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1.
JAMA ; 327(15): 1478-1487, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756509

ABSTRACT

Importance: There is limited comparative epidemiological evidence on outcomes associated with COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy; monitoring pregnancy outcomes in large populations is required. Objective: To evaluate peripartum outcomes following COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based retrospective cohort study in Ontario, Canada, using a birth registry linked with the provincial COVID-19 immunization database. All births between December 14, 2020, and September 30, 2021, were included. Exposures: COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy, COVID-19 vaccination after pregnancy, and no vaccination. Main Outcomes and Measures: Postpartum hemorrhage, chorioamnionitis, cesarean delivery (overall and emergency cesarean delivery), admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and low newborn 5-minute Apgar score (<7). Linear and robust Poisson regression was used to generate adjusted risk differences (aRDs) and risk ratios (aRRs), respectively, comparing cumulative incidence of outcomes in those who received COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy with those vaccinated after pregnancy and those with no record of COVID-19 vaccination at any point. Inverse probability of treatment weights were used to adjust for confounding. Results: Among 97 590 individuals (mean [SD] age, 31.9 [4.9] years), 22 660 (23%) received at least 1 dose of COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy (63.6% received dose 1 in the third trimester; 99.8% received an mRNA vaccine). Comparing those vaccinated during vs after pregnancy (n = 44 815), there were no significantly increased risks of postpartum hemorrhage (incidence: 3.0% vs 3.0%; aRD, -0.28 per 100 individuals [95% CI, -0.59 to 0.03]; aRR, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.82-1.02]), chorioamnionitis (0.5% vs 0.5%; aRD, -0.04 per 100 individuals [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.09]; aRR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.70-1.21]), cesarean delivery (30.8% vs 32.2%; aRD, -2.73 per 100 individuals [95% CI, -3.59 to -1.88]; aRR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.89-0.95]), NICU admission (11.0% vs 13.3%; aRD, -1.89 per 100 newborns [95% CI, -2.49 to -1.30]; aRR, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.80-0.90]), or low Apgar score (1.8% vs 2.0%; aRD, -0.31 per 100 newborns [95% CI, -0.56 to -0.06]; aRR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.73-0.97]). Findings were qualitatively similar when compared with individuals who did not receive COVID-19 vaccination at any point (n = 30 115). Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study in Ontario, Canada, COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy, compared with vaccination after pregnancy and with no vaccination, was not significantly associated with increased risk of adverse peripartum outcomes. Study interpretation should consider that the vaccinations received during pregnancy were primarily mRNA vaccines administered in the second and third trimester.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Chorioamnionitis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Postpartum Hemorrhage , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Chorioamnionitis/epidemiology , Chorioamnionitis/etiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Ontario/epidemiology , Peripartum Period , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic
2.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-16, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574630

ABSTRACT

In a large-scale study, 128176 non-pregnant patients (228 studies) and 10000 pregnant patients (121 studies) confirmed COVID-19 cases included in this Meta-Analysis. The mean (confidence interval [CI]) of age and gestational age of admission (GA) in pregnant women was 33 (28-37) years old and 36 (34-37) weeks, respectively. Pregnant women show the same manifestations of COVID-19 as non-pregnant adult patients. Fever (pregnant: 75.5%; non-pregnant: 74%) and cough (pregnant: 48.5%; non-pregnant: 53.5%) are the most common symptoms in both groups followed by myalgia (26.5%) and chill (25%) in pregnant and dysgeusia (27%) and fatigue (26.5%) in non-pregnant patients. Pregnant women are less probable to show cough (odds ratio [OR] 0.7; 95% CI 0.67-0.75), fatigue (OR: 0.58; CI: 0.54-0.61), sore throat (OR: 0.66; CI: 0.61-0.7), headache (OR: 0.55; CI: 0.55-0.58) and diarrhea (OR: 0.46; CI: 0.4-0.51) than non-pregnant adult patients. The most common imaging found in pregnant women is ground-glass opacity (57%) and in non-pregnant patients is consolidation (76%). Pregnant women have higher proportion of leukocytosis (27% vs. 14%), thrombocytopenia (18% vs. 12.5%) and have lower proportion of raised C-reactive protein (52% vs. 81%) compared with non-pregnant patients. Leucopenia and lymphopenia are almost the same in both groups. The most common comorbidity in pregnant patients is diabetes (18%) and in non-pregnant patients is hypertension (21%). Case fatality rate (CFR) of non-pregnant hospitalized patients is 6.4% (4.4-8.5), and mortality due to all-cause for pregnant patients is 11.3% (9.6-13.3). Regarding the complications of pregnancy, postpartum hemorrhage (54.5% [7-94]), caesarean delivery (48% [42-54]), preterm labor (25% [4-74]) and preterm birth (21% [12-34]) are in turn the most prevalent complications. Comparing the pregnancy outcomes show that caesarean delivery (OR: 3; CI: 2-5), low birth weight (LBW) (OR: 9; CI: 2.4-30) and preterm birth (OR: 2.5; CI: 1.5-3.5) are more probable in pregnant woman with COVID-19 than pregnant women without COVID-19. The most prevalent neonatal complications are neonatal intensive care unit admission (43% [2-96]), fetal distress (30% [12-58]) and LBW (25% [16-37]). The rate of vertical transmission is 5.3% (1.3-16), and the rate of positive SARS-CoV-2 test for neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 is 8% (4-16). Overall, pregnant patients present with the similar clinical characteristics of COVID-19 when compared with the general population, but they may be more asymptomatic. Higher odds of caesarean delivery, LBW and preterm birth among pregnant patients with COVID-19 suggest a possible association between COVID-19 infection and pregnancy complications. Low risk of vertical transmission is present, and SARS-CoV-2 can be detected in all conception products, particularly placenta and breast milk. Interpretations of these results should be done cautiously due to the heterogeneity between studies; however, we believe our findings can guide the prenatal and postnatal considerations for COVID-19 pregnant patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/mortality , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnant Women , Premature Birth , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
3.
Ginekol Pol ; 92(11): 818-821, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573977

ABSTRACT

The influence of the blood group on the occurrence and severity of diseases has aroused the curiosity of scientists for many years. The AB0 group system is the best known and described blood group system. It is also the only system whose antibodies are constantly present in the blood serum. The most common blood type in Poland, according to data provided by Honorary blood donation and blood therapy, is group A Rh+ (plus), while the least common is group AB Rh- (minus). In studies of pregnant women scientists discovered the influence of blood type in the development of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, the risk of preterm labor, and even COVID-19 infection. The impact of the mothers' blood group also affects the birth weight of newborns, as well as the development of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to the heterospecificity of AB0. The influence of the blood group on the increased risk of developing certain diseases and complications of the neonatal period has also been proven. Therefore, it seems important to study blood groups of pregnant women and newborns of different nationalities, correlate the results with available reports and use this knowledge in everyday clinical practice. This will help to increase the speed of detection of diseases in pregnancy and neonatal period. It will also facilitate the management of the patient depending on their blood group.


Subject(s)
Blood Group Antigens , COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/blood , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Poland/epidemiology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 5864-5872, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432419

ABSTRACT

The aim was to investigate the association of the delivery mode and vertical transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) through the samples of vaginal secretions, placenta, cord blood, or amniotic fluid as well as the neonatal outcomes. This cross-sectional study presents an analysis of prospectively gathered data collected at a single tertiary hospital. Sixty-three pregnant women with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) participated in the study. Vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 was analyzed with reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests and blood tests for immunoglobulin G (IgG)-immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. All patients were in the mild or moderate category for COVID-19. Only one placental sample and two of the vaginal secretion samples were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Except for one, all positive samples were obtained from patients who gave birth by cesarean. All cord blood and amniotic fluid samples were negative for SARS-CoV-2. Two newborns were screened positive for COVID-19 IgG-IgM within 24 h after delivery, but the RT-PCR tests were negative. A positive RT-PCR result was detected in a neof a mother whose placenta, cord blood, amniotic fluid, and vaginal secretions samples were negative. He died due to pulmonary hemorrhage on the 11th day of life. In conclusion, we demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 can be detectable in the placenta or vaginal secretions of pregnant women. Detection of the virus in the placenta or vaginal secretions may not be associated with neonatal infection. Vaginal delivery may not increase the incidence of neonatal infection, and cesarean may not prevent vertical transmission. The decision regarding the mode of delivery should be based on obstetric indications and COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cesarean Section , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tertiary Care Centers , Vagina/virology , Young Adult
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 5864-5872, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252014

ABSTRACT

The aim was to investigate the association of the delivery mode and vertical transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) through the samples of vaginal secretions, placenta, cord blood, or amniotic fluid as well as the neonatal outcomes. This cross-sectional study presents an analysis of prospectively gathered data collected at a single tertiary hospital. Sixty-three pregnant women with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) participated in the study. Vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 was analyzed with reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests and blood tests for immunoglobulin G (IgG)-immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. All patients were in the mild or moderate category for COVID-19. Only one placental sample and two of the vaginal secretion samples were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Except for one, all positive samples were obtained from patients who gave birth by cesarean. All cord blood and amniotic fluid samples were negative for SARS-CoV-2. Two newborns were screened positive for COVID-19 IgG-IgM within 24 h after delivery, but the RT-PCR tests were negative. A positive RT-PCR result was detected in a neof a mother whose placenta, cord blood, amniotic fluid, and vaginal secretions samples were negative. He died due to pulmonary hemorrhage on the 11th day of life. In conclusion, we demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 can be detectable in the placenta or vaginal secretions of pregnant women. Detection of the virus in the placenta or vaginal secretions may not be associated with neonatal infection. Vaginal delivery may not increase the incidence of neonatal infection, and cesarean may not prevent vertical transmission. The decision regarding the mode of delivery should be based on obstetric indications and COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cesarean Section , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tertiary Care Centers , Vagina/virology , Young Adult
6.
JAMA ; 325(16): 1631-1639, 2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237389

ABSTRACT

Importance: Safe reduction of the cesarean delivery rate is a national priority. Objective: To evaluate the rates of cesarean delivery for nulliparous, term, singleton, vertex (NTSV) births in California in the context of a statewide multifaceted intervention designed to reduce the rates of cesarean delivery. Design, Setting, and Participants: Observational study of cesarean delivery rates from 2014 to 2019 among 7 574 889 NTSV births in the US and at 238 nonmilitary hospitals providing maternity services in California. From 2016 to 2019, California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative partnered with Smart Care California to implement multiple approaches to decrease the rates of cesarean delivery. Hospitals with rates of cesarean delivery greater than 23.9% for NTSV births were invited to join 1 of 3 cohorts for an 18-month quality improvement collaborative between July 2016 and June 2019. Exposures: Within the collaborative, multidisciplinary teams implemented multiple strategies supported by mentorship, shared learning, and rapid-cycle data feedback. Partnerships among nonprofit organizations, state governmental agencies, purchasers, and health plans addressed the external environment through transparency, award programs, and incentives. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was the change in cesarean delivery rates for NTSV births in California and a difference-in-differences analysis was performed to compare cesarean delivery rates for NTSV births in California vs the rates in the rest of the US. A mixed multivariable logistic regression model that adjusted for patient-level and hospital-level confounders also was used to assess the collaborative and the external statewide actions. The cesarean delivery rates for NTSV births at hospitals participating in the collaborative were compared with the rates from the nonparticipating hospitals and the rates in the participating hospitals prior to participation in the collaborative. Results: A total of 7 574 889 NTSV births occurred in the US from 2014 to 2019, of which 914 283 were at 238 hospitals in California. All California hospitals were exposed to the statewide actions to reduce the rates of cesarean delivery, including the 149 hospitals that had baseline rates of cesarean delivery greater than 23.9% for NTSV births, of which 91 (61%) participated in the quality improvement collaborative. The rate of cesarean delivery for NTSV births in California decreased from 26.0% (95% CI, 25.8%-26.2%) in 2014 to 22.8% (95% CI, 22.6%-23.1%) in 2019 (relative risk, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.87-0.89). The rate of cesarean delivery for NTSV births in the US (excluding California births) was 26.0% in both 2014 and 2019 (relative risk, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.996-1.005). The difference-in-differences analysis revealed that the reduction in the rate of cesarean delivery for NTSV births in California was 3.2% (95% CI, 1.7%-3.5%) higher than in the US (excluding California). Compared with the hospitals and the periods not exposed to the collaborative activities, and after adjusting for patient characteristics and time using a modified stepped-wedge analysis, exposure to collaborative activities was associated with a lower odds of cesarean delivery for NTSV births (24.4% vs 24.6%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.85-0.89]). Conclusions and Relevance: In this observational study of NTSV births in California from 2014 to 2019, the rates of cesarean delivery decreased over time in the setting of the implementation of a coordinated hospital-level collaborative and statewide initiatives designed to support vaginal birth.


Subject(s)
Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Health Policy , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , California , Female , Hospital Administration , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Multivariate Analysis , Parity , Pregnancy , State Government
7.
JAMA ; 325(20): 2076-2086, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206730

ABSTRACT

Importance: The outcomes of newborn infants of women testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 in pregnancy is unclear. Objective: To evaluate neonatal outcomes in relation to maternal SARS-CoV-2 test positivity in pregnancy. Design, Setting, and Participants: Nationwide, prospective cohort study based on linkage of the Swedish Pregnancy Register, the Neonatal Quality Register, and the Register for Communicable Diseases. Ninety-two percent of all live births in Sweden between March 11, 2020, and January 31, 2021, were investigated for neonatal outcomes by March 8, 2021. Infants with malformations were excluded. Infants of women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were matched, directly and using propensity scores, on maternal characteristics with up to 4 comparator infants. Exposures: Maternal test positivity for SARS-CoV-2 in pregnancy. Main Outcomes and Measures: In-hospital mortality; neonatal resuscitation; admission for neonatal care; respiratory, circulatory, neurologic, infectious, gastrointestinal, metabolic, and hematologic disorders and their treatments; length of hospital stay; breastfeeding; and infant test positivity for SARS-CoV-2. Results: Of 88 159 infants (49.0% girls), 2323 (1.6%) were delivered by mothers who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The mean gestational age of infants of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers was 39.2 (SD, 2.2) weeks vs 39.6 (SD, 1.8) weeks for comparator infants, and the proportions of preterm infants (gestational age <37 weeks) were 205/2323 (8.8%) among infants of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers and 4719/85 836 (5.5%) among comparator infants. After matching on maternal characteristics, maternal SARS-CoV-2 test positivity was significantly associated with admission for neonatal care (11.7% vs 8.4%; odds ratio [OR], 1.47; 95% CI, 1.26-1.70) and with neonatal morbidities such as respiratory distress syndrome (1.2% vs 0.5%; OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.50-3.84), any neonatal respiratory disorder (2.8% vs 2.0%; OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.07-1.90), and hyperbilirubinemia (3.6% vs 2.5%; OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.13-1.90). Mortality (0.30% vs 0.12%; OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 0.99-6.57), breastfeeding rates at discharge (94.4% vs 95.1%; OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67-1.05), and length of stay in neonatal care (median, 6 days in both groups; difference, 0 days; 95% CI, -2 to 7 days) did not differ significantly between the groups. Twenty-one infants (0.90%) of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in the neonatal period; 12 did not have neonatal morbidity, 9 had diagnoses with unclear relation to SARS-CoV-2, and none had congenital pneumonia. Conclusions and Relevance: In a nationwide cohort of infants in Sweden, maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy was significantly associated with small increases in some neonatal morbidities. Given the small numbers of events for many of the outcomes and the large number of statistical comparisons, the findings should be interpreted as exploratory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/etiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Gestational Age , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hyperbilirubinemia/epidemiology , Hyperbilirubinemia/etiology , Infant, Extremely Premature , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/mortality , Infant, Premature , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Live Birth/epidemiology , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Propensity Score , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/etiology , Resuscitation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sweden/epidemiology
8.
Semin Perinatol ; 45(5): 151430, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203278

ABSTRACT

Little empirical data support the use of telemedicine to provide medical and developmental follow-up care to preterm and high-risk infants after hospital discharge. Nevertheless, the COVID-19 pandemic temporarily rendered telemedicine the only means by which to provide essential follow-up care to this population. In this article we discuss our institution's experience with rapid implementation of telemedicine in a multi-site neonatal follow-up program as well as benefits and limitations of the use of telemedicine in this context. Finally, we discuss the current problems that must be solved in order to optimize telemedicine as a tool for providing comprehensive, multidisciplinary medical and developmental care to high risk infants and their families.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19 , Infant Care , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Telemedicine , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child Development , Family Health , Humans , Infant Care/methods , Infant Care/organization & administration , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Infant, Premature/growth & development , Program Evaluation , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e217523, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198345

ABSTRACT

Importance: The incidence of mother-to-newborn SARS-CoV-2 transmission appears low and may be associated with biological and social factors. However, data are limited on the factors associated with neonatal clinical or viral testing outcomes. Objective: To ascertain the percentage of neonates who were born to mothers with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results during the birth hospitalization, the clinical and sociodemographic factors associated with neonatal test result positivity, and the clinical and virological outcomes for newborns during hospitalization and 30 days after discharge. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter cohort study included 11 academic or community hospitals in Massachusetts and mother-neonate dyads whose delivery and discharge occurred between March 1, 2020, and July 31, 2020. Eligible dyads were identified at each participating hospital through local COVID-19 surveillance and infection control systems. Neonates were born to mothers with positive SARS-CoV-2 test results within 14 days before to 72 hours after delivery, and neonates were followed up for 30 days after birth hospital discharge. Exposures: Hypothesized maternal risk factors in neonatal test result positivity included maternal COVID-19 symptoms, vaginal delivery, rooming-in practice, Black race or Hispanic ethnicity, and zip code-derived social vulnerability index. Delivery indicated by worsening maternal COVID-19 symptoms was hypothesized to increase the risk of adverse neonatal health outcomes. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes for neonates were (1) positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, (2) indicators of adverse health, and (3) clinical signs and viral testing. Test result positivity was defined as at least 1 positive result on a specimen obtained by nasopharyngeal swab using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. Clinical and testing data were obtained from electronic medical records of nonroutine health care visits within 30 days after hospital discharge. Results: The cohort included 255 neonates (mean [SD] gestational age at birth, 37.9 [2.6] weeks; 62 [24.3%] with low birth weight or preterm delivery) with 250 mothers (mean [SD] age, 30.4 [6.3] years; 121 [48.4%] were of Hispanic ethnicity). Of the 255 neonates who were born to mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection, 225 (88.2%) were tested for SARS-CoV-2 and 5 (2.2%) had positive results during the birth hospitalization. High maternal social vulnerability was associated with higher likelihood of neonatal test result positivity (adjusted odds ratio, 4.95; 95% CI, 1.53-16.01; P = .008), adjusted for maternal COVID-19 symptoms, delivery mode, and rooming-in practice. Adverse outcomes during hospitalization were associated with preterm delivery indicated by worsening maternal COVID-19 symptoms. Of the 151 newborns with follow-up data, 28 had nonroutine clinical visits, 7 underwent SARS-CoV-2 testing, and 1 had a positive result. Conclusions and Relevance: The findings emphasize the importance of both biological and social factors in perinatal SARS-CoV-2 infection outcomes. Newborns exposed to SARS-CoV-2 were at risk for both direct and indirect adverse health outcomes, supporting efforts of ongoing surveillance of the virus and long-term follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Delivery, Obstetric , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Low Birth Weight , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Male , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Socioeconomic Factors
10.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(7): 741-746, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182902

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe maternal characteristics and clinical outcomes of infants born to mothers with positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) tests during pregnancy at an urban, safety-net hospital in Boston. STUDY DESIGN: We abstracted electronic chart data from 75 pregnant women with positive SARS-CoV-2 tests at any stage of gestation until 72 hours after birth who delivered consecutively between March 31 and August 6, 2020 at our center. We collected clinical data on maternal and infant characteristics, including testing, signs, and symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), delivery outcomes, newborn care practices (skin-to-skin care, location of care, and breastfeeding) and 30-day postdischarge infant emergency room visits and readmissions. We described categorical characteristics as percentages for this case series. RESULTS: Among 75 pregnant women, 47 (63%) were Hispanic, 10 (13%) had hypertension, 23 (30%) had prepregnancy obesity, and 57 (76%) had symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Regarding birth outcomes, 32 (41%) had cesarean delivery and 14 (19%) had preterm birth. Among 75 infants, 5 (7%) had positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction tests in the first week of life, all of whom were born to Hispanic mothers with symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and had clinical courses consistent with gestational age. Six (8%) infants visited the emergency department within 30 days of discharge; one was admitted with a non-COVID-19 diagnosis. CONCLUSION: At our urban, safety-net hospital among pregnant women with positive SARS-CoV-2 tests, 41% had a cesarean delivery and 19% had a preterm birth. Seven percent of infants had one or more positive SARS-CoV-2 tests and all infants had clinical courses expected for gestational age. KEY POINTS: · Among 75 pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 positive testing at our center, five infants (7%) had one or more SARS-CoV-2 positive tests in the first week of life.. · Infants with positive SARS-CoV-2 tests had clinical courses expected for gestational age..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Boston/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gestational Age , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant Care/methods , Infant Care/statistics & numerical data , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Safety-net Providers/statistics & numerical data
11.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 22(9): 533-537, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972947

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization classified coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) as a pandemic and recommends strict restrictions regarding most aspects of daily activities. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether the pandemic has changed the prenatal care and pregnancy outcome in pregnant women without COVID-19. METHODS: The authors conducted a cross-sectional study to describe changes in outpatient clinic visits and to compare the rates of cesarean and instrumental deliveries between two periods of time: March-April 2020 (during the COVID-19 outbreak) with March-April of the preceding year, 2019. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 outbreak, visits to obstetric triage, gynecologic triage, high-risk clinic, and ultrasound units decreased by 36.4%, 34.7%, 32.8%, and 18.1%, respectively. The medical center experienced a 17.8% drop in the total number of births (610 births) compared with March and April 2019 (742 births). During the outbreak women were more likely to be nulliparous (33.3% vs. 27.6%, P = 0.02) and present with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy (7.5% vs. 4%, P = 0.005) or gestational diabetes (13% vs. 10%, P = 0.03). More epidural analgesia was used (83.1% vs. 77.1%, P = 0.006). There were more operative vaginal deliveries during the outbreak (16.7% vs. 6.8%, P = 0.01). All other maternal and neonatal outcomes were comparable between the two periods. CONCLUSIONS: The medical facility experienced a major decline in all aspects of the routine obstetrics activities during the time of the pandemic. The higher rate of operative vaginal deliveries among nulliparous may be associated with the pandemic effect on the rate of high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery, Obstetric/trends , Facilities and Services Utilization/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Infection Control/methods , Prenatal Care/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Israel/epidemiology , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome
12.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 106(2): e836-e854, 2021 01 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922691

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To determine impact of mild fasting hyperglycemia in early pregnancy (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] 5.1-5.5 mmol/L) on pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: We measured FPG at 11.9 ± 1.8 weeks in 2006 women from a prospective cohort study. Women with FPG ≥5.6 mmol/L (19) received treatment and were excluded from further analyses. A total of 1838 women with FPG <5.6 mmol/L received a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. RESULTS: Of all participants, 78 (4.2%) had FPG 5.1 to 5.5 mmol/L in early pregnancy, of which 49 had a normal OGTT later in pregnancy (high fasting normal glucose tolerance [NGT] group). Compared with the NGT group with FPG <5.1 mmol/L in early pregnancy (low fasting NGT group, n = 1560), the high fasting NGT group had a higher body mass index (BMI), higher insulin resistance with more impaired insulin secretion and higher FPG and 30 minute glucose levels on the OGTT. The admission rate to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was significantly higher in the high fasting NGT group than in the low fasting NGT group (20.4% [10] vs 9.3% [143], P = .009), with no difference in duration (7.0 ± 8.6 vs 8.4 ± 14.3 days, P = .849) or indication for NICU admission between both groups. The admission rate to NICU remained significantly higher (odds ratio 2.47; 95% confidence interval 1.18-5.19, P = .017) after adjustment for age, BMI, and glucose levels at the OGTT. CONCLUSIONS: When provision of an OGTT is limited such as in the Covid-19 pandemic, using FPG in early pregnancy could be an easy alternative to determine who is at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.


Subject(s)
Fasting/blood , Hyperglycemia/blood , Intensive Care, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications/blood , Adult , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19 , Female , Gestational Age , Glucose Tolerance Test , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/etiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/blood , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/epidemiology , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/therapy , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
13.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 9(5): 596-608, 2020 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919282

ABSTRACT

Understanding the role that children play in the clinical burden and propagation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections, is emerging. While the severe manifestations and acute clinical burden of COVID-19 have largely spared children compared with adults, understanding the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, management, and prevention opportunities and the social and behavioral impacts on child health is vital. Foremost is clarifying the contribution of asymptomatic and mild infections to transmission within the household and community and the clinical and epidemiologic significance of uncommon severe post-infectious complications. Here, we summarize the current knowledge, identify resources, and outline research opportunities. Pediatric infectious diseases clinicians have a unique opportunity to advocate for the inclusion of children in epidemiological, clinical, treatment, and prevention studies to optimize their care as well as to represent children in the development of guidance and policy during pandemic response.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child Health Services , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pediatrics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(1): 93-98, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-884843

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of confirmed novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease or infants under investigation among a cohort of U.S. neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Secondarily, to evaluate hospital policies regarding maternal COVID-19 screening and related to those infants born to mothers under investigation or confirmed to have COVID-19. STUDY DESIGN: Serial cross-sectional surveys of MEDNAX-affiliated NICUs from March 26 to April 3, April 8 to April 19, May 4 to May 22, and July 13 to August 2, 2020. The surveys included questions regarding COVID-19 patient burden and policies regarding infant separation, feeding practices, and universal maternal screening. RESULTS: Among 386 MEDNAX-affiliated NICUs, responses were received from 153 (42%), 160 (44%), 165 (45%), 148 (38%) across four rounds representing an active patient census of 3,465, 3,486, 3,452, and 3,442 NICU admitted patients on the day of survey completion. Confirmed COVID-19 disease in NICU admitted infants was rare, with the prevalence rising from 0.03 (1 patient) to 0.44% (15 patients) across the four survey rounds, while the prevalence of patients under investigation increased from 0.8 to 2.6%. Hospitals isolating infants from COVID-19-positive mothers fell from 46 to 20% between the second and fourth surveys, while centers permitting direct maternal breastfeeding increased 17 to 47% over the same period. Centers reporting universal severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) screening for all expectant mothers increased from 52 to 69%. CONCLUSION: Among a large cohort of NICU infants, the prevalence of infants under investigation or with confirmed neonatal COVID-19 disease was low. Policies regarding universal maternal screening for SARS-CoV-2, infant isolation from positive mothers, and direct maternal breastfeeding for infants born to positive mothers are rapidly evolving. As universal maternal screening for SARS-CoV-2 becomes more common, the impact of these policies requires further investigation. KEY POINTS: · In this cohort, neonatal COVID-19 is rare.. · Policies regarding isolation and breastfeeding for infants are rapidly evolving.. · Most hospitals are now providing universal screening for expectant mothers for SARS-CoV-2..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Mass Screening , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Policy Making , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Prevalence , United States/epidemiology
15.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed ; 106(3): 330-335, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-781104

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To summarise currently reported neonatal cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: A search strategy was designed to retrieve all articles published from 1 December 2019 to 12 May 2020, by combining the terms 'coronavirus' OR 'covid' OR 'SARS-CoV-2') AND ('neonat*' OR 'newborn') in the following electronic databases: MEDLINE/Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, MedRxiv, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Review and the WHO COVID-19 database, with no language restrictions. Quality of studies was evaluated by using a specific tool for assessment of case reports and/or case series. RESULTS: Twenty-six observational studies (18 case reports and 8 case series) with 44 newborns with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection were included in the final analysis. Studies were mainly from China and Italy. Half of neonates had a documented contact with the infected mother and one out of three infected neonates was admitted from home. Median age at diagnosis was 5 days. One out of four neonates was asymptomatic, and the remaining showed mild symptoms typical of acute respiratory infections and/or gastrointestinal symptoms. The majority of neonates were left in spontaneous breathing (room air) and had good prognosis after a median duration of hospitalisation of 10 days. CONCLUSIONS: Most neonates with SARS-CoV-2 infection were asymptomatic or presented mild symptoms, generally were left in spontaneous breathing and had a good prognosis after median 10 days of hospitalisation. Large epidemiological and clinical cohort studies, as well as the implementation of collaborative networks, are needed to improve the understanding of the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection in neonates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Global Health , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/physiopathology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Patient Care Management , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Am J Perinatol ; 37(8): 869-872, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-163401

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To date, no information on late-onset infection in newborns to mother with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contracted in pregnancy are available. This study aimed to evaluate postdischarge SARS-CoV-2 status of newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy that, at birth, were negative to SARS-CoV-2. STUDY DESIGN: This is an observational study of neonates born to mothers with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). RESULTS: Seven pregnant women with documented SARS-CoV-2 infection have been evaluated in our institution. One woman had a spontaneous abortion at 8 weeks of gestational age, four women recovered and are still in follow-up, and two women delivered. Two newborns were enrolled in the study. At birth and 3 days of life, newborns were negative to SARS-CoV-2. At 2-week follow-up, one newborn tested positive although asymptomatic. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight the importance of follow-up of newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy, since they remain at risk of contracting the infection in the early period of life and long-term consequences are still unknown. KEY POINTS: · Newborns to mothers with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy can acquire the infection later after birth.. · Newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy need a long-term follow-up, even if they tested negative at birth.. · Specific guidelines for the long-term follow-up of newborns to mothers with COVID-19 in pregnancy are needed..


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Postnatal Care , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , Aftercare/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/physiopathology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Needs Assessment , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Postnatal Care/methods , Postnatal Care/standards , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
17.
Am J Perinatol ; 37(8): 780-791, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-157858

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has urged the development and implementation of guidelines and protocols on diagnosis, management, infection control strategies, and discharge planning. However, very little is currently known about neonatal COVID-19 and severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections. Thus, many questions arise with regard to respiratory care after birth, necessary protection to health care workers (HCW) in the delivery room and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and safety of bag and mask ventilation, noninvasive respiratory support, deep suctioning, endotracheal intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Indeed, these questions have created tremendous confusion amongst neonatal HCW. In this manuscript, we comprehensively reviewed the current evidence regarding COVID-19 perinatal transmission, respiratory outcomes of neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 and infants with documented SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the evidence for using different respiratory support modalities and aerosol-generating procedures in this specific population. The results demonstrated that to date, neonatal COVID-19 infection is uncommon, generally acquired postnatally, and associated with favorable respiratory outcomes. The reason why infants display a milder spectrum of disease remains unclear. Nonetheless, the risk of severe or critical illness in young patients exists. Currently, the recommended respiratory approach for infants with suspected or confirmed infection is not evidence based but should include all routinely used types of support, with the addition of viral filters, proper personal protective equipment, and placement of infants in isolation rooms, ideally with negative pressure. As information is changing rapidly, clinicians should frequently watch out for updates on the subject. KEY POINTS: · Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic urged development of guidelines.. · Neonatal COVID-19 disease is uncommon.. · Respiratory outcomes in neonates seems favorable.. · Current neonatal respiratory care should continue.. · Clinicians should watch frequently for updates..


Subject(s)
Airway Management , Coronavirus Infections , Infant, Newborn, Diseases , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Airway Management/methods , Airway Management/trends , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Evidence-Based Practice , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/epidemiology , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/prevention & control , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/therapy , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/virology , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
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