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1.
Anaesthesia ; 77 Suppl 1: 49-58, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612834

ABSTRACT

Delirium is a common condition affecting hospital inpatients, including those having surgery and on the intensive care unit. Delirium is also common in patients with COVID-19 in hospital settings, and the occurrence is higher than expected for similar infections. The short-term outcomes of those with COVID-19 delirium are similar to that of classical delirium and include increased length of stay and increased mortality. Management of delirium in COVID-19 in the context of a global pandemic is limited by the severity of the syndrome and compounded by the environmental constraints. Practical management includes effective screening, early identification and appropriate treatment aimed at minimising complications and timely escalation decisions. The pandemic has played out on the national stage and the effect of delirium on patients, relatives and healthcare workers remains unknown but evidence from the previous SARS outbreak suggests there may be long-lasting psychological damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Delirium/epidemiology , Delirium/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Delirium/metabolism , Delirium/therapy , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Intensive Care Units/trends
2.
J Neuroinflammation ; 19(1): 2, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603365

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental illnesses in the U.S. and are estimated to consume one-third of the country's mental health treatment cost. Although anxiolytic therapies are available, many patients still exhibit treatment resistance, relapse, or substantial side effects. Further, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home order, social isolation, fear of the pandemic, and unprecedented times, the incidence of anxiety has dramatically increased. Previously, we have demonstrated dihydromyricetin (DHM), the major bioactive flavonoid extracted from Ampelopsis grossedentata, exhibits anxiolytic properties in a mouse model of social isolation-induced anxiety. Because GABAergic transmission modulates the immune system in addition to the inhibitory signal transmission, we investigated the effects of short-term social isolation on the neuroimmune system. METHODS: Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were housed under absolute social isolation for 4 weeks. The anxiety-like behaviors after DHM treatment were examined using elevated plus-maze and open field behavioral tests. Gephyrin protein expression, microglial profile changes, NF-κB pathway activation, cytokine level, and serum corticosterone were measured. RESULTS: Socially isolated mice showed increased anxiety levels, reduced exploratory behaviors, and reduced gephyrin levels. Also, a dynamic alteration in hippocampal microglia were detected illustrated as a decline in microglia number and overactivation as determined by significant morphological changes including decreases in lacunarity, perimeter, and cell size and increase in cell density. Moreover, social isolation induced an increase in serum corticosterone level and activation in NF-κB pathway. Notably, DHM treatment counteracted these changes. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that social isolation contributes to neuroinflammation, while DHM has the ability to improve neuroinflammation induced by anxiety.


Subject(s)
Flavonols/pharmacology , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Microglia/drug effects , Microglia/metabolism , Social Isolation/psychology , Animals , Anxiety/metabolism , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , Flavonols/therapeutic use , Male , Maze Learning/drug effects , Maze Learning/physiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 789735, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581322

ABSTRACT

Background: The host immune response has a prominent role in the progression and outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Lymphopenia has been described as an important feature of SARS-CoV-2 infection and has been associated with severe disease manifestation. Lymphocyte dysregulation and hyper-inflammation have been shown to be associated with a more severe clinical course; however, a T cell subpopulation whose dysfunction correlate with disease progression has yet to be identify. Methods: We performed an immuno-phenotypic analysis of T cell sub-populations in peripheral blood from patients affected by different severity of COVID-19 (n=60) and undergoing a different clinical evolution. Clinical severity was established based on a modified WHO score considering both ventilation support and respiratory capacity (PaO2/FiO2 ratio). The ability of circulating cells at baseline to predict the probability of clinical aggravation was explored through multivariate regression analyses. Results: The immuno-phenotypic analysis performed by multi-colour flow cytometry confirmed that patients suffering from severe COVID-19 harboured significantly reduced circulating T cell subsets, especially for CD4+ T, Th1, and regulatory T cells. Peripheral T cells also correlated with parameters associated with disease severity, i.e., PaO2/FiO2 ratio and inflammation markers. CD4+ T cell subsets showed an important significant association with clinical evolution, with patients presenting markedly decreased regulatory T cells at baseline having a significantly higher risk of aggravation. Importantly, the combination of gender and regulatory T cells allowed distinguishing between improved and worsened patients with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 82%. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the association between CD4+ T cell dysregulation and COVID-19 severity and progression. Our results support the importance of analysing baseline regulatory T cell levels, since they were revealed able to predict the clinical worsening during hospitalization. Regulatory T cells assessment soon after hospital admission could thus allow a better clinical stratification and patient management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Hospitalization , Lymphocyte Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Progression , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Prognosis , Public Health Surveillance , ROC Curve , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism
4.
Gastroenterology ; 160(3): 925-928.e4, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575253
5.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(5): 672-682, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493295

ABSTRACT

While the use of vitamin C as a therapeutic agent has been investigated since the 1950s, there has been substantial recent interest in the role of vitamin C supplementation in critical illness and particularly, sepsis and septic shock. Humans cannot synthesize vitamin C and rely on exogenous intake to maintain a plasma concentration of approximately 70 to 80 µmol/L. Vitamin C, in healthy humans, is involved with antioxidant function, wound healing, endothelial function, and catecholamine synthesis. Its function in the human body informs the theoretical basis for why vitamin C supplementation may be beneficial in sepsis/septic shock.Critically ill patients can be vitamin C deficient due to low dietary intake, increased metabolic demands, inefficient recycling of vitamin C metabolites, and loss due to renal replacement therapy. Intravenous supplementation is required to achieve supraphysiologic serum levels of vitamin C. While some clinical studies of intravenous vitamin C supplementation in sepsis have shown improvements in secondary outcome measures, none of the randomized clinical trials have shown differences between vitamin C supplementation and standard of care and/or placebo in the primary outcome measures of the trials. There are some ongoing studies of high-dose vitamin C administration in patients with sepsis and coronavirus disease 2019; the majority of evidence so far does not support the routine supplementation of vitamin C in patients with sepsis or septic shock.


Subject(s)
Ascorbic Acid/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Vitamins/pharmacology , Vitamins/therapeutic use , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Ascorbic Acid/administration & dosage , Ascorbic Acid/adverse effects , Ascorbic Acid Deficiency/physiopathology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Critical Illness , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Vasoconstrictor Agents/pharmacology , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/adverse effects
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 741502, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477825

ABSTRACT

Host innate immune response follows severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and it is the driver of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) amongst other inflammatory end-organ morbidities. Such life-threatening coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is heralded by virus-induced activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs; monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells). MPs play substantial roles in aberrant immune secretory activities affecting profound systemic inflammation and end-organ malfunctions. All follow the presence of persistent viral components and virions without evidence of viral replication. To elucidate SARS-CoV-2-MP interactions we investigated transcriptomic and proteomic profiles of human monocyte-derived macrophages. While expression of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, paralleled monocyte-macrophage differentiation, it failed to affect productive viral infection. In contrast, simple macrophage viral exposure led to robust pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression but attenuated type I interferon (IFN) activity. Both paralleled dysregulation of innate immune signaling pathways, specifically those linked to IFN. We conclude that the SARS-CoV-2-infected host mounts a robust innate immune response characterized by a pro-inflammatory storm heralding end-organ tissue damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Innate , Macrophages/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Regulatory Networks , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/metabolism , Proteome , Proteomics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Transcriptome
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 727861, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477822

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory response is a host-protective mechanism against tissue injury or infections, but also has the potential to cause extensive immunopathology and tissue damage, as seen in many diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic syndrome and many other infectious diseases with public health concerns, such as Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), if failure to resolve in a timely manner. Recent studies have uncovered a superfamily of endogenous chemical molecules that tend to resolve inflammatory responses and re-establish homeostasis without causing excessive damage to healthy cells and tissues. Among these, the monocyte chemoattractant protein-induced protein (MCPIP) family consisting of four members (MCPIP-1, -2, -3, and -4) has emerged as a group of evolutionarily conserved molecules participating in the resolution of inflammation. The focus of this review highlights the biological functions of MCPIP-1 (also known as Regnase-1), the best-studied member of this family, in the resolution of inflammatory response. As outlined in this review, MCPIP-1 acts on specific signaling pathways, in particular NFκB, to blunt production of inflammatory mediators, while also acts as an endonuclease controlling the stability of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), leading to the resolution of inflammation, clearance of virus and dead cells, and promotion of tissue regeneration via its pleiotropic effects. Evidence from transgenic and knock-out mouse models revealed an involvement of MCPIP-1 expression in immune functions and in the physiology of the cardiovascular system, indicating that MCPIP-1 is a key endogenous molecule that governs normal resolution of acute inflammation and infection. In this review, we also discuss the current evidence underlying the roles of other members of the MCPIP family in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Further understanding of the proteins from this family will provide new insights into the identification of novel targets for both host effectors and microbial factors and will lead to new therapeutic treatments for infections and other inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/immunology , Ribonucleases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcription Factors/immunology , Animals , Apoptosis/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Mice , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , Transcriptional Activation/immunology , Ubiquitination
8.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 193: 114812, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474355

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is characterised by several grades of chronic inflammation and collagen deposition in the interalveolar space and is a hallmark of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Recently, infectious agents have emerged as driving causes for PF development; however, the role of viral/bacterial infections in the initiation and propagation of PF is still debated. In this context, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and PF development. Although the infection by SARS-CoV-2 can be eradicated in most cases, the development of fibrotic lesions cannot be precluded; furthermore, whether these lesions are stable or progressive fibrotic events is still unknown. Herein, an overview of the main molecular mechanisms driving the fibrotic process together with the currently approved and newly proposed therapeutic solutions was given. Then, the most recent data that emerged from post-COVID-19 patients was discussed, in order to compare PF and COVID-19-dependent PF, highlighting shared and specific mechanisms. A better understanding of PF aetiology is certainly needed, also to develop effective therapeutic strategies and COVID-19 pathology is offering one more chance to do it. Overall, the work reported here could help to define new approaches for therapeutic intervention in the diversity of the ILD spectrum.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology
9.
Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol ; 394(12): 2471-2474, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473989

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiological process of the disease, Covid-19, is mediated by innate immunity, with the presence of macrophages responsible for secreting type 1 and 6 interleukins (IL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leading to dilation of endothelial cells with a consequent increase in capillary permeability. The treatment of this disease has been much discussed, but the variability in the clinical picture, the difficulties for diagnosis and treatment, especially of those patients who have the most severe clinical condition of the disease. Immunization is an effective tool for controlling the spread and overload of health services, but its effectiveness involves high investments in the acquisition of inputs, development of vaccines, and logistics of storage and distribution. These factors can be obstacles for countries with lower economic, technological, and infrastructure indexes. Reflecting on these difficulties, we raised the possibility of adjuvant therapies with imminent research feasibility, as is the case with the use of carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol whose has biological properties that serve as a barrier to processes mediated by free radicals, such as irritation and inflammation, due to its antioxidant action. Many authors highlighted the activity of carvacrol as a potent suppressor of COX-2 expression minimizing the acute inflammatory process, decreasing the release of some pro-inflammatory mediators such as IL-1ß, TNF-α, PGE2. Anyway, the benefits of carvacrol are numerous and the therapeutic possibilities too. With this description, the question arises: would carvacrol be a supporting treatment option, effective in minimizing the deleterious effects of Covid-19? There is still a lot to discover and research.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Cymenes/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Cymenes/pharmacology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases are characterized by a dysregulated inflammatory and thrombotic state, leading to devastating complications with increased morbidity and mortality rates. SUMMARY: In this review article, we present the available evidence regarding the impact of inflammation on platelet activation in atherosclerosis. Key messages: In the context of a dysfunctional vascular endothelium, structural alterations by means of endothelial glycocalyx thinning or functional modifications through impaired NO bioavailability and increased levels of von Willebrand factor result in platelet activation. Moreover, neutrophil-derived mediators, as well as neutrophil extracellular traps formation, have been implicated in the process of platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation. The role of pro-inflammatory cytokines is also critical since their receptors are also situated in platelets while TNF-α has also been found to induce inflammatory, metabolic, and bone marrow changes. Additionally, important progress has been made towards novel concepts of the interaction between inflammation and platelet activation, such as the toll-like receptors, myeloperoxidase, and platelet factor-4. The accumulating evidence is especially important in the era of the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic, characterized by an excessive inflammatory burden leading to thrombotic complications, partially mediated by platelet activation. Lastly, recent advances in anti-inflammatory therapies point towards an anti-thrombotic effect secondary to diminished platelet activation.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Humans , Neutrophils/metabolism , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Platelet Activation , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism
11.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 144: 112291, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxytocin (OXT), a neuropeptide involved in mammal reproductive and prosocial behaviors, has been reported to interact with various stressor-provoked neurobiological changes, including neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter, and inflammatory processes. In view of disturbances in psychosocial relationships due to social isolation and physical distancing measures amid the COVID-19 pandemic, being one of the triggering factors for the recent rise in depression and anxiety, OXT is a potential candidate for a new antidepressant. METHODS: In this present study, we have aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (RE), extracted from distillation residue of rosemary essential oil, on central OXT level in the context of other stress biomarkers and neurotransmitter levels in mice models. Tail suspension test (TST) and elevated plus maze test (EPMT) following LPS injection were employed to assess depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in mice, respectively. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with RE for seven days significantly improved behavior in TST and EPMT. Whole-genome microarray analysis reveals that RE significantly reversed TST stress-induced alterations in gene expressions related to oxytocinergic and neurotransmitter pathways and inflammatory processes. In both models, RE significantly increased central Oxt and Oxtr expressions, as well as OXT protein levels. RE also significantly attenuated stress-induced changes in serum corticosterone, brain and serum BDNF levels, and brain neurotransmitters levels in both models. INTERPRETATION: Altogether, our study is the first to report antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activities of RE through modulating oxytocinergic system in mice brain and thus highlights the prospects of RE in the treatment of depressive disorders of psychosocial nature.


Subject(s)
Anti-Anxiety Agents/therapeutic use , Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Oxytocin/metabolism , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Receptors, Oxytocin/metabolism , Rosmarinus , Animals , Anti-Anxiety Agents/isolation & purification , Anti-Anxiety Agents/pharmacology , Antidepressive Agents/isolation & purification , Antidepressive Agents/pharmacology , Anxiety/drug therapy , Anxiety/metabolism , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Oxytocin/agonists , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Receptors, Oxytocin/agonists
12.
J Immunol ; 207(10): 2521-2533, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468558

ABSTRACT

Many patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in intensive care units suffer from cytokine storm. Although anti-inflammatory therapies are available to treat the problem, very often, these treatments cause immunosuppression. Because angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on host cells serves as the receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), to delineate a SARS-CoV-2-specific anti-inflammatory molecule, we designed a hexapeptide corresponding to the spike S1-interacting domain of ACE2 receptor (SPIDAR) that inhibited the expression of proinflammatory molecules in human A549 lung cells induced by pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2, but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Accordingly, wild-type (wt), but not mutated (m), SPIDAR inhibited SARS-CoV-2 spike S1-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of IL-6 and IL-1ß in human lung cells. However, wtSPIDAR remained unable to reduce activation of NF-κB and expression of proinflammatory molecules in lungs cells induced by TNF-α, HIV-1 Tat, and viral dsRNA mimic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, indicating the specificity of the effect. The wtSPIDAR, but not mutated SPIDAR, also hindered the association between ACE2 and spike S1 of SARS-CoV-2 and inhibited the entry of pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2, but not vesicular stomatitis virus, into human ACE2-expressing human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Moreover, intranasal treatment with wtSPIDAR, but not mutated SPIDAR, inhibited lung activation of NF-κB, protected lungs, reduced fever, improved heart function, and enhanced locomotor activities in SARS-CoV-2 spike S1-intoxicated mice. Therefore, selective targeting of SARS-CoV-2 spike S1-to-ACE2 interaction by wtSPIDAR may be beneficial for coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Lung/immunology , Peptides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Locomotion , Male , Mice , Molecular Targeted Therapy , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Peptides/genetics , Peptides/therapeutic use , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463708

ABSTRACT

Social behavioral changes, including social isolation or loneliness, increase the risk for stress-related disorders, such as major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicide, which share a strong neuroinflammatory etiopathogenetic component. The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α, a newly discovered target involved in emotional behavior regulation, is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor and a transcription factor that, following stimulation by endogenous or synthetic ligands, may induce neuroprotective effects by modulating neuroinflammation, and improve anxiety and depression-like behaviors by enhancing neurosteroid biosynthesis. How stress affects epigenetic mechanisms with downstream effects on inflammation and emotional behavior remains poorly understood. We studied the effects of 4-week social isolation, using a mouse model of PTSD/suicide-like behavior, on hippocampal PPAR-α epigenetic modification. Decreased PPAR-α expression in the hippocampus of socially isolated mice was associated with increased levels of methylated cytosines of PPAR-α gene CpG-rich fragments and deficient neurosteroid biosynthesis. This effect was associated with increased histone deacetylases (HDAC)1, methyl-cytosine binding protein (MeCP)2 and decreased ten-eleven translocator (TET)2 expression, which favor hypermethylation. These alterations were associated with increased TLR-4 and pro-inflammatory markers (e.g., TNF-α,), mediated by NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus of aggressive mice. This study contributes the first evidence of stress-induced brain PPAR-α epigenetic regulation. Social isolation stress may constitute a risk factor for inflammatory-based psychiatric disorders associated with neurosteroid deficits, and targeting epigenetic marks linked to PPAR-α downregulation may offer a valid therapeutic approach.


Subject(s)
Aggression , Hippocampus/metabolism , Inflammation/etiology , PPAR alpha/genetics , Social Isolation , Stress, Psychological , Aggression/psychology , Animals , Behavior, Animal , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly , CpG Islands , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Susceptibility , Epigenesis, Genetic , Gene Expression , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Male , Methylation , Mice , PPAR alpha/metabolism , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Signal Transduction
14.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456314

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Intra-articular fractures are a major cause of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Despite adequate surgical treatment, the long-term risk for PTOA is high. Previous studies reported that joint injuries initiate an inflammatory cascade characterized by an elevation of synovial pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can lead to cartilage degradation and PTOA development. This review summarizes the literature on the post-injury regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the markers of cartilage destruction in patients suffering from intra-articular fractures. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases (1960-February 2020) and included studies that were performed on human participants, and we included control groups. Two investigators assessed the quality of the included studies using Covidence and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results: Based on the surveyed literature, several synovial pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukins (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70, interferon-y, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were significantly elevated in patients suffering from intra-articular fractures compared to the control groups. A simultaneous elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and IL-1RA was also observed. In contrast, IL-13, CTX-II, and aggrecan concentrations did not differ significantly between the compared cohorts. Conclusions: Overall, intra-articular fractures are associated with an increase in inflammation-related synovial cytokines. However, more standardized studies which focus on the ratio of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at different time points are needed.


Subject(s)
Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Intra-Articular Fractures/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Joints/pathology , Synovial Fluid/metabolism
15.
Clin Immunol ; 232: 108857, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433069

ABSTRACT

Aging can alter immunity affecting host defense. COVID-19 has the most devastating clinical outcomes in older adults, raising the implication of immune aging in determining its severity and mortality. We investigated biological predictors for clinical outcomes in a dataset of 13,642 ambulatory and hospitalized adult COVID-19 patients, including younger (age < 65, n = 566) and older (age ≥ 65, n = 717) subjects, with in-depth analyses of inflammatory molecules, cytokines and comorbidities. Disease severity and mortality in younger and older adults were associated with discrete immune mechanisms, including predominant T cell activation in younger adults, as measured by increased soluble IL-2 receptor alpha, and increased IL-10 in older adults although both groups also had shared inflammatory processes, including acute phase reactants, contributing to clinical outcomes. These observations suggest that progression to severe disease and death in COVID-19 may proceed by different immunologic mechanisms in younger versus older subjects and introduce the possibility of age-based immune directed therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Age Factors , Aged , Aging/metabolism , Aging/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
16.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(38)2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392993

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 induces a robust, extended inflammatory "cytokine storm" that contributes to an increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Macrophages are a key innate immune cell population responsible for the cytokine storm that has been shown, in T2D, to promote excess inflammation in response to infection. Using peripheral monocytes and sera from human patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and a murine hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-A59) (an established murine model of SARS), we identified that coronavirus induces an increased Mφ-mediated inflammatory response due to a coronavirus-induced decrease in the histone methyltransferase, SETDB2. This decrease in SETDB2 upon coronavirus infection results in a decrease of the repressive trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3) at NFkB binding sites on inflammatory gene promoters, effectively increasing inflammation. Mφs isolated from mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of SETDB2 displayed increased pathologic inflammation following coronavirus infection. Further, IFNß directly regulates SETDB2 in Mφs via JaK1/STAT3 signaling, as blockade of this pathway altered SETDB2 and the inflammatory response to coronavirus infection. Importantly, we also found that loss of SETDB2 mediates an increased inflammatory response in diabetic Mϕs in response to coronavirus infection. Treatment of coronavirus-infected diabetic Mφs with IFNß reversed the inflammatory cytokine production via up-regulation of SETDB2/H3K9me3 on inflammatory gene promoters. Together, these results describe a potential mechanism for the increased Mφ-mediated cytokine storm in patients with T2D in response to COVID-19 and suggest that therapeutic targeting of the IFNß/SETDB2 axis in T2D patients may decrease pathologic inflammation associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Macrophages/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokines/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Female , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/physiopathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction
17.
J Neuroimmunol ; 358: 577654, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386080

ABSTRACT

Increasing evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, is associated with increased risk of developing neurological or psychiatric conditions such as depression, anxiety or dementia. While the precise mechanism underlying this association is unknown, aberrant activation of toll-like receptor (TLR)3, a viral recognizing pattern recognition receptor, may play a key role. Synthetic cannabinoids and enhancing cannabinoid tone via inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) has been demonstrated to modulate TLR3-induced neuroimmune responses and associated sickness behaviour. However, the role of individual FAAH substrates, and the receptor mechanisms mediating these effects, are unknown. The present study examined the effects of intracerebral or systemic administration of the FAAH substrates N-oleoylethanolamide (OEA), N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) or the anandamide (AEA) analogue meth-AEA on hyperthermia and hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression following administration of the TLR3 agonist, and viral mimetic, poly I:C. The data demonstrate that meth-AEA does not alter TLR3-induced hyperthermia or hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression. In comparison, OEA and PEA attenuated the TLR3-induced hyperthermia, although only OEA attenuated the expression of hyperthermia-related genes (IL-1ß, iNOS, COX2 and m-PGES) in the hypothalamus. OEA, but not PEA, attenuated TLR3-induced increases in the expression of all IRF- and NFκB-related genes examined in the hypothalamus, but not in the spleen. Antagonism of PPARα prevented the OEA-induced attenuation of IRF- and NFκB-related genes in the hypothalamus following TLR3 activation but did not significantly alter temperature. PPARα agonism did not alter TLR3-induced hyperthermia or hypothalamic inflammatory gene expression. These data indicate that OEA may be the primary FAAH substrate that modulates TLR3-induced neuroinflammation and hyperthermia, effects partially mediated by PPARα.


Subject(s)
Ethanolamines/pharmacology , Hyperthermia, Induced/methods , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , PPAR alpha/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 3/administration & dosage , Amidohydrolases/pharmacology , Animals , Female , Gene Expression , PPAR alpha/agonists , PPAR alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Poly I-C/toxicity , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley
18.
CNS Neurosci Ther ; 27(1): 36-47, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388231

ABSTRACT

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an important physiological barrier that separates the central nervous system (CNS) from the peripheral circulation, which contains inflammatory mediators and immune cells. The BBB regulates cellular and molecular exchange between the blood vessels and brain parenchyma. Normal functioning of the BBB is crucial for the homeostasis and proper function of the brain. It has been demonstrated that peripheral inflammation can disrupt the BBB by various pathways, resulting in different CNS diseases. Recently, clinical research also showed CNS complications following SARS-CoV-2 infection and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy, which both lead to a cytokine storm in the circulation. Therefore, elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the BBB disruption induced by peripheral inflammation will provide an important basis for protecting the CNS in the context of exacerbated peripheral inflammatory diseases. In the present review, we first summarize the physiological properties of the BBB that makes the CNS an immune-privileged organ. We then discuss the relevance of peripheral inflammation-induced BBB disruption to various CNS diseases. Finally, we elaborate various factors and mechanisms of peripheral inflammation that disrupt the BBB.


Subject(s)
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Brain/immunology , Brain/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation Mediators/immunology
19.
J Leukoc Biol ; 110(3): 425-431, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375609

ABSTRACT

The immune response plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection ranging from protection to tissue damage and all occur in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS patients display elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines and innate immune cells, and T and B cell lymphocytes have been implicated in this dysregulated immune response. Mast cells are abundant resident cells of the respiratory tract and are able to release different inflammatory mediators rapidly following stimulation. Recently, mast cells have been associated with tissue damage during viral infections, but their role in SARS-CoV-2 infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the profile of mast cell activation markers in the serum of COVID-19 patients. We noticed that SARS-CoV-2-infected patients showed increased carboxypeptidase A3 (CPA3) and decreased serotonin levels in their serum when compared with symptomatic SARS-CoV-2-negative patients. CPA3 levels correlated with C-reactive protein, the number of circulating neutrophils, and quick SOFA. CPA3 in serum was a good biomarker for identifying severe COVID-19 patients, whereas serotonin was a good predictor of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In summary, our results show that serum CPA3 and serotonin levels are relevant biomarkers during SARS-CoV-2 infection. This suggests that mast cells and basophils are relevant players in the inflammatory response in COVID-19 and may represent targets for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Carboxypeptidases A/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/diagnosis , Mast Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serotonin/metabolism , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Mast Cells/pathology , Severity of Illness Index
20.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 282: 114574, 2022 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373117

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Gekko gecko is used as a traditional medicine for various diseases including respiratory disorders in northeast Asian countries, mainly Korea, Japan, and China. AIM OF THE STUDY: Allergic asthma is a chronic respiratory disease caused by an inappropriate immune response. Due to the recent spread of coronavirus disease 2019, interest in the treatment of pulmonary disorders has rapidly increased. In this study, we investigated the anti-asthmatic effects of G. gecko extract (GGE) using an established mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To evaluate the anti-asthmatic effects of GGE, we evaluated histological changes and the responses of inflammatory mediators related to allergic airway inflammation. Furthermore, we investigated the regulatory effects of GGE on type 2 helper T (Th2) cell activation. RESULTS: Administration of GGE attenuated asthmatic phenotypes, including inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus production, and expression of Th2 cytokines. Furthermore, GGE treatment reduced Th2 cell activation and differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that GGE alleviates allergic airway inflammation by regulating Th2 cell activation and differentiation.


Subject(s)
Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , Medicine, East Asian Traditional , Mucus/metabolism , Ovalbumin , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Animals , Asthma/chemically induced , Asthma/pathology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19 , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Flow Cytometry , Immunoglobulin E/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pandemics , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology , Tryptamines/pharmacology
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