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1.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 533-544, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537202

ABSTRACT

Cough is one of the most common presenting symptoms of COVID-19, along with fever and loss of taste and smell. Cough can persist for weeks or months after SARS-CoV-2 infection, often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive impairment, dyspnoea, or pain-a collection of long-term effects referred to as the post-COVID syndrome or long COVID. We hypothesise that the pathways of neurotropism, neuroinflammation, and neuroimmunomodulation through the vagal sensory nerves, which are implicated in SARS-CoV-2 infection, lead to a cough hypersensitivity state. The post-COVID syndrome might also result from neuroinflammatory events in the brain. We highlight gaps in understanding of the mechanisms of acute and chronic COVID-19-associated cough and post-COVID syndrome, consider potential ways to reduce the effect of COVID-19 by controlling cough, and suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. Although neuromodulators such as gabapentin or opioids might be considered for acute and chronic COVID-19 cough, we discuss the possible mechanisms of COVID-19-associated cough and the promise of new anti-inflammatories or neuromodulators that might successfully target both the cough of COVID-19 and the post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/etiology , Inflammation/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neuroimmunomodulation , Cough/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
2.
Indian J Pathol Microbiol ; 64(4): 735-740, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485280

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is a pandemic viral disease that has affected the Indian population very badly with more than 8.46 million cases and > 0.125 million deaths. Aim: Primary objective of the study is to establish the role of hematological, coagulation and inflammatory biomarkers in early identification of clinically severe covid-19 cases. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted from July 2020 to August 2020 at a dedicated COVID-19 referral hospital in central India. Only RT-PCR confirmed COVID-19 positive 300 cases admitted in the hospital were included in this study. Based on the clinical assessment, patients were categorised as mild, moderate, and severe groups as per ICMR guidelines. Blood samples of all cases were tested for haematological, coagulation and inflammatory biomarkers and mean values were compared among the three groups of patients. Results: 46% patients belonged to >60 years of age group. Hematological parameters like total leukocyte count, absolute neutrophil count, Neutrophil: Lymphocyte ratio, Platelet: Lymphocyte ratio significantly increased with lymphocytopenia (P=0.001). Coagulation profile(D-dimer and PT) and inflammatory biomarkers like CRP, LDH, ferritin, procalcitonin and NT- Pro BNP, all were significantly increased with severity of patients(p=0.001). ROC plotted for all the parameters between severe v/s non-severe cases showed that CRP, LDH and D-dimer had a good discriminative precision with AUC >0.8. Conclusion: We suggest that biochemical markers like CRP, LDH and D-dimer can be used as a screening tool to differentiate severe patients from non-severe patients of Covid-19 disease in order to identify severe disease at early stage for optimal utilization of resources & reducing further morbidity & mortality.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Early Diagnosis , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol ; 35: 20587384211048026, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440891

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a highly heterogeneous and complex medical disorder; indeed, severe COVID-19 is probably amongst the most complex of medical conditions known to medical science. While enormous strides have been made in understanding the molecular pathways involved in patients infected with coronaviruses an overarching and comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of COVID-19 is lacking. Such an understanding is essential in the formulation of effective prophylactic and treatment strategies. Based on clinical, proteomic, and genomic studies as well as autopsy data severe COVID-19 disease can be considered to be the connection of three basic pathologic processes, namely a pulmonary macrophage activation syndrome with uncontrolled inflammation, a complement-mediated endothelialitis together with a procoagulant state with a thrombotic microangiopathy. In addition, platelet activation with the release of serotonin and the activation and degranulation of mast cells contributes to the hyper-inflammatory state. Auto-antibodies have been demonstrated in a large number of hospitalized patients which adds to the end-organ damage and pro-thrombotic state. This paper provides a clinical overview of the major pathogenetic mechanism leading to severe COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Complement Activation , Complement System Proteins/metabolism , Cytokines/blood , Disease Progression , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Inflammation/virology , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/immunology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/physiopathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/virology , Platelet Activation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serotonin/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/blood , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/immunology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/physiopathology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/virology
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(38)2021 09 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392993

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 induces a robust, extended inflammatory "cytokine storm" that contributes to an increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Macrophages are a key innate immune cell population responsible for the cytokine storm that has been shown, in T2D, to promote excess inflammation in response to infection. Using peripheral monocytes and sera from human patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and a murine hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-A59) (an established murine model of SARS), we identified that coronavirus induces an increased Mφ-mediated inflammatory response due to a coronavirus-induced decrease in the histone methyltransferase, SETDB2. This decrease in SETDB2 upon coronavirus infection results in a decrease of the repressive trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3) at NFkB binding sites on inflammatory gene promoters, effectively increasing inflammation. Mφs isolated from mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of SETDB2 displayed increased pathologic inflammation following coronavirus infection. Further, IFNß directly regulates SETDB2 in Mφs via JaK1/STAT3 signaling, as blockade of this pathway altered SETDB2 and the inflammatory response to coronavirus infection. Importantly, we also found that loss of SETDB2 mediates an increased inflammatory response in diabetic Mϕs in response to coronavirus infection. Treatment of coronavirus-infected diabetic Mφs with IFNß reversed the inflammatory cytokine production via up-regulation of SETDB2/H3K9me3 on inflammatory gene promoters. Together, these results describe a potential mechanism for the increased Mφ-mediated cytokine storm in patients with T2D in response to COVID-19 and suggest that therapeutic targeting of the IFNß/SETDB2 axis in T2D patients may decrease pathologic inflammation associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Macrophages/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Cytokines/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/genetics , Female , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/physiopathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , NF-kappa B/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction
5.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389305

ABSTRACT

Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system contributing substantially to health and disease. There is increasing evidence that inflammatory microglia may induce or accelerate brain aging, by interfering with physiological repair and remodeling processes. Many viral infections affect the brain and interfere with microglia functions, including human immune deficiency virus, flaviviruses, SARS-CoV-2, influenza, and human herpes viruses. Especially chronic viral infections causing low-grade neuroinflammation may contribute to brain aging. This review elucidates the potential role of various neurotropic viruses in microglia-driven neurocognitive deficiencies and possibly accelerated brain aging.


Subject(s)
Aging , Brain/physiopathology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Microglia/virology , Virus Diseases/physiopathology , Animals , Brain/immunology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Microglia/immunology , Microglia/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology
6.
Curr Neurovasc Res ; 18(1): 162-168, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Robust evidence has described that Parkinson´s disease (PD) is associated with an increased risk for developing epileptic seizures. In fact, an interplay between PD and epilepsy has been of interest for many years. An emerging hypothesis is that inflammation could link both diseases. OBJECTIVE: Bearing in mind the experience of our group in the field of Ca2+/cAMP signalling pathways, this article discussed, beyond inflammation, the role of these signalling pathways in this link between PD and epilepsy. METHODS: Publications involving Ca2+/cAMP signalling pathways, PD, and epilepsy (alone or combined) were collected by searching PubMed and EMBASE. RESULTS: The comprehension of the interplay between PD and epilepsy could improve the drug therapy. In addition, a Ca2+ signalling dyshomeostasis due to Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an emerging and rapidly evolving situation, has been reported. CONCLUSION: Thus, this article also debated recent findings about therapeutics involving Ca2+ channel blockers for preventing Ca2+ signalling dyshomeostasis due to COVID-19, including the correlation among COVID-19, epilepsy, and PD.


Subject(s)
Calcium Signaling , Cyclic AMP , Epilepsy/complications , Inflammation/complications , Parkinson Disease/complications , Signal Transduction , COVID-19/complications , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Epilepsy/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology
7.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 9987931, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367496

ABSTRACT

Objective: Respiratory failure is the leading cause of mortality in COVID-19 patients, characterized by a generalized disbalance of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between immune-inflammatory index and mortality in PSI IV-V patients with COVID-19. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of COVID-19 patients from Feb. to Apr. 2020 in the Zhongfa Xincheng Branch of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China. Patients who presented high severity of COVID-19-related pneumonia were enrolled for further analysis according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) tool. Results: A total of 101 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were identified at initial research. The survival analysis revealed that mortality of the PSI IV-V cohort was significantly higher than the PSI I-III group (p = 0.0003). The overall mortality in PSI IV-V patients was 32.1% (9/28). The fatal cases of the PSI IV-V group had a higher level of procalcitonin (p = 0.022) and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p = 0.033) compared with the survivors. Procalcitonin was the most sensitive predictor of mortality for the severe COVID-19 population with area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78, higher than the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (0.75) and total lymphocyte (0.68) and neutrophil (0.67) counts. Conclusion: Procalcitonin and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio may potentially be effective predictors for mortality in PSI IV-V patients with COVID-19. Increased procalcitonin and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio were associated with greater risk of mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/mortality , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Procalcitonin/blood , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
8.
Biol Aujourdhui ; 215(1-2): 63-72, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358360

ABSTRACT

Obesity is considered a pandemic responsible for millions of deaths worldwide for many years. At the end of 2019, the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appeared, causing the death of more than a million people in less than a year. Numerous studies suggest that obesity could be defined as key to the onset of severe forms of this emerging disease. Indeed, SARS-CoV2 infects the host by binding to ACE2 receptors present on the surface of the cells and causes excessive secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α, which lead to developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It therefore seems essential to make up effective preventive strategies to protect this part of the population from the risk of developing a severe form of COVID-19. The ketogenic diet, which is low in sugars and high in fat, has interesting properties, both in the fight against obesity but also against severe infections. This article focuses on the latest scientific advances that make it possible to consider the ketogenic diet as a preventive strategy that simultaneously reduces the development of obesity while strengthening the immune system, two key actions in the fight against SARS-CoV2 infections and severe forms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet, Ketogenic , Inflammation/etiology , Obesity/prevention & control , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adipocytes/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Diet, Ketogenic/adverse effects , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Inflammation/prevention & control , Leptin/physiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/diet therapy , Obesity/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology
9.
Radiol Med ; 126(10): 1273-1281, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305169

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate the agreement between chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) and to assess the diagnostic performance of chest MRI relative to that of CT during the follow-up of patients recovered from coronavirus disease 2019. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two patients underwent both follow-up chest CT and MRI scans, evaluated for ground-glass opacities (GGOs), consolidation, interlobular septal thickening, fibrosis, pleural indentation, vessel enlargement, bronchiolar ectasia, and changes compared to prior CT scans. DWI/ADC was evaluated for signal abnormalities suspicious for inflammation. Agreement between CT and MRI was assessed with Cohen's k and weighted k. Measures of diagnostic accuracy of MRI were calculated. RESULTS: The agreement between CT and MRI was almost perfect for consolidation (k = 1.00) and change from prior CT (k = 0.857); substantial for predominant pattern (k = 0.764) and interlobular septal thickening (k = 0.734); and poor for GGOs (k = 0.339), fibrosis (k = 0.224), pleural indentation (k = 0.231), and vessel enlargement (k = 0.339). Meanwhile, the sensitivity of MRI was high for GGOs (1.00), interlobular septal thickening (1.00), and consolidation (1.00) but poor for fibrotic changes (0.18), pleural indentation (0.23), and vessel enlargement (0.50) and the specificity was overall high. DWI was positive in 46.0% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The agreement between MRI and CT was overall good. MRI was very sensitive for GGOs, consolidation and interlobular septal thickening and overall specific for most findings. DWI could be a reputable imaging biomarker of inflammatory activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/diagnostic imaging , Inflammation/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Nat Rev Nephrol ; 17(11): 751-764, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297305

ABSTRACT

Although respiratory failure and hypoxaemia are the main manifestations of COVID-19, kidney involvement is also common. Available evidence supports a number of potential pathophysiological pathways through which acute kidney injury (AKI) can develop in the context of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Histopathological findings have highlighted both similarities and differences between AKI in patients with COVID-19 and in those with AKI in non-COVID-related sepsis. Acute tubular injury is common, although it is often mild, despite markedly reduced kidney function. Systemic haemodynamic instability very likely contributes to tubular injury. Despite descriptions of COVID-19 as a cytokine storm syndrome, levels of circulating cytokines are often lower in patients with COVID-19 than in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome with causes other than COVID-19. Tissue inflammation and local immune cell infiltration have been repeatedly observed and might have a critical role in kidney injury, as might endothelial injury and microvascular thrombi. Findings of high viral load in patients who have died with AKI suggest a contribution of viral invasion in the kidneys, although the issue of renal tropism remains controversial. An impaired type I interferon response has also been reported in patients with severe COVID-19. In light of these observations, the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of COVID-19-associated AKI may provide insights into therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Adaptive Immunity/physiology , Biopsy , Complement System Proteins , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Hematuria/physiopathology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/physiology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Immunosenescence , Inflammation/physiopathology , Inflammation/virology , Interferon Type I/physiology , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Proteinuria/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Viral Load
11.
Bioessays ; 43(9): e2000211, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293142

ABSTRACT

We propose that hyper-inflammation (HYPi) is a ''runaway'' consequence of acute inflammation (ACUi) that arises more easily (and also abates less easily) in those who host a pre-existing chronic inflammation (CHRi), because (i) most factors involved in generating an ACUi to limit viral proliferation are already present when there is an underlying CHRi, and also because (ii) anti-inflammatory (AI) mechanisms for the abatement of ACUi (following containment of viral proliferation) are suppressed and desensitized where there is an underlying CHRi, with this causing the ACUi to spiral into a HYPi. Stress, pollution, diet, and gut microbiomes (alterable in weeks through dietary changes) have an intimate and bidirectional cause-effect relationship with CHRi. We propose that avoidance of CHRi-promoting foods and adoption of CHRi-suppressing foods could reduce susceptibility to HYPi, in Covid-19 and in other viral diseases, such as influenza, which are characterized by episodic and unpredictable HYPi.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Inflammation/physiopathology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Diet/adverse effects , Humans
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238898

ABSTRACT

Inflammation is a key mechanism for the clearance of infective agents and other inflammatory triggers and is pivotal for the repairing processes of the affected tissues. Inflammation is a multistep process driven by a great number of mediators which regulate specific aspects of the inflammatory response, in agreement with a well-defined chronobiological program. A great number of inflammation-related diseases show a deeply altered immune chronobiology (e.g., COVID-19-related cytokines storm). This aspect highlights the need for a deeper understanding of the inflammatory phenomenon. It is fundamental to study inflammation as a multilevel phenomenon. Of particular interest is the low-grade chronic inflammation, which is an etiological factor of many chronic diseases. Nowadays, the therapeutic approach to low grade chronic inflammation is one of the great challenges of traditional pharmacology. Currently, no drugs specifically designed for the treatment of chronic inflammatory forms are available. Today, bioregulatory systems medicine (BrSM) and low dose medicine (LDM), two pharmacological paradigms grounded in systems medicine, potentially represent new tools for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. Scientific research has assessed the effectiveness and safety of both these therapeutic approaches, in particular for the management of chronic inflammatory conditions and chronic immunological dysregulations.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Systems Analysis , Acute Disease , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Chronic Disease/drug therapy , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/physiopathology
13.
Microcirculation ; 28(7): e12718, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236400

ABSTRACT

Recently, accumulating evidence has highlighted the role of endothelial dysfunction in COVID-19 progression. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD-related risk factors (eg, age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity). Equally, these are also risk factors for COVID-19. The purpose of this review was to explore CMD pathophysiology in COVID-19, based on recent evidence. COVID-19 mechanisms were reviewed in terms of imbalanced renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-systems (RAAS), systemic inflammation and immune responses, endothelial dysfunction, and coagulatory disorders. Based on these mechanisms, we addressed CMD pathophysiology within the context of COVID-19, from five perspectives. The first was the disarrangement of local RAAS and Kallikrein-kinin-systems attributable to SARS-Cov-2 entry, and the concomitant decrease in coronary microvascular endothelial angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) levels. The second was related to coronary microvascular obstruction, induced by COVID-19-associated systemic hyper-inflammation and pro-thrombotic state. The third was focused on how pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-related systemic hypoxia elicited oxidative stress in coronary microvessels and cardiac sympathetic nerve activation. Fourthly, we discussed how autonomic nerve dysfunction mediated by COVID-19-associated mental, physical, or physiological factors could elicit changes in coronary blood flow, resulting in CMD in COVID-19 patients. Finally, we analyzed reciprocity between the coronary microvascular endothelium and perivascular cellular structures due to viremia, SARS-CoV-2 dissemination, and systemic inflammation. These mechanisms may function either consecutively or intermittently, finally culminating in CMD-mediated cardiovascular symptoms in COVID-19 patients. However, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be clarified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Coronary Vessels/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Male , Microcirculation/physiology , Models, Cardiovascular , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/physiopathology
14.
Nutr Res ; 90: 1-12, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202105

ABSTRACT

Since the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is linked to chronic inflammation, people with initial lower inflammatory status could have better outcomes from exposure to this disease. Because dietary habits are one of the most important modifiable risk factors for inflammation, identification of dietary components associated with inflammation could play a significant role in controlling or reducing the risk of COVID-19. We investigated the inflammatory potential of diets consumed by African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) women of childbearing age (n = 509) who are at high risk for exposure to COVID-19 by being residents of Birmingham, Alabama, a city severely affected by this pandemic. The overall pro- and anti- inflammatory scores were calculated using dietary intake data gathered using Block food frequency questionnaire. The proinflammatory potential of diets consumed by AAs was significantly higher compared to CAs. Several anti- and proinflammatory nutrients and food groups consumed differed by race. With consumption of a greater number of antioxidants and B-vitamins, CAs switched toward an anti-inflammatory score more effectively than AAs while AAs performed better than CAs in improving the anti-inflammatory score with the consumption of a greater number of minerals and vitamin D. Effective race-specific dietary modifications or supplementation with nutrients identified will be useful to improve proinflammatory diets toward anti-inflammatory. This approach could aid in controlling the current COVID-19 pandemic and future pandemics of a similar nature in women at risk for exposure.


Subject(s)
African Americans/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet/methods , Inflammation/physiopathology , /statistics & numerical data , Adult , Alabama , Diet/adverse effects , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 204(4): 421-430, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180997

ABSTRACT

Rationale: Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay of intensive care but contributes to the mortality of patients through ventilator-induced lung injury. eCypA (extracellular CypA [cyclophilin A]) is an emerging inflammatory mediator and metalloproteinase inducer, and the gene responsible for its expression has recently been linked to coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Objectives: To explore the involvement of eCypA in the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods: Mice were ventilated with a low or high Vt for up to 3 hours, with or without blockade of eCypA signaling, and lung injury and inflammation were evaluated. Human primary alveolar epithelial cells were exposed to in vitro stretching to explore the cellular source of eCypA, and CypA concentrations were measured in BAL fluid from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome to evaluate the clinical relevance. Measurements and Main Results: High-Vt ventilation in mice provoked a rapid increase in soluble CypA concentration in the alveolar space but not in plasma. In vivo ventilation and in vitro stretching experiments indicated the alveolar epithelium as the likely major source. In vivo blockade of eCypA signaling substantially attenuated physiological dysfunction, macrophage activation, and MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases). Finally, we found that patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome showed markedly elevated concentrations of eCypA within BAL fluid. Conclusions: CypA is upregulated within the lungs of injuriously ventilated mice (and critically ill patients), where it plays a significant role in lung injury. eCypA represents an exciting novel target for pharmacological intervention.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/immunology , Cyclophilin A/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/immunology , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/physiopathology , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cells, Cultured/drug effects , Cyclophilin A/pharmacology , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Male , Mice , Models, Animal , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/genetics
16.
Pulmonology ; 27(5): 423-437, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174466

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a new beta coronavirus, similar to SARS-CoV-1, that emerged at the end of 2019 in the Hubei province of China. It is responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. The ability to gain quick control of the pandemic has been hampered by a lack of detailed knowledge about SARS-CoV-2-host interactions, mainly in relation to viral biology and host immune response. The rapid clinical course seen in COVID-19 indicates that infection control in asymptomatic patients or patients with mild disease is probably due to the innate immune response, as, considering that SARS-CoV-2 is new to humans, an effective adaptive response would not be expected to occur until approximately 2-3 weeks after contact with the virus. Antiviral innate immunity has humoral components (complement and coagulation-fibrinolysis systems, soluble proteins that recognize glycans on cell surface, interferons, chemokines, and naturally occurring antibodies) and cellular components (natural killer cells and other innate lymphocytes). Failure of this system would pave the way for uncontrolled viral replication in the airways and the mounting of an adaptive immune response, potentially amplified by an inflammatory cascade. Severe COVID-19 appears to be due not only to viral infection but also to a dysregulated immune and inflammatory response. In this paper, the authors review the most recent publications on the immunobiology of SARS-CoV-2, virus interactions with target cells, and host immune responses, and highlight possible associations between deficient innate and acquired immune responses and disease progression and mortality. Immunotherapeutic strategies targeting both the virus and dysfunctional immune responses are also addressed.


Subject(s)
Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Progression , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Inflammation/virology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/complications , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/pathology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/virology , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Stroke ; 52(5): 1885-1894, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166635

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raised concerns about the correlation with this viral illness and increased risk of stroke. Although it is too early in the pandemic to know the strength of the association between COVID-19 and stroke, it is an opportune time to review the relationship between acute viral illnesses and stroke. Here, we summarize pathophysiological principles and available literature to guide understanding of how viruses may contribute to ischemic stroke. After a review of inflammatory mechanisms, we summarize relevant pathophysiological principles of vasculopathy, hypercoagulability, and hemodynamic instability. We will end by discussing mechanisms by which several well-known viruses may cause stroke in an effort to inform our understanding of the relationship between COVID-19 and stroke.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/physiopathology , Acute Disease , Blood Coagulation , Brain Ischemia/virology , Hemodynamics , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Ischemic Stroke/virology , Pandemics , Plaque, Atherosclerotic/physiopathology , Risk , Thrombophilia/physiopathology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Vascular Diseases/physiopathology , Virus Diseases/physiopathology
19.
Nature ; 593(7860): 564-569, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155701

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have provided insights into the pathology of and immune response to COVID-191-8. However, a thorough investigation of the interplay between infected cells and the immune system at sites of infection has been lacking. Here we use high-parameter imaging mass cytometry9 that targets the expression of 36 proteins to investigate the cellular composition and spatial architecture of acute lung injury in humans (including injuries derived from SARS-CoV-2 infection) at single-cell resolution. These spatially resolved single-cell data unravel the disordered structure of the infected and injured lung, alongside the distribution of extensive immune infiltration. Neutrophil and macrophage infiltration are hallmarks of bacterial pneumonia and COVID-19, respectively. We provide evidence that SARS-CoV-2 infects predominantly alveolar epithelial cells and induces a localized hyperinflammatory cell state that is associated with lung damage. We leverage the temporal range of fatal outcomes of COVID-19 in relation to the onset of symptoms, which reveals increased macrophage extravasation and increased numbers of mesenchymal cells and fibroblasts concomitant with increased proximity between these cell types as the disease progresses-possibly as a result of attempts to repair the damaged lung tissue. Our data enable us to develop a biologically interpretable landscape of lung pathology from a structural, immunological and clinical standpoint. We use this landscape to characterize the pathophysiology of the human lung from its macroscopic presentation to the single-cell level, which provides an important basis for understanding COVID-19 and lung pathology in general.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Progression , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Single-Cell Analysis , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Inflammation/virology , Lung/physiopathology , Macrophages/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Time Factors , Viral Tropism
20.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(3): 216-218, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154141

ABSTRACT

We analysed RRI and other hemodynamic, re-spiratory and inflammation parameters in critically ill pa-tients affected by severe covid-19 with acute distress respi-ratory syndrome (ARDS) aiming at verifying their modifica-tions during supine and prone positioning and any mutual correlation or interplay with RRI.


Subject(s)
Blood Flow Velocity , COVID-19/physiopathology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Kidney/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Renal Artery/physiopathology , Renal Circulation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Creatinine/blood , Diastole , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/diagnosis , Kidney Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Supine Position , Systole
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