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1.
Cytokine ; 149: 155755, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632232

ABSTRACT

This study analyzed the levels at admission of biomarkers for their association with and ability to predict risk of severe outcomes, including admission to the ICU, need for invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), need for vasopressor use (VU), and in-hospital mortality (IHM) in 700 patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Biomarker data split by outcomes was compared using Mann-Whitney U tests; frequencies of biomarker values were compared using Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to look at the impact of biomarkers by outcome. Patients that suffered IHM were more likely to have reduced platelet numbers and high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels among patients admitted to the ICU. Risk factors for mortality were related to hyper-coagulability (low platelet count and increased D-dimer) and decreased respiratory (PaO2/FiO2 ratio) and kidney function (BUN). Association with risks of other severe outcomes were as follows: ICU with hyper-inflammation (IL-6) and decreased respiratory function; IMV with low platelet count, abnormal neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio with reduced respiratory function, VU with inflammatory markers (IL-6), and low platelet count with respiratory function. Our studies confirmed the association of biomarkers of hematological, inflammatory, coagulation, pulmonary and kidney functions with disease severity. Whether these biomarkers have any mechanistic or causal role in the disease progress requires further investigation.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
2.
J Exp Med ; 219(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594167

ABSTRACT

In rare instances, pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection results in a novel immunodysregulation syndrome termed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We compared MIS-C immunopathology with severe COVID-19 in adults. MIS-C does not result in pneumocyte damage but is associated with vascular endotheliitis and gastrointestinal epithelial injury. In MIS-C, the cytokine release syndrome is characterized by IFNγ and not type I interferon. Persistence of patrolling monocytes differentiates MIS-C from severe COVID-19, which is dominated by HLA-DRlo classical monocytes. IFNγ levels correlate with granzyme B production in CD16+ NK cells and TIM3 expression on CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells. Single-cell TCR profiling reveals a skewed TCRß repertoire enriched for TRBV11-2 and a superantigenic signature in TIM3+/CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells. Using NicheNet, we confirm IFNγ as a central cytokine in the communication between TIM3+/CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells, CD16+ NK cells, and patrolling monocytes. Normalization of IFNγ, loss of TIM3, quiescence of CD16+ NK cells, and contraction of patrolling monocytes upon clinical resolution highlight their potential role in MIS-C immunopathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adolescent , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Blood Vessels/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Proliferation , Child , Cohort Studies , Complement Activation , Cytokines/metabolism , Enterocytes/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Inflammation/pathology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interleukin-15/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Superantigens/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 167, 2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585891

ABSTRACT

The ongoing 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by SARS-CoV-2 has posed a worldwide pandemic and a major global public health threat. The severity and mortality of COVID-19 are associated with virus-induced dysfunctional inflammatory responses and cytokine storms. However, the interplay between host inflammatory responses and SARS-CoV-2 infection remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein, the major structural protein of the virion, promotes the virus-triggered activation of NF-κB signaling. After binding to viral RNA, N protein robustly undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), which recruits TAK1 and IKK complex, the key kinases of NF-κB signaling, to enhance NF-κB activation. Moreover, 1,6-hexanediol, the inhibitor of LLPS, can attenuate the phase separation of N protein and restrict its regulatory functions in NF-κB activation. These results suggest that LLPS of N protein provides a platform to induce NF-κB hyper-activation, which could be a potential therapeutic target against COVID-19 severe pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , A549 Cells , Acrylates/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Vero Cells
4.
Life Sci ; 284: 119201, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine storm is the exaggerated immune response often observed in viral infections. It is also intimately linked with the progression of COVID-19 disease as well as associated complications and mortality. Therefore, targeting the cytokine storm might help in reducing COVID-19-associated health complications. The number of COVID-19 associated deaths (as of January 15, 2021; https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/) in the USA is high (1199/million) as compared to countries like India (110/million). Although the reason behind this is not clear, spices may have some role in explaining this difference. Spices and herbs are used in different traditional medicines, especially in countries such as India to treat various chronic diseases due to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. AIM: To evaluate the literature available on the anti-inflammatory properties of spices which might prove beneficial in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. METHOD: A detailed literature search has been conducted on PubMed for collecting information pertaining to the COVID-19; the history, origin, key structural features, and mechanism of infection of SARS-CoV-2; the repurposed drugs in use for the management of COVID-19, and the anti-inflammatory role of spices to combat COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. KEY FINDINGS: The literature search resulted in numerous in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials that have reported the potency of spices to exert anti-inflammatory effects by regulating crucial molecular targets for inflammation. SIGNIFICANCE: As spices are derived from Mother Nature and are inexpensive, they are relatively safer to consume. Therefore, their anti-inflammatory property can be exploited to combat the cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients. This review thus focuses on the current knowledge on the role of spices for the treatment of COVID-19 through suppression of inflammation-linked cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Spices , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
Biomolecules ; 11(12)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572361

ABSTRACT

Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism is critical in the initiation and resolution of inflammation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4/D4/E4 (LTB4/LD4/LTE4), derived from AA, are involved in the initiation of inflammation and regulation of immune response, hematopoiesis, and M1 (pro-inflammatory) macrophage facilitation. Paradoxically, PGE2 suppresses interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production and triggers the production of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) from AA to initiate inflammation resolution process and augment regeneration of tissues. LXA4 suppresses PGE2 and LTs' synthesis and action and facilitates M2 macrophage generation to resolve inflammation. AA inactivates enveloped viruses including SARS-CoV-2. Macrophages, NK cells, T cells, and other immunocytes release AA and other bioactive lipids to produce their anti-microbial actions. AA, PGE2, and LXA4 have cytoprotective actions, regulate nitric oxide generation, and are critical to maintain cell shape and control cell motility and phagocytosis, and inflammation, immunity, and anti-microbial actions. Hence, it is proposed that AA plays a crucial role in the pathobiology of ischemia/reperfusion injury, sepsis, COVID-19, and other critical illnesses, implying that its (AA) administration may be of significant benefit in the prevention and amelioration of these diseases.


Subject(s)
Fatty Acids, Essential/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Dinoprostone/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Leukotriene B4/metabolism , Lipoxins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
6.
J Exp Med ; 219(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565893

ABSTRACT

In addition to providing partial protection against pediatric tuberculosis, vaccination with bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been reported to confer nonspecific resistance to unrelated pulmonary pathogens, a phenomenon attributed to the induction of long-lasting alterations within the myeloid cell compartment. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous, but not subcutaneous, inoculation of BCG protects human-ACE2 transgenic mice against lethal challenge with SARS-CoV-2 (SCV2) and results in reduced viral loads in non-transgenic animals infected with an α variant. The observed increase in host resistance was associated with reductions in SCV2-induced tissue pathology, inflammatory cell recruitment, and cytokine production that multivariate analysis revealed as only partially related to diminished viral load. We propose that this protection stems from BCG-induced alterations in the composition and function of the pulmonary cellular compartment that impact the innate response to the virus and ensuing immunopathology. While intravenous BCG vaccination is not a clinically acceptable practice, our findings provide an experimental model for identifying mechanisms by which nonspecific stimulation of the pulmonary immune response promotes host resistance to SCV2 lethality.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Administration, Intravenous , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Chemokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Viral Load
7.
Chem Biol Interact ; 352: 109777, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559106

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the differences in the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 infection of patients based on sex and disease severity. METHODS: We used an analytical framework of 382 transcriptional modules and multi-omics analyses to discriminate COVID-19 patients based on sex and disease severity. RESULTS: Male and female patients overexpressed modules related to the innate immune response. The expression of modules related to the adaptive immune response showed lower enrichment levels in males than females. Inflammation modules showed ascending overexpression in male and female patients, while a higher level was observed in severe female patients. Moderate female patients demonstrated significant overexpression to interferon, cytolytic lymphocyte, T & B cells, and erythrocytes modules. Moderate female patients showed a higher adaptive immune response than males matched group. Pathways involved in metabolism dysregulation and Hippo signaling were upregulated in females than in male patients. Females and moderate cases showed higher levels of metabolic dysregulation. CONCLUSIONS: The immune landscape in COVID-19 patients was noticeably different between the sexes, and these differences may highlight disease vulnerability in males. This study suggested that certain treatments that increase or decrease the immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 might be necessary for male and female patients at certain disease stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Characteristics
8.
Immunity ; 54(11): 2632-2649.e6, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549842

ABSTRACT

The incidence and severity of sepsis is higher among individuals of African versus European ancestry. We found that genetic risk variants (RVs) in the trypanolytic factor apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1), present only in individuals of African ancestry, were associated with increased sepsis incidence and severity. Serum APOL1 levels correlated with sepsis and COVID-19 severity, and single-cell sequencing in human kidneys revealed high expression of APOL1 in endothelial cells. Analysis of mice with endothelial-specific expression of RV APOL1 and in vitro studies demonstrated that RV APOL1 interfered with mitophagy, leading to cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the inflammasome (NLRP3) and the cytosolic nucleotide sensing pathways (STING). Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of NLRP3 and STING protected mice from RV APOL1-induced permeability defects and proinflammatory endothelial changes in sepsis. Our studies identify the inflammasome and STING pathways as potential targets to reduce APOL1-associated health disparities in sepsis and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Sepsis/genetics , Animals , Apolipoprotein L1/blood , COVID-19/pathology , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Membrane Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Mitophagy/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Risk Factors , Sepsis/pathology , Severity of Illness Index , /statistics & numerical data
9.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542427

ABSTRACT

Hyperactivation of immune responses resulting in excessive release of pro-inflammatory mediators in alveoli/lung structures is the principal pathological feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The cytokine hyperactivation in COVID-19 appears to be similar to those seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disease. Emerging evidence conferred the severity and risk of COVID-19 to RA patients. Amid the evidence of musculoskeletal manifestations involving immune-inflammation-dependent mechanisms and cases of arthralgia and/or myalgia in COVID-19, crosstalk between COVID-19 and RA is often debated. The present article sheds light on the pathological crosstalk between COVID-19 and RA, the risk of RA patients in acquiring SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the aspects of SARS-CoV-2 infection in RA development. We also conferred whether RA can exacerbate COVID-19 outcomes based on available clinical readouts. The mechanistic overlapping in immune-inflammatory features in both COVID-19 and RA was discussed. We showed the emerging links of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-dependent and macrophage-mediated pathways in both diseases. Moreover, a detailed review of immediate challenges and key recommendations for anti-rheumatic drugs in the COVID-19 setting was presented for better clinical monitoring and management of RA patients. Taken together, the present article summarizes available knowledge on the emerging COVID-19 and RA crosstalk and their mechanistic overlaps, challenges, and therapeutic options.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Macrophages/metabolism , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
10.
Cells ; 10(12)2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538383

ABSTRACT

Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and their function is essential to configure adaptative immunity and avoid excessive inflammation. DCs are predicted to play a crucial role in the clinical evolution of the infection by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV)-2. DCs interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein, which mediates cell receptor binding and subsequent fusion of the viral particle with host cell, is a key step to induce effective immunity against this virus and in the S protein-based vaccination protocols. Here we evaluated human DCs in response to SARS-CoV-2 S protein, or to a fragment encompassing the receptor binding domain (RBD) challenge. Both proteins increased the expression of maturation markers, including MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors. DCs interaction with the SARS-CoV-2 S protein promotes activation of key signaling molecules involved in inflammation, including MAPK, AKT, STAT1, and NFκB, which correlates with the expression and secretion of distinctive proinflammatory cytokines. Differences in the expression of ACE2 along the differentiation of human monocytes to mature DCs and inter-donor were found. Our results show that SARS-CoV-2 S protein promotes inflammatory response and provides molecular links between individual variations and the degree of response against this virus.


Subject(s)
Dendritic Cells/pathology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Lectins, C-Type/metabolism , Protein Domains , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , STAT Transcription Factors/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Tissue Donors
11.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(4)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a severe immune-mediated disorder. We aim to report the neurologic features of children with PIMS-TS. METHODS: We identified children presenting to a large children's hospital with PIMS-TS from March to June 2020 and performed a retrospective medical note review, identifying clinical and investigative features alongside short-term outcome of children presenting with neurologic symptoms. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with PIMS-TS were identified, 9 (12%) had neurologic involvement: altered conciseness (3), behavioral changes (3), focal neurology deficits (2), persistent headaches (2), hallucinations (2), excessive sleepiness (1), and new-onset focal seizures (1). Four patients had cranial images abnormalities. At 3-month follow-up, 1 child had died, 1 had hemiparesis, 3 had behavioral changes, and 4 completely recovered. Systemic inflammatory and prothrombotic markers were higher in patients with neurologic involvement (mean highest CRP 267 vs 202 mg/L, p = 0.05; procalcitonin 30.65 vs 13.11 µg/L, p = 0.04; fibrinogen 7.04 vs 6.17 g/L, p = 0.07; d-dimers 19.68 vs 7.35 mg/L, p = 0.005). Among patients with neurologic involvement, these markers were higher in those without full recovery at 3 months (ferritin 2284 vs 283 µg/L, p = 0.05; d-dimers 30.34 vs 6.37 mg/L, p = 0.04). Patients with and without neurologic involvement shared similar risk factors for PIMS-TS (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic ethnicity 78% vs 70%, obese/overweight 56% vs 42%). CONCLUSIONS: Broad neurologic features were found in 12% patients with PIMS-TS. By 3-month follow-up, half of these surviving children had recovered fully without neurologic impairment. Significantly higher systemic inflammatory markers were identified in children with neurologic involvement and in those who had not recovered fully.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child Behavior Disorders/epidemiology , Child Behavior Disorders/etiology , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/psychology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
12.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211051764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511654

ABSTRACT

The precise mechanisms of pathology in severe COVID-19 remains elusive. Current evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators are responsible for the manifestation of clinical symptoms that precedes a fatal response to infection. This review examines the nature of platelet activating factor and emphasizes the similarities between the physiological effects of platelet activating factor and the clinical complications of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Platelet Activating Factor/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/mortality , Inflammation/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/mortality , Thrombosis/pathology
13.
Med Oncol ; 39(1): 6, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506526

ABSTRACT

To assess the prognostic role of different inflammatory indices on the outcome of cancer patients with COVID-19. Sixty-two adults and 22 pediatric cancer patients with COVID-19 infection were assessed for the prognostic value of certain inflammatory indices including the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte to lymphocyte ratio (MLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), derived NLR (dNLR), systemic inflammation index (SII), mean platelet volume to platelet ratio (MPR), C-reactive protein to lymphocyte ratio (CRP/L), aggregate index of systemic inflammation (AISI), systemic inflammation response index (SIRI), and neutrophil to lymphocyte, platelet ratio (NLPR). Data were correlated to patients' outcome regarding ICU admission, and incidence of mortality. Increased CRP/L ratio in adult COVID-19 cancer patients was significantly associated with inferior survival [152 (19-2253) in non-survivors, compared to 27.4 (0.8-681) in survivors (P = 0.033)]. It achieved a sensitivity (60%) and a specificity (90.2%) at a cut-off 152, while it achieved a sensitivity of 60% and specificity 95.1% at a cut-off 252 (AUC 0.795, P = 0.033). When combining both CRP/L and NLPR for the prediction of poor outcome in adult cancer patients with COVID19, the sensitivity increased to 80% and the specificity was 70.7% (AUC 0.805, P = 0.027). Increased incidence of ICU admission in pediatric cancer patients associated significantly with the severity of covid19 infection, decreased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) < 28.3, increased red cell distribution width (RDW) > 16, lymphopenia < 1.04, pseudo Pelger-Huet appearance, and PLR < 196.4 (P = 0.004, P = 0.040, P = 0.029, P = 0. 0.039, P = 0.050, and P = 0.040; respectively). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV), MCH, and RDW could be useful prognostic markers for poor outcome in COVID-19 pediatric cancer patients (P < 0.05 for all). Increased both CRP/L and NLPR associated significantly with poor survival in adult COVID-19 cancer patients, while PLR associated significantly with ICU admission in pediatric COVID-19 cancer patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Blood Platelets/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Leukocyte Count/methods , Lymphocytes/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/virology , Neutrophils/pathology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sensitivity and Specificity , Young Adult
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477961

ABSTRACT

Chronic diseases and viral infections have threatened human life over the ages and constitute the main reason for increasing death globally. The rising burden of these diseases extends to negatively affecting the economy and trading globally, as well as daily life, which requires inexpensive, novel, and safe therapeutics. Therefore, scientists have paid close attention to probiotics as safe remedies to combat these morbidities owing to their health benefits and biotherapeutic effects. Probiotics have been broadly adopted as functional foods, nutraceuticals, and food supplements to improve human health and prevent some morbidity. Intriguingly, recent research indicates that probiotics are a promising solution for treating and prophylactic against certain dangerous diseases. Probiotics could also be associated with their essential role in animating the immune system to fight COVID-19 infection. This comprehensive review concentrates on the newest literature on probiotics and their metabolism in treating life-threatening diseases, including immune disorders, pathogens, inflammatory and allergic diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal dysfunctions, and COVID-19 infection. The recent information in this report will particularly furnish a platform for emerging novel probiotics-based therapeutics as cheap and safe, encouraging researchers and stakeholders to develop innovative treatments based on probiotics to prevent and treat chronic and viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/therapy , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/therapy
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 735922, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477823

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a major public health issue. COVID-19 is considered an airway/multi-systemic disease, and demise has been associated with an uncontrolled immune response and a cytokine storm in response to the virus. However, the lung pathology, immune response, and tissue damage associated with COVID-19 demise are poorly described and understood due to safety concerns. Using post-mortem lung tissues from uninfected and COVID-19 deadly cases as well as an unbiased combined analysis of histology, multi-viral and host markers staining, correlative microscopy, confocal, and image analysis, we identified three distinct phenotypes of COVID-19-induced lung damage. First, a COVID-19-induced hemorrhage characterized by minimal immune infiltration and large thrombus; Second, a COVID-19-induced immune infiltration with excessive immune cell infiltration but no hemorrhagic events. The third phenotype correspond to the combination of the two previous ones. We observed the loss of alveolar wall integrity, detachment of lung tissue pieces, fibroblast proliferation, and extensive fibrosis in all three phenotypes. Although lung tissues studied were from lethal COVID-19, a strong immune response was observed in all cases analyzed with significant B cell and poor T cell infiltrations, suggesting an exhausted or compromised immune cellular response in these patients. Overall, our data show that SARS-CoV-2-induced lung damage is highly heterogeneous. These individual differences need to be considered to understand the acute and long-term COVID-19 consequences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Lung Injury/pathology , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Female , Hemorrhage/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Lung/pathology , Lung Injury/virology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Macrophage Activation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocytes, Smooth Muscle/pathology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/pathology
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 727861, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477822

ABSTRACT

Inflammatory response is a host-protective mechanism against tissue injury or infections, but also has the potential to cause extensive immunopathology and tissue damage, as seen in many diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic syndrome and many other infectious diseases with public health concerns, such as Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), if failure to resolve in a timely manner. Recent studies have uncovered a superfamily of endogenous chemical molecules that tend to resolve inflammatory responses and re-establish homeostasis without causing excessive damage to healthy cells and tissues. Among these, the monocyte chemoattractant protein-induced protein (MCPIP) family consisting of four members (MCPIP-1, -2, -3, and -4) has emerged as a group of evolutionarily conserved molecules participating in the resolution of inflammation. The focus of this review highlights the biological functions of MCPIP-1 (also known as Regnase-1), the best-studied member of this family, in the resolution of inflammatory response. As outlined in this review, MCPIP-1 acts on specific signaling pathways, in particular NFκB, to blunt production of inflammatory mediators, while also acts as an endonuclease controlling the stability of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), leading to the resolution of inflammation, clearance of virus and dead cells, and promotion of tissue regeneration via its pleiotropic effects. Evidence from transgenic and knock-out mouse models revealed an involvement of MCPIP-1 expression in immune functions and in the physiology of the cardiovascular system, indicating that MCPIP-1 is a key endogenous molecule that governs normal resolution of acute inflammation and infection. In this review, we also discuss the current evidence underlying the roles of other members of the MCPIP family in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Further understanding of the proteins from this family will provide new insights into the identification of novel targets for both host effectors and microbial factors and will lead to new therapeutic treatments for infections and other inflammatory diseases.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/immunology , Ribonucleases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transcription Factors/immunology , Animals , Apoptosis/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Mice , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , Transcriptional Activation/immunology , Ubiquitination
17.
J Immunol Res ; 2021: 8669098, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476888

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study explored the consistency and differences in the immune cells and cytokines between patients with COVID-19 or cancer. We further analyzed the correlations between the acute inflammation and cancer-related immune disorder. Methods: This retrospective study involved 167 COVID-19 patients and 218 cancer patients. COVID-19 and cancer were each further divided into two subgroups. Quantitative and qualitative variables were measured by one-way ANOVA and chi-square test, respectively. Herein, we carried out a correlation analysis between immune cells and cytokines and used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to discover the optimal diagnostic index. Results: COVID-19 and cancers were associated with lymphopenia and high levels of monocytes, neutrophils, IL-6, and IL-10. IL-2 was the optimal indicator to differentiate the two diseases. Compared with respiratory cancer patients, COVID-19 patients had lower levels of IL-2 and higher levels of CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. In the subgroup analysis, IL-6 was the optimal differential diagnostic parameter that had the ability to identify if COVID-19 patients would be severely affected, and severe COVID-19 patients had lower levels of lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD3+CD8+T cells, and CD19+ B cells) and CD16+CD56+ NK cells and higher level of neutrophils. There were significant differences in the levels of CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells between T1-2 and T3-4 stages as well as IL-2 and CD19+ B cells between N0-1 and N2-3 stages while no significant differences between the metastatic and nonmetastatic cancer patients. Additionally, there were higher correlations between IL-2 and IL-4, TNF-α and IL-2, TNF-α and IL-4, TNF-α and IFN-γ, and CD16+CD56+NK cells and various subsets of T cells in COVID-19 patients. There was a higher correlation between CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in cancer patients. Conclusion: Inflammation associated with COVID-19 or cancer had effects on patients' outcomes. Accompanied by changes in immune cells and cytokines, there were consistencies, differences, and satisfactory correlations between patients with COVID-19 and those with cancers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Lymphopenia/blood , Monocytes/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
18.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458477

ABSTRACT

The enlightenment of the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as a part of the innate immune system shed new insights into the pathologies of various diseases. The initial idea that NETs are a pivotal defense structure was gradually amended due to several deleterious effects in consecutive investigations. NETs formation is now considered a double-edged sword. The harmful effects are not limited to the induction of inflammation by NETs remnants but also include occlusions caused by aggregated NETs (aggNETs). The latter carries the risk of occluding tubular structures like vessels or ducts and appear to be associated with the pathologies of various diseases. In addition to life-threatening vascular clogging, other occlusions include painful stone formation in the biliary system, the kidneys, the prostate, and the appendix. AggNETs are also prone to occlude the ductal system of exocrine glands, as seen in ocular glands, salivary glands, and others. Last, but not least, they also clog the pancreatic ducts in a murine model of neutrophilia. In this regard, elucidating the mechanism of NETs-dependent occlusions is of crucial importance for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to address the putative mechanisms of NETs-associated occlusions in the pathogenesis of disease, as well as prospective treatment modalities.


Subject(s)
Embolism/immunology , Extracellular Traps/physiology , Thrombosis/immunology , Animals , Body Fluids/immunology , Body Fluids/physiology , Embolism/physiopathology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Neutrophils/immunology , Prospective Studies , Thrombosis/physiopathology
19.
Med Sci Monit ; 26: e922281, 2020 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a sudden and serious disease with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) is a novel target for inflammatory disease, and ibudilast (IBU), a PDE4 inhibitor, inhibits inflammatory response. Our study investigated the effect of IBU on the pathogenesis of neonatal ARDS and the underlying mechanism related to it. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of PDE4, CXCR4, SDF-1, CXCR5, CXCL1, inflammatory cytokines, and proteins related to cell apoptosis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the pathological morphology of lung tissue. Pulmonary edema score was used to assess the degree of lung water accumulation after pulmonary injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, IL-1ß, IL-6, and MCP-1) in serum. TUNEL assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS Increased expression of PDE4 was observed in an LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model, and IBU ameliorated LPS-induced pathological manifestations and pulmonary edema in lung tissue. In addition, IBU attenuated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines by inactivating the chemokine axis in the LPS-induced neonatal ARDS mouse model. Finally, IBU significantly reduced LPS-induced cell apoptosis in lung tissue. CONCLUSIONS IBU, a PDE4 inhibitor, protected against ARDS by interfering with pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis. Our findings provide a novel and promising strategy to regulate pulmonary inflammation in ARDS.


Subject(s)
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4/metabolism , Inflammation/drug therapy , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/drug therapy , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Apoptosis/drug effects , Apoptosis/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/diagnosis , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Injections, Intraperitoneal , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pyridines/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn/pathology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
20.
Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol ; 394(11): 2187-2195, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442084

ABSTRACT

Millions of people around the world are involved with COVID-19 due to infection with SARS-CoV-2. Virological features of SARS-CoV-2, including its genomic sequence, have been identified but the mechanisms governing COVID-19 immunopathogenesis have remained uncertain. miR-223 is a hematopoietic cell-derived miRNA that is implicated in regulating monocyte-macrophage differentiation, neutrophil recruitment, and pro-inflammatory responses. The miR-223 controls inflammation by targeting a variety of factors, including TRAF6, IKKα, HSP-70, FOXO1, TLR4, PI3K/AKT, PARP-1, HDAC2, ITGB3, CXCL2, CCL3, IL-6, IFN-I, STMN1, IL-1ß, IL-18, Caspase-1, NF-κB, and NLRP3. The key role of miR-223 in regulating the inflammatory process and its antioxidant and antiviral role can suggest this miRNA as a potential regulatory factor in the process of COVID-19 immunopathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Inflammasomes/genetics , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , MicroRNAs/genetics , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Inflammasomes/immunology , Inflammation/immunology
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