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1.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(2): 76-82, 2021 04.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183983

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to analyze available resources, guidelines in use, and preparedness to care for newborn infants at maternity centers in Argentina during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: Cross-sectional study based on a survey administered to medical and nursing staff. In May 2020, Argentine facilities with more than 500 annual births were contacted; 58 % of these were from the public sector. RESULTS: In total, 104/147 facilities answered (71 %). All had guidelines for care during the pandemic, and 93 % indicated they had been trained on how to use them. A companion was not allowed during childbirth in 26 % of private facilities and in 60 % of public ones (p < 0.01). Deferred cord clamping was recommended in 87 %; rooming-in with asymptomatic newborns was promoted in 62 %; breastfeeding using protective measures was recommended in 70 %; and breast milk using a bottle, in 23 %. In 94 %, family visiting in the Neonatology Unit was restricted. Difficulties included the unavailability of individual rooms for symptomatic newborn infants and a potential shortage of health care staff and personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS: All facilities are aware of the national guidelines to fight the pandemic. Most have the resources to comply with the recommended protective measures. There is uncertainty as to whether personal protective equipment, staff, and physical space available at the different facilities would be enough if cases increased significantly.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Infant Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Argentina/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Policy , Humans , Infant Care/statistics & numerical data , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Male , Maternal Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy
3.
JCO Oncol Pract ; 17(3): e343-e354, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154056

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We present the strategy of a comprehensive cancer center organized to make operations pandemic proof and achieve continuity of cancer care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Disease Outbreak Response (DORS) measures implemented at our center and its satellite clinics included strict infection prevention, manpower preservation, prudent resource allocation, and adaptation of standard-of-care treatments. Critical day-to-day clinical operations, number of persons screened before entry, staff temperature monitoring, and personal protection equipment stockpile were reviewed as a dashboard at daily DORS taskforce huddles. Polymerase chain reaction swab tests performed for patients and staff who met defined criteria for testing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection were tracked. Descriptive statistics of outpatient attendances and treatment caseloads from February 3 to May 23, 2020, were compared with the corresponding period in 2019. RESULTS: We performed COVID-19 swabs for 80 patients and 93 staff, detecting three cancer patients with community-acquired COVID-19 infections with no nosocomial transmission. Patients who required chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery and patients who are on maintenance treatment continued to receive timely treatment without disruption. The number of intravenous chemotherapy treatments was maintained at 97.8% compared with 2019, whereas that of weekly radiotherapy treatments remained stable since December 2019. All cancer-related surgeries proceeded without delay, with a 0.3% increase in workload. Surveillance follow-ups were conducted via teleconsultation, accounting for a 30.7% decrease in total face-to-face clinic consultations. CONCLUSION: Through the coordinated efforts of a DORS taskforce, it is possible to avoid nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 transmissions among patients and staff without compromising on care delivery at a national cancer center.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , /transmission , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing , Health Personnel , Hospitalization , Humans , Mass Screening , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Singapore/epidemiology
4.
Int J Prison Health ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153332

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: New South Wales (NSW) correctional system houses 30% of prisoners in Australia and at this time has only had a single documented case of COVID-19 amongst its prisoner population. The coordinated response by Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network (The Network) undertaken with the support of NSW Ministry of Health, in partnership with Corrective Services NSW (CSNSW), Youth Justice and private jails has ensured that the NSW correctional system has remained otherwise COVID-free. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A research study of how a range of partners which support the operations of NSW Correctional System developed an effective approach for the prevention a COVID-19 epidemic amongst its inmates. FINDINGS: Establishment of effective partnerships, early coordination of representatives from all aspects of the NSW correctional system, limited access to the correctional environment, reduced prison population and strict isolation of all new receptions have all contributed to maintaining this COVID-free status despite other NSW settings with similar risk profiles, such as aged care facilities and cruise ship arrivals, experiencing serious outbreaks. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Although Australia/New Zealand context of suppressed community infection rates for COVID-19 (which are approaching elimination in some jurisdictions) is in contrast to the situation in other parts of the world, the principles described in this paper will be useful to most other correctional systems. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Modelling was used to underline our approach and reinforced the veracity of following this approach. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: The Network and CSNSW has been able to mount an effective, integrated response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has been sustainable through the first peak of COVID-19 cases. This case study catalogues the process of developing this response and details each intervention implemented with inventive use of tables to demonstrate the impact of the range of interventions used.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Prisons/organization & administration , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , New South Wales/epidemiology , Organizational Case Studies , Pandemics
5.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 71, 2021 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150410

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal diseases such as celiac disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), inflammatory bowel disease (IBDs) and acute or chronic diarrhea are quite frequent in the pediatric population. The approach, the diagnosis and management can be changed in the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic era. This review has focused on: i) the current understanding of digestive involvement in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected children and adolescents and the clinical implications of COVID-19 for pediatric gastroenterologists, ii) the impact of COVID-19 on the clinical approach to patients with pre-existing or onset diseases, including diagnosis and treatment, and iii) the role and limited access to the instrumental diagnosis such as digestive endoscopy. To date, it is unclear if immunosuppression in patients with IBD and chronic liver disease represents a risk factor for adverse outcomes. Scheduled outpatient follow-up visits may be postponed, especially in patients in remission. Conversely, telemedicine services are strongly recommended. The introduction of new therapeutic regimens should be made on an individual basis, discussing the benefits and risks with each patient. Furthermore, psychological care in all children with chronic disease and their parents should be ensured. All non-urgent and elective endoscopic procedures may be postponed as they must be considered at high risk of viral transmission. Finally, until SARS-CoV-2 vaccination is not available, strict adherence to standard social distancing protocols and the use of personal protective equipment should continue to be recommended.


Subject(s)
/complications , Gastrointestinal Diseases/virology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Adolescent , Child , Gastrointestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Diseases/therapy , Humans
6.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 109, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: No versatile web app exists that allows epidemiologists and managers around the world to comprehensively analyze the impacts of COVID-19 mitigation. The http://covid-webapp.numerusinc.com/ web app presented here fills this gap. METHODS: Our web app uses a model that explicitly identifies susceptible, contact, latent, asymptomatic, symptomatic and recovered classes of individuals, and a parallel set of response classes, subject to lower pathogen-contact rates. The user inputs a CSV file of incidence and, if of interest, mortality rate data. A default set of parameters is available that can be overwritten through input or online entry, and a user-selected subset of these can be fitted to the model using maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE). Model fitting and forecasting intervals are specifiable and changes to parameters allow counterfactual and forecasting scenarios. Confidence or credible intervals can be generated using stochastic simulations, based on MLE values, or on an inputted CSV file containing Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimates of one or more parameters. RESULTS: We illustrate the use of our web app in extracting social distancing, social relaxation, surveillance or virulence switching functions (i.e., time varying drivers) from the incidence and mortality rates of COVID-19 epidemics in Israel, South Africa, and England. The Israeli outbreak exhibits four distinct phases: initial outbreak, social distancing, social relaxation, and a second wave mitigation phase. An MCMC projection of this latter phase suggests the Israeli epidemic will continue to produce into late November an average of around 1500 new case per day, unless the population practices social-relaxation measures at least 5-fold below the level in August, which itself is 4-fold below the level at the start of July. Our analysis of the relatively late South African outbreak that became the world's fifth largest COVID-19 epidemic in July revealed that the decline through late July and early August was characterised by a social distancing driver operating at more than twice the per-capita applicable-disease-class (pc-adc) rate of the social relaxation driver. Our analysis of the relatively early English outbreak, identified a more than 2-fold improvement in surveillance over the course of the epidemic. It also identified a pc-adc social distancing rate in early August that, though nearly four times the pc-adc social relaxation rate, appeared to barely contain a second wave that would break out if social distancing was further relaxed. CONCLUSION: Our web app provides policy makers and health officers who have no epidemiological modelling or computer coding expertise with an invaluable tool for assessing the impacts of different outbreak mitigation policies and measures. This includes an ability to generate an epidemic-suppression or curve-flattening index that measures the intensity with which behavioural responses suppress or flatten the epidemic curve in the region under consideration.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Infection Control , Internet , Mobile Applications , /etiology , Computer Simulation , Effect Modifier, Epidemiologic , England/epidemiology , Epidemics , Forecasting/methods , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Israel/epidemiology , Markov Chains , Population Surveillance/methods , Risk Factors , South Africa/epidemiology
7.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211002099, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133570

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health care workers (HCWs) are at the forefront to fight against COVID-19 pandemic. They are at more risk of contracting the infection. This study was planned to assess potential risk factors of 2019-novel coronavirus infection among HCWs working in a health facility and to evaluate the effectiveness of infection prevention and control measures among them. METHODS: A study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital among HCWs who were directly or indirectly involved in the management of a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19. The socio-demographic characteristics, history of exposure, IPC measures followed and clinical symptoms were compared between health care workers in COVID and non-COVID areas. RESULTS: Majority (45%) of HCWs were nurses, followed by hospital/sanitary/technical attendants (30%) and doctors (24%). Out of a total of 256 HCWs, 2% tested positive. Around 80% of HCWs had ever attended any IPC training. A statistically significant association was found between posting area of HCWs and their exposure to COVID patients (duration of exposure, PPE has worn by HCWs, direct contact of HCWs with the patient's material) and COVID positivity (P value <.001). CONCLUSION: If health care workers were trained and take adequate precautions then the risk of getting an infection is minimized.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital , Adult , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(5): e24503, 2021 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125447

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Recently, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic has greatly threatened global public health. The responsibility of healthcare-associated infection control professionals (ICPs) is to prevent and control the nosocomial infections. The mental health status of ICPs deserves more attention, however, the correlational research is still lacking. This study aims to investigate the incidence and risk factors of mental health status among ICPs in China during the outbreak of COVID-19.A national cross-sectional survey was performed. The online questionnaire was completed by 9228 ICPs from 3776 hospitals throughout China. Data collection tools were used, including demographics data questionnaire, the Chinese version of the 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the Chinese version of the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ) for medical staff. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted.The total score of mental health of Chinese ICPs was 3.45 ±â€Š2.57. 5608 (60.77%) ICPs might have mental health problems. The psychological capital was in the upper-middle level with an average score of 3.72 ±â€Š0.38. An increased mental health problem risk was associated with the greater self-efficacy and working in the public hospital; a significantly lower risk was obtained by working in the second-class hospital rather than in the third-class hospitals. Besides, mental health problem risk of ICPs working in hospitals of the western economic region or northeast economic region was more significant than that in hospitals of the central economic region. However, a lower risk was caused by the unmarried than married, and working years in department ≤1 year contributed to the lower risk than that >20 years. Moreover, fewer working hours per week, higher values of hope, and optimism each were contributed to a lower risk.Chinese healthcare-associated ICPs were under different levels of mental health problems in fighting against COVID-19. More importantly, we should actively deal with the mental health problem of ICPs and help them get rid of psychological disorders.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection , Infection Control Practitioners , Infection Control , Occupational Exposure , Occupational Stress , Adult , /prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control Practitioners/psychology , Infection Control Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 246-249, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122049

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concerns have emerged regarding infection transmission during flexible nasoendoscopy. METHODS: Information was gathered prospectively on flexible nasoendoscopy procedures performed between March and June 2020. Patients and healthcare workers were followed up to assess for coronavirus disease 2019 development. One-sided 97.5 per cent Poisson confidence intervals were calculated for upper limits of risk where zero events were observed. RESULTS: A total of 286 patients were recruited. The most common indication for flexible nasoendoscopy was investigation of 'red flag' symptoms (67 per cent). Forty-seven patients (16 per cent, 95 per cent confidence interval = 13-21 per cent) had suspicious findings on flexible nasoendoscopy requiring further investigation. Twenty patients (7.1 per cent, 95 per cent confidence interval = 4.4-11 per cent) had new cancer diagnoses. Zero coronavirus disease 2019 infections were recorded in the 273 patients. No. 27 endoscopists (the doctors and nurses who carried out the procedures) were followed up.The risk of developing coronavirus disease 2019 after flexible nasoendoscopy was determined to be 0-1.3 per cent. CONCLUSION: The risk of coronavirus disease 2019 transmission associated with performing flexible nasoendoscopy in asymptomatic patients, while using appropriate personal protective equipment, is very low. Additional data are required to confirm these findings in the setting of further disease surges.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Endoscopy/adverse effects , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Endoscopy/instrumentation , Female , Humans , Ireland , Male , Patient Selection , Personal Protective Equipment , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment
10.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 91(2)2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119589

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome due to Coronavirus-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is caused by combined alveolar-capillary lung damage, with bilateral pneumonia and thrombosis, which often causes respiratory failure. Proper COVID-19 management requires high skills in airway control and the need to perform aerosol-generating procedures such as bronchoscopy, which can increase the possibility of virus spreading among healthcare professionals. In an epidemiologically delicate moment, the multidisciplinary decision on "WHEN, HOW and WHY" to perform bronchoscopies minimizing the risk of COVID-19 transmission, represented a great challenge for all specialists engaged in bronchoscopic procedures. In this work authors want to share all technical aspects of 87 videobronchoscopies performed in confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients, from 3rd to 6th January 2020, describing the reason, the organizational and operational model and patients characteristics. Was also evaluated the impact of high-risk procedures such as bronchoscopy on the personnel involved. The disclosure of all technical details, represents, in the opinion of the authors, an important contribution, capable of providing support to all physicians engaged in bronchoscopy procedures in confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Airway Management , Bronchoscopy , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Bronchoscopes , /transmission , Humans , Patient Selection , Personal Protective Equipment
12.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 47, 2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) has rapidly become a pandemic emergency, distressing health systems in each affected country. Preparation strategies for managing this pandemic have been keys to face the COVID-19 surge all over the world and all levels of care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the epidemic, the Italian society of pediatric emergency-urgency (SIMEUP) promoted a national survey aiming to evaluate preparedness and response of pediatric emergency departments (PED) critical in ensuring optimal management of COVID-19 cases. RESULTS: Our results suggest that Italian PED have promptly set a proactive approach to the present emergency. 98.9% of the hospitals have defined special pathways and assistive protocols concerning the management of pediatric COVID-19 cases. The highest percentage of application of the measures for preventive and protective for COVID-19 concerned the use of personal protective equipments. CONCLUSIONS: Results show that the following measures for pediatric patients, admitted in PED, have been promptly implemented throughout the whole country: eg. use of protective devices, pre-triage of patients accessing the hospital. Despite COVID-19 being a new threat, we have shown that by developing an easy-to-follow decision algorithm and clear plans for the interventional platform teams, we can ensure optimal health care workers and patients' safety.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/organization & administration , /epidemiology , Child , Clinical Protocols , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Personal Protective Equipment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Triage/organization & administration
13.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 21(1): 98, 2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care professionals in endoscopic labs have an elevated risk for COVID-19 infection, therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of current pandemic on the workflow and infection prevention and control strategies of endoscopy units in real-life setting. METHODS: All members of Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology were invited between 7 and 17 April 2020 to participate in this cross-section survey study and to complete an online, anonymous questionnaire. RESULTS: Total of 120 endoscopists from 83 institutes were enrolled of which 35.83% worked in regions with high cumulative incidence of COVID-19. Only 33.33% of them had undergone training about infection prevention in their workplace. 95.83% of endoscopists regularly used risk stratification of patients for infection prior endoscopy. While indications of examinations in low risk patients varied widely, in high-risk or positive patients endoscopy was limited to gastrointestinal bleeding (95.00%), removal of foreign body from esophagus (87.50%), management of obstructive jaundice (72.50%) and biliary pancreatitis (67.50%). Appropriate amount of personal protective equipment was available in 60.85% of endoscopy units. In high-risk or positive patients, surgical mask, filtering facepiece mask, protective eyewear and two pairs of gloves were applied in 30.83%, 76.67%, 90.00% and 87.50% of cases, respectively. Personal protective equipment fully complied with European guideline only in 67.50% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Survey found large variability in indications of endoscopy and relative weak compliance to national and international practical recommendations in terms of protective equipment. This could be improved by adequate training about infection prevention.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Workflow , /epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Hungary , Patient Selection , Personal Protective Equipment
14.
Curr Opin Pulm Med ; 27(2): 73-78, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109362

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The worldwide SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has taken a heavy toll on ICUs worldwide. This review expounds on lessons learned for ICU preparedness during the pandemic and for future mass casualty events. RECENT FINDINGS: In the 21st century, there have already been several outbreaks of infectious diseases that have led to mass casualties creating ICU strain, providing multiple opportunities for hospitals and hospital systems to prepare their ICUs for future events. Unfortunately, the sheer scale and rapidity of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic led to overwhelming strain on every aspect of ICU disaster preparedness. Yet, by analyzing experiences of hospitals throughout the first 7 months of the current pandemic in the areas of infection control, equipment preparedness, staffing strategies, ICU spatial logistics as well as acute and postacute treatment, various important lessons have already emerged that will prove critical for successful future ICU preparedness. SUMMARY: Preemptive planning, beginning with the early identification of staffing resources, supply chains and alternative equipment sources, coupled with strong infection control practices that also provide for the flexibility for evolving evidence is of utmost importance. However, there is no single approach that can be applied to every health system.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Infection Control/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pandemics , Humans
15.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(10): e593-e597, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105014

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the strategies to monitor and expand access to care for a health system workers in the first 2 months of the COVID-19 epidemic in Brazil. METHODS: Description of the implemented strategy based on the guidelines developed to address the surveillance and care of a large health system's workforce in the COVID-19 epidemic. RESULTS: During phase 1, the surveillance strategy focused on monitoring suspected cases among employees. In phase 2, surveillance was restricted to employees with confirmed COVID-19, aiming at monitoring of symptoms and following hospitalizations. Access to care was expanded. A total of 1089 employees were diagnosed with COVID-19, 89 required hospitalizations and none had died. CONCLUSION: The strategies adopted were promptly implemented and could be adapted to the changing epidemic dynamics, allowing low rates of adverse outcomes in this high-risk population.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Registries , Risk Assessment , Workforce/organization & administration
16.
Cancer Control ; 28: 1073274821997425, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105647

ABSTRACT

This systematic review aims to gather primary data from cancer institutions that have implemented changes to cancer service provision amid the COVID-19 outbreak to inform future intervention and health care facility response strategies. A comprehensive literature search was done on Global Health Medline and EMBASE using pertinent key words and MeSH terms relating to COVID-19 and Cancer service provision. A total of 72 articles were selected for inclusion in this systematic review. Following the narrative synthesis that was conducted of the literature, 6 core themes that encompassed common cancer service intervention adopted by institutions were identified: (1) Testing and Tracking, (2) Outreach and Communication, (3) Protection, (4) Social Distancing (5) Treatment Management, (6) Service Restructuring. Since cancer patients are a high-risk population amid the COVID-19 pandemic, these areas of targeted intervention can be used to inform necessary actions in institutions facing similar risks, based on previous learning from numerous cancer centers globally.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/therapy , Communication , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics
17.
Emerg Med Pract ; 23(Suppl 2): 1-38, 2021 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100631

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, originated in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in late 2019 and grew rapidly into a pandemic. As of the writing of this monograph, there are over 100 million confirmed cases worldwide and 2.3 million deaths.1 New York City, with over 630,000 COVID-19-positive patients and over 27,000 deaths, became the infection epicenter in the United States. The Mount Sinai Health System, with 8 hospitals spread across New York City and Long Island, has been on the forefront of the pandemic. This compendium summarizes the lessons learned through interdisciplinary collaborations to meet the varied challenges created by the explosive appearance of the infection in our community, and will be updated continuously as new research and best practices emerge. It is our hope is that the collaborations and lessons learned that went into creating these guidelines and protocols can serve as a useful template for other systems to adapt to their fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
/epidemiology , Clinical Protocols , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Cooperative Behavior , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics
18.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 61(4): E508-E519, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102691

ABSTRACT

Background: The role of health systems in the management of disasters, including natural hazards like outbreaks and pandemics, is crucial and vital. Healthcare systems which are unprepared to properly deal with crises are much more likely to expose their public health workers and health personnel to harm and will not be able to deliver healthcare provisions in critical situations. This can lead to a drammatic toll of deaths, even in developed countries. The possible occurrence of global crises has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to devise instruments, guidelines and tools to assess the capacity of countries to deal with disasters. Iran's health system has been hit hardly by the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we aimed to assess its preparedness and response to the outbreak. Methods: The present investigation was designed as a qualitative study. We utilized the "COVID-19 Strategic Preparedness and Response Plan" devised by WHO as a conceptual framework. Results: The dimension/pillar which scored the highest was national laboratories, followed by surveillance, rapid response teams and case investigations. Risk communication and community engagement was another pillar receiving a high score, followed by infection prevention and control and by country-level coordination, planning and monitoring. The pillars/dimensions receiving the lowest scores were operational support and logistics; case management; and points of entry. Discussion: The COVID-19 pandemic has represented an unprecedent event that has challenged healthcare systems and facilities worldwide, highlighting their weaknesses and the need for inter-sectoral cooperation and collaboration during the crisis. Analyzing these experiences and capitalizing on them, by strengthening them,will help countries to be more prepared to face possible future crises.


Subject(s)
/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , /epidemiology , Community Health Workers/organization & administration , Health Plan Implementation/organization & administration , Health Policy , Humans , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Research Design , World Health Organization
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