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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 681636, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714997

ABSTRACT

The emergence of COVID-19 has emphasised that biological assay data must be analysed quickly to develop safe, effective and timely vaccines/therapeutics. For viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, the primary way of measuring immune correlates of protection is through assays such as the pseudotype microneutralisation (pMN) assay, thanks to its safety and versatility. However, despite the presence of existing tools for data analysis such as PRISM and R the analysis of these assays remains cumbersome and time-consuming. We introduce an open-source R Shiny web application and R library (AutoPlate) to accelerate data analysis of dose-response curve immunoassays. Using example data from influenza studies, we show that AutoPlate improves on available analysis software in terms of ease of use, flexibility and speed. AutoPlate (https://philpalmer.shinyapps.io/AutoPlate/) is a tool for the use of laboratories and wider scientific community to accelerate the analysis of biological assays in the development of viral vaccines and therapeutics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunoassay/statistics & numerical data , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Humans , Immunoassay/standards , Quality Control , Software
2.
J Immunol ; 208(6): 1467-1482, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690085

ABSTRACT

Asthma is a chronic disease of childhood, but for unknown reasons, disease activity sometimes subsides as children mature. In this study, we present clinical and animal model evidence suggesting that the age dependency of childhood asthma stems from an evolving host response to respiratory viral infection. Using clinical data, we show that societal suppression of respiratory virus transmission during coronavirus disease 2019 lockdown disrupted the traditional age gradient in pediatric asthma exacerbations, connecting the phenomenon of asthma remission to virus exposure. In mice, we show that asthmatic lung pathology triggered by Sendai virus (SeV) or influenza A virus is highly age-sensitive: robust in juvenile mice (4-6 wk old) but attenuated in mature mice (>3 mo old). Interestingly, allergen induction of the same asthmatic traits was less dependent on chronological age than viruses. Age-specific responses to SeV included a juvenile bias toward type 2 airway inflammation that emerged early in infection, whereas mature mice exhibited a more restricted bronchiolar distribution of infection that produced a distinct type 2 low inflammatory cytokine profile. In the basal state, aging produced changes to lung leukocyte burden, including the number and transcriptional landscape of alveolar macrophages (AMs). Importantly, depleting AMs in mature mice restored post-SeV pathology to juvenile levels. Thus, aging influences chronic outcomes of respiratory viral infection through regulation of the AM compartment and type 2 inflammatory responses to viruses. Our data provide insight into how asthma remission might develop in children.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Aging/physiology , Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Lung/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Respirovirus Infections/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sendai virus/physiology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Animals , Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , United States/epidemiology
3.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 412-423, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585244

ABSTRACT

Although frequently reported since the beginning of the pandemic, questions remain regarding the impact of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) interaction with circulating respiratory viruses in coinfected patients. We here investigated dual infections involving early-pandemic SARS-CoV-2 and the Alpha variant and three of the most prevalent respiratory viruses, rhinovirus (RV) and Influenza A and B viruses (IAV and IBV), in reconstituted respiratory airway epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface. We found that SARS-CoV-2 replication was impaired by primary, but not secondary, rhino- and influenza virus infection. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 had no effect on the replication of these seasonal respiratory viruses. Inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 correlated better with immune response triggered by RV, IAV and IBV than the virus entry. Using neutralizing antibody against type I and III interferons, SARS-CoV-2 blockade in dual infections could be partly prevented. Altogether, these data suggested that SARS-CoV-2 interaction with seasonal respiratory viruses would be modulated by interferon induction and could impact SARS-CoV-2 epidemiology when circulation of other respiratory viruses is restored.


Subject(s)
Coinfection/virology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza B virus/physiology , Respiratory System/virology , Rhinovirus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology , Coinfection/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/physiology
4.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580410

ABSTRACT

The number of obese adults and children is increasing worldwide, with obesity now being a global epidemic. Around 2.8 million people die annually from clinical overweight or obesity. Obesity is associated with numerous comorbid conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and cancer, and even the development of severe disease after infection with viruses. Over the past twenty years, a number of new viruses has emerged and entered the human population. Moreover, influenza (H1N1)pdm09 virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have caused pandemics. During pandemics, the number of obese patients presents challenging and complex issues in medical and surgical intensive care units. Morbidity amongst obese individuals is directly proportional to body mass index. In this review, we describe the impact of obesity on the immune system, adult mortality, and immune response after infection with pandemic influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2. Finally, we address the effect of obesity on vaccination.


Subject(s)
Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Comorbidity , Humans , Immunity , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Obesity/immunology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
Cell Rep ; 37(6): 109961, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1507742

ABSTRACT

Following infection or immunization, memory B cells (MBCs) and long-lived plasma cells provide humoral immunity that can last for decades. Most principles of MBC biology have been determined with hapten-protein carrier models or fluorescent protein immunizations. Here, we examine the temporal dynamics of the germinal center (GC) B cell and MBC response following mouse influenza A virus infection. We find that antiviral B cell responses within the lung-draining mediastinal lymph node (mLN) and the spleen are distinct in regard to duration, enrichment for antigen-binding cells, and class switching dynamics. While splenic GCs dissolve after 6 weeks post-infection, mLN hemagglutinin-specific (HA+) GCs can persist for 22 weeks. Persistent GCs continuously differentiate MBCs, with "peak" and "late" GCs contributing equal numbers of HA+ MBCs to the long-lived compartment. Our findings highlight critical aspects of persistent GC responses and MBC differentiation following respiratory virus infection with direct implications for developing effective vaccination strategies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Germinal Center/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Influenza A virus/physiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , T-Box Domain Proteins/physiology , Animals , Cell Differentiation , Female , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology
6.
mBio ; 11(2)2020 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452919

ABSTRACT

Obesity is associated with increased disease severity, elevated viral titers in exhaled breath, and significantly prolonged viral shed during influenza A virus infection. Due to the mutable nature of RNA viruses, we questioned whether obesity could also influence influenza virus population diversity. Here, we show that minor variants rapidly emerge in obese mice. The variants exhibit increased viral replication, resulting in enhanced virulence in wild-type mice. The increased diversity of the viral population correlated with decreased type I interferon responses, and treatment of obese mice with recombinant interferon reduced viral diversity, suggesting that the delayed antiviral response exhibited in obesity permits the emergence of a more virulent influenza virus population. This is not unique to obese mice. Obesity-derived normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells also showed decreased interferon responses and increased viral replication, suggesting that viral diversity also was impacted in this increasing population.IMPORTANCE Currently, 50% of the adult population worldwide is overweight or obese. In these studies, we demonstrate that obesity not only enhances the severity of influenza infection but also impacts viral diversity. The altered microenvironment associated with obesity supports a more diverse viral quasispecies and affords the emergence of potentially pathogenic variants capable of inducing greater disease severity in lean hosts. This is likely due to the impaired interferon response, which is seen in both obese mice and obesity-derived human bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting that obesity, aside from its impact on influenza virus pathogenesis, permits the stochastic accumulation of potentially pathogenic viral variants, raising concerns about its public health impact as the prevalence of obesity continues to rise.


Subject(s)
Disease Susceptibility , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/etiology , Obesity/complications , Animals , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Mice , Mutation , Phenotype , RNA, Viral , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Virulence , Virus Replication
7.
Nat Immunol ; 22(11): 1416-1427, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475314

ABSTRACT

Ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 (interferon-stimulated gene 15) (ISG15) is a ubiquitin-like modifier induced during infections and involved in host defense mechanisms. Not surprisingly, many viruses encode deISGylating activities to antagonize its effect. Here we show that infection by Zika, SARS-CoV-2 and influenza viruses induce ISG15-modifying enzymes. While influenza and Zika viruses induce ISGylation, SARS-CoV-2 triggers deISGylation instead to generate free ISG15. The ratio of free versus conjugated ISG15 driven by the papain-like protease (PLpro) enzyme of SARS-CoV-2 correlates with macrophage polarization toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype and attenuated antigen presentation. In vitro characterization of purified wild-type and mutant PLpro revealed its strong deISGylating over deubiquitylating activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of PLpro substrates and secretome from SARS-CoV-2-infected macrophages revealed several glycolytic enzymes previously implicated in the expression of inflammatory genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that altered free versus conjugated ISG15 dysregulates macrophage responses and probably contributes to the cytokine storms triggered by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Ubiquitins/metabolism , Cell Differentiation , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Cytokines/genetics , Gene Knockdown Techniques , HeLa Cells , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Ubiquitination , Ubiquitins/genetics , Zika Virus/physiology , Zika Virus Infection/immunology
8.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436097

ABSTRACT

Type III interferons (lambda IFNs) are a quite new, small family of three closely related cytokines with interferon-like activity. Attention to IFN-λ is mainly focused on direct antiviral activity in which, as with IFN-α, viral genome replication is inhibited without the participation of immune system cells. The heterodimeric receptor for lambda interferons is exposed mainly on epithelial cells, which limits its possible action on other cells, thus reducing the likelihood of developing undesirable side effects compared to type I IFN. In this study, we examined the antiviral potential of exogenous human IFN-λ1 in cellular models of viral infection. To study the protective effects of IFN-λ1, three administration schemes were used: 'preventive' (pretreatment); 'preventive/therapeutic' (pre/post); and 'therapeutic' (post). Three IFN-λ1 concentrations (from 10 to 500 ng/mL) were used. We have shown that human IFN-λ1 restricts SARS-CoV-2 replication in Vero cells with all three treatment schemes. In addition, we have shown a decrease in the viral loads of CHIKV and IVA with the 'preventive' and 'preventive/therapeutic' regimes. No significant antiviral effect of IFN-λ1 against AdV was detected. Our study highlights the potential for using IFN-λ as a broad-spectrum therapeutic agent against respiratory RNA viruses.


Subject(s)
Adenoviruses, Human/drug effects , Chikungunya virus/drug effects , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Interferons/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , A549 Cells , Adenoviruses, Human/physiology , Animals , Chikungunya virus/physiology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Influenza A virus/physiology , Interferons/therapeutic use , Interleukins , RNA Virus Infections/drug therapy , RNA Virus Infections/prevention & control , Recombinant Proteins/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
9.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(26): 30317-30325, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387130

ABSTRACT

Influenza A viruses (IAV) and SARS-CoV-2 can spread via liquid droplets and aerosols. Face masks and other personal protective equipment (PPE) can act as barriers that prevent the spread of these viruses. However, IAV and SARS-CoV-2 are stable for hours on various materials, which makes frequent and correct disposal of these PPE important. Metal ions embedded into PPE may inactivate respiratory viruses, but confounding factors such as adsorption of viruses make measuring and optimizing the inactivation characteristics difficult. Here, we used polyamide 6.6 (PA66) fibers containing embedded zinc ions and systematically investigated if these fibers can adsorb and inactivate SARS-CoV-2 and IAV H1N1 when woven into a fabric. We found that our PA66-based fabric decreased the IAV H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 titer by approximately 100-fold. Moreover, we found that the zinc content and the virus inactivating property of the fabric remained stable over 50 standardized washes. Overall, these results provide insights into the development of reusable PPE that offer protection against RNA virus spread.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/physiology , Nylons/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Textiles , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Zinc/pharmacology , Adsorption , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cotton Fiber , Dogs , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Ions , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Polypropylenes/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vero Cells , Viral Load , Zinc Oxide/pharmacology
10.
Science ; 373(6557): 918-922, 2021 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367378

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic avian influenza A virus (IAV) infections are rare. Sustained transmission of these IAVs between humans has not been observed, suggesting a role for host genes. We used whole-genome sequencing to compare avian IAV H7N9 patients with healthy controls and observed a strong association between H7N9 infection and rare, heterozygous single-nucleotide variants in the MX1 gene. MX1 codes for myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA), an interferon-induced antiviral guanosine triphosphatase known to control IAV infections in transgenic mice. Most of the MxA variants identified lost the ability to inhibit avian IAVs, including H7N9, in transfected human cell lines. Nearly all of the inactive MxA variants exerted a dominant-negative effect on the antiviral function of wild-type MxA, suggesting an MxA null phenotype in heterozygous carriers. Our study provides genetic evidence for a crucial role of the MX1-based antiviral defense in controlling zoonotic IAV infections in humans.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/genetics , Agricultural Workers' Diseases/genetics , Agricultural Workers' Diseases/virology , Animals , Cell Line , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetic Variation , Heterozygote , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Mutation, Missense , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/chemistry , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/metabolism , Poultry , Viral Zoonoses , Whole Genome Sequencing
11.
J Immunol ; 207(5): 1229-1238, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344412

ABSTRACT

Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) or seasonal influenza may lead to respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The pathophysiology of this respiratory failure is attributed to local immune dysregulation, but how the immune response to viral infection in the lower airways of the human lung differs between individuals with respiratory failure and those without is not well understood. We used quantitative multiparameter flow cytometry and multiplex cytokine assays to evaluate matched blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from control human subjects, subjects with symptomatic seasonal influenza who did not have respiratory failure, and subjects with severe seasonal influenza or SARS-CoV-2 infection with respiratory failure. We find that severe cases are associated with an influx of nonclassical monocytes, activated T cells, and plasmablast B cells into the lower airways. Cytokine concentrations were not elevated in the lower airways of moderate influenza patients compared with controls; however, 28 of 35 measured cytokines were significantly elevated in severe influenza, severe SARS-CoV-2 infection, or both. We noted the largest elevations in IL-6, IP-10, MCP-1, and IL-8. IL-1 family cytokines and RANTES were higher in severe influenza infection than severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. Interestingly, only the concentration of IP-10-correlated between blood and BAL during severe infection. Our results demonstrate inflammatory immune dysregulation in the lower airways during severe viral pneumonia that is distinct from lower airway responses seen in human patients with symptomatic, but not severe, illness and suggest that measurement of blood IP-10 concentration may predict this unique dysregulation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Respiratory System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Blood Proteins/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Insufficiency , Severity of Illness Index
12.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244885, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251754

ABSTRACT

Human influenza virus infections occur annually worldwide and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Hence, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is urgently required. Rice Power® extract developed by the Yushin Brewer Co. Ltd. is a novel aqueous extract of rice obtained via saccharization and fermentation with various microorganisms, such as Aspergillus oryzae, yeast [such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae], and lactic acid bacteria, possessing various biological and pharmacological properties. In our previous experimental screening with thirty types of Rice Power® extracts, we observed that the 30th Rice Power® (Y30) extract promoted the survival of influenza A virus-infected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Therefore, to identify compounds for the development of novel anti-influenza drugs, we aimed to investigate whether the Y30 extract exhibits anti-influenza A virus activity. In the present study, we demonstrated that the Y30 extract strongly promoted the survival of influenza A H1N1 Puerto Rico 8/34 (A/PR/8/34), California 7/09, or H3N2 Aichi 2/68 (A/Aichi/2/68) viruses-infected MDCK cells and inhibited A/PR/8/34 or A/Aichi/2/68 viruses infection and growth in the co-treatment and pre-infection experiments. The pre-treatment of Y30 extract on MDCK cells did not induce anti-influenza activity in the cell. The Y30 extract did not significantly affect influenza A virus hemagglutination, and neuraminidase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities. Interestingly, the electron microscopy experiment revealed that the Y30 extract disrupts the integrity of influenza A virus particles by permeabilizing the viral membrane envelope, suggesting that Y30 extract has a direct virucidal effect against influenza A virus. Furthermore, we observed that compared to the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract, the water extract of Y30 extract considerably promoted the survival of cells infected with A/PR/8/34 virus. These results indicated that more anti-influenza components were present in the water extract of Y30 extract than in the EtOAc extract. Our results highlight the potential of a rice extract fermented with A. oryzae and S. cerevisiae as an anti-influenza medicine and a drug source for the development of anti-influenza compounds.


Subject(s)
Aspergillus oryzae/metabolism , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Oryza/chemistry , Oryza/microbiology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Water/chemistry , Acetates/chemistry , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Dogs , Fermentation , Influenza A virus/growth & development , Influenza A virus/physiology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Microbial Viability/drug effects
13.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(26): 30317-30325, 2021 Jul 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284676

ABSTRACT

Influenza A viruses (IAV) and SARS-CoV-2 can spread via liquid droplets and aerosols. Face masks and other personal protective equipment (PPE) can act as barriers that prevent the spread of these viruses. However, IAV and SARS-CoV-2 are stable for hours on various materials, which makes frequent and correct disposal of these PPE important. Metal ions embedded into PPE may inactivate respiratory viruses, but confounding factors such as adsorption of viruses make measuring and optimizing the inactivation characteristics difficult. Here, we used polyamide 6.6 (PA66) fibers containing embedded zinc ions and systematically investigated if these fibers can adsorb and inactivate SARS-CoV-2 and IAV H1N1 when woven into a fabric. We found that our PA66-based fabric decreased the IAV H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 titer by approximately 100-fold. Moreover, we found that the zinc content and the virus inactivating property of the fabric remained stable over 50 standardized washes. Overall, these results provide insights into the development of reusable PPE that offer protection against RNA virus spread.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus/physiology , Nylons/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Textiles , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Zinc/pharmacology , Adsorption , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cotton Fiber , Dogs , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Influenza A virus/drug effects , Ions , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Polypropylenes/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Vero Cells , Viral Load , Zinc Oxide/pharmacology
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 641360, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247859

ABSTRACT

Human SP-D is a potent innate immune molecule whose presence at pulmonary mucosal surfaces allows its role in immune surveillance against pathogens. Higher levels of serum SP-D have been reported in the patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Studies have suggested the ability of human SP-D to recognise spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV; its interaction with HCoV-229E strain leads to viral inhibition in human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells. Previous studies have reported that a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rfhSP-D) composed of 8 Gly-X-Y repeats, neck and CRD region, can act against a range of viral pathogens including influenza A Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo. In this context, this study was aimed at examining the likely protective role of rfhSP-D against SARS-CoV-2 infection. rfhSP-D showed a dose-responsive binding to S1 spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 and its receptor binding domain. Importantly, rfhSP-D inhibited interaction of S1 protein with the HEK293T cells overexpressing human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (hACE2). The protective role of rfhSP-D against SARS-CoV-2 infection as an entry inhibitor was further validated by the use of pseudotyped lentiviral particles expressing SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein; ~0.5 RLU fold reduction in viral entry was seen following treatment with rfhSP-D (10 µg/ml). These results highlight the therapeutic potential of rfhSP-D in SARS-CoV-2 infection and merit pre-clinical studies in animal models.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza A virus/physiology , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/physiology , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/physiology , Virion/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Protein Binding , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virus Internalization
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11025, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246385

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic and led to nearly three million deaths globally. As of April 2021, there are still many countries that do not have COVID-19 vaccines. Before the COVID-19 vaccines were developed, some evidence suggested that an influenza vaccine may stimulate nonspecific immune responses that reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection or the severity of COVID-19 illness after infection. This study evaluated the association between influenza vaccination and the risk of COVID-19 infection. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study with data from July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020 with the Claims data from Symphony Health database. The study population was adults age 65 years old or older who received influenza vaccination between September 1 and December 31 of 2019. The main outcomes and measures were odds of COVID-19 infection and severe COVID-19 illness after January 15, 2020. We found the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of COVID-19 infection risk between the influenza-vaccination group and no-influenza-vaccination group was 0.76 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-0.77). Among COVID-19 patients, the aOR of developing severe COVID-19 illness was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.68-0.76) between the influenza-vaccination group and the no-influenza-vaccination group. When the influenza-vaccination group and the other-vaccination group were compared, the aOR of COVID-19 infection was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.93-0.97), and the aOR of developing a severe COVID-19 illness was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.80-1.13). The influenza vaccine may marginally protect people from COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza Vaccines/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
16.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232574

ABSTRACT

Despite vaccination and antivirals, influenza remains a communicable disease of high burden, with limited therapeutic options available to patients that develop complications. Here, we report the development and preclinical characterization of Adipose Stromal Cell (ASC) concentrated secretome (CS), generated by process adaptable to current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) standards. We demonstrate that ASC-CS limits pulmonary histopathological changes, infiltration of inflammatory cells, protein leak, water accumulation, and arterial oxygen saturation (spO2) reduction in murine model of lung infection with influenza A virus (IAV) when first administered six days post-infection. The ability to limit lung injury is sustained in ASC-CS preparations stored at -80 °C for three years. Priming of the ASC with inflammatory factors TNFα and IFNγ enhances ASC-CS ability to suppress lung injury. IAV infection is associated with dramatic increases in programmed cell death ligand (PDL1) and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) levels. ASC-CS application significantly reduces both PDL1 and Angpt2 levels. Neutralization of PDL1 with anti-mouse PDL1 antibody starting Day6 onward effectively ablates lung PDL1, but only non-significantly reduces Angpt2 release. Most importantly, late-phase PDL1 neutralization results in negligible suppression of protein leakage and inflammatory cell infiltration, suggesting that suppression of PDL1 does not play a critical role in ASC-CS therapeutic effects.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/cytology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Lung Injury/therapy , Lung Injury/virology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/therapy , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Angiopoietin-2/metabolism , Animals , B7-H1 Antigen/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Cryopreservation , Culture Media, Conditioned/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/pathology , Lung Injury/complications , Lung Injury/pathology , Male , Mice , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/complications , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Sex Characteristics , Stromal Cells/metabolism
17.
Hum Genomics ; 15(1): 26, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220117

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mathematical approaches have been for decades used to probe the structure of DNA sequences. This has led to the development of Bioinformatics. In this exploratory work, a novel mathematical method is applied to probe the DNA structure of two related viral families: those of coronaviruses and those of influenza viruses. The coronaviruses are SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1, and MERS. The influenza viruses include H1N1-1918, H1N1-2009, H2N2-1957, and H3N2-1968. METHODS: The mathematical method used is the slow feature analysis (SFA), a rather new but promising method to delineate complex structure in DNA sequences. RESULTS: The analysis indicates that the DNA sequences exhibit an elaborate and convoluted structure akin to complex networks. We define a measure of complexity and show that each DNA sequence exhibits a certain degree of complexity within itself, while at the same time there exists complex inter-relationships between the sequences within a family and between the two families. From these relationships, we find evidence, especially for the coronavirus family, that increasing complexity in a sequence is associated with higher transmission rate but with lower mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The complexity measure defined here may hold a promise and could become a useful tool in the prediction of transmission and mortality rates in future new viral strains.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/classification , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Influenza A virus/classification , Influenza A virus/genetics , Models, Genetic , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Humans , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/mortality , Influenza, Human/transmission , Influenza, Human/virology , Sequence Analysis, DNA , Species Specificity , Time Factors
18.
Immunity ; 54(6): 1186-1199.e7, 2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207036

ABSTRACT

A cardinal feature of COVID-19 is lung inflammation and respiratory failure. In a prospective multi-country cohort of COVID-19 patients, we found that increased Notch4 expression on circulating regulatory T (Treg) cells was associated with disease severity, predicted mortality, and declined upon recovery. Deletion of Notch4 in Treg cells or therapy with anti-Notch4 antibodies in conventional and humanized mice normalized the dysregulated innate immunity and rescued disease morbidity and mortality induced by a synthetic analog of viral RNA or by influenza H1N1 virus. Mechanistically, Notch4 suppressed the induction by interleukin-18 of amphiregulin, a cytokine necessary for tissue repair. Protection by Notch4 inhibition was recapitulated by therapy with Amphiregulin and, reciprocally, abrogated by its antagonism. Amphiregulin declined in COVID-19 subjects as a function of disease severity and Notch4 expression. Thus, Notch4 expression on Treg cells dynamically restrains amphiregulin-dependent tissue repair to promote severe lung inflammation, with therapeutic implications for COVID-19 and related infections.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions , Immunity, Cellular , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptor, Notch4/metabolism , Signal Transduction , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , Amphiregulin/pharmacology , Animals , Biomarkers , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Disease Susceptibility , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Immunomodulation/drug effects , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Influenza A virus/physiology , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Receptor, Notch4/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Notch4/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Future Microbiol ; 16(3): 135-142, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110198

ABSTRACT

The ability of influenza A virus to evolve, coupled with increasing antimicrobial resistance, could trigger an influenza pandemic with great morbidity and mortality. Much of the 1918 influenza pandemic mortality was likely due to bacterial coinfection, including Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. S. aureus resists many antibiotics. The lack of new antibiotics suggests alternative antimicrobials, such as bacteriophages, are needed. Potential delivery routes for bacteriophage therapy (BT) include inhalation and intravenous injection. BT has recently been used successfully in compassionate access pulmonary infection cases. Phage lysins, enzymes that hydrolyze bacterial cell walls and which are bactericidal, are efficacious in animal pneumonia models. Clinical trials will be needed to determine whether BT can ameliorate disease in influenza and S. aureus coinfection.


Subject(s)
Bacteriophages/physiology , Coinfection/therapy , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/therapy , Phage Therapy , Pneumonia, Staphylococcal/therapy , Staphylococcus aureus/virology , Animals , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/mortality , Coinfection/virology , Humans , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza, Human/mortality , Influenza, Human/virology , Pneumonia, Staphylococcal/microbiology , Pneumonia, Staphylococcal/mortality , Staphylococcus aureus/genetics , Staphylococcus aureus/physiology
20.
Cell Res ; 31(4): 395-403, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091494

ABSTRACT

The upcoming flu season in the Northern Hemisphere merging with the current COVID-19 pandemic raises a potentially severe threat to public health. Through experimental coinfection with influenza A virus (IAV) and either pseudotyped or live SARS-CoV-2 virus, we found that IAV preinfection significantly promoted the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 in a broad range of cell types. Remarkably, in vivo, increased SARS-CoV-2 viral load and more severe lung damage were observed in mice coinfected with IAV. Moreover, such enhancement of SARS-CoV-2 infectivity was not observed with several other respiratory viruses, likely due to a unique feature of IAV to elevate ACE2 expression. This study illustrates that IAV has a unique ability to aggravate SARS-CoV-2 infection, and thus, prevention of IAV infection is of great significance during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Coinfection/pathology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/deficiency , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Cathepsin L/genetics , Cathepsin L/metabolism , Cell Line , Coinfection/virology , Humans , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , RNA, Guide/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Viral Load , Virus Internalization
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