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1.
Ciênc. Saúde Colet ; 25(supl.1): 2479-2486, Mar. 2020. graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1725052

ABSTRACT

Resumo O presente ensaio busca discutir as implicações do isolamento social devido à pandemia do COVID-19 para o uso intensivo da internet entre crianças e adolescentes e suas possíveis consequências para a prática de violências autoinflingidas. Discutimos brevemente o potencial ansiogênico e a reprodução de um "medo global" que se consolidam com a exposição maciça e sem mediação dos conteúdos consumidos, que podem aumentar as vulnerabilidades para estresse e ideações suicidas. Centramos nosso debate sobre práticas "recreativas", denominadas de "desafios" com poder autolesivo, realizados por adolescentes no site Youtube. Essa prática revelou-se crescente a partir das medidas de isolamento social. Nossa reflexão sobre esses riscos é feita a partir da perspectiva teórica da sociabilidade digital, e suas implicações nas interações de adolescentes mediadas pela internet.


Abstract This essay aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. We briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a "global fear" that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. We centered our debate on "recreational" practices, called "challenges" with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Adolescent , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Anxiety/psychology , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Time Factors , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Behavior, Addictive , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Social Media/statistics & numerical data
2.
J Biomed Semantics ; 12(1): 15, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The ontology authoring step in ontology development involves having to make choices about what subject domain knowledge to include. This may concern sorting out ontological differences and making choices between conflicting axioms due to limitations in the logic or the subject domain semantics. Examples are dealing with different foundational ontologies in ontology alignment and OWL 2 DL's transitive object property versus a qualified cardinality constraint. Such conflicts have to be resolved somehow. However, only isolated and fragmented guidance for doing so is available, which therefore results in ad hoc decision-making that may not be the best choice or forgotten about later. RESULTS: This work aims to address this by taking steps towards a framework to deal with the various types of modeling conflicts through meaning negotiation and conflict resolution in a systematic way. It proposes an initial library of common conflicts, a conflict set, typical steps toward resolution, and the software availability and requirements needed for it. The approach was evaluated with an actual case of domain knowledge usage in the context of epizootic disease outbreak, being avian influenza, and running examples with COVID-19 ontologies. CONCLUSIONS: The evaluation demonstrated the potential and feasibility of a conflict resolution framework for ontologies.


Subject(s)
Biological Ontologies/statistics & numerical data , Computational Biology/statistics & numerical data , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Semantic Web , Semantics , Vocabulary, Controlled , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics/prevention & control , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval/methods , Logic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
3.
Curr Oncol ; 28(2): 1153-1160, 2021 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167436

ABSTRACT

In a prospective study, we sought to determine acceptability of linkage of administrative and clinical trial data among Canadian patients and Research Ethics Boards (REBs). The goal is to develop a more harmonized approach to data, with potential to improve clinical trial conduct through enhanced data quality collected at reduced cost and inconvenience for patients. On completion of the original LY.12 randomized clinical trial in lymphoma (NCT00078949), participants were invited to enrol in the Long-term Innovative Follow-up Extension (LIFE) component. Those consenting to do so provided comprehensive identifying information to facilitate linkage with their administrative data. We prospectively designed a global assessment of this innovative approach to clinical trial follow-up including rates of REB approval and patient consent. The pre-specified benchmark for patient acceptability was 80%. Of 16 REBs who reviewed the research protocol, 14 (89%) provided approval; two in Quebec declined due to small patient numbers. Of 140 patients invited to participate, 115 (82%, 95% CI 76 to 88%) from across 9 Canadian provinces provided consent and their full name, date of birth, health insurance number and postal code to facilitate linkage with their administrative data for long-term follow-up. Linkage of clinical trial and administrative data is feasible and acceptable. Further collaborative work including many stakeholders is required to develop an optimized secure approach to research. A more coordinated national approach to health data could facilitate more rapid testing and identification of new effective treatments across multiple jurisdictions and diseases from diabetes to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Information Storage and Retrieval/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Registries , Canada , Ethics Committees, Research , Female , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Male , Prospective Studies
4.
Health Info Libr J ; 38(1): 1-4, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120949

ABSTRACT

Michael Cook looks at the role of an embedded Public Health Information Specialist highlighting the ways the core evidence, information and knowledge skills are used to progress Public Health activity in local government settings. Acknowledging the current pandemic, he explores how COVID-19 has dominated all aspects of health and social care, and outlines how evidence services have work within these complex Public Health systems to lead the local response and recovery efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Evidence-Based Practice/organization & administration , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Local Government , Public Health Practice/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Public Health Administration
5.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(D1): D29-D37, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-947664

ABSTRACT

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI; https://www.ebi.ac.uk/) provides freely available data and bioinformatics services to the scientific community, alongside its research activity and training provision. The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has brought to the forefront a need for the scientific community to work even more cooperatively to effectively tackle a global health crisis. EMBL-EBI has been able to build on its position to contribute to the fight against COVID-19 in a number of ways. Firstly, EMBL-EBI has used its infrastructure, expertise and network of international collaborations to help build the European COVID-19 Data Platform (https://www.covid19dataportal.org/), which brings together COVID-19 biomolecular data and connects it to researchers, clinicians and public health professionals. By September 2020, the COVID-19 Data Platform has integrated in excess of 170 000 COVID-19 biomolecular data and literature records, collected through a number of EMBL-EBI resources. Secondly, EMBL-EBI has strived to continue its support of the life science communities through the crisis, with updated Training provision and improved service provision throughout its resources. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of EMBL-EBI's core principles, including international cooperation, resource sharing and central data brokering, and has further empowered scientific cooperation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Computational Biology/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Nucleic Acid/statistics & numerical data , Information Storage and Retrieval/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/methods , Computational Biology/organization & administration , Databases, Nucleic Acid/organization & administration , Global Health , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Proteins/metabolism
6.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(D1): D1388-D1395, 2021 01 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910391

ABSTRACT

PubChem (https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) is a popular chemical information resource that serves the scientific community as well as the general public, with millions of unique users per month. In the past two years, PubChem made substantial improvements. Data from more than 100 new data sources were added to PubChem, including chemical-literature links from Thieme Chemistry, chemical and physical property links from SpringerMaterials, and patent links from the World Intellectual Properties Organization (WIPO). PubChem's homepage and individual record pages were updated to help users find desired information faster. This update involved a data model change for the data objects used by these pages as well as by programmatic users. Several new services were introduced, including the PubChem Periodic Table and Element pages, Pathway pages, and Knowledge panels. Additionally, in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, PubChem created a special data collection that contains PubChem data related to COVID-19 and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Databases, Chemical , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , User-Computer Interface , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Discovery/statistics & numerical data , Epidemics , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval/methods , Internet , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Software
7.
Health Info Libr J ; 38(1): 66-71, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894756

ABSTRACT

This is part of a new series in this regular feature regarding trends in the provision of information by health science libraries. By sharing expertise and drawing together relevant trends the series intends to serve as a road map for both health science librarians and health informatics professionals. This article shows how a medical and biomedical research library changed practices, and reassessed user needs for the COVID-19 emergency. Discusses changes to online education (and collaborative working) to provide user-friendly services, researcher support tailored to need and re-visioning library space. J.M.


Subject(s)
Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Librarians/statistics & numerical data , Libraries, Digital/organization & administration , Libraries, Medical/organization & administration , Medical Informatics/organization & administration , Belgium , COVID-19 , Humans
8.
Res Synth Methods ; 12(2): 136-147, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838918

ABSTRACT

We researchers have taken searching for information for granted for far too long. The COVID-19 pandemic shows us the boundaries of academic searching capabilities, both in terms of our know-how and of the systems we have. With hundreds of studies published daily on COVID-19, for example, we struggle to find, stay up-to-date, and synthesize information-all hampering evidence-informed decision making. This COVID-19 information crisis is indicative of the broader problem of information overloaded academic research. To improve our finding capabilities, we urgently need to improve how we search and the systems we use. We respond to Klopfenstein and Dampier (Res Syn Meth. 2020) who commented on our 2020 paper and proposed a way of improving PubMed's and Google Scholar's search functionalities. Our response puts their commentary in a larger frame and suggests how we can improve academic searching altogether. We urge that researchers need to understand that search skills require dedicated education and training. Better and more efficient searching requires an initial understanding of the different goals that define the way searching needs to be conducted. We explain the main types of searching that we academics routinely engage in; distinguishing lookup, exploratory, and systematic searching. These three types must be conducted using different search methods (heuristics) and using search systems with specific capabilities. To improve academic searching, we introduce the "Search Triangle" model emphasizing the importance of matching goals, heuristics, and systems. Further, we suggest an urgently needed agenda toward search literacy as the norm in academic research and fit-for-purpose search systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computational Biology/methods , Information Storage and Retrieval/methods , Search Engine , Biomedical Research , Computational Biology/statistics & numerical data , Computational Biology/trends , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Information Storage and Retrieval/trends , Pandemics , PubMed , Publications , Research Personnel , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Vaccine ; 38(34): 5430-5435, 2020 07 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613549

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health-seeking behaviors change during pandemics and may increase with regard to illnesses with symptoms similar to the pandemic. The global reaction to COVID-19 may drive interest in vaccines for other diseases. OBJECTIVES: Our study investigated the correlation between global online interest in COVID-19 and interest in CDC-recommended routine vaccines. DESIGN, SETTINGS, MEASUREMENTS: This infodemiology study used Google Trends data to quantify worldwide interest in COVID-19 and CDC-recommended vaccines using the unit search volume index (SVI), which estimates volume of online search activity relative to highest volume of searches within a specified period. SVIs from December 30, 2019 to March 30, 2020 were collected for "coronavirus (Virus)" and compared with SVIs of search terms related to CDC-recommended adult vaccines. To account for seasonal variation, we compared SVIs from December 30, 2019 to March 30, 2020 with SVIs from the same months in 2015 to 2019. We performed country-level analyses in ten COVID-19 hotspots and ten countries with low disease burden. RESULTS: There were significant positive correlations between SVIs for "coronavirus (Virus)" and search terms for pneumococcal (R = 0.89, p < 0.0001) and influenza vaccines (R = 0.93, p < 0.0001) in 2020, which were greater than SVIs for the same terms in 2015-2019 (p = 0.005, p < 0.0001, respectively). Eight in ten COVID-19 hotspots demonstrated significant positive correlations between SVIs for coronavirus and search terms for pneumococcal and influenza vaccines. LIMITATIONS: SVIs estimate relative changes in online interest and do not represent the interest of people with no Internet access. CONCLUSION: A peak in worldwide interest in pneumococcal and influenza vaccines coincided with the COVID-19 pandemic in February and March 2020. Trends are likely not seasonal in origin and may be driven by COVID-19 hotspots. Global events may change public perception about the importance of vaccines. Our findings may herald higher demand for pneumonia and influenza vaccines in the upcoming season.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Influenza Vaccines , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Internet , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumococcal Vaccines , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Health Education/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Search Engine/statistics & numerical data , United States
10.
Health Info Libr J ; 37(3): 233-239, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597768

ABSTRACT

The virus, commonly known as COVID-19 which emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, has spread in 213 countries, areas or territories around the globe, with nearly 144 683 deaths worldwide on 18 April 2020. In the wake of this pandemic, we have witnessed a massive infodemic with the public being bombarded with vast quantities of information, much of which is not scientifically correct. Fighting fake news is now the new front in the COVID-19 battle. This regular feature comments on the role of health sciences librarians and information professionals in combating the COVID-19 infodemic. To support their work, it draws attention to the myth busters, fact-checkers and credible sources relating to COVID-19. It also documents the guides that libraries have put together to help the general public, students and faculty recognise fake news.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Media/organization & administration , Attitude to Health , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Databases, Factual , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Ciênc. Saúde Colet ; 25(supl.1): 2479-2486, Mar. 2020. graf
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-594338

ABSTRACT

Resumo O presente ensaio busca discutir as implicações do isolamento social devido à pandemia do COVID-19 para o uso intensivo da internet entre crianças e adolescentes e suas possíveis consequências para a prática de violências autoinflingidas. Discutimos brevemente o potencial ansiogênico e a reprodução de um "medo global" que se consolidam com a exposição maciça e sem mediação dos conteúdos consumidos, que podem aumentar as vulnerabilidades para estresse e ideações suicidas. Centramos nosso debate sobre práticas "recreativas", denominadas de "desafios" com poder autolesivo, realizados por adolescentes no site Youtube. Essa prática revelou-se crescente a partir das medidas de isolamento social. Nossa reflexão sobre esses riscos é feita a partir da perspectiva teórica da sociabilidade digital, e suas implicações nas interações de adolescentes mediadas pela internet.


Abstract This essay aimed to discuss the implications of social isolation due to the COVID-19 pandemic for the intensive use of the internet among children and adolescents and its possible consequences for the practice of self-inflicted violence. We briefly discussed the anxiogenic potential and the reproduction of a "global fear" that are consolidated with the massive and unmediated exposure of the content consumed, which can increase the vulnerabilities to stress and suicidal ideas. We centered our debate on "recreational" practices, called "challenges" with self-harm power, carried out by teenagers on the YouTube website. This practice has been shown to increase with the social isolation measures. Our reflection on these risks builds on the theoretical perspective of digital sociability, and its implications for the internet-mediated interactions of adolescents.


Subject(s)
Humans , Child , Adolescent , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Isolation/psychology , Self-Injurious Behavior/psychology , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus , Anxiety/psychology , Self Concept , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Time Factors , Information Storage and Retrieval/statistics & numerical data , Behavior, Addictive , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Fear , Social Media/statistics & numerical data
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