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1.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(1)2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085260

ABSTRACT

The surge in clinical demand, shortage in personal protective equipment and high-exposure risk for healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged hospital common practices and forced a reassessment of care delivery models. Code blue teams are highly specialised units that partake in life-saving situations that can jeopardise the safety of team members. There is a paucity of guidance in regards to proper infection control measures to protect the responders.This study describes a methodical approach to assessing vulnerabilities to transmission of SARS-CoV-2 within existing code blue practices, modalities to limit the number of code blue team responders and modifications to the protocol at a large community teaching hospital. The effort undertaken faced challenges due to the nature of the pandemic and the increased demand on healthcare workers. Quality improvement methods facilitated our protocol design and implementation. To this date, there has been no identified COVID-19 disease in any protected code blue (PCB) team members. We recommend that similar practices be considered and adopted widely and practised periodically.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Health Personnel/education , Hospital Rapid Response Team/standards , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Focus Groups , Health Personnel/standards , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , Quality Improvement
2.
J Wound Care ; 30(Sup2): S8-S11, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081455

ABSTRACT

The Sars-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in significant and unprecedented shifts in the delivery of health care services in the United States. Although wound care remains an essential service during the COVID-19 pandemic, the financial consequences and infectious disease ramifications of the pandemic have resulted in closure or limitation of hours in many outpatient wound and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) centers. As HBOT patients often require daily treatment sessions for a period of months, it is necessary for facilities providing HBOT services to adjust to the COVID-19 pandemic while still maintaining availability of this important service. Modification of HBOT session timing and chamber decontamination procedures, utilisation of telehealth services for initial patient evaluations, and acceptance of novel patient populations and diagnoses are mechanisms by which HBOT centers can adapt to the evolving model of health care delivery throughout a pandemic. While COVID-19 is not a currently accepted indication for HBOT, patients may be referred for HBOT consultation due to the post-infectious sequelae of the virus, and thus HBOT facilities must be aware of the potential uses of this treatment for post-viral complications. By redefining paradigms for health care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic, HBOT and wound centers can continue to provide high-quality and uninterrupted care to vulnerable patient populations.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/methods , Hyperbaric Oxygenation/methods , Wounds and Injuries/therapy , Appointments and Schedules , Disinfection , Environment Design , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Telemedicine , Triage/methods , United States
3.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 63(1): e1-e5, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079745

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound impact on elderly patients, and thus, adequate treatment plans are essential. This qualitative report provides recommendations for the supportive care and treatment of residents in long-term care facilities (LTCF) with COVID-19. A treatment protocol was developed in response to an outbreak of COVID-19 in an LTCF based in Johannesburg and was implemented over a 3-month period.


Subject(s)
/therapy , Homes for the Aged/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Long-Term Care/organization & administration , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Patient Care Management/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Frail Elderly , Health Plan Implementation , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Long-Term Care/methods , Male , South Africa
4.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(1): 22-31, 2021 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079738

ABSTRACT

In late 2019 a novel coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in China and spread throughout the world over a short period of time causing a pandemic of a respiratory disease named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). SARS-CoV-2 is easily transmitted from person to person through respiratory droplets and direct contact. The scarce available data indicate that dental healthcare personnel are at increased risk for acquisition of infection. Following the lockdown lifting, dental schools should be prepared to refunction safely and provide essential educational and healthcare services while protecting their students, patients, and personnel. The generation of aerosols in dental practice, in association with the high-transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 through aerosol-generation procedures, the simultaneous provision of dental services to patients in the same areas, and the fact that asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic infected persons may transmit the virus, render the implementation of specific infection prevention and control measures imperative for dental schools. Herein we review the few evidence-based data available to guide infection prevention and control measures for COVID-19 in dental schools.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Infection Control/methods , Schools, Dental , Aerosols , Asymptomatic Infections , Carrier State/transmission , Carrier State/virology , Humans
5.
Intern Med J ; 51(1): 99-101, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078976

ABSTRACT

There is a paucity of Australian literature exploring the spread of COVID-19 among residents living in residential aged care facilities (RACF). In this case series of COVID-19 outbreaks in six RACF, we collected data on the cumulative proportion of residents who tested positive for COVID-19 within 21 days of the index case being identified. We describe the observations of a Residential In-Reach service within these six RACF and found that rapid cohorting strategies, personal protective equipment availability and adequacy of use, embedded infection control staff, and adequate outbreak preparedness plans may have influenced the differences observed between RACF in the containment and minimisation of the spread of COVID-19 amongst residents.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Homes for the Aged , Infection Control/methods , Aged , Australia/epidemiology , Humans
6.
Cir Cir ; 89(1): 4-11, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077009

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak have major implications in conventional surgical practice. As the number of patients with this diagnosis is rising, the infection risk for the surgical staff will be higher. Few publications have addressed the surgical management of patients diagnosed with COVID-19. Objective: To assess recommendations for care of patients and surgical team during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (April 2020) were searched the key words "COVID-19", "PROTOCOL" and "SURGERY". Relevant recommendations, guidelines and cases series were checked for the most accurate information for apply to our center. Results: We found 379 papers that included the key words. A total of 25 papers were included in the manuscript based in the pertinence of the recommendations. Three major topics were selected: perioperative, intraoperative and postoperative. Conclusion: As an attempt to regulate the surgical team approach, we present recommendations to preserve patients and surgical staff safety with high quality standards of care through reproducible strategies applicable in most hospital centers.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Pandemics , Aerosols , Air Pollution, Indoor , Appointments and Schedules , Disinfection/methods , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Humans , Mexico , Occupational Exposure , Operating Rooms , Patient Isolation , Perioperative Care , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel, Hospital , Recovery Room , Sterilization/methods , Surgical Equipment
7.
Saudi Med J ; 42(2): 166-169, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076930

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To avoid hospital spread of Coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) and to analyze out of hospital outcomes after amputation. METHODS: Prospective analysis of data obtained from 60 diabetic patients in 2020 was performed at Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Personal protection equipment included double surgical mask, glasses, disposable surgical coats, and surgical masks for patients. Swabs were used to take samples from wounds. We randomly divided patients in 2 groups of 30 patients each. In pre-operative treatment, we used local anesthesia lidocaine hydrochloride 2% (Belupo, Koprivnica, Croatia) in group A and systemic analgesia intravenous tramadol chloride 100 mg intravenous (Krka, Novo Mesto, Slovenia) in group B. Wounds were surgically treated each day and heal spontaneously. Periodical control exams were performed. RESULTS: Wound healing did not present any statistically significant differences between groups (group A: 69±21.97 and B: 61±22.13 days, t=-1.22; p=0.11). No statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between groups A and B in wound healing regarding to gender or cigarette use was noted. CONCLUSION: No significant differences in amputation treatment between the 2 comparative groups were noted. No confirmed COVID-19 infections in medical staff who performed surgical interventions or in treated patients were detected.


Subject(s)
Amputation , Diabetic Foot/surgery , Infection Control/methods , Perioperative Care/methods , Bosnia and Herzegovina/epidemiology , /epidemiology , Diabetic Foot/complications , Female , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing
8.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(2): 88-95, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1073072

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 remains a threat for a fear of a second pandemic. Emergency orthopaedic operations are still among the most commonly performed procedures with increased risk of transmission of SARS CoV-2 to the patients and the healthcare workers. The aim of this study was to present the evidence available into best practices limiting the spread of COVID-19 in healthcare setting during current and future pandemics. METHODS: A review of the literature was performed in multiple databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control), using 'COVID-19' with other relevant keywords in different combinations. Owing to the limited and heterogenous evidence available, data were presented in a narrative manner. FINDINGS: From the evidence gathered it was noted that a multimodal approach to minimising pathogen transmission is required. This primarily comprises the wider engineering and administrative controls to reduce the concentration of the pathogen and to separate staff and patients from it. Theatre isolation and traffic control bundling, theatre flow and logistics, ventilation and waste management form a pivotal role in the environmental/engineering controls. Administrative measures include policies for both patients and staff. For patients, isolation and preoperative screening are of utmost value. For staff, testing for COVID-19, risk assessment, redeployment and provision of persona; protective equipment, together with the necessary training are important administrative controls. CONCLUSION: We believe these measures are likely to improve the sustainability of resources and can be carried to elective settings in order to return to some form of normality and help to mitigate the effects of future pandemics.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Housekeeping, Hospital , Infection Control/methods , Operating Rooms , Personal Protective Equipment , Ventilation , Waste Management , Workflow , Air Filters , Humans , Inservice Training , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Risk Assessment , State Medicine , United Kingdom
9.
J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol ; 26(1): 127-129, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072799

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-19 has affected million of people worldwide, constituting the biggest social, economic, and health crisis since World War 2. During this pandemic, the hospitals have become hot zones for the treatment of patients. Therefore, it is important to take the appropriate protective measures and ensure the physician's health and, especially, those who work in the intensive care units and in operating rooms. In this letter, we are trying to make a discussion regarding the measures that should be considered by the healthcare workers who are facing this invisible enemy during their effort to provide their services in the surgery rooms.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Air Filters , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Medical Waste Disposal , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment
10.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep ; 21(2): 8, 2021 02 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070935

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has challenged healthcare system capacities and safety for health care workers, reshaping doctor-patient interaction favoring e-Health or telemedicine. The pandemic situation may make difficult to prioritize patients with allergies diseases (AD), face-to-face evaluation, and moreover concern about the possible COVID-19 diagnosis, since COVID-19 shared many symptoms in common with AD. Being COVID-19 a novel disease, everyone is susceptible; there are some advances on vaccine and specific treatment. We evaluate existing literature on allergic diseases (AD): allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, drug allergy, and skin allergy, and potential underlying mechanisms for any interrelationship between AD and COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: There is inconclusive and controversial evidence of the association between AD and the risk of adverse clinical outcomes of COVID-19. AD patients should minimize hospital and face-to-face visits, and those who have used biologics and allergen immunotherapy should continue the treatment. It is essential to wear personal protective equipment for the protection of health care workers. Social distancing, rational use of facemasks, eye protection, and hand disinfection for health care workers and patients deserve further attention and promotion. Teleconsultation during COVID-19 times for AD patients is very encouraging and telemedicine platform can provide a reliable service in patient care.


Subject(s)
Asthma/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Rhinitis, Allergic/therapy , Telemedicine , Asthma/immunology , Biological Products , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/immunology , Dermatitis, Allergic Contact/therapy , Dermatitis, Atopic/immunology , Dermatitis, Atopic/therapy , Desensitization, Immunologic , Disease Management , Disease Outbreaks , Drug Hypersensitivity/immunology , Drug Hypersensitivity/therapy , Food Hypersensitivity/immunology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Rhinitis, Allergic/immunology
11.
Ann Ital Chir ; 91: 563-567, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068445

ABSTRACT

2019-nCoV currently named SARS-CoV-2 is a highly pathogenic Coronavirus identified in Wuhan China in December 2019. Turkey declared the first case relatively late compared to Asian and European countries on March 11, as the first SARS-CoV-2 infection in Turkey. In this study, we aimed to determine patients' outcomes in 50 surgeries done in the incubation period of SARS-CoV-2 in our hospital. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 50 patients who underwent surgeries during the incubation period of CoVid-19 at Istinye University Gaziosmanpasa Medical Park Hospital in Istanbul, from March 2 to April 11, 2020. RESULTS: The age of 50 patients range was 21 to 73, and the median age was 43.32 (64%) patients were women. The median length of hospital stay is 2.6 days (1-21). Operations at various difficulty levels were also performed on patients with co-morbidities. No complication or mortality was observed except for 1 patient, and the ICU requirement of that patient was also due to high energy trauma. CONCLUSION: Although contrary claims have been made in various studies; it is the primary duty of us surgeons to operate CoVid-19 positive/suspicious patients safely and without any contamination, and on the other hand, to continue their operations without victimizing negative patients. In this pilot study, we would like to emphasize with necessary and adequate measures these can be achieved. KEY WORDS: CoVid-19, SARS-CoV-2, Surgery.


Subject(s)
/diagnosis , Emergencies/epidemiology , Hospitals, Isolation/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Incubation Period , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , /epidemiology , Comorbidity , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Isolation , Pilot Projects , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Procedures, Operative/mortality , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
J Invasive Cardiol ; 33(2): E71-E76, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063668

ABSTRACT

In Spring 2020, the United States epicenter of COVID-19 was New York City, in which the borough of the Bronx was particularly affected. This Fall, there has been a resurgence of COVID-19 in Europe and the Midwestern United States. We describe our experience transforming our cardiac catheterization laboratories to accommodate an influx of COVID-19 patients so as to provide other hospitals with a potential blueprint. We transformed our pre/postprocedural patient care areas into COVID-19 intensive care and step-down units and maintained emergent invasive care for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction using existing space and personnel.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Catheterization/methods , Cardiology Service, Hospital , Coronary Care Units , Critical Care , Infection Control , Laboratories, Hospital/organization & administration , Organizational Innovation , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , /epidemiology , Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Cardiology Service, Hospital/trends , Coronary Care Units/methods , Coronary Care Units/organization & administration , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/organization & administration , Critical Care/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , New York City/epidemiology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Perioperative Care/methods , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
13.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 8(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Digestive endoscopy is considered a high-risk procedure for COVID-19. Recommendations have been made for its practice during the pandemic. This study was conducted to determine adherence to recommendations for endoscopy practice during the COVID-19 pandemic in Latin America (LA). METHODS: A survey was conducted of endoscopists from LA consisting of 43 questions for the evaluation of four items: general and sociodemographic features, and preprocedure, intraprocedure and postprocedure aspects. RESULTS: A response was obtained from 338 endoscopists (response rate 34.5%) across 15 countries in LA. In preprocedure aspects (hand washing, use of face masks for patients, respiratory triage area, training for the placement/removal of personal protective equipment (PPE) and availability of specific area for the placement/removal of PPE), there was adherence in <75%. Regarding postprocedure aspects, 77% (261/338) had reused PPE, mainly the N95 respirator or higher, and this was with a standardised decontamination procedure only in 32% (108/338) of the time. Postprocedure room decontamination was carried out by 47% on >75% of occasions. In relationship to intraprocedure aspects (knowledge of risk and type of endoscopic procedures, use of PPE, airway management in patients and infrastructure), there was adherence in >75% for all the parameters and 78% of endoscopists only performed emergencies or time-sensitive procedures. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to the recommendations for endoscopy practice during the COVID-19 pandemic is adequate in the intraprocedure aspect. However, it is deficient in the preprocedure and postprocedure aspects.


Subject(s)
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Guideline Adherence , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , /prevention & control , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
14.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(1): 152-155, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065436

ABSTRACT

Health care workers are at high risk for contracting coronavirus disease 2019. However, little is known about the risk of transmission between coworkers. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) between coworkers in a surgical environment. This was an observational study of 394 health care workers in a surgical environment who were exposed to 2 known SARS-CoV-2-positive coworkers. Standard infection precautions were in place at the time of the exposure. All 394 exposed workers initially underwent nasopharyngeal swab testing for SARS-CoV-2 using the polymerase chain reaction technique. Of the original group, 387 were tested again with the same technique 1 week later. Of 394 SARS-CoV-2-exposed health care workers initially tested, 1 was positive. No new positive cases were found on repeated testing of 387 participants 1 week later. The risk of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in a health care unit with universal masking and appropriate hand hygiene is low. This finding should provide some reassurance to surgical practices as they reopen.


Subject(s)
/transmission , Health Personnel , Infection Control/methods , Operating Rooms , Adult , Aged , Female , Florida/epidemiology , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure , Personal Protective Equipment , Risk Factors
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24503, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062941

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Recently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has greatly threatened global public health. The responsibility of healthcare-associated infection control professionals (ICPs) is to prevent and control the nosocomial infections. The mental health status of ICPs deserves more attention, however, the correlational research is still lacking. This study aims to investigate the incidence and risk factors of mental health status among ICPs in China during the outbreak of COVID-19.A national cross-sectional survey was performed. The online questionnaire was completed by 9228 ICPs from 3776 hospitals throughout China. Data collection tools were used, including demographics data questionnaire, the Chinese version of the 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the Chinese version of the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ) for medical staff. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted.The total score of mental health of Chinese ICPs was 3.45 ±â€Š2.57. 5608 (60.77%) ICPs might have mental health problems. The psychological capital was in the upper-middle level with an average score of 3.72 ±â€Š0.38. An increased mental health problem risk was associated with the greater self-efficacy and working in the public hospital; a significantly lower risk was obtained by working in the second-class hospital rather than in the third-class hospitals. Besides, mental health problem risk of ICPs working in hospitals of the western economic region or northeast economic region was more significant than that in hospitals of the central economic region. However, a lower risk was caused by the unmarried than married, and working years in department ≤1 year contributed to the lower risk than that >20 years. Moreover, fewer working hours per week, higher values of hope, and optimism each were contributed to a lower risk.Chinese healthcare-associated ICPs were under different levels of mental health problems in fighting against COVID-19. More importantly, we should actively deal with the mental health problem of ICPs and help them get rid of psychological disorders.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection , Infection Control Practitioners , Infection Control , Occupational Exposure , Occupational Stress , Adult , /prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control Practitioners/psychology , Infection Control Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24409, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062940

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus seems to contribute significantly to increased postoperative complications and mortality after emergency surgical procedures. Additionally, the fear of COVID-19 contagion delays the consultation of patients, resulting in the deterioration of their acute diseases by the time of consultation. In the specific case of urgent digestive surgery patients, both factors significantly worsen the postoperative course and prognosis. Main working hypothesis: infection by COVID-19 increases postoperative 30-day-mortality for any cause in patients submitted to emergency/urgent general or gastrointestinal surgery. Likewise, hospital collapse during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic increased 30-day-mortality for any cause. Hence, the main objective of this study is to estimate the cumulative incidence of mortality at 30-days-after-surgery. Secondary objectives are: to estimate the cumulative incidence of postoperative complications and to develop a specific postoperative risk propensity model for COVID-19-infected patients.A multicenter, observational retrospective cohort study (COVID-CIR-study) will be carried out in consecutive patients operated on for urgent digestive pathology. Two cohorts will be defined: the "pandemic" cohort, which will include all patients (classified as COVID-19-positive or -negative) operated on for emergency digestive pathology during the months of March to June 2020; and the "control" cohort, which will include all patients operated on for emergency digestive pathology during the months of March to June 2019. Information will be gathered on demographic characteristics, clinical and analytical parameters, scores on the usual prognostic scales for quality management in a General Surgery service (POSSUM, P-POSSUM and LUCENTUM scores), prognostic factors applicable to all patients, specific prognostic factors for patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, postoperative morbidity and mortality (at 30 and 90 postoperative days). The main objective is to estimate the cumulative incidence of mortality at 30 days after surgery. As secondary objectives, to estimate the cumulative incidence of postoperative complications and to develop a specific postoperative risk propensity model for SARS-CoV-2 infected patients.The protocol (version1.0, April 20th 2020) was approved by the local Institutional Review Board (Ethic-and-Clinical-Investigation-Committee, code PR169/20, date 05/05/20). The study findings will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant national and international scientific meetings.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04479150 (July 21, 2020).


Subject(s)
Digestive System Diseases , Digestive System Surgical Procedures , Emergency Treatment , Infection Control , Postoperative Complications , Time-to-Treatment , Adult , /prevention & control , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/epidemiology , Digestive System Diseases/mortality , Digestive System Diseases/surgery , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/methods , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/mortality , Emergencies/epidemiology , Emergency Treatment/adverse effects , Emergency Treatment/methods , Emergency Treatment/mortality , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mortality , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Observational Studies as Topic , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Research Design , Risk Assessment/methods
17.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 23, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061200

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first SARS-CoV-2 pandemic phase, the sudden closure of schools was one of the main measures to minimize the spread of the virus. In the second phase, several safety procedures were implemented to avoid school closure. To evaluate if the school is a safe place, students and staff of two school complexes of Rome were monitored to evaluate the efficacy of prevention measures inside the school buildings. METHODS: Oral secretions specimens were collected from 1262 subjects for a total of 3431 samples, collected over a 3 months period. Detection of Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was performed by real-time PCR. Target genes were represented by E gene, RdRP/S gene and N gene. RESULTS: Among the 3431 samples analyzed, just 16 sample resulted as positive or low positive: 1 sample in the first month, 12 samples in the second month and 3 in the third month. In each period of evaluation, all positive children attended different classes. CONCLUSIONS: Even if the school has the potential for spreading viruses, our preliminary results show the efficacy of the implementations undertaken in this setting to minimize virus diffusion. Our evidence suggests that school does not act as an amplifier for transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and can be really considered a safe place for students.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , School Health Services/organization & administration , Adolescent , /transmission , Child , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
18.
Air Med J ; 40(1): 76-78, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060580

ABSTRACT

This short communication highlights the US Air Force's recent success with having their aeromedical evacuation crews use the Transportation Isolation System for the first time operationally to transport patients positive for coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Aerospace Medicine/methods , Air Ambulances , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Military Medicine/methods , Military Personnel , Aerospace Medicine/instrumentation , Aerospace Medicine/trends , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/trends , Military Medicine/instrumentation , Military Medicine/trends , United States
19.
Adv Respir Med ; 88(6): 638-639, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058966

ABSTRACT

Performing medical procedures with the use of personal protective equipment may reduce the efficiency of medical procedures performed, for example, as with the current use of respiratory protection devices, including N95 or surgical masks. Healthcare workers (HCWs) using N95 respirators or medical masks may experience discomfort associated with wearing a mask when performing medical procedures, in particular those associated with increased physical activity, causing increased respiratory effort.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Masks/standards
20.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245913, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052441

ABSTRACT

Asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection of healthcare workers (HCWs) has been reported as a key player in the nosocomial spreading of COVID-19. Early detection of infected HCWs can prevent spreading of the virus in hospitals among HCWs and patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the asymptomatic infection of HCWs in a private clinic in the city of Santiago, Chile. Our study was conducted during a period of 5 weeks at the peak of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Chile. Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained from 413 HCWs and tested for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 using RT-qPCR. We found that a 3.14% of HCWs were positive for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 (14/413). Out of these, 7/14 were completely asymptomatic and did not develop symptoms within 3 weeks of testing. Sequencing of viral genomes showed the predominance of the GR clade; however, sequence comparison demonstrated numerous genetic differences among them suggesting community infection as the main focus of transmission among HCWs. Our study demonstrates that the protocols applied to protect HCWs and patients have been effective as no infection clusters due to asymptomatic carriers were found in the clinic. Together, these data suggest that infection with SARS-CoV-2 among HCWs of this health center is not nosocomial.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , /epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Adult , /virology , Chile/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , /isolation & purification
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