Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0109121, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591660

ABSTRACT

Chemical methods of virus inactivation are used routinely to prevent viral transmission in both a personal hygiene capacity but also in at-risk environments like hospitals. Several virucidal products exist, including hand soaps, gels, and surface disinfectants. Resin acids, which can be derived from tall oil, produced from trees, have been shown to exhibit antibacterial activity. However, whether these products or their derivatives have virucidal activity is unknown. Here, we assessed the capacity of rosin soap to inactivate a panel of pathogenic mammalian viruses in vitro. We show that rosin soap can inactivate human enveloped viruses: influenza A virus (IAV), respiratory syncytial virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). For IAV, rosin soap could provide a 100,000-fold reduction in infectivity. However, rosin soap failed to affect the nonenveloped encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The inhibitory effect of rosin soap against IAV infectivity was dependent on its concentration but not on the incubation time or temperature. In all, we demonstrate a novel chemical inactivation method against enveloped viruses, which could be of use for preventing virus infections in certain settings. IMPORTANCE Viruses remain a significant cause of human disease and death, most notably illustrated through the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Control of virus infection continues to pose a significant global health challenge to the human population. Viruses can spread through multiple routes, including via environmental and surface contamination, where viruses can remain infectious for days. Methods for inactivating viruses on such surfaces may help mitigate infection. Here, we present evidence identifying a novel virucidal product, rosin soap, which is produced from tall oil from coniferous trees. Rosin soap was able to rapidly and potently inactivate influenza virus and other enveloped viruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Resins, Plant/pharmacology , Soaps/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/analysis , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Influenza A virus/growth & development , Plant Oils/analysis , Plant Oils/pharmacology , Resins, Plant/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Soaps/analysis , Virus Inactivation/drug effects
2.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 575: 36-41, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370449

ABSTRACT

Air spaces and material surfaces in a pathogen-contaminated environment can often be a source of infection to humans, and disinfection has become a common intervention focused on reducing the contamination levels. In this study, we examined the efficacy of SAIW, a unique electrolyzed water with chlorine-free, high pH, high concentration of dissolved hydrogen, and low oxygen reduction potential, for the inactivation of several viruses and bacteria. Infectivity assays revealed that initial viral titers of enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), influenza A virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, human coronavirus, feline calicivirus, and canine parvovirus, were reduced by 2.9- to 5.5-log10 within 30 s of SAIW exposure. Similarly, the culturability of three Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Legionella) dropped down by 1.9- to 4.9-log10 within 30 s of SAIW treatment. Mechanistically, treatment with SAIW was found to significantly decrease the binding and subsequent entry efficiencies of SARS-CoV-2 on Vero cells. Finally, we showed that this chlorine-free electrolytic ion water had no acute inhalation toxicity in mice, demonstrating that SAIW holds promise for a safer antiviral and antibacterial disinfectant.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Disinfection/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Water/pharmacology , Animals , Calicivirus, Feline/drug effects , Calicivirus, Feline/growth & development , Chlorocebus aethiops , Colony Count, Microbial , Electrolysis , Escherichia coli/drug effects , Escherichia coli/growth & development , Herpesvirus 1, Human/drug effects , Herpesvirus 1, Human/growth & development , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Influenza A virus/growth & development , Legionella/drug effects , Legionella/growth & development , Mice , Parvovirus, Canine/drug effects , Parvovirus, Canine/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Salmonella/drug effects , Salmonella/growth & development , Skin/drug effects , Vero Cells , Viral Load
3.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244885, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251754

ABSTRACT

Human influenza virus infections occur annually worldwide and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Hence, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is urgently required. Rice Power® extract developed by the Yushin Brewer Co. Ltd. is a novel aqueous extract of rice obtained via saccharization and fermentation with various microorganisms, such as Aspergillus oryzae, yeast [such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae], and lactic acid bacteria, possessing various biological and pharmacological properties. In our previous experimental screening with thirty types of Rice Power® extracts, we observed that the 30th Rice Power® (Y30) extract promoted the survival of influenza A virus-infected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Therefore, to identify compounds for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs, we aimed to investigate whether the Y30 extract exhibits anti-influenza A virus activity. In the present study, we demonstrated that the Y30 extract strongly promoted the survival of influenza A H1N1 Puerto Rico 8/34 (A/PR/8/34), California 7/09, or H3N2 Aichi 2/68 (A/Aichi/2/68) viruses-infected MDCK cells and inhibited A/PR/8/34 or A/Aichi/2/68 viruses infection and growth in the co-treatment and pre-infection experiments. The pre-treatment of Y30 extract on MDCK cells did not induce anti-influenza activity in the cell. The Y30 extract did not significantly affect influenza A virus hemagglutination, and neuraminidase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities. Interestingly, the electron microscopy experiment revealed that the Y30 extract disrupts the integrity of influenza A virus particles by permeabilizing the viral membrane envelope, suggesting that Y30 extract has a direct virucidal effect against influenza A virus. Furthermore, we observed that compared to the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract, the water extract of Y30 extract considerably promoted the survival of cells infected with A/PR/8/34 virus. These results indicated that more anti-influenza components were present in the water extract of Y30 extract than in the EtOAc extract. Our results highlight the potential of a rice extract fermented with A. oryzae and S. cerevisiae as an anti-influenza medicine and a drug source for the development of anti-influenza compounds.


Subject(s)
Aspergillus oryzae/metabolism , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Oryza/chemistry , Oryza/microbiology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Water/chemistry , Acetates/chemistry , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Dogs , Fermentation , Influenza A virus/growth & development , Influenza A virus/physiology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Microbial Viability/drug effects
4.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 7635, 2020 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-196615

ABSTRACT

Proteolytic cleavage of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin by host proteases is crucial for virus infectivity and spread. The transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2 was previously identified as the essential protease that can cleave hemagglutinin of many subtypes of influenza virus and spike protein of coronavirus. Herein, we found that a guanine rich tract, capable of forming intramolecular G-quadruplex in the presence of potassium ions, in the promoter region of human TMPRSS2 gene was quite important for gene transcriptional activity, hence affecting its function. Furthermore, 7 new synthesized benzoselenoxanthene analogues were found to enable stabilizing such G-quadruplex. More importantly, compounds can down-regulate TMPRSS2 gene expression, especially endogenous TMPRSS2 protein levels, and consequently suppress influenza A virus propagation in vitro. Our results provide a new strategy for anti-influenza A virus infection by small molecules targeting the TMPRSS2 gene G-quadruplex and thus inhibiting TMPRSS2 expression, which is valuable for developing small molecule drugs against influenza A virus and also may be a potential candidate as anti- SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoV 2) lead molecules.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/growth & development , Organoselenium Compounds , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Cell Line , DNA Footprinting , Drug Discovery , G-Quadruplexes , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Influenza A virus/physiology , Organoselenium Compounds/chemistry , Organoselenium Compounds/pharmacology , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Transcription, Genetic
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL