic. However, studies on mental health in Indonesia remain scarce and no study has evaluated the HRQoL among HCWs. Thus, this study was designed to explore the mental health status and HRQoL among HCWs in Indonesia. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: This was an open online survey in Indonesia conducted from December 2020 to February 2021. PARTICIPANTS: This study involved HCWs who worked during the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the 502 respondents who accessed the online questionnaire, 392 were included in the analysis. OUTCOMES: Mental health status was measured using the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale and HRQoL was measured using the second version of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF12v2). RESULTS: The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among HCWs was 29.4%, 44.9% and 31.8%, respectively. Using the SF12v2 questionnaire, 354 (90.3%) HCWs were found to have impaired physical component and 156 (39.8%) HCWs have impaired mental component. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of mental health problems among HCWs was high in Indonesia. HRQoL, particularly the physical component, was affected in most HCWs. Thus, policymakers should give more attention to the mental health and HRQoL of HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Mental Health , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Trop Pediatr ; 68(3)2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784400

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the number of cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is increasing, reported cases in Asian countries are still low, particularly in Indonesia. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of patients with MIS-C in a tertiary referral hospital in Indonesia. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study with collected data of patients with MIS-C admitted to Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo from March 2020 to April 2021. RESULTS: The first case of MIS-C was detected 5 months after the first reported coronavirus disease 2019 case in Indonesia. Thirteen patients out of 158 positive admitted patients for COVID-19 were diagnosed with MIS-C during the study period. Of these 13 patients, 2 patients (15%) had a fatal outcome. Subjects were predominantly male, and the median age was 7.58 years (IQR 12.3) years. Most patients required mechanical ventilation (7 out of 13 patients) and intubation (8 out of 13 patients). Patients who needed intubation usually needed mechanical ventilation. All inflammatory markers, white blood cells, neutrophil counts, and all coagulation factor parameters (except for normal prothrombin time and activated partial prothrombin time) were elevated. The median time to MIS-C diagnosis was 2 days in the survivor group (n = 11) compared to 8.5 days in the non-survivor group (n = 2). Compared to the non-survivor group, those who survived spent more days in the hospital, received vasopressors earlier, and did not require mechanical ventilation as early as the non-survivors. CONCLUSIONS: Our work highlights the differences in MIS-C clinical course, treatment, and clinical outcomes between the two groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776222

ABSTRACT

Lack of knowledge often leads to nonchalant attitudes and improper practices that expose people to greater risks during a pandemic. Therefore, improving the general public's knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) concerning coronavirus disease (COVID-19) can play a pivotal role in reducing the risks, especially in a country such as Indonesia with its scarcity of health resources for testing and tracing. Using the case of Malang District, this study set out to evaluate KAP regarding COVID-19 and its risk factors immediately after the Malang health authorities implemented various preventive measures. A population-based survey involving 3425 individuals was carried out between 1 May and 20 May 2020. Our findings revealed that less than half of the respondents demonstrated accurate knowledge (25.3%), positive attitudes (36.6%), or frequent best practices (48.8%) with regard to COVID-19 prevention. The results of logistic regression analyses showed that more accurate knowledge was associated with more positive attitudes and more frequent best practices (OR = 1.603, p-value < 0.001; OR = 1.585, p-value < 0.001, respectively). More positive attitudes were also associated with more frequent best practices (OR = 1.126, p-value < 0.001). The level of KAP varied according to sociodemographic characteristics, access to the services of community health workers, and mobile health technology for COVID-19 screening. Some global health proposals to improve health behaviors among the general public in the context of the scarcity of health resource settings are suggested based on the study findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 Mar 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771196

ABSTRACT

To tackle the spread of COVID-19 globally, countries around the world have responded by implementing measures such as lockdowns, social distance maintenance, temporary school closures, and remote working and learning. COVID-19 social isolation has been found to increase stress, and potentially have long term harmful effects on both mental and physical health. Stress and compromised parenting often place children at risk of violence and abuse. In parallel, times of hardship might also provide an opportunity to build stronger relationships with our children. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) joined many other agencies and international organizations in recognizing the threat the pandemic might have on individual and family wellbeing, and has thus availed a number of light-touch parenting resources. One such tool is the 'Caring for your child in response to the COVID-19 lockdown' booklet, developed to enhance parenting skills, and to build family harmony as challenged by the COVID-19 context. This short communication reflects on a feasibility study that took place in Indonesia during the implementation of this booklet with 30 parents in five cities. Thematic analysis identified challenges in parenting during COVID-19, as well as reported positive experiences of engaging in the parenting resource. The findings are discussed with regard to the usefulness of light-touch parenting information, adding to the context of the feasibility and global scalability of reaching families. The implications pave the way to the engagement and implication of more intensive parenting information interventions in high-stress contexts. Despite the challenge, there is promising news for families globally, as agencies and policy-makers begin to recognize the importance of supporting families with the appropriate skills to navigate extreme stress contexts with effective strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Parenting , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Touch
6.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221089767, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is one of the most terrifying diabetic complications for patients, due to the high mortality rate and risk for amputation. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many diabetic patients limited their visits to the hospital, resulting in delays for treatment especially in emergency cases. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the characteristics of patients with DFU pre- and during COVID-19 pandemic period. Methods: This study was a retrospective cohort study using foot registry data. We compared our patients' characteristics pre-COVID-19 pandemic period (1 March 2019-28 February 2020) and during COVID-19 pandemic period (1 March 2020-28 February 2021). RESULTS: Cohorts of 84 and 71 patients with DFU pre- and during COVID-19 pandemic period, respectively, were included in this study. High infection grade (66.7% vs 83.1%, P = .032), osteomyelitis event (72.6% vs 87.3%, P = .04), leukocyte count (15 565.0/µL vs 20 280.0/µL, P = .002), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (7.7 vs 12.1, P = .008), waiting time-to-surgery (39.0 h vs 78.5 h, P = .034), and number of major amputation (20.2% vs 39.4%, P = .014) were significantly higher during the COVID-19 pandemic period. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with DFU had more severe infection, higher proportion of osteomyelitis, longer waiting time for getting surgical intervention, and higher incidence of major amputation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Diabetic Foot , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
7.
Acta Biomed ; 93(1): e2022018, 2022 03 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The number of COVID-19 cases surging despite the large scale of health promotion campaigns. This study aimed to find disease transmissibility and affected vaccine efficacy associated with the mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern. METHODS: The study was a descriptive temporal survey design with secondary ecological data: the whole-genome sequence (WGS) from the Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza (GISAID) and COVID-19 data from the Palembang City Health Office website. Bioinformatics software was used to detect mutations. RESULTS: Palembang submitted 43 whole genome sequences, 13 of which were Pangoline sequences classifications. CONCLUSIONS: The two concern variations, Alpha and Delta, were associated with increased transmissions and decreased vaccination efficacy using temporal analysis. Regulations governing the relaxation of mobility restrictions should be based on high rates of testing and tracing, and universal vaccination programs should require that all received two doses of any vaccines as fast as possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
8.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0259954, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753180

ABSTRACT

The advent of coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19, continues to trigger several important disruptions/innovations in practically every sector around the world. Additionally, the impacts are predominant in certain educational systems and in creating opportunities. Previous studies had addressed possible effective methods in handling distant learning and student interactions. This qualitative study explored lecturers' information literacy experience during online classes as a result of the pandemic. Semi-structured interview techniques were applied among participants, made up of 15 lecturers in the Humanities Faculty, Diponegoro University, Indonesia, and thematic analysis was used to analyze the data obtained. The results showed the focus of lecturers' information literacy experience was primarily on student interactions and knowledge of various online learning platforms. However, information repackaging was a significant initial consideration during virtual classes, after identifying salient student characteristics. In summary, the present study have contributed to the theoretical understanding of information literacy and may be of benefit to the teaching faculties for enhancing teaching and learning activities, as well as providing student support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Humanities/education , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Adult , Female , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Information Literacy , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research
9.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0265257, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745311

ABSTRACT

This research aims to find out the phenomenon of webinar competition from the viewpoint of the audience. Covid-19 pandemic makes webinars a means for knowledge dissemination. Many events offered turned out to be a tight competition among organizers and caused a different response for the audience. Academics participants' responses had never been known in depth so that they could be the basis for determining the strategy for the organizers. Using quantitative data through online surveys to further interpreted with the help of previous literature. The independent variables gender, age, frequency, cost, and place are used to determine their effect on loyalty, which is represented by the length of duration in participating in each webinar. The effectiveness of webinars as a means of disseminating ideas in the pandemic era still faces various challenges. Among academics, the loyalty at the webinar event is influenced by gender and age. It is important for organizers to effectively communicate to webinar participants so that they get the message they want to convey.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(3): 660-671, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736724

ABSTRACT

We retrospectively evaluated clinical features and outcomes in children treated for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) at Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, during 2011-2020. Among 283 patients, 153 (54.1%) were <5 years of age, and 226 (79.9%) had stage II or III TBM. Predictors of in-hospital death (n = 44 [15.5%]) were stage III TBM, hydrocephalus, male sex, low-income parents, seizures at admission, and lack of bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination. Predictors of postdischarge death (n = 18 [6.4%]) were hydrocephalus, tuberculoma, and lack of bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination. At treatment completion, 91 (32.1%) patients were documented to have survived, of whom 33 (36.3%) had severe neurologic sequelae and 118 (41.7%) had unknown outcomes. Predictors of severe neurologic sequelae were baseline temperature >38°C, stage III TBM, and baseline motor deficit. Despite treatment, childhood TBM in Indonesia causes substantial neurologic sequelae and death, highlighting the importance of improved early diagnosis, better tuberculosis prevention, and optimized TBM management strategies.


Subject(s)
Tuberculosis, Meningeal , Aftercare , Child , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Tuberculosis, Meningeal/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Meningeal/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Meningeal/epidemiology
11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 18(1): 2042135, 2022 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730549

ABSTRACT

In 2019, the World Health Organization (WHO) named the anti-vaccine movement one of the top 10 global health threats. This trend has shown that it can diminish public faith in government and increase public distrust of scientific results in the health sector, including the use of the COVID-19 vaccine. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-vaccine movement on Twitter social media platform, which uses Hashtag to protest vaccination regulations in the COVID-19 pandemic. The content analysis, relationship analysis, and word cloud analysis models were used in this study, which used a descriptive qualitative approach. The primary data source for this study is Hashtag, which are used to focus on three aspects. First, establish which information in Brazil, the United States, and Indonesia leads the anti-vaccine COVID-19 narrative. Second, how does the Hashtag link between each country work? Third, which narrative dominates the use of Hashtag in each of the three countries? According to the findings of this study, in Brazil, 69.2% of Twitter Hashtag associated to the COVID-19 vaccination were negative, compared to 59.4% in the USA and 62.8% in Indonesia. In general, the Hashtag used in the three countries to oppose COVID-19 vaccination policies have a clear and significant relationship. In Brazil, the Hashtag #covidiots was the most popular, while in the United States, #covivaccine was the most popular, and in Indonesia, #antivaccine was the most popular.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Anti-Vaccination Movement , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vaccination
12.
Glob Heart ; 17(1): 9, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726567

ABSTRACT

Background: Although there have been several studies investigating prognostic factors for mortality in COVID-19, there have been lack of studies in low- and middle-income countries, including Indonesia. To date, the country has the highest mortality rate among Asian countries. Objective: We sought to identify the prognostic factors of mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Jakarta. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we included all adult inpatients (≥18 years old) with confirmed COVID-19 from Koja General Hospital (North Jakarta, Indonesia) who had been hospitalized between March 20th and July 31st, 2020. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and radiology data were extracted from the medical records and compared between survivors and non-survivors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to explore the prognostic factors associated with in-hospital death. Results: Two hundred forty-three patients were included in the study, of whom 32 died. Comorbid of hypertension (OR 3.59; 95% CI 1.12-11.48; p = 0.031), obesity (OR 6.34; 95% CI 1.68-23.98; p = 0.007), immediate need of HFNC and/or IMV (OR 64.93; 95% CI 11.08-380.61; p < 0.001), abnormal RDW (OR 3.68; 95% CI 1.09-12.34; p = 0.035), ALC < 1,000/µL (OR 3.51; 95% CI 1.08-11.44; p = 0.038), D-dimer > 500 ng/mL (OR 9.36; 95% CI 1.53-57.12; p = 0.015) on admission, as well as chloroquine treatment (OR 3.61; 95% CI 1.09-11.99; p = 0.036) were associated with greater risk of overall mortality in COVID-19 patients. The likelihood of mortality increased with increasing number of prognostic factors. Conclusion: The potential prognostic factors of hypertension, obesity, immediate need of HFNC and/or IMV, abnormal RDW, ALC < 1,000/µL, D-dimer > 500 ng/mL, and chloroquine treatment could help clinicians to identify COVID-19 patients with poor prognosis at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Adolescent , Adult , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Morbidity , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Global COVID-19 outbreaks in early 2020 have burdened health workers, among them surveillance workers who have the responsibility to undertake routine disease surveillance activities. The aim of this study was to describe the quality of the implementation of Indonesia's Early Warning and Response Alert System (EWARS) for disease surveillance and to measure the burden of disease surveillance reporting quality before and during the COVID-19 epidemic in Indonesia. METHODS: A mixed-method approach was used. A total of 38 informants from regional health offices participated in Focus Group Discussion (FGD) and In-Depth Interview (IDI) for informants from Ministry of Health. The FGD and IDI were conducted using online video communication. Yearly completeness and timeliness of reporting of 34 provinces were collected from the application. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically, and quantitative data were analyzed descriptively. RESULTS: Major implementation gaps were found in poorly distributed human resources and regional infrastructure inequity. National reporting from 2017-2019 showed an increasing trend of completeness (55%, 64%, and 75%, respectively) and timeliness (55%, 64%, and 75%, respectively). However, the quality of the reporting dropped to 53% and 34% in 2020 concomitant with the SARS-CoV2 epidemic. CONCLUSIONS: Report completeness and timeliness are likely related to regional infrastructure inequity and the COVID-19 epidemic. It is recommended to increase report capacities with an automatic EWARS application linked systems in hospitals and laboratories.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Population Surveillance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Population Surveillance/methods , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Med Life ; 15(1): 7-14, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709142

ABSTRACT

Indonesia is currently experiencing the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, impacting maternal health services and maternal mortality. This research aims to investigate the use of antenatal care (ANC) during the COVID-19 second wave and the factors that play a role in this situation. A cross-sectional study was conducted during July 2021 on 344 pregnant women in primary, secondary, and tertiary maternal health care facilities in Pasuruan Regency, Indonesia. The data collection technique was simple random sampling, with face-to-face interviews assisted by questionnaires. Logistic regression and adjusted odds ratio with 95% CI and p<0.05 were performed to identify a significant relationship. 136 (39.5%) pregnant women did not use ANC services during the second wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. Husband's support (AOR=13.814, 95% CI: 8.090-23.588), believing that pregnant women are not afraid of contracting COVID-19 (AOR=6.501, 95% CI: 3.904-10.825), easy access to transportation (AOR=12.145, 95% CI: 6.186-23.846), ease of ANC fees (AOR=4.105, 95% CI: 2.424-6.950), no lockdown policy (AOR=3.130, 95% CI: 1.983-4.940), knowledge regarding COVID-19 (AOR=2.975, 95% CI: 1.793-4.938), COVID-19 information on social media (AOR=3.035, 95% CI: 1.179-7.815), COVID-19 prevention protocols in health facilities (AOR=8.478, 95% CI: 3.611-19.903) were predictors of ANC utilization. This encourages the importance of prioritizing health services for pregnant women during the pandemic, overcoming the fear of contracting COVID-19 through maternal education, husband support, easy access to ANC, and improving the quality of ANC service facilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prenatal Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Facilities and Services Utilization , Female , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Pregnancy , Prenatal Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Health Popul Nutr ; 41(1): 4, 2022 02 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700597

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic was the weakening of the community's economic condition. The weak economy of the community will have an impact on household food security. This study aims to determine food security in the COVID-19 pandemic situation and the impact of the pandemic on food security in urban and semi-urban areas. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with a total sample of 517 people who live in urban (Jakarta) and semi-urban (Depok) areas. The research data was collected online and purposively through Posyandu cadres who have access to family/community. Food security was measured using HFIAS (Household Food Insecurity Access Scale) method, while impact of COVID-19 pandemic was categorized into two categories: impacted (reduced income and laid off) and less impacted (not reduced income and laid off). Data analysis used the Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: There were 65.0% of households with various level of food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the multivariate analysis showed that family income during the COVID-19 pandemic (AOR = 4.2; CI = 2.7-6.7), the type of impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, i.e., reduced income and stopped working (AOR = 2.6; CI = 1.6-4.1), and the age of the respondent (AOR = 1.7; CI = 1.1-2.5) were significantly related to household food security during the pandemic after being controlled by husband's work status. Households with lower income had 4 times higher risk to experience food insecurity compared to those with higher income. Heavily impacted households (through reduced income and stopped working) had 3 times higher risk to experience food insecurity compared to those who did not. Additionally, we found that households with younger respondent (< 31 years old) had 2 times higher risk to experience food insecurity compared to those older counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted household food security in both urban and semi-urban areas through worsening employment status and income condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Food Security , Food Supply , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 19(3): 536-542, 2021 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687864

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several laboratory parameters have been linked to Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), with lymphocytes being one of the most important. Lymphopenia is frequently linked to a worsening of clinical symptoms and an increased risk of death in COVID-19. This study aimed to determine the role of lymphocyte levels in predicting COVID-19 patient mortality. METHODS: This is a prognostic study that is conducted from March 1 to August 31, 2020. Data from medical records and laboratory findings of COVID-19 patients were used in the study. Patient distribution and complete blood count were among the information gathered. ROC curve analysis, bivariate analysis (Chi-Square and Mann Whitney), in addition to survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier) were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: In a total of 318 patients, 59 were non-survivors and 259 were survivors. Besides, a cut-off value of ?1460 cells/µL (P<0.05) was used for lymphocyte levels. Lymphopenia also has a 4.35-fold increase in the risk of mortality. Furthermore, the survival analysis revealed differences in the probability of survival within 30 days between COVID-19 patients with lymphopenia and those without (HR: 5.5722 (3.2509-9.5510), 95% CI; p<0.0001). A lymphocyte count of ?1460 cell/µL can increase the risk of death by fourfold. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study indicated a significant difference in outcome between lymphopenia and non-lymphopenia patients. Lymphopenia plays an important role in estimating COVID-19 patient mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes , Nepal , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Geospat Health ; 17(s1)2022 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687131

ABSTRACT

With 25% confirmed cases of the country's total number of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on 31 January 2021, Jakarta has the highest confirmed cases of in Indonesia. The city holds a significant role as the centre of government and national economic activity for which pandemic have had a huge impact. Spatiotemporal analysis was employed to identify the current condition of disease transmission and to provide comprehensive information on the COVID-19 outbreak in Jakarta. We applied space-time analysis to visualise the pattern of COVID-19 hotspots in each time series. We also mapped area capacity of the referral hospitals covering the entire area of Jakarta to understand the hospital service range. This research was conducted in 4 stages: i) disease mapping; ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis; iii) space-time pattern analysis; and iv) areal capacity mapping. The analysis resulted in 144 sub-districts categorised as high vulnerability. Autocorrelation studies by Moran's I identified cluster patterns and the emerging hotspot results indicated successful interventions as the number of hotspots fell in the first period of social restrictions. The results presented should be beneficial for policy makers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spatio-Temporal Analysis
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648423

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study is to explore the impacts of COVID-19 and changes taking place among the Indonesian female sex worker (FSW) community during the COVID-19 pandemic and the predictors of these changes. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey and selected the participants using a purposive snowball sampling technique. Incentives were provided to participants in the form of a 5 USD e-wallet balance. Variables of interest included adaptation to online sex work, adherence to COVID-19 prevention measures during sex work, number of clients, income reduction, social support, condom access, and condom use frequency. Sociodemographic data and COVID-19 fear index values were also collected. Final analysis included 951 FSWs, of whom 36.4% of had adapted to online sex work and 48.6% had practiced COVID-19 prevention measures. Major reductions in client frequency and income were reported by 67.8% and 71.1% of respondents, respectively. However, only 36.3% of FSWs reported they had ever received any form of social support from any parties, public or private. Meanwhile, 16.7% encountered difficulties in accessing condoms and 12.5% reported less frequent condom use during the pandemic. Easy access to condoms was the main factor influencing the frequency of condom use. As expected, staying in employment protected FSWs from major income loss, while education and younger age predicted adaptive behavioral changes, such as taking up online sex work. The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted access to socioeconomic support systems and HIV prevention services among FSWs and has further exposed them to the dual jeopardy of HIV and COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sex Workers , Condoms , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Safe Sex
19.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262827, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1643285

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The potential role of medical students in raising awareness during public health emergencies has been acknowledged. To further explore their potentials as public educators and role models for the communities during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, this study aims to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of these students toward COVID-19. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted among undergraduate medical students in Indonesia. Socio-demographics characteristics, social interaction history, information-seeking behavior, as well as knowledge, attitude, and practice toward COVID-19 were collected through a self-reported questionnaire. A p-value of <0.05 indicated statistical significance. RESULTS: Out of 4870 respondents, 64.9% had positive attitude and 51.5% had positive practice toward COVID-19, while only 29.8% had adequate knowledge. Knowledge was slightly positively correlated with attitude and practice (ρ = 0.074 and ρ = 0.054, respectively; both p<0.001), while attitude was weakly correlated with practice (ρ = 0.234, p<0.001). Several factors including age, sex, place of residence, institution type, academic level, family income, history of chronic illness, prior volunteering experience, and perceptual awareness on COVID-19 were significantly associated with either knowledge, attitude, and/or practice toward COVID-19. Furthermore, health institution's and the government's press releases, as well as health expert opinions were deemed as the most reliable sources of COVID-19-related information-yet trivially none of these sources were associated with knowledge, attitude, and practice in the study population. CONCLUSION: Many undergraduate medical students in Indonesia had positive attitude and practice against COVID-19, yet only a few had adequate knowledge. This warrants further interventions to keep them updated with COVID-19 evidence to maximize their potentials in raising public awareness on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Perception/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Female , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Male , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
20.
Curr Neurovasc Res ; 18(3): 360-363, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. Indonesia had reported a 2.8% of mortality rate up to June 2021. CASE PRESENTATION: A strategy to control the virus spreading is by vaccination. The Indonesian Food and Drug Monitoring Agency had approved the use of CoronaVac, an inactivated virus vaccine developed by Sinovac. Most Adverse Events Following Immunization (AEFI) for Corona- Vac are mild, and the most common symptoms are injection-site pain, headache, and fatigue. Neurovascular adverse events, including thrombosis or ischaemic stroke after receiving CoronaVac have not previously been reported. CONCLUSION: Correspondingly, we reported three patients with an Acute Ischaemic Stroke (AIS) after the administration of CoronaVac in our hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects , Aged , Humans , Incidence , Indonesia/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
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