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2.
Cleve Clin J Med ; 87(9): 526-531, 2020 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742877

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 management practices devised for the medical intensive care unit are centered on 2 main goals: ensuring caregiver safety and providing the highest quality patient care through adherence to evidence-based best practices. Rapid, sweeping changes for successful management are based on creating an educational platform to introduce and then further cement these concepts through a unified approach to clinical care. Creating a culture change in a short period of time requires overcoming a host of challenges; however, the result is a more unified and focused approach.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
4.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 100, 2020 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736810

ABSTRACT

Background: Brazil faces some challenges in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic, including: the risks for cross-infection (community infection) increase in densely populated areas; low access to health services in areas where the number of beds in intensive care units (ICUs) is scarce and poorly distributed, mainly in states with low population density. Objective: To describe and intercorrelate epidemiology and geographic data from Brazil about the number of intensive care unit (ICU) beds at the onset of COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The epidemiology and geographic data were correlated with the distribution of ICU beds (public and private health systems) and the number of beneficiaries of private health insurance using Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The same data were correlated using partial correlation controlled by gross domestic product (GDP) and number of beneficiaries of private health insurance. Findings: Brazil has a large geographical area and diverse demographic and economic aspects. This diversity is also present in the states and the Federal District regarding the number of COVID-19 cases, deaths and case fatality rate. The effective management of severe COVID-19 patients requires ICU services, and the scenario was also dissimilar as for ICU beds and ICU beds/10,000 inhabitants for the public (SUS) and private health systems mainly at the onset of COVID-19 pandemic. The distribution of ICUs was uneven between public and private services, and most patients rely on SUS, which had the lowest number of ICU beds. In only a few states, the number of ICU beds at SUS was above 1 to 3 by 10,000 inhabitants, which is the number recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Conclusions: Brazil needed to improve the number of ICU beds units to deal with COVID-19 pandemic, mainly for the SUS showing a late involvement of government and health authorities to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral , Private Sector/statistics & numerical data , Public Sector/statistics & numerical data , Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Brazil/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Patient Care Management/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Severity of Illness Index
7.
BMC Surg ; 20(1): 190, 2020 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730210

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP) outbreak in Wuhan, China in early 2020, resulted in over 80 thousand infections in China. At present, NCP has an explosive growth in the world. Surgeons could refuse selective operation during the outbreak, but they must face the emergency operation. We hope to avoid the spread of NCP while ensuring efficient treatment of emergency cases. METHODS: The data of patients with incarcerated hernia admitted to Beijing Chaoyang Hospital during NCP epidemic were analyzed and compared with those in 2019. All cases were divided into NCP group and 2019 group. The operation data and inpatient protection process of emergency cases were analyzed. Result During the NCP epidemic, 17 cases with incarcerated hernia were treated in our department. A Total of 263 cases of the same disease were admitted in 2019. There was no significant difference in age, gender, BMI and hernia type between two groups. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in operation method and hospital stay. The waiting time for emergency operation of NCP group was significantly longer than that of 2019 group (P = 0.002). A buffer ward was set up by administrator of hospital during NCP outbreak. Hospitals were divided into "Red area, Yellow area and Green area" artificially, and strict screening consultation system was implemented. There was no case of SARS-nCoV-2 infection in medical staff. CONCLUSION: It was safe and effective to carry out emergency operation on the premise of screening, protection and isolation during the NCP epidemic. The increased waiting time for operation due to NCP screening did not threaten medical safety of emergency incarcerated hernia patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hernia, Abdominal/surgery , Herniorrhaphy , Hospitals, General , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergencies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
8.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 79, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730147

ABSTRACT

Background: Workers whose occupations put them in contact with infected persons and the public are at increased risk of COVID-19 infection. Recommendations: The Collegium Ramazzini calls on governments at all levels to protect worker health by strengthening public health systems; maintaining comprehensive social insurance systems; establishing policies that presume all COVID-19 infections in high-risk workers are work-related; enforcing all occupational health standards; and developing pandemic preparedness plans. The Collegium Ramazzini calls on all employers - large and small, public and private - to protect the health of all workers by developing disease preparedness plans; implementing basic infection control measures; establishing disease identification and isolation policies; reducing hazardous exposures; supporting personal protective equipment (PPE) programs; and restricting unnecessary travel. Conclusion: Governments and employers have legal obligations to protect worker health. They are not relieved of these duties during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Global Health , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Societies, Medical , Travel
9.
Heart Rhythm ; 17(9): e242-e254, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728577

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has presented substantial challenges to patient care and impacted health care delivery, including cardiac electrophysiology practice throughout the globe. Based upon the undetermined course and regional variability of the pandemic, there is uncertainty as to how and when to resume and deliver electrophysiology services for arrhythmia patients. This joint document from representatives of the Heart Rhythm Society, American Heart Association, and American College of Cardiology seeks to provide guidance for clinicians and institutions reestablishing safe electrophysiological care. To achieve this aim, we address regional and local COVID-19 disease status, the role of viral screening and serologic testing, return-to-work considerations for exposed or infected health care workers, risk stratification and management strategies based on COVID-19 disease burden, institutional preparedness for resumption of elective procedures, patient preparation and communication, prioritization of procedures, and development of outpatient and periprocedural care pathways.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiac Electrophysiology/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine
10.
J Hosp Med ; 15(8): 483-488, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721647

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Although intensive care unit (ICU) adaptations to the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have received substantial attention , most patients hospitalized with COVID-19 have been in general medical units. OBJECTIVE: To characterize inpatient adaptations to care for non-ICU COVID-19 patients. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: A network of 72 hospital medicine groups at US academic centers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: COVID-19 testing, approaches to personal protective equipment (PPE), and features of respiratory isolation units (RIUs). RESULTS: Fifty-one of 72 sites responded (71%) between April 3 and April 5, 2020. At the time of our survey, only 15 (30%) reported COVID-19 test results being available in less than 6 hours. Half of sites with PPE data available reported PPE stockpiles of 2 weeks or less. Nearly all sites (90%) reported implementation of RIUs. RIUs primarily utilized attending physicians, with few incorporating residents and none incorporating students. Isolation and room-entry policies focused on grouping care activities and utilizing technology (such as video visits) to communicate with and evaluate patients. The vast majority of sites reported decreases in frequency of in-room encounters across provider or team types. Forty-six percent of respondents reported initially unrecognized non-COVID-19 diagnoses in patients admitted for COVID-19 evaluation; a similar number reported delayed identification of COVID-19 in patients admitted for other reasons. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has required medical wards to rapidly adapt with expanding use of RIUs and use of technology emerging as critical approaches. Reports of unrecognized or delayed diagnoses highlight how such adaptations may produce potential adverse effects on care.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Guideline Adherence , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , United States/epidemiology
11.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 14(7): 699-706, 2020 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721548

ABSTRACT

The emergence of a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2), from Wuhan, China, in December 2019 has challenged many countries. The current pandemic caused by this coronavirus has already negatively affected millions of people and the economies of countries worldwide. However, the challenges faced by Saudi Arabia during the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) epidemic that began in 2012 led to marked improvements in the government's response to the current pandemic. Saudi Arabia is one of largest countries in the Middle East and is home to the holiest Muslim sites. Since the global risk of the virus was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO), Saudi Arabia has taken substantial public health measures to control the spread of the infection. This review reports on the transmission of SARS-COV-2 in Saudi Arabia and the proactive responses taken by the government, comparing the Saudi government's actions and their effects with those of other countries. Although Saudi Arabia is currently experiencing the peak of the pandemic, their early precautionary responses have shortened the period of individual/family isolation, reduced the number of confirmed infections and infection-related fatality rates, and decreased the economic burden of the people and the country compared with other countries in the Middle East and elsewhere.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Body Temperature , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Islam , Public Health , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Social Isolation
12.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 14(7): 696-698, 2020 07 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721543

ABSTRACT

Different countries have employed various strategies for controlling the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic because there is no consensus regarding effective control measures in the literature. Epidemic control strategies can be classified into two types based on their characteristics. The first type is the "severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like epidemic control strategy," i.e., containment. The second type is the "influenza pandemic-like epidemic control strategy" (flu pandemic-like strategy), i.e., mitigation. This paper presents a comparative analysis on the prevention and control strategies for COVID-19 in different countries to provide a reference to control the further spread of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(16)2020 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717729

ABSTRACT

We aimed to investigate the management of urgent dental care, the perception of risk and workplace preparedness among dental staff in Norway during the COVID-19 pandemic. An electronic questionnaire regarding the strictest confinement period in Norway (13 March-17 April 2020) was distributed to dental staff. Among the 1237 respondents, 727 (59%) treated patients, of whom 170 (14%) worked in clinics designated to treat patients suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19. Out of them 88% (143) received training and 64% (103) simulation in additional infection prevention procedures, while 27 (24%) respondents reported deviation. In total, 1051 (85%) respondents perceived that dental staff had a high risk of being infected, 1039 (84%) that their workplace handled the current situation well, 767 (62%) that their workplace had adequate infection control equipment and 507 (41%) agreed that their workplace is well equipped to handle an escalation. Before an appointment, 1182 (96%) respondents always/often inquired per phone information if a patient experienced symptoms of COVID-19, and 1104 (89%) asked about a history of travel to affected areas. Twice as many patients on average per week were treated by phone than in a clinic. A lower proportion of dental staff in high incidence counties applied additional infection prevention measures compared to low and medium incidence counties. To conclude, urgent dental health care was managed relatively well in Norway. Additional training of the dental staff in adequate infection prevention and step-by-step procedures may be needed. These results may be used to improve the dental health service's response to future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dental Health Services/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Health Services/standards , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telephone , Workplace/organization & administration
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(16)2020 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711376

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to create new classifications for occupations that have emerged from the COVID-19 pandemic in Korea, based on Reich's classifications for the United States. We examined Korean workers' occupational calling, psychological health, and quality of life. An online questionnaire was administered and data from 1029 Korean workers were analyzed. The questionnaire comprised the Korean version of the Multidimensional Calling Measure to assess occupational calling, the Psychosocial Well-being Index-short form for psychological health, and the Control, Autonomy, Self-realization, and Pleasure (CASP-19) scale for quality of life. We created a Korean-adapted version of the classes of occupation based on those created by the COVID-19 situation in the USA. Our results showed that Korean workers had a high perceived calling to work, and different classes showed different levels of quality of life and psychological health. We need a health concentration management system for essential groups or personal safety protection equipment should be provided. Education on infection control should be offered and effective medical system processes should be in place. We need to develop technology to respond to medical needs online, remotely, or telephonically. The government should implement policies to ensure job security and to improve wages and welfare.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mental Health , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quality of Life/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Ginekol Pol ; 91(7): 424-427, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-709961

ABSTRACT

The publication presents recommendations on the performance of surgical procedures in gynecology during the COVID- 19 pandemic. The recommendations were prepared by the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians, based on current knowledge of SARS CoV-2. These recommendations contain the latest guidelines of scientific societies related to the subject of operational procedures.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Gynecology , Infection Control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Gynecology/organization & administration , Gynecology/standards , Gynecology/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Poland/epidemiology , Societies, Medical/standards
17.
Crit Pathw Cardiol ; 19(3): 112-114, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705771

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, the coronovirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in more than 2,160,000 positive cases and more than 145,000 deaths until April 18, 2020. The pressure to the health services worldwide has been unprecedented. The redeployment of staff and resources to treat more efficiently COVID-19 cases along with the need to reduce disease transmission has affected the field of electrophysiology among many others. Amendments to clinical pathways are obligatory in this perspective to continue to provide the necessary health services to the people who need them, although at the same time, infection control and prevention are not compromised by inadvertent disease transmission or unnecessary use of resources. We aim to provide a guide of the logistic aspects of electrophysiology procedures derived from our tertiary cardiac center during the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Electrophysiology , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Pathways/trends , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Cardiac Electrophysiology/methods , Cardiac Electrophysiology/organization & administration , Cardiac Electrophysiology/trends , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/methods , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , United Kingdom
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(32): e21548, 2020 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705597

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) emerged in Wuhan in December 2019, has spread in many countries affected people globally. In response to the economic requirement of the nation and meet the need of patient's, a momentous event was going back to work step by step as fighting against COVID-19. Safety in clinical work is of priority as elective surgery in the department of surgery progressing. We used checklists based on our experiences on COVID-19 control and reality of clinical work from February to March in the West China Hospital, involving events of screening patient, chaperonage, and healthcare workers. Checklist summarized the actual clinical nursing work and management practices, hope to provide a reference for the order of surgery during the epidemic prevention and control, and standardize the clinical nursing work of surgery during pandemic.


Subject(s)
Checklist/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Vascular Surgical Procedures/organization & administration , Chi-Square Distribution , China , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital , Occupational Health , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration
19.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 49(1): 59, 2020 Aug 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705369

ABSTRACT

With the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been significant changes and challenges in the management of oncology patients. One of the major strategies to reduce transmission of the virus between patients and healthcare workers is deferral of follow-up visits. However, deferral may not be possible in total laryngectomy patients. Urgent procedures may be necessary to prevent complications related to ill-fitting tracheoesophageal puncture (TEP) voice prostheses, such as aspiration or loss of voicing. In this paper, we describe the Princess Margaret Cancer Center's approach to managing this unique patient population.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Laryngeal Neoplasms/surgery , Laryngectomy/statistics & numerical data , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Laryngeal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Laryngectomy/methods , Larynx, Artificial , Male , Ontario , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Prosthesis Implantation/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment
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