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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580700

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) followed by repair with lung remodeling is observed in COVID-19. These findings can lead to pulmonary terminal fibrosis, a form of irreversible sequelae. There is evidence that TGF-ß is intimately involved in the fibrogenic process. When activated, TGF-ß promotes the differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and regulates the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this sense, the present study evaluated the histopathological features and immunohistochemical biomarkers (ACE-2, AKT-1, Caveolin-1, CD44v6, IL-4, MMP-9, α-SMA, Sphingosine-1, and TGF-ß1 tissue expression) involved in the TGF-ß1 signaling pathways and pulmonary fibrosis. The study consisted of 24 paraffin lung samples from patients who died of COVID-19 (COVID-19 group), compared to 10 lung samples from patients who died of H1N1pdm09 (H1N1 group) and 11 lung samples from patients who died of different causes, with no lung injury (CONTROL group). In addition to the presence of alveolar septal fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) was found to be significantly increased in the COVID-19 group, associated with a higher density of Collagen I (mature) and III (immature). There was also a significant increase observed in the immunoexpression of tissue biomarkers ACE-2, AKT-1, CD44v6, IL-4, MMP-9, α-SMA, Sphingosine-1, and TGF-ß1 in the COVID-19 group. A significantly lower expression of Caveolin-1 was also found in this group. The results suggest the participation of TGF-ß pathways in the development process of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, it would be plausible to consider therapy with TGF-ß inhibitors in those patients recovered from COVID-19 to mitigate a possible development of pulmonary fibrosis and its consequences for post-COVID-19 life quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism , Actins/metabolism , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Caveolin 1/metabolism , Collagen Type I/metabolism , Collagen Type III/metabolism , Female , Humans , Hyaluronan Receptors/metabolism , Immunohistochemistry , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Interleukin-4/metabolism , Male , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism , Middle Aged , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism
2.
Cell Rep ; 37(12): 110126, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556413

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have shown that the high mortality caused by viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and influenza virus primarily results from complications of a cytokine storm. Therefore, it is critical to identify the key factors participating in the cytokine storm. Here we demonstrate that interferon-induced protein 35 (IFP35) plays an important role in the cytokine storm induced by SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus infection. We find that the levels of serum IFP35 in individuals with SARS-CoV-2 correlates with severity of the syndrome. Using mouse model and cell assays, we show that IFP35 is released by lung epithelial cells and macrophages after SARS-CoV-2 or influenza virus infection. In addition, we show that administration of neutralizing antibodies against IFP35 considerably reduces lung injury and, thus, the mortality rate of mice exposed to viral infection. Our findings suggest that IFP35 serves as a biomarker and as a therapeutic target in virus-induced syndromes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/blood , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/metabolism , Macrophages/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6619-6627, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544307

ABSTRACT

Both severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and influenza viruses cause similar clinical presentations. It is essential to assess severely ill patients presenting with a viral syndrome for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. We aimed to compare clinical and biochemical features between pneumonia patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and H1N1. Sixty patients diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia and 61 patients diagnosed with influenza pneumonia were hospitalized between October 2020-January 2021 and October 2017-December 2019, respectively. All the clinical data and laboratory results, chest computed tomography scans, intensive care unit admission, invasive mechanical ventilation, and outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. The median age was 65 (range 32-96) years for patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis and 58 (range 18-83) years for patients with influenza (p = 0.002). The comorbidity index was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 (p = 0.010). Diabetes mellitus and hypertension were statistically significantly more common in patients with COVID-19 (p = 0.019, p = 0.008, respectively). The distribution of severe disease and mortality was not significantly different among patients with COVID-19 than influenza patients (p = 0.096, p = 0.049).). In comparison with inflammation markers; C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were significantly higher in influenza patients than patients with COVID-19 (p = 0.033). The presence of sputum was predictive for influenza (odds ratio [OR] 0.342 [95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1.130-0.899]). CRP and platelet were also predictive for COVID-19 (OR 4.764 [95% CI, 1.003-1.012] and OR 0.991 [95% CI 0.984-0.998], respectively. We conclude that sputum symptoms by itself are much more detected in influenza patients. Besides that, lower CRP and higher PLT count would be discriminative for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/diagnostic imaging , Influenza, Human/therapy , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21519, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500511

ABSTRACT

A high neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is considered an unfavorable prognostic factor in various diseases, including COVID-19. The prognostic value of NLR in other respiratory viral infections, such as Influenza, has not hitherto been extensively studied. We aimed to compare the prognostic value of NLR in COVID-19, Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection (RSV). A retrospective cohort of COVID-19, Influenza and RSV patients admitted to the Tel Aviv Medical Center from January 2010 to October 2020 was analyzed. Laboratory, demographic, and clinical parameters were collected. Two way analyses of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the association between NLR values and poor outcomes among the three groups. ROC curve analyses for each virus was applied to test the discrimination ability of NLR. 722 COVID-19, 2213 influenza and 482 RSV patients were included. Above the age of 50, NLR at admission was significantly lower among COVID-19 patients (P < 0.001). NLR was associated with poor clinical outcome only in the COVID-19 group. ROC curve analysis was performed; the area under curve of poor outcomes for COVID-19 was 0.68, compared with 0.57 and 0.58 for Influenza and RSV respectively. In the COVID-19 group, multivariate logistic regression identified a high NLR (defined as a value above 6.82) to be a prognostic factor for poor clinical outcome, after adjusting for age, sex and Charlson comorbidity score (odds ratio of 2.9, P < 0.001). NLR at admission is lower and has more prognostic value in COVID-19 patients, when compared to Influenza and RSV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/pathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Lymphocytes/cytology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19713, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454811

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) presents with non-specific clinical features. This may result in misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis, and lead to further transmission in the community. We aimed to derive early predictors to differentiate COVID-19 from influenza and dengue. The study comprised 126 patients with COVID-19, 171 with influenza and 180 with dengue, who presented within 5 days of symptom onset. All cases were confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction tests. We used logistic regression models to identify demographics, clinical characteristics and laboratory markers in classifying COVID-19 versus influenza, and COVID-19 versus dengue. The performance of each model was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Shortness of breath was the strongest predictor in the models for differentiating between COVID-19 and influenza, followed by diarrhoea. Higher lymphocyte count was predictive of COVID-19 versus influenza and versus dengue. In the model for differentiating between COVID-19 and dengue, patients with cough and higher platelet count were at increased odds of COVID-19, while headache, joint pain, skin rash and vomiting/nausea were indicative of dengue. The cross-validated area under the ROC curve for all four models was above 0.85. Clinical features and simple laboratory markers for differentiating COVID-19 from influenza and dengue are identified in this study which can be used by primary care physicians in resource limited settings to determine if further investigations or referrals would be required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Dengue/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Adult , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Dengue/complications , Dengue/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Diarrhea/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/metabolism , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vomiting/etiology , Young Adult
6.
Mucosal Immunol ; 14(6): 1224-1234, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387186

ABSTRACT

Epidemiological evidence establishes obesity as an independent risk factor for increased susceptibility and severity to viral respiratory pneumonias associated with H1N1 influenza and SARS-CoV-2 pandemics. Given the global obesity prevalence, a better understanding of the mechanisms behind obese susceptibility to infection is imperative. Altered immune cell metabolism and function are often perceived as a key causative factor of dysregulated inflammation. However, the contribution of adipocytes, the dominantly altered cell type in obesity with broad inflammatory properties, to infectious disease pathogenesis remains largely ignored. Thus, skewing of adipocyte-intrinsic cellular metabolism may lead to the development of pathogenic inflammatory adipocytes, which shape the overall immune responses by contributing to either premature immunosenescence, delayed hyperinflammation, or cytokine storm in infections. In this review, we discuss the underappreciated contribution of adipocyte cellular metabolism and adipocyte-produced mediators on immune system modulation and how such interplay may modify disease susceptibility and pathogenesis of influenza and SARS-CoV-2 infections in obese individuals.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza, Human/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adipocytes/pathology , Adipocytes/virology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Inflammation/virology , Influenza, Human/pathology
7.
Life Sci ; 283: 119871, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336712

ABSTRACT

Non-communicable, chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) affect millions of individuals worldwide. The course of these CRDs (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis) are often punctuated by microbial infections that may result in hospitalization and are associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, as well as reduced quality of life. Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a key protein that regulates airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion. There has been much interest in IL-13 from the last two decades. This cytokine is believed to play a decisive role in the exacerbation of inflammation during the course of viral infections, especially, in those with pre-existing CRDs. Here, we discuss the common viral infections in CRDs, as well as the potential role that IL-13 plays in the virus-induced disease pathogenesis of CRDs. We also discuss, in detail, the immune-modulation potential of IL-13 that could be translated to in-depth studies to develop IL-13-based therapeutic entities.


Subject(s)
Influenza, Human/immunology , Interleukin-13/immunology , Lung Diseases/immunology , Chronic Disease , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung Diseases/pathology , Mucus/immunology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 691879, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282387

ABSTRACT

Increasing human Adenovirus (HAdV) infections complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) even fatal outcome were reported in immunocompetent adolescent and adult patients. Here, we characterized the cytokine/chemokine expression profiles of immunocompetent patients complicated with ARDS during HAdV infection and identified biomarkers for disease severity/progression. Forty-eight cytokines/chemokines in the plasma samples from 19 HAdV-infected immunocompetent adolescent and adult patients (ten complicated with ARDS) were measured and analyzed in combination with clinical indices. Immunocompetent patients with ARDS caused by severe acute respiratory disease coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (panH1N1) or bacteria were included for comparative analyses. Similar indices of disease course/progression were found in immunocompetent patients with ARDS caused by HAdV, SARS-CoV-2 or panH1N infections, whereas the HAdV-infected group showed a higher prevalence of viremia, as well as increased levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK). Expression levels of 33 cytokines/chemokines were increased significantly in HAdV-infected patients with ARDS compared with that in healthy controls, and many of them were also significantly higher than those in SARS-CoV-2-infected and panH1N1-infected patients. Expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1ß, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), IL-6, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), IL-10, IL-1α and IL-2Ra was significantly higher in HAdV-infected patients with ARDS than that in those without ARDS, and negatively associated with the ratio of the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2). Analyses of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) showed that expression of IL-10, M-CSF, MIG, HGF, IL-1ß, IFN-γ and IL-2Ra could predict the progression of HAdV infection, with the highest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.944 obtained for IL-10. Of note, the AUC value for the combination of IL-10, IFN-γ, and M-CSF reached 1. In conclusion, the "cytokine storm" occurred during HAdV infection in immunocompetent patients, and expression of IL-10, M-CSF, MIG, HGF, IL-1ß, IFN-γ and IL-2Ra was closely associated with disease severity and could predict disease progression.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Adenovirus Infections, Human/complications , Adenovirus Infections, Human/pathology , Adenoviruses, Human , Adolescent , Adult , Bacteria , Bacterial Infections/blood , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/pathology , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Viremia/blood , Viremia/complications , Viremia/pathology , Young Adult
9.
Virol J ; 18(1): 127, 2021 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In COVID-19 patients, undetected co-infections may have severe clinical implications associated with increased hospitalization, varied treatment approaches and mortality. Therefore, we investigated the implications of viral and bacterial co-infection in COVID-19 clinical outcomes. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained from 48 COVID-19 patients (29% ICU and 71% non-ICU) and screened for the presence of 24 respiratory pathogens using six multiplex PCR panels. RESULTS: We found evidence of co-infection in 34 COVID-19 patients (71%). Influenza A H1N1 (n = 17), Chlamydia pneumoniae (n = 13) and human adenovirus (n = 10) were the most commonly detected pathogens. Viral co-infection was associated with increased ICU admission (r = 0.1) and higher mortality (OR 1.78, CI = 0.38-8.28) compared to bacterial co-infections (OR 0.44, CI = 0.08-2.45). Two thirds of COVID-19 critically ill patients who died, had a co-infection; and Influenza A H1N1 was the only pathogen for which a direct relationship with mortality was seen (r = 0.2). CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the importance of screening for co-infecting viruses in COVID-19 patients, that could be the leading cause of disease severity and death. Given the high prevalence of Influenza co-infection in our study, increased coverage of flu vaccination is encouraged to mitigate the transmission of influenza virus during the on-going COVID-19 pandemic and reduce the risk of severe outcome and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Coinfection/mortality , Influenza, Human/mortality , Adult , Aged , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Bacterial Infections/mortality , Bacterial Infections/pathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/pathology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/microbiology , Nasopharynx/virology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
10.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1191-1199, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246663

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has led to more than 159 million confirmed cases with over 3.3 million deaths worldwide, but it remains mystery why most infected individuals (∼98%) were asymptomatic or only experienced mild illness. The same mystery applies to the deadly 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic, which has puzzled the field for a century. Here we discuss dual potential properties of the 1918 H1N1 pandemic viruses that led to the high fatality rate in the small portion of severe cases, while about 98% infected persons in the United States were self-limited with mild symptoms, or even asymptomatic. These variations now have been postulated to be impacted by polymorphisms of the sialic acid receptors in the general population. Since coronaviruses (CoVs) also recognize sialic acid receptors and cause severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemics and pandemics, similar principles of influenza virus evolution and pandemicity may also apply to CoVs. A potential common principle of pathogen/host co-evolution of influenza and CoVs under selection of host sialic acids in parallel with different epidemic and pandemic influenza and coronaviruses is discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Sialic Acids/metabolism , Asymptomatic Diseases , Biological Evolution , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype/pathogenicity , Influenza, Human/mortality , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Saliva/metabolism , Saliva/virology
11.
Cytokine ; 144: 155593, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242912

ABSTRACT

An analysis of published data appertaining to the cytokine storms of COVID-19, H1N1 influenza, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) reveals many common immunological and biochemical abnormalities. These include evidence of a hyperactive coagulation system with elevated D-dimer and ferritin levels, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) and microthrombi coupled with an activated and highly permeable vascular endothelium. Common immune abnormalities include progressive hypercytokinemia with elevated levels of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1ß, proinflammatory chemokines, activated macrophages and increased levels of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFκB). Inflammasome activation and release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) is common to COVID-19, H1N1, and MAS but does not appear to be a feature of CRS. Elevated levels of IL-18 are detected in patients with COVID-19 and MAS but have not been reported in patients with H1N1 influenza and CRS. Elevated interferon-γ is common to H1N1, MAS, and CRS but levels of this molecule appear to be depressed in patients with COVID-19. CD4+ T, CD8+ and NK lymphocytes are involved in the pathophysiology of CRS, MAS, and possibly H1N1 but are reduced in number and dysfunctional in COVID-19. Additional elements underpinning the pathophysiology of cytokine storms include Inflammasome activity and DAMPs. Treatment with anakinra may theoretically offer an avenue to positively manipulate the range of biochemical and immune abnormalities reported in COVID-19 and thought to underpin the pathophysiology of cytokine storms beyond those manipulated via the use of, canakinumab, Jak inhibitors or tocilizumab. Thus, despite the relative success of tocilizumab in reducing mortality in COVID-19 patients already on dexamethasone and promising results with Baricitinib, the combination of anakinra in combination with dexamethasone offers the theoretical prospect of further improvements in patient survival. However, there is currently an absence of trial of evidence in favour or contravening this proposition. Accordingly, a large well powered blinded prospective randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test this hypothesis is recommended.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Disease-Free Survival , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/mortality , Influenza, Human/pathology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/pathology , Survival Rate
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10793, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242045

ABSTRACT

Finding novel biomarkers for human pathologies and predicting clinical outcomes for patients is challenging. This stems from the heterogeneous response of individuals to disease and is reflected in the inter-individual variability of gene expression responses that obscures differential gene expression analysis. Here, we developed an alternative approach that could be applied to dissect the disease-associated molecular changes. We define gene ensemble noise as a measure that represents a variance for a collection of genes encoding for either members of known biological pathways or subunits of annotated protein complexes and calculated within an individual. The gene ensemble noise allows for the holistic identification and interpretation of gene expression disbalance on the level of gene networks and systems. By comparing gene expression data from COVID-19, H1N1, and sepsis patients we identified common disturbances in a number of pathways and protein complexes relevant to the sepsis pathology. Among others, these include the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and peroxisomes. This suggests a Warburg effect and oxidative stress as common hallmarks of the immune host-pathogen response. Finally, we showed that gene ensemble noise could successfully be applied for the prediction of clinical outcome namely, the mortality of patients. Thus, we conclude that gene ensemble noise represents a promising approach for the investigation of molecular mechanisms of pathology through a prism of alterations in the coherent expression of gene circuits.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Gene Expression , Influenza, Human/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Electron Transport Complex I/genetics , Electron Transport Complex I/metabolism , Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/virology , Oxidative Stress/genetics , Peroxisomes/genetics , Peroxisomes/metabolism , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sepsis/complications , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/mortality , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate , User-Computer Interface
13.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 45, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229005

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hematological comparison of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and other viral pneumonias can provide insights into COVID-19 treatment. METHODS: In this retrospective case-control single-center study, we compared the data of 126 patients with viral pneumonia during different outbreaks [severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, influenza A (H1N1) in 2009, human adenovirus type 7 in 2018, and COVID-19 in 2020]. RESULTS: One of the COVID-19 characteristics was a continuous decline in the hemoglobin level. The neutrophil count was related to the aggravation of COVID-19 and SARS. Thrombocytopenia occurred in patients with SARS and severe COVID-19 even at the recovery stage. Lymphocytes were related to the entire course of adenovirus infection, recovery of COVID-19, and disease development of SARS. CONCLUSIONS: Dynamic changes in hematological counts could provide a reference for the pathogenesis and prognosis of pneumonia caused by respiratory viruses in clinics.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/blood , COVID-19/blood , Influenza, Human/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/blood , Adenovirus Infections, Human/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hemoglobins/analysis , Humans , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Thrombocytopenia/pathology , Young Adult
14.
J Pathol Clin Res ; 7(5): 459-470, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219662

ABSTRACT

Autopsies of patients who have died from COVID-19 have been crucial in delineating patterns of injury associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Despite their utility, comprehensive autopsy studies are somewhat lacking relative to the global burden of disease, and very few comprehensive studies contextualize the findings to other fatal viral infections. We developed a novel autopsy protocol in order to perform postmortem examinations on victims of COVID-19 and herein describe detailed clinical information, gross findings, and histologic features observed in the first 16 complete COVID-19 autopsies. We also critically evaluated the role of ancillary studies used to establish a diagnosis of COVID-19 at autopsy, including immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridization (ISH), and electron microscopy (EM). IHC and ISH targeting SARS-CoV-2 were comparable in terms of the location and number of infected cells in lung tissue; however, nonspecific staining of bacteria was seen occasionally with IHC. EM was unrevealing in blindly sampled tissues. We then compared the clinical and histologic features present in this series to six archival cases of fatal seasonal influenza and six archival cases of pandemic influenza from the fourth wave of the 'Spanish Flu' in the winter of 1920. In addition to routine histology, the inflammatory infiltrates in the lungs of COVID-19 and seasonal influenza victims were compared using quantitative IHC. Our results demonstrate that the clinical and histologic features of COVID-19 are similar to those seen in fatal cases of influenza, and the two diseases tend to overlap histologically. There was no significant difference in the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in COVID-19 and influenza at sites of acute lung injury at the time of autopsy. Our study underscores the relatively nonspecific clinical features and pathologic changes shared between severe cases of COVID-19 and influenza, while also providing important caveats to ancillary methods of viral detection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Aged , Autopsy , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , In Situ Hybridization , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Seasons
15.
Am J Public Health ; 111(6): 1086-1094, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217009

ABSTRACT

Separated by a century, the influenza pandemic of 1918 and the COVID-19 pandemic of 2019-2021 are among the most disastrous infectious disease emergences of modern times. Although caused by unrelated viruses, the two pandemics are nevertheless similar in their clinical, pathological, and epidemiological features, and in the civic, public health, and medical responses to combat them. Comparing and contrasting the two pandemics, we consider what lessons we have learned over the span of a century and how we are applying those lessons to the challenges of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics/history , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/history , COVID-19/pathology , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Influenza, Human/history , Influenza, Human/pathology , Public Health
16.
J Virol ; 95(14): e0013021, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203943

ABSTRACT

The nasal mucosa constitutes the primary entry site for respiratory viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). While the imbalanced innate immune response of end-stage coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been extensively studied, the earliest stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection at the mucosal entry site have remained unexplored. Here, we employed SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus infection in native multi-cell-type human nasal turbinate and lung tissues ex vivo, coupled with genome-wide transcriptional analysis, to investigate viral susceptibility and early patterns of local mucosal innate immune response in the authentic milieu of the human respiratory tract. SARS-CoV-2 productively infected the nasal turbinate tissues, predominantly targeting respiratory epithelial cells, with a rapid increase in tissue-associated viral subgenomic mRNA and secretion of infectious viral progeny. Importantly, SARS-CoV-2 infection triggered robust antiviral and inflammatory innate immune responses in the nasal mucosa. The upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes, cytokines, and chemokines, related to interferon signaling and immune-cell activation pathways, was broader than that triggered by influenza virus infection. Conversely, lung tissues exhibited a restricted innate immune response to SARS-CoV-2, with a conspicuous lack of type I and III interferon upregulation, contrasting with their vigorous innate immune response to influenza virus. Our findings reveal differential tissue-specific innate immune responses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts that are specific to SARS-CoV-2. The studies shed light on the role of the nasal mucosa in active viral transmission and immune defense, implying a window of opportunity for early interventions, whereas the restricted innate immune response in early-SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues could underlie the unique uncontrolled late-phase lung damage of advanced COVID-19. IMPORTANCE In order to reduce the late-phase morbidity and mortality of COVID-19, there is a need to better understand and target the earliest stages of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the human respiratory tract. Here, we have studied the initial steps of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the consequent innate immune responses within the natural multicellular complexity of human nasal mucosal and lung tissues. Comparing the global innate response patterns of nasal and lung tissues infected in parallel with SARS-CoV-2 and influenza virus, we found distinct virus-host interactions in the upper and lower respiratory tract, which could determine the outcome and unique pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Studies in the nasal mucosal infection model can be employed to assess the impact of viral evolutionary changes and evaluate new therapeutic and preventive measures against SARS-CoV-2 and other human respiratory pathogens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dogs , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Lung/pathology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Nasal Mucosa/pathology , Nasal Mucosa/virology , Organ Specificity/immunology , RNA, Messenger/immunology , RNA, Viral/immunology , Vero Cells
17.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 365, 2021 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) share similar symptoms with influenza A (IA), but it is more worthwhile to understand the disparities of the two infections regarding their clinical characteristics on admission. METHODS: A total of 71 age-matched pediatric IA and COVID-19 patient pairs were formed and their clinical data on admission were compared. RESULTS: Fever, cough, nasal congestion and nausea/vomiting were the most common symptoms on admission for both infections but occurred less often in COVID-19. The IA patients were more likely to have lower-than-normal levels of lymphocyte count and percentage and to have higher-than-normal levels of activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, serum C-reactive protein, and serum procalcitonin, while the COVID-19 patients had higher odds of having lower-than-normal levels of neutrophil count and percentage. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that influenza A is more symptomatic than COVID-19 for children and might be an overall more severe infection at the time of admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Symptom Assessment , Adolescent , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Cough , Female , Fever , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/pathology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Nausea , Neutrophils , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Procalcitonin , Retrospective Studies , Vomiting
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6638, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147847

ABSTRACT

Pandemics, like the 1918 Spanish Influenza and COVID-19, spread through regions of the World in subsequent waves. Here we propose a consistent picture of the wave pattern based on the epidemic Renormalisation Group (eRG) framework, which is guided by the global symmetries of the system under time rescaling. We show that the rate of spreading of the disease can be interpreted as a time-dilation symmetry, while the final stage of an epidemic episode corresponds to reaching a time scale-invariant state. We find that the endemic period between two waves is a sign of instability in the system, associated to near-breaking of the time scale-invariance. This phenomenon can be described in terms of an eRG model featuring complex fixed points. Our results demonstrate that the key to control the arrival of the next wave of a pandemic is in the strolling period in between waves, i.e. when the number of infections grows linearly. Thus, limiting the virus diffusion in this period is the most effective way to prevent or delay the arrival of the next wave. In this work we establish a new guiding principle for the formulation of mid-term governmental strategies to curb pandemics and avoid recurrent waves of infections, deleterious in terms of human life loss and economic damage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Models, Theoretical , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Health Policy , Humans , Influenza, Human/pathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
19.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol ; 64(6): 687-697, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143104

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has rapidly become a global pandemic. In addition to the acute pulmonary symptoms of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) (the disease associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection), pulmonary and distal coagulopathies have caused morbidity and mortality in many patients. Currently, the molecular pathogenesis underlying COVID-19-associated coagulopathies are unknown. Identifying the molecular basis of how SARS-CoV-2 drives coagulation is essential to mitigating short- and long-term thrombotic risks of sick and recovered patients with COVID-19. We aimed to perform coagulation-focused transcriptome analysis of in vitro infected primary respiratory epithelial cells, patient-derived bronchial alveolar lavage cells, and circulating immune cells during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our objective was to identify transcription-mediated signaling networks driving coagulopathies associated with COVID-19. We analyzed recently published experimentally and clinically derived bulk or single-cell RNA sequencing datasets of SARS-CoV-2 infection to identify changes in transcriptional regulation of blood coagulation. We also confirmed that the transcriptional expression of a key coagulation regulator was recapitulated at the protein level. We specifically focused our analysis on lung tissue-expressed genes regulating the extrinsic coagulation cascade and the plasminogen activation system. Analyzing transcriptomic data of in vitro infected normal human bronchial epithelial cells and patient-derived bronchial alveolar lavage samples revealed that SARS-CoV-2 infection induces the extrinsic blood coagulation cascade and suppresses the plasminogen activation system. We also performed in vitro SARS-CoV-2 infection experiments on primary human lung epithelial cells to confirm that transcriptional upregulation of tissue factor, the extrinsic coagulation cascade master regulator, manifested at the protein level. Furthermore, infection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with influenza A virus did not drive key regulators of blood coagulation in a similar manner as SARS-CoV-2. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not differentially express genes regulating the extrinsic coagulation cascade or plasminogen activation system during SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting that they are not directly inducing coagulopathy through these pathways. The hyperactivation of the extrinsic blood coagulation cascade and the suppression of the plasminogen activation system in SARS-CoV-2-infected epithelial cells may drive diverse coagulopathies in the lung and distal organ systems. Understanding how hosts drive such transcriptional changes with SARS-CoV-2 infection may enable the design of host-directed therapeutic strategies to treat COVID-19 and other coronaviruses inducing hypercoagulation.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Blood Coagulation Disorders/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Transcription, Genetic , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line , Female , Humans , Influenza A virus/metabolism , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/pathology , Male
20.
APMIS ; 129(7): 324-339, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1109474

ABSTRACT

Influenza virus and coronavirus pandemics regularly sweep the globe, at great cost of health and economy. Our aim was to conduct a PubMed search for autopsy studies on influenza and coronavirus to investigate the contribution of autopsies during pandemics, focussing on autopsy methods and procedures and the role of autopsy findings in pandemics. The retrieved autopsy studies generally relied on microscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunostaining and electron microscopy. Most were small and reported on lung effects, including diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. Antibiotic therapy has diminished a role for bacterial pneumonia, whereas obesity is an emerging risk factor. Autopsy studies have provided new insights into coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) treatments like anti-coagulative therapy. Unfortunately, autopsies during pandemics are hampered by lack of guidelines, facilities and expertise for handling potentially infectious corpses and by widely varying recommendations for personal protective equipment and procedures. The Department of Forensic Pathology, at the Forensic Institute, at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark has, in collaboration with the Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, initiated a prospective observational study on COVID-19-related deaths encompassing postmortem imaging, standardized autopsy procedures/reporting and extensive tissue sampling for histological, chemical, microbiological and genetic analysis. The study involves a diverse array of research groups at the University of Copenhagen, and the clinical field.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , COVID-19/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Influenza, Human/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Pandemics
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