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1.
Science ; 374(6571): 1127-1133, 2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723460

ABSTRACT

Humans differ in their susceptibility to infectious disease, partly owing to variation in the immune response after infection. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to quantify variation in the response to influenza infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from European- and African-ancestry males. Genetic ancestry effects are common but highly cell type specific. Higher levels of European ancestry are associated with increased type I interferon pathway activity in early infection, which predicts reduced viral titers at later time points. Substantial population-associated variation is explained by cis-expression quantitative trait loci that are differentiated by genetic ancestry. Furthermore, genetic ancestry­associated genes are enriched among genes correlated with COVID-19 disease severity, suggesting that the early immune response contributes to ancestry-associated differences for multiple viral infection outcomes.


Subject(s)
African Americans/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , /genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Susceptibility , Gene Expression Regulation , Genetic Variation , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Quantitative Trait Loci , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Load , Young Adult
3.
Cells ; 11(3)2022 01 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667057

ABSTRACT

The global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is still ongoing, as is research on the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular infection by coronaviruses, with the hope of developing therapeutic agents against this pandemic. Other important respiratory viruses such as 2009 pandemic H1N1 and H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV), influenza A viruses, are also responsible for a possible outbreak due to their respiratory susceptibility. However, the interaction of these viruses with host cells and the regulation of post-transcriptional genes remains unclear. In this study, we detected and analyzed the comparative transcriptome profiling of SARS-CoV-2, panH1N1 (A/California/07/2009), and H7N9 (A/Shanghai/1/2013) infected cells. The results showed that the commonly upregulated genes among the three groups were mainly involved in autophagy, pertussis, and tuberculosis, which indicated that autophagy plays an important role in viral pathogenicity. There are three groups of commonly downregulated genes involved in metabolic pathways. Notably, unlike panH1N1 and H7N9, SARS-CoV-2 infection can inhibit the m-TOR pathway and activate the p53 signaling pathway, which may be responsible for unique autophagy induction and cell apoptosis. Particularly, upregulated expression of IRF1 was found in SARS-CoV-2, panH1N1, and H7N9 infection. Further analysis showed SARS-CoV-2, panH1N1, and H7N9 infection-induced upregulation of lncRNA-34087.27 could serve as a competitive endogenous RNA to stabilize IRF1 mRNA by competitively binding with miR-302b-3p. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of influenza A virus and SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , RNA/immunology , Transcriptome/immunology , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/physiology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-1/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , MicroRNAs/immunology , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA/genetics , RNA/metabolism , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/immunology , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA-Seq/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Transcriptome/genetics
4.
BMC Genomics ; 22(1): 912, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1577274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severity of influenza disease can range from mild symptoms to severe respiratory failure and can partly be explained by host genetic factors that predisposes the host to severe influenza. Here, we aimed to summarize the current state of evidence that host genetic variants play a role in the susceptibility to severe influenza infection by conducting a systematic review and performing a meta-analysis for all markers with at least three or more data entries. RESULTS: A total of 34 primary human genetic association studies were identified that investigated a total of 20 different genes. The only significant pooled ORs were retrieved for the rs12252 polymorphism: an overall OR of 1.52 (95% CI [1.06-2.17]) for the rs12252-C allele compared to the rs12252-T allele. A stratified analysis by ethnicity revealed opposite effects in different populations. CONCLUSION: With exception for the rs12252 polymorphism, we could not identify specific genetic polymorphisms to be associated with severe influenza infection in a pooled meta-analysis. This advocates for the use of large, hypothesis-free, genome-wide association studies that account for the polygenic nature and the interactions with other host, pathogen and environmental factors.


Subject(s)
Influenza, Human , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics
5.
Cell Rep Med ; 3(2): 100522, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650891

ABSTRACT

The molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), and what distinguishes them from common seasonal influenza virus and other lung injury states such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, remain poorly understood. To address these challenges, we combine transcriptional profiling of 646 clinical nasopharyngeal swabs and 39 patient autopsy tissues to define body-wide transcriptome changes in response to COVID-19. We then match these data with spatial protein and expression profiling across 357 tissue sections from 16 representative patient lung samples and identify tissue-compartment-specific damage wrought by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, evident as a function of varying viral loads during the clinical course of infection and tissue-type-specific expression states. Overall, our findings reveal a systemic disruption of canonical cellular and transcriptional pathways across all tissues, which can inform subsequent studies to combat the mortality of COVID-19 and to better understand the molecular dynamics of lethal SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptome/genetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Female , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/pathology , Influenza, Human/virology , Lung/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Orthomyxoviridae , RNA-Seq/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/microbiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Viral Load
6.
Biochemistry (Mosc) ; 86(7): 800-817, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594970

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, a new human respiratory disease that has killed nearly 3 million people in a year since the start of the pandemic, is a global public health challenge. Its infectious agent, SARS-CoV-2, differs from other coronaviruses in a number of structural features that make this virus more pathogenic and transmissible. In this review, we discuss some important characteristics of the main SARS-CoV-2 surface antigen, the spike (S) protein, such as (i) ability of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) to switch between the "standing-up" position (open pre-fusion conformation) for receptor binding and the "lying-down" position (closed pre-fusion conformation) for immune system evasion; (ii) advantage of a high binding affinity of the RBD open conformation to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor for efficient cell entry; and (iii) S protein preliminary activation by the intracellular furin-like proteases for facilitation of the virus spreading across different cell types. We describe interactions between the S protein and cellular receptors, co-receptors, and antagonists, as well as a hypothetical mechanism of the homotrimeric spike structure destabilization that triggers the fusion of the viral envelope with the cell membrane at physiological pH and mediates the viral nucleocapsid entry into the cytoplasm. The transition of the S protein pre-fusion conformation to the post-fusion one on the surface of virions after their treatment with some reagents, such as ß-propiolactone, is essential, especially in relation to the vaccine production. We also compare the COVID-19 pathogenesis with that of severe outbreaks of "avian" influenza caused by the A/H5 and A/H7 highly pathogenic viruses and discuss the structural similarities between the SARS-CoV-2 S protein and hemagglutinins of those highly pathogenic strains. Finally, we touch on the prospective and currently used COVID-19 antiviral and anti-pathogenetic therapeutics, as well as recently approved conventional and innovative COVID-19 vaccines and their molecular and immunological features.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Influenza A virus/chemistry , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza A virus/metabolism , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
7.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2234, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574124

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic is the most serious event of the year 2020, causing considerable global morbidity and mortality. The goal of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of reported associations between inter-individual immunogenic variants and disease susceptibility or symptoms caused by the coronavirus strains severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus-2, and two of the main respiratory viruses, respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. The results suggest that the genetic background of the host could affect the levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and might modulate the progression of Covid-19 in affected patients. Notably, genetic variations in innate immune components such as toll-like receptors and mannose-binding lectin 2 play critical roles in the ability of the immune system to recognize coronavirus and initiate an early immune response to clear the virus and prevent the development of severe symptoms. This review provides promising clues related to the potential benefits of using immunotherapy and immune modulation for respiratory infectious disease treatment in a personalized manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Influenza, Human/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Variation, Individual , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Mannose-Binding Lectin/genetics , Mannose-Binding Lectin/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/drug therapy , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/drug effects , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/immunology , SARS Virus/drug effects , SARS Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/drug therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology
8.
J Leukoc Biol ; 110(1): 21-26, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574077

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly pathogenic RNA virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in humans. Although most patients with COVID-19 have mild illness and may be asymptomatic, some will develop severe pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, multi-organ failure, and death. RNA viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 are capable of hijacking the epigenetic landscape of host immune cells to evade antiviral defense. Yet, there remain considerable gaps in our understanding of immune cell epigenetic changes associated with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection pathology. Here, we examined genome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm) profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 terminally-ill, critical COVID-19 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 plasma viremia compared with uninfected, hospitalized influenza, untreated primary HIV infection, and mild/moderate COVID-19 HIV coinfected individuals. Cell-type deconvolution analyses confirmed lymphopenia in severe COVID-19 and revealed a high percentage of estimated neutrophils suggesting perturbations to DNAm associated with granulopoiesis. We observed a distinct DNAm signature of severe COVID-19 characterized by hypermethylation of IFN-related genes and hypomethylation of inflammatory genes, reinforcing observations in infection models and single-cell transcriptional studies of severe COVID-19. Epigenetic clock analyses revealed severe COVID-19 was associated with an increased DNAm age and elevated mortality risk according to GrimAge, further validating the epigenetic clock as a predictor of disease and mortality risk. Our epigenetic results reveal a discovery DNAm signature of severe COVID-19 in blood potentially useful for corroborating clinical assessments, informing pathogenic mechanisms, and revealing new therapeutic targets against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , DNA Methylation/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Genome, Human , COVID-19/virology , HIV Infections/genetics , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
JCI Insight ; 6(22)2021 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDInfluenza A virus (IAV) and SARS-CoV-2 are pandemic viruses causing millions of deaths, yet their clinical manifestations are distinctly different.METHODSWith the hypothesis that upper airway immune and epithelial cell responses are also distinct, we performed single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-Seq) on nasal wash cells freshly collected from adults with either acute COVID-19 or influenza or from healthy controls. We focused on major cell types and subtypes in a subset of donor samples.ResultsNasal wash cells were enriched for macrophages and neutrophils for both individuals with influenza and those with COVID-19 compared with healthy controls. Hillock-like epithelial cells, M2-like macrophages, and age-dependent B cells were enriched in COVID-19 samples. A global decrease in IFN-associated transcripts in neutrophils, macrophages, and epithelial cells was apparent in COVID-19 samples compared with influenza samples. The innate immune response to SARS-CoV-2 appears to be maintained in macrophages, despite evidence for limited epithelial cell immune sensing. Cell-to-cell interaction analyses revealed a decrease in epithelial cell interactions in COVID-19 and highlighted differences in macrophage-macrophage interactions for COVID-19 and influenza.ConclusionsOur study demonstrates that scRNA-Seq can define host and viral transcriptional activity at the site of infection and reveal distinct local epithelial and immune cell responses for COVID-19 and influenza that may contribute to their divergent disease courses.FundingMassachusetts Consortium on Pathogen Readiness, the Mathers Foundation, and the Department of Defense (W81XWH2110029) "COVID-19 Expansion for AIRe Program."


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunity, Innate , Influenza A virus , Influenza, Human , Macrophages , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Male , Nasal Lavage , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
10.
JCI Insight ; 6(24)2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501860

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 promotes an imbalanced host response that underlies the development and severity of COVID-19. Infections with viruses are known to modulate transposable elements (TEs), which can exert downstream effects by modulating host gene expression, innate immune sensing, or activities encoded by their protein products. We investigated the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on TE expression using RNA-Seq data from cell lines and from primary patient samples. Using a bioinformatics tool, Telescope, we showed that SARS-CoV-2 infection led to upregulation or downregulation of TE transcripts, a subset of which differed from cells infected with SARS, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV or MERS), influenza A virus (IAV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3). Differential expression of key retroelements specifically identified distinct virus families, such as Coronaviridae, with unique retroelement expression subdividing viral species. Analysis of ChIP-Seq data showed that TEs differentially expressed in SARS-CoV-2 infection were enriched for binding sites for transcription factors involved in immune responses and for pioneer transcription factors. In samples from patients with COVID-19, there was significant TE overexpression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and downregulation in PBMCs. Thus, although the host gene transcriptome is altered by infection with SARS-CoV-2, the retrotranscriptome may contain the most distinctive features of the cellular response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics , Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements/genetics , A549 Cells , Cell Line , Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing , Computational Biology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , DNA Transposable Elements/genetics , Down-Regulation , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Influenza A virus , Influenza, Human/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human , RNA-Seq , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses , Respirovirus Infections/genetics , Retroelements/genetics , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Transcriptome , Up-Regulation
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 14295, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387482

ABSTRACT

Methylene blue is an FDA (Food and Drug Administration) and EMA (European Medicines Agency) approved drug with an excellent safety profile. It displays broad-spectrum virucidal activity in the presence of UV light and has been shown to be effective in inactivating various viruses in blood products prior to transfusions. In addition, its use has been validated for methemoglobinemia and malaria treatment. In this study, we first evaluated the virucidal activity of methylene blue against influenza virus H1N1 upon different incubation times and in the presence or absence of light activation, and then against SARS-CoV-2. We further assessed the therapeutic activity of methylene blue by administering it to cells previously infected with SARS-CoV-2. Finally, we examined the effect of co-administration of the drug together with immune serum. Our findings reveal that methylene blue displays virucidal preventive or therapeutic activity against influenza virus H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 at low micromolar concentrations and in the absence of UV-activation. We also confirm that MB antiviral activity is based on several mechanisms of action as the extent of genomic RNA degradation is higher in presence of light and after long exposure. Our work supports the interest of testing methylene blue in clinical studies to confirm a preventive and/or therapeutic efficacy against both influenza virus H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Methylene Blue/pharmacology , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Ultraviolet Rays/adverse effects , Vero Cells , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/radiation effects
13.
J Infect Dis ; 224(1): 21-30, 2021 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379462

ABSTRACT

The differentiation between influenza and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could constitute a diagnostic challenge during the ongoing winter owing to their clinical similitude. Thus, novel biomarkers are required to enable making this distinction. Here, we evaluated whether the surfactant protein D (SP-D), a collectin produced at the alveolar epithelium with known immune properties, was useful to differentiate pandemic influenza A(H1N1) from COVID-19 in critically ill patients. Our results revealed high serum SP-D levels in patients with severe pandemic influenza but not those with COVID-19. This finding was validated in a separate cohort of mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 who also showed low plasma SP-D levels. However, plasma SP-D levels did not distinguish seasonal influenza from COVID-19 in mild-to-moderate disease. Finally, we found that high serum SP-D levels were associated with death and renal failure among severe pandemic influenza cases. Thus, our studies have identified SP-D as a unique biomarker expressed during severe pandemic influenza but not COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/genetics , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment , Young Adult
14.
Science ; 373(6557): 918-922, 2021 08 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367378

ABSTRACT

Zoonotic avian influenza A virus (IAV) infections are rare. Sustained transmission of these IAVs between humans has not been observed, suggesting a role for host genes. We used whole-genome sequencing to compare avian IAV H7N9 patients with healthy controls and observed a strong association between H7N9 infection and rare, heterozygous single-nucleotide variants in the MX1 gene. MX1 codes for myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA), an interferon-induced antiviral guanosine triphosphatase known to control IAV infections in transgenic mice. Most of the MxA variants identified lost the ability to inhibit avian IAVs, including H7N9, in transfected human cell lines. Nearly all of the inactive MxA variants exerted a dominant-negative effect on the antiviral function of wild-type MxA, suggesting an MxA null phenotype in heterozygous carriers. Our study provides genetic evidence for a crucial role of the MX1-based antiviral defense in controlling zoonotic IAV infections in humans.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/virology , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/genetics , Agricultural Workers' Diseases/genetics , Agricultural Workers' Diseases/virology , Animals , Cell Line , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genetic Variation , Heterozygote , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/physiology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Mutation, Missense , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/chemistry , Myxovirus Resistance Proteins/metabolism , Poultry , Viral Zoonoses , Whole Genome Sequencing
16.
Cell Rep ; 35(12): 109286, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274179

ABSTRACT

B cell responses are critical for antiviral immunity. However, a comprehensive picture of antigen-specific B cell differentiation, clonal proliferation, and dynamics in different organs after infection is lacking. Here, by combining single-cell RNA and B cell receptor (BCR) sequencing of antigen-specific cells in lymph nodes, spleen, and lungs after influenza infection in mice, we identify several germinal center (GC) B cell subpopulations and organ-specific differences that persist over the course of the response. We discover transcriptional differences between memory cells in lungs and lymphoid organs and organ-restricted clonal expansion. Remarkably, we find significant clonal overlap between GC-derived memory and plasma cells. By combining BCR-mutational analyses with monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression and affinity measurements, we find that memory B cells are highly diverse and can be selected from both low- and high-affinity precursors. By linking antigen recognition with transcriptional programming, clonal proliferation, and differentiation, these finding provide important advances in our understanding of antiviral immunity.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Cell Differentiation/genetics , Cell Proliferation , Clone Cells , Germinal Center/immunology , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/immunology , Humans , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mutation/genetics , Mutation Rate , Organ Specificity , Plasma Cells/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12948, 2021 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279894

ABSTRACT

COVID 19 disease has become a global catastrophe over the past year that has claimed the lives of over two million people around the world. Despite the introduction of vaccines against the disease, there is still a long way to completely eradicate it. There are concerns about the complications following infection with SARS-CoV-2. This research aimed to evaluate the possible correlation between infection with SARS-CoV viruses and cancer in an in-silico study model. To do this, the relevent dataset was selected from GEO database. Identification of differentially expressed genes among defined groups including SARS-CoV, SARS-dORF6, SARS-BatSRBD, and H1N1 were screened where the |Log FC| ≥ 1and p < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Later, the pathway enrichment analysis and gene ontology (GO) were used by Enrichr and Shiny GO databases. Evaluation with STRING online was applied to predict the functional interactions of proteins, followed by Cytoscape analysis to identify the master genes. Finally, analysis with GEPIA2 server was carried out to reveal the possible correlation between candidate genes and cancer development. The results showed that the main molecular function of up- and down-regulated genes was "double-stranded RNA binding" and actin-binding, respectively. STRING and Cytoscape analysis presented four genes, PTEN, CREB1, CASP3, and SMAD3 as the key genes involved in cancer development. According to TCGA database results, these four genes were up-regulated notably in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our findings suggest that pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most probably malignancy happening after infection with SARS-CoV family.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Carcinogenesis/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/complications , Pancreatic Neoplasms/etiology , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Caspase 3/genetics , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Gene Ontology , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/virology , PTEN Phosphohydrolase/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps , Risk , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Signal Transduction/genetics , Smad3 Protein/genetics , Up-Regulation/genetics
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12174, 2021 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263512

ABSTRACT

With many countries strapped for medical resources due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is highly desirable to allocate the precious resources to those who need them the most. Several markers have been found to be associated with the disease severity in COVID-19 patients. However, the established markers only display modest prognostic power individually and better markers are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of S100A12, a prominent marker gene for bacterial infection, in the prognosis of disease severity in COVID-19 patients. To ensure the robustness of the association, a total of 1695 samples from 14 independent transcriptome datasets on sepsis, influenza infection and COVID-19 infection were examined. First, it was demonstrated that S100A12 was a marker for sepsis and severity of sepsis. Then, S100A12 was found to be a marker for severe influenza infection, and there was an upward trend of S100A12 expression as the severity level of influenza infection increased. As for COVID-19 infection, it was found that S100A12 expression was elevated in patients with severe and critical COVID-19 infection. More importantly, S100A12 expression at hospital admission was robustly correlated with future quantitative indexes of disease severity and outcome in COVID-19 patients, superior to established prognostic markers including CRP, PCT, d-dimer, ferritin, LDH and fibrinogen. Thus, S100A12 is a valuable novel prognostic marker for COVID-19 severity and deserves more attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , S100A12 Protein/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Female , Genetic Markers/genetics , Humans , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/genetics , Male , Prognosis , RNA, Messenger/genetics
20.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 06 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259626

ABSTRACT

Epithelial characteristics underlying the differential susceptibility of chronic asthma to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) and other viral infections are currently unclear. By revisiting transcriptomic data from patients with Th2 low versus Th2 high asthma, as well as mild, moderate, and severe asthmatics, we characterized the changes in expression of human coronavirus and influenza viral entry genes relative to sex, airway location, and disease endotype. We found sexual dimorphism in the expression of SARS-CoV-2-related genes ACE2, TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and SLC6A19. ACE2 receptor downregulation occurred specifically in females in Th2 high asthma, while proteases broadly assisting coronavirus and influenza viral entry, TMPRSS2, and TMPRSS4, were highly upregulated in both sexes. Overall, changes in SARS-CoV-2-related gene expression were specific to the Th2 high molecular endotype of asthma and different by asthma severity and airway location. The downregulation of ACE2 (COVID-19, SARS) and ANPEP (HCoV-229E) viral receptors wascorrelated with loss of club and ciliated cells in Th2 high asthma. Meanwhile, the increase in DPP4 (MERS-CoV), ST3GAL4, and ST6GAL1 (influenza) was associated with increased goblet and basal activated cells. Overall, this study elucidates sex, airway location, disease endotype, and changes in epithelial heterogeneity as potential factors underlying asthmatic susceptibility, or lack thereof, to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions , Influenza, Human/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Asthma/genetics , Asthma/virology , COVID-19/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/genetics , Coronavirus 229E, Human/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Epithelial Cells/classification , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Influenza, Human/genetics , Male , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/genetics , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae/genetics , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sex Characteristics
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