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2.
Medwave ; 20(4): e7916, 2020 Jun 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-651724

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 is a world public health problem due to its morbidity and mortality, especially in at-risk groups. The dental environment has a high risk of viral transmission; accordingly, this study aimed to identify recommendations based on the best available evidence for dental care during this pandemic. Methods: We performed a search for scientific evidence published since 2002 to March 23th 2020 in electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Epistemonikos) and the web pages of the American Dental Association, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Oral Health, the Ministry of Health in Chile and scientific societies. Results: We included nine published studies. The recommendations were the following: unrestricted use of personal protection elements, use of extraoral radiographic techniques, use of mouth rinses with 1% hydrogen peroxide or 0.2% iodine povidone, a four-hand technique with ongoing aspiration and the use of absorbable sutures. Furthermore, there is a consensus that non-urgent treatments should be postponed during periods of community transmission. Conclusions: Dental practitioners are exposed to a high risk of cross-infection, meaning they must implement recommendations based on the best available evidence to preserve the health of team members and the population they are caring for.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Dental Care/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic
3.
Emerg Med J ; 37(7): 398-399, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-767959

ABSTRACT

Given the high risk of healthcare worker (HCW) infection with COVID-19 during aerosol-generating medical procedures, the use of a box barrier during intubation for protection of HCWs has been examined. Previous simulation work has demonstrated its efficacy in protecting HCWs from cough-expelled droplets. Our objective was to assess its ability to protect HCWs against aerosols generated during aerosol-generating medical procedures. We used a battery-powered vapouriser to assess movement of vapour with: (1) no barrier; (2) a box barrier; and (3) a box barrier and a plastic sheet covering the box and patient's body. We visualised the trajectory of vapour and saw that the vapour remained within the barrier space when the box barrier and plastic sheet were used. This is in contrast to the box barrier alone, where vapour diffused towards the feet of the patient and throughout the room, and to no barrier where the vapour immediately diffused to the laryngoscopist. This demonstrates that the box with the plastic sheet has the potential to limit the spread of aerosols towards the laryngoscopist, and thus may play a role in protecting HCWs during aerosol-generating medical procedures. This is of particular importance in the care of patients with suspected COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Protective Devices , Aerosols , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control
5.
Trials ; 21(1): 754, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742452

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the combination of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and standard personal protective equipment (PPE) compared to the use of standard personal protective equipment alone on the proportion of laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infections among frontline healthcare workers(HCWs) in India TRIAL DESIGN: HOPE is an investigator initiated multi-centre open-label parallel group randomized controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: All HCWs currently working in an environment with direct exposure to patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection are eligible to participate in the trial. The trial aims to be conducted across 20-30 centres (public and private hospitals) in India. HCWs who decline consent, who have a confirmed COVID-19 infection, those who are already on chloroquine/HCQ for any indication, or if pregnant or breast-feeding, or have known QT prolongation or are on medications that when taken with HCQ can prolong the QTc will be excluded. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: The interventions to be compared in this trial are standard practice (use of recommended PPE) and HCQ plus standard practice. In the standard practice arm, HCWs will use recommended PPE as per institutional guidelines and based on their roles. They will be discouraged from taking HCQ to prevent contamination and contacted every week for the duration of the study to ascertain if they have taken any HCQ. Any such use will be reported as a protocol violation. In the intervention arm, HCWs will be administered 800mg of HCQ as a loading dose on the day of randomization (as two 400mg doses 12hrs apart) and subsequently continued on 400mg once a week for 12 weeks. This will be in addition to the use of recommended PPE as per institutional guidelines and based on their roles. HCWs will collect the drug once every week from designated research and pharmacy staff at site. A weekly phone reminder will be provided to participants in this arm to ensure compliance. An ECG will be performed between 4-6 weeks in this arm and if the QTc is prolonged (greater than 450milliseconds), the drug will be stopped. Follow-up will however continue. Participants in both arms will receive a weekly phone call for evaluation of the primary outcome, to monitor protocol compliance and development of any adverse events (in the HCQ group). MAIN OUTCOMES: Participants will be followed on a weekly basis. The primary outcome is the proportion of HCWs developing laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection within 6 months of randomization. We will also evaluate a number of secondary outcomes, including hospitalization related to suspected/confirmed COVID-19 infection, intensive care unit or high-dependency unit admission due to suspected/confirmed COVID-19 infection, all-cause mortality, need for organ support ( non-invasive or invasive ventilation, vasopressors and renal replacement therapy), ICU and hospital length of stay, readmission, days off work and treatment-related adverse events. RANDOMISATION: Randomisation will be conducted through a password-protected, secure website using a central, computer-based randomisation program. Randomisation will be stratified by participating institutions and by the role of HCW - nursing, medical and other. Participants will be randomised 1:1 to either standard practice only or HCQ plus standard practice. Allocation concealment is maintained by central web-based randomisation BLINDING (MASKING): This is an unblinded study: study assigned treatment will be known to the research team and participant. Bias will be mitigated through an objective end point (laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection). NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 6,950 HCWs will be enrolled (3475 to the intervention) and (3475 to the standard practice group) to detect a 25% relative reduction, or 2.5% absolute reduction, in the infection rate from an estimated baseline infection rate of 10%, with 80% statistical power using a two-sided test at 5% level of significance. Available data from China and Italy indicate that the rate of infection among frontline healthcare workers varies between 4% to 12%. We therefore assumed a baseline infection rate of 10% among HCWs. This sample size allows for a potential loss to follow-up rate of 10% and a potential non-compliance rate of 10% in both the treatment and control arms. TRIAL STATUS: HOPE protocol version 3.0 dated June 3rd 2020. Recruitment started on 29th June 2020 and currently 56 participants have been enrolled. Planned completion of enrolment is January 31st 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials Registry of India: CTRI/2020/05/025067 (prospectively registered) Date of registration: 6th May 2020 FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest of expedited dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Health Personnel , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Chemoprevention , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , India , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
6.
J Int Med Res ; 48(8): 300060520949772, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-742337

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to introduce an easy method of surgical smoke evacuation for patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 undergoing emergency surgery. METHODS: An easy, inexpensive, protective, and practical surgical smoke evacuation device/system was developed and is herein described. RESULTS: The use of this surgical smoke evacuation device/system in open surgery is convenient and effective. It allows for easy, economic, useful, and protective surgical smoke evacuation. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 infection causes direct mortality and morbidity, and its incidence has recently increased. Protection from electrosurgery-related smoke is recommended particularly during the current pandemic. This surgical smoke evacuation device/system is easy to use and provides a convenient and effective method of smoke evacuation during both open surgery and all cauterization interventions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Electrocoagulation/instrumentation , Electrosurgery/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Suction/instrumentation , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Electrocoagulation/methods , Electrosurgery/methods , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Smoke/prevention & control
7.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop ; 53: e20200358, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740414

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The spread of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has generated the collapse of health care systems and significant impacts on the health of the workers involved in combatting the disease worldwide. METHODS: We conducted an integrative literature review focusing on the alternatives implemented to develop care for frontline health care workers in times of COVID-19. RESULTS: Fifteen articles disclosed the importance of physical and mental care for workers. CONCLUSIONS: A sensitive view of the health care worker's care is urgently needed to maintain the quality of health service offered to the population and preserve the health of frontline workers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus , Health Personnel/psychology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
8.
Ann Ital Chir ; 91: 273-276, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739593

ABSTRACT

CASE REPORT: A 64-year-old woman presented to our emergency department during the outbreak of the covid-19 emergency in Italy with syncope, anosmia, mild dyspnoea and atypical chest and dorsal pain. A chest CT scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection (ATBAD) and bilateral lung involvement with ground-glass opacity, compatible with interstitial pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal swabs resulted positive for SARS-CoV-2. For the persistence of chest pain, despite the analgesic therapy, we decided to treat her with a TEVAR. Patient's chest and back pain resolved during the first few days after the procedure. No surgical or respiratory complications occurred and the patient was discharged 14 days after surgery. DISCUSSION: By performing the operation under local anesthesia, it was possible to limit both the staff inside the operatory room and droplet/aerosol release. Since we had to perform the operation in a hemodynamics room, thanks to the limited extension of the endoprosthesis and the good caliber of the right vertebral artery we were able to reduce the risk of spinal cord ischemia despite the lack of a revascularization of the left subclavian artery. CONCLUSIONS: A minimally invasive total endovascular approach allows, through local anesthesia and percutaneous access, to avoid surgical cut down and orotracheal intubation. This, combined with a defined management protocol for infected patients, seems to be a reasonable way to perform endovascular aortic procedures in urgent setting, even in a SARSCoV- 2 positive patient. KEY WORDS: COVID-19, Dissection, TEVAR.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Dissecting/surgery , Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/surgery , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anesthesia, Local , Aneurysm, Dissecting/complications , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/complications , Contraindications, Procedure , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Drug Therapy, Combination , Enoxaparin/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Intraoperative Complications/prevention & control , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Operating Rooms , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Spinal Cord Ischemia/prevention & control , Vertebral Artery/surgery
9.
Ann Ital Chir ; 91: 235-238, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739563

ABSTRACT

The present pandemic caused by the SARS COV-2 coronavirus is still ongoing, although it is registered a slowdown in the spread for new cases. The main environmental route of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is through droplets and fomites or surfaces, but there is a potential risk of virus spread also in smaller aerosols during various medical procedures causing airborne transmission. To date, no information is available on the risk of contagion from the peritoneal fluid with which surgeons can come into contact during the abdominal surgery on COVID-19 patients. We have investigated the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the peritoneal cavity of patients affected by COVID-19, intraoperatively and postoperatively. KEY WORDS: Covid-19, Laparotomy, Surgery.


Subject(s)
Ascitic Fluid/virology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intestinal Perforation/surgery , Laparotomy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Sigmoid Diseases/surgery , Viremia/transmission , Aerosols , Aged, 80 and over , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diverticulum/complications , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Intestinal Perforation/blood , Intestinal Perforation/complications , Intestinal Perforation/virology , Intraoperative Period , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Postoperative Period , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Risk , Serum/virology , Sigmoid Diseases/blood , Sigmoid Diseases/complications , Sigmoid Diseases/virology , Viremia/virology
10.
Trials ; 21(1): 754, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736432

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the combination of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and standard personal protective equipment (PPE) compared to the use of standard personal protective equipment alone on the proportion of laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infections among frontline healthcare workers(HCWs) in India TRIAL DESIGN: HOPE is an investigator initiated multi-centre open-label parallel group randomized controlled trial. PARTICIPANTS: All HCWs currently working in an environment with direct exposure to patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection are eligible to participate in the trial. The trial aims to be conducted across 20-30 centres (public and private hospitals) in India. HCWs who decline consent, who have a confirmed COVID-19 infection, those who are already on chloroquine/HCQ for any indication, or if pregnant or breast-feeding, or have known QT prolongation or are on medications that when taken with HCQ can prolong the QTc will be excluded. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: The interventions to be compared in this trial are standard practice (use of recommended PPE) and HCQ plus standard practice. In the standard practice arm, HCWs will use recommended PPE as per institutional guidelines and based on their roles. They will be discouraged from taking HCQ to prevent contamination and contacted every week for the duration of the study to ascertain if they have taken any HCQ. Any such use will be reported as a protocol violation. In the intervention arm, HCWs will be administered 800mg of HCQ as a loading dose on the day of randomization (as two 400mg doses 12hrs apart) and subsequently continued on 400mg once a week for 12 weeks. This will be in addition to the use of recommended PPE as per institutional guidelines and based on their roles. HCWs will collect the drug once every week from designated research and pharmacy staff at site. A weekly phone reminder will be provided to participants in this arm to ensure compliance. An ECG will be performed between 4-6 weeks in this arm and if the QTc is prolonged (greater than 450milliseconds), the drug will be stopped. Follow-up will however continue. Participants in both arms will receive a weekly phone call for evaluation of the primary outcome, to monitor protocol compliance and development of any adverse events (in the HCQ group). MAIN OUTCOMES: Participants will be followed on a weekly basis. The primary outcome is the proportion of HCWs developing laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection within 6 months of randomization. We will also evaluate a number of secondary outcomes, including hospitalization related to suspected/confirmed COVID-19 infection, intensive care unit or high-dependency unit admission due to suspected/confirmed COVID-19 infection, all-cause mortality, need for organ support ( non-invasive or invasive ventilation, vasopressors and renal replacement therapy), ICU and hospital length of stay, readmission, days off work and treatment-related adverse events. RANDOMISATION: Randomisation will be conducted through a password-protected, secure website using a central, computer-based randomisation program. Randomisation will be stratified by participating institutions and by the role of HCW - nursing, medical and other. Participants will be randomised 1:1 to either standard practice only or HCQ plus standard practice. Allocation concealment is maintained by central web-based randomisation BLINDING (MASKING): This is an unblinded study: study assigned treatment will be known to the research team and participant. Bias will be mitigated through an objective end point (laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection). NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 6,950 HCWs will be enrolled (3475 to the intervention) and (3475 to the standard practice group) to detect a 25% relative reduction, or 2.5% absolute reduction, in the infection rate from an estimated baseline infection rate of 10%, with 80% statistical power using a two-sided test at 5% level of significance. Available data from China and Italy indicate that the rate of infection among frontline healthcare workers varies between 4% to 12%. We therefore assumed a baseline infection rate of 10% among HCWs. This sample size allows for a potential loss to follow-up rate of 10% and a potential non-compliance rate of 10% in both the treatment and control arms. TRIAL STATUS: HOPE protocol version 3.0 dated June 3rd 2020. Recruitment started on 29th June 2020 and currently 56 participants have been enrolled. Planned completion of enrolment is January 31st 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials Registry of India: CTRI/2020/05/025067 (prospectively registered) Date of registration: 6th May 2020 FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest of expedited dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Health Personnel , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Chemoprevention , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , India , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
11.
AORN J ; 112(3): 217-224, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734213

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 first appeared in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and led to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), which quickly spread globally. Protocols for surgical patients with COVID-19 were lacking, particularly for pregnant women undergoing cesarean deliveries. Perioperative nurses at Tongji Hospital in Wuhan retrospectively analyzed the perioperative nursing process, including OR preparation, intraoperative care, and OR cleanup, for women with COVID-19 undergoing cesarean deliveries. Preparation involved altering the layout of the surgical suite, educating staff members, providing personal protective equipment, and creating new in-house guidelines to help protect personnel and patients. This article describes how perioperative personnel strategized to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 in the OR and presents a multiple-case summary of six pregnant patients with COVID-19 who underwent cesarean deliveries at Tongji Hospital in January and February 2020.


Subject(s)
Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , China , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy
13.
Can J Anaesth ; 67(7): 885-892, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734051

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on 11 March 2020 because of its rapid worldwide spread. In the operating room, as part of hospital outbreak response measures, anesthesiologists are required to have heightened precautions and tailor anesthetic practices to individual patients. In particular, by minimizing the many aerosol-generating procedures performed during general anesthesia, anesthesiologists can reduce exposure to patients' respiratory secretions and the risk of perioperative viral transmission to healthcare workers and other patients. To avoid any airway manipulation, regional anesthesia should be considered whenever surgery is planned for a suspect or confirmed COVID-19 patient or any patient who poses an infection risk. Regional anesthesia has benefits of preservation of respiratory function, avoidance of aerosolization and hence viral transmission. This article explores the practical considerations and recommended measures for performing regional anesthesia in this group of patients, focusing on control measures geared towards ensuring patient and staff safety, equipment protection, and infection prevention. By doing so, we hope to address an issue that may have downstream implications in the way we practice infection control in anesthesia, with particular relevance to this new era of emerging infectious diseases and novel pathogens. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is not the first, and certainly will not be the last novel virus that will lead to worldwide outbreaks. Having a well thought out regional anesthesia plan to manage these patients in this new normal will ensure the best possible outcome for both the patient and the perioperative management team.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Conduction/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Anesthesiologists , Anesthesiology/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Operating Rooms/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
14.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 79, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-730147

ABSTRACT

Background: Workers whose occupations put them in contact with infected persons and the public are at increased risk of COVID-19 infection. Recommendations: The Collegium Ramazzini calls on governments at all levels to protect worker health by strengthening public health systems; maintaining comprehensive social insurance systems; establishing policies that presume all COVID-19 infections in high-risk workers are work-related; enforcing all occupational health standards; and developing pandemic preparedness plans. The Collegium Ramazzini calls on all employers - large and small, public and private - to protect the health of all workers by developing disease preparedness plans; implementing basic infection control measures; establishing disease identification and isolation policies; reducing hazardous exposures; supporting personal protective equipment (PPE) programs; and restricting unnecessary travel. Conclusion: Governments and employers have legal obligations to protect worker health. They are not relieved of these duties during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Global Health , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Societies, Medical , Travel
15.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 43(4): 413-427, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729222

ABSTRACT

As the confirmed cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue to grow with over 1 million documented infections in the United States alone, researchers and health care workers race to find effective treatment options for this potentially fatal disease. Mortality remains high in patients whose disease course requires mechanical ventilation and admission to intensive care units. While focusing on therapies to decrease mortality is essential, we must also consider the logistical hurdles faced with regard to safely and effectively delivering treatment while limiting the risk of harm to hospital staff and other noninfected patients. In this article, we discuss aspects of surge planning, considerations in limiting health care worker exposure, the logistics of medication delivery in a uniform and consolidated manner, protocols for delivering emergent care in a rapidly deteriorating coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) patient, and safe practices for transporting infected patients.


Subject(s)
Clinical Protocols , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitals, General/organization & administration , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Safety Management/organization & administration , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission
19.
Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi ; 34(3): 196-198, 2020 Mar.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721656

ABSTRACT

It has been more than 2 months since the outbreak of coronavirus disease(COVID-19). The Chinese Ear & Nose & Throat Department(ENT) health care workers are brave in defending against the disease. The COVID-19 patients without predominant symptoms may consult ENT doctors, even though the ENT department isn't thought first front of the battle. The ENT health care workers have high risks of exposing to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This article gives some recommendations of infection prevention and control to ENT health care workers of the outpatient and inpatient department.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Otolaryngology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Humans
20.
Am J Disaster Med ; 15(2): 93-97, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721604

ABSTRACT

As the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) escalates globally, and no end in sight, we describe an approach for adapting swiftly to the increasing number of COVID-19 parturients admitted into labor and delivery unit. The adaptability includes physical layout, triaging, quick testing, isolating confirmed parturients, access to designated intensive care units, facilitating emergent cesarean deliveries, and educating health care personnel. It is vital that other healthy parturi-ents and healthcare providers must be protected from COVID-19. It is encouraged that institutions exchange and dis-seminate information to succeed in the global fight against this dreaded pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus , Delivery, Obstetric , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Labor, Obstetric , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy
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