Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 52
Filter
1.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 28(6): 492-496, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117109

ABSTRACT

Demands for telepsychiatry have increased due to the challenges of COVID-19. The global pandemic caused a significant increase in anxiety and depression and a worsening of eating disorder symptoms, while the implementation of social distancing both exacerbated these mental health issues and disrupted the in-person delivery of mental health services. Rapid adaptation of telepsychiatry in the acute inpatient setting has been reported with favorable outcomes in patient experiences. This article reports our experience with a transition to telepsychiatry services on an acute eating disorder unit and the impact on quality of care. Forty-two inpatients on an eating disorders unit completed 410 surveys evaluating their experience with telepsychiatry. Simultaneously, surveys were distributed to physicians to identify technical and connectivity issues. Our experience showed that patients on an eating disorder unit, who had an average length of stay of 22 days, were very satisfied with telepsychiatry, with few technical or safety issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychiatry , Telemedicine , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 31(6): 1467-1479, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992826

ABSTRACT

A strong association exists between the quality of nurse-service user therapeutic relationship and care outcomes on acute mental health inpatient wards. Despite evidence that service users desire improved therapeutic engagement, and registered mental health nurses recognize the benefits of therapeutic relationships, such interactions remain sub-optimal. There is a dearth of evidence on factors influencing implementation of interventions to support and encourage therapeutic engagement. This study aimed to understand the barriers and enablers to implementation of the Therapeutic Engagement Questionnaire (TEQ), across fifteen acute inpatient wards in seven English mental health organizations. Qualitative methods were used in which data were collected from ethnographic field notes and documentary review, coded, and analysed using thematic analysis. Theoretical framing supported data analysis and interpretation. Reporting adheres to the Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research. The TEQ as an evidence-based intervention co-produced with service users and nurses was valued and welcomed by many nurse directors, senior clinicians, and ward managers. However, a range of practical and perceptual factors impeded implementation. Furthermore, many existing contextual challenges for intervention implementation in acute inpatient wards were magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Suitable facilitation to address these barriers can help support implementation of the TEQ, with some transferability to implementation of other interventions in these settings. Our study suggests several facilitation methods, brought together in a conceptual model, including encouragement of reflective, facilitative discussion meetings among stakeholders and researchers, effort put into winning nurse 'buy-in' and identifying and supporting ward-level agents of change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Relig Health ; 61(5): 4189-4204, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906326

ABSTRACT

This study was carried out to determine the relationship between the spiritual orientation and psychological well-being levels of inpatients diagnosed with COVID-19 and the factors affecting the psychological well-being of patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 136 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 who were hospitalized in the COVID-19 clinics of a state hospital between May and July 2021 and volunteered to participate in the study. To collect the study data, the Personal Information Form, Spiritual Orientation Scale (SOS) and Psychological Well-Being Scale (PWBS) were used. There was a positive correlation between the mean scores obtained from the overall SOS and PWBS (r = .335, p < .001). Of the participants, those who were women, who were over 65-year-old patients, who were hospitalized for 8-14 days and who had chronic diseases had lower levels of psychological well-being. The inpatients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 had high levels of spirituality and psychological well-being. It was found that there is a relationship between the spiritual orientation and psychological well-being of inpatients hospitalized with the diagnosis of COVID-19. The fact that nurses take spirituality into account while providing care to patients diagnosed with COVID-19 may be effective in protecting their patients' mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inpatients , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Male , Spirituality , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey
5.
Transl Behav Med ; 12(7): 816-824, 2022 Jul 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901240

ABSTRACT

New York City was a "global COVID-19 hotspot" in spring 2020. Many health teams rapidly transitioned to telehealth platforms. Little is known about the experiences of inpatient palliative care services who delivered telehealth services during the pandemic. This study was aimed to explore the experiences of an interdisciplinary palliative care team in meeting the holistic needs of oncology inpatients via telehealth over a 10-week period during the first COVID-19 surge. A targeted sample of interdisciplinary palliative specialists at an urban comprehensive cancer center participated in in-depth interviews that explored participants' experiences delivering physical, psychosocial, and spiritual care via telehealth. An interdisciplinary coding team followed a rigorous thematic text analysis approach and met regularly to reach consensus on emerging themes. Eleven palliative specialists from six disciplines (chaplaincy, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant, and social work) participated. Seventy-three percent reported not receiving telehealth training prior to COVID-19 and 64% were "not at all" or "somewhat comfortable" delivering telepalliative care. Several themes were identified, including the barriers related to telehealth, the impact of telehealth on the quality of relationships with patients, their families, and coworkers, and the changes in perceived self-efficacy of fulfilling job responsibilities. Telehealth use has increased significantly during COVID-19, requiring further evaluation of its utility. Participants reported both positive and negative inpatient telepalliative care experiences associated with various domains of professional functioning, such as communication, relationships with key stakeholders, and self-efficacy. Enhanced telehealth training and support must be improved to sustain the palliative workforce and promote high-quality patient and family care in the future.


In spring 2020, New York City was a COVID-19 global hotspot. The palliative care team at a major cancer center rapidly transitioned to a "virtual service" (i.e., telehealth) without any physical contact with oncology inpatients for a 10-week period. No infrastructure for inpatient telehealth had been established prior to the transition. We wanted to explore how effective the interdisciplinary palliative care team felt in meeting the psychosocial, spiritual, and physical needs of patients and their families via telehealth. The palliative care team consisted of advanced practice providers, physicians, a chaplain, pharmacist, and social worker. Through participant interviews, our research team identified common themes related to the barriers and facilitators of telehealth; various effects on the quality of relationships with patients, their families, and coworkers; and diverse experiences related to the team's perceived effectiveness in delivering telepalliative care. There are several implications to consider. Inpatient practice settings must design telehealth infrastructures to ensure both patient and provider protections when in-person care is not possible. Multilevel policies must direct investments in telehealth training for health professionals to support high-quality care during future public health crises. Research should be directed toward developing and measuring enhanced telehealth interventions to support effective and holistic virtual palliative care delivery for inpatient settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Palliative Care/psychology , Pandemics
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(9)2022 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820278

ABSTRACT

Understanding the patient experience of admission to a psychiatric mother-baby unit (MBU) informs service improvement and strengthens patient-centered care. This study aims to examine patients' experience, satisfaction, and change in mental health status related to MBU admission. At discharge, 70 women admitted to a public MBU completed the Patient Outcome and Experience Measure (POEM), rated the usefulness of therapeutic groups, and provided written qualitative feedback. Paired sample t-tests, correlations, and thematic content analysis were completed. Women were highly satisfied with the level of care and support received, particularly for those who were voluntarily admitted. Women reported an improvement in mental health from admission to discharge. Women appreciated the staff's interpersonal skills, provision of practical skills, education, advice, support from other women, and therapeutic groups offered. Women suggested improvements such as having greater food choices, more MBU beds, more group sessions, family visitations, which had been restricted due to COVID-19, environmental modifications, and clarity of communication surrounding discharge. This study highlights the benefits of MBUs and the specific aspects of care that are favorable in treating women with mental illnesses who are co-admitted with their baby in an MBU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , Female , Humans , Infant , Inpatients/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Reported Outcome Measures
8.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 77: 77-79, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Prior research suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has been detrimental to adolescent mental health. However, no research has examined whether the pandemic is associated with increased symptom severity among high-risk youth, such as those hospitalized for a psychiatric crisis. METHOD: Over a four-year period, upon admission to an adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit, youth completed measures of depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), feeling like a burden and lack of belongingness (Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire), trauma-related symptoms (Child Trauma Screen), suicidal thoughts and behaviors (Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview Self-Report Version). We compared the severity of these symptoms for patients admitted during the pandemic to the severity for patients admitted to the same unit in the three years before the pandemic. RESULTS: Across most symptoms, youth hospitalized during the pandemic reported increased severity compared to those hospitalized before the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents requiring psychiatric hospitalization during the pandemic reported increased symptom severity compared to adolescents hospitalized on the same inpatient unit in the three years prior to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inpatients , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Suicidal Ideation
10.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 60(6): 27-32, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547523

ABSTRACT

Seclusion practices have traditionally been used in psychiatry to maintain patient and staff safety. Despite negative emotional consequences for all involved parties and the movement toward patient-centered care, these practices continue in in-patient psychiatric units across the United States. The purpose of the current quality improvement project was to decrease the rate of seclusion events on an adult inpatient psychiatric unit through the implementation of a standard debriefing process based on the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors' Six Core Strategies for Reducing Seclusion and Restraint Use. In 2020, the seclusion rates at the project site were above state and national benchmarks. Post-intervention, the seclusion hours per 1,000 patient care hours increased by 16% (0.38 to 0.44); however, the mean duration of each seclusion episode decreased by 10% (158 minutes to 142 minutes). Intervention compliance was low, including interprofessional participation. These findings demonstrate the need to address seclusion practices with an evidence-based solution, such as debriefing, coupled with adequate support from interprofessional leadership. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 60(6), 27-32.].


Subject(s)
Inpatients , Mental Disorders , Adult , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Patient Isolation/psychology , Quality Improvement , Restraint, Physical , United States
11.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260819, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546969

ABSTRACT

Studies assessing the mental health of patients with COVID-19 infection remain limited. Disasters and major emergencies, not just COVID-19, undoubtedly lead to greater incidence of mental health problems. Previous studies indicate that the novel Coronavirus disease can cause panic and stress in patients. Our literature search didn't reveal any previous published data from Cameroon and the Central African sub-region. In order to bridge this gap, we assessed the prevalence and factors associated with depression and anxiety in COVID-19 patients. We carried out a cross-sectional study in a secondary hospital in the Littoral Region of Cameroon. We recruited hospitalised COVID-19 patients during a 4-month period. We collected data on sociodemographic characteristics. The HADS score was used to assess levels of anxiety and depression. All analysis were done using Stata 14. A P value of <0.05 was used as the cut-off for statistical significance. A total number of 285 patients took part in this study with a mean age of 48.47 years. The prevalence of anxiety in COVID-19 patients was 60.35% while the prevalence of depression was 81.40%. At multivariate logistic regression male gender (OR: 1.89, P = 0.04), hypoxaemia (OR: 2.20, P = 0.01), presence of COVID-19 complications (OR: 1.61, P = 0.02) and current episode of depression (OR: 4.14, P<0.01) were independently associated with anxiety. Similarly, age > 35 years (OR:2.03, P = 0.02), presence of comorbidity (OR: 1.68, P = 0.01), BMI > = 30kg/m2 (OR: 1.78, P = 0.02), presence of COVID-19 complications (OR: 1.28, P = 0.01) and anxiety (OR: 4.60, P<0.001) were independently associated with depression. Hospitalised patients with COVID-19 experienced high levels of anxiety and depression. Treatment of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 should therefore include psychotherapy and psychiatric support.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Inpatients/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Cameroon/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors , Sex Factors
13.
Int J Psychiatry Med ; 56(4): 240-254, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495823

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support, coping strategies, anxiety, and depression symptoms among hospitalized COVID-19 patients by comparing them with a matched control group in terms of age, gender, and education level. METHOD: The patient group (n = 84) and the healthy controls (HCs, n = 92) filled in the questionnaire including the socio-demographic form, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale, and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced through the online survey link. RESULTS: The COVID-19 patients had higher perceived social support and coping strategies scores than the HCs. However, anxiety and depression scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. In logistic regression analysis performed in COVID-19 patients, the presence of chest CT finding (OR = 4.31; 95% CI = 1.04-17.95) was a risk factor for anxiety and the use of adaptive coping strategies (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.73-0.99) had a negative association with anxiety. In addition, the use of adaptive coping strategies (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.79-0.98) and high perceived social support (OR = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.93- 0,99) had a negative association with depression symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal studies involving the return to normality phase of the COVID-19 pandemic are needed to investigate the effects of factors such as coping strategies and perceived social support that could increase the psychological adjustment and resilience of individuals on anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Inpatients/psychology , Social Support , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
14.
Med Princ Pract ; 30(6): 535-541, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484145

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the presence and severity of depressive symptoms among coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) inpatients and any possible changes after their discharge. SUBJECT AND METHODS: We collected data of patients admitted to the Infectious Disease Unit in Sassari, Italy, for COVID-19, from March 8 to May 8, 2020. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was performed 1 week after admission (T0) and 1 week after discharge (T1). The cutoff point chosen to define the clinical significance of depressive symptoms was 20 (at least moderate). RESULTS: Forty-eight subjects were included. Mean age was 64.3 ± 17.6 years, and 32 (66.7%) were male. Most frequent comorbidities were cardiovascular diseases (19; 39.6%) and hypertension (17; 35.4%). When performing BDI-II at T0, 21 (43.7%) patients reported depressive symptoms at T0, according to the chosen cutoff point (BDI-II = 20). Eight (16.7%) patients had minimal symptoms. Mild mood disturbance and moderate and severe depressive symptoms were found in 24 (50%), 14 (29.2%), and 2 (4.2%) patients, respectively, at T0. The comparison of the BDI-II questionnaire at T0 with T1 showed a significant improvement in the total score (p < 0.0001), as well as in 4 out of the 5 selected questions of interest (p < 0.05). Univariate analysis showed that kidney failure and the death of a roommate were significantly associated with severity of mood disorders. CONCLUSION: Mood disturbances and depressive symptoms commonly occur among COVID-19 inpatients. Our results show that COVID-19 inpatients might be at higher risk for developing depressive reactive disorders and could benefit from an early psychological evaluation and strategies improving sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Inpatients/psychology , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep/physiology , Adjustment Disorders , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Mood Disorders/diagnosis , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1968141, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475710

ABSTRACT

The no-visitor policies endorsed by healthcare organizations to limit COVID-19 virus risk exposure have unfortunately contributed to the isolation of patients further exacerbating distress in relatives and frontline healthcare workers. To contrast such effects, many healthcare institutions have adopted technology-based solutions helping patients and families communicate online through the aid of virtual devices. To date, no study has investigated whether facilitating patient-family videocalls would mitigate distress levels in frontline healthcare professionals. Caring for emotional needs of patients by re-establishing affiliative connections interrupted by the pandemic through patient-family videocalls is expected to mitigate distress in engaged healthcare workers as an example of a tend-and-befriend response to stress caused by the pandemic. We tested this hypothesis in a cross-sectional study conducted during 1-30 June 2020, involving 209 healthcare workers (nurses = 146; physicians = 63) engaged in the COVID-19 frontline in Italy. Half of participants in our sample (n = 107) had assisted efforts aimed at connecting patients remotely with families through videocalls. Psychological distress measures included symptoms of burnout, post-traumatic stress, anxiety, depression, and difficulty in sleep and wakefulness. Partially in line with our expectations we found a modulation effect specific for professional category: nurses assisting patient-family videocalls reported significantly lower levels of distress and a better quality of wakefulness compared to those who did not, whereas physicians reported higher levels of distress during such virtual communications. We interpret these findings from the perspective of patient-family communication and differences in skills and training between nurses and physicians. These findings highlight that technology-based solutions aimed at reducing barriers and alleviating distress in healthcare settings should be promoted in concert with skill enhancement training for healthcare professionals especially in terms of communicating online and communicating difficult topics with patients and families.


La política de no recibir visitas que ha sido legitimada por organizaciones de atención de salud para limitar el riesgo de la exposición al virus COVID-19 ha contribuido en forma desafortunada al aislamiento de los pacientes, lo que aumenta el malestar/angustia en familiares y en trabajadores de salud de la primera línea. Para contrastar tales efectos, muchas instituciones de salud han adoptado soluciones basadas en la tecnología para ayudar a pacientes y familiares a comunicarse en línea a través de la ayuda de dispositivos virtuales. Hasta la fecha, ningún estudio ha investigado si es que la facilitación de video llamadas paciente-familiares pudiese mitigar el nivel de angustia en profesionales de salud de primera línea. Se espera que el cuidado de las necesidades emocionales de los pacientes mediante el restablecimiento de conexiones afilativas interrumpidas por la pandemia a través de video llamadas entre el paciente y la familia ayude a mitigar la angustia en los trabajadores de la salud como un ejemplo de una respuesta de "cuidar y hacer amigos" a la angustia causada por la pandemia. Probamos esta hipótesis en un estudio transversal realizado entre el 01 y el 30 de junio del 2020, en la que participaron 209 trabajadores de la salud (enfermeras=146; médicos=63) involucrados en la atención de la primera línea del COVID-19 en Italia. La mitad de los participantes en nuestra muestra (n=107) habían asistido a esfuerzos destinados a conectar a los pacientes en forma remota con sus familias a través de video-llamadas. Las medidas de angustia psicológica incluyeron síntomas de burnout, estrés postraumático, ansiedad, depresión, dificultad para dormir y estar despiertos. Parcialmente en línea con nuestras expectativas, encontramos un efecto modulador específico para la categoría profesional: Las enfermeras que asistían las video llamadas de los pacientes con sus familias reportaron significativamente menor nivel de angustia y una mejor calidad de vigilia en comparación con las que no lo hicieron, mientras los médicos reportaron mayores niveles de angustia durante tales comunicaciones virtuales. Interpretamos estos hallazgos desde la perspectiva de la comunicación paciente-familia y las diferencias en las habilidades y formación entre las enfermeras y los médicos. Estos hallazgos destacan que las soluciones basadas en la tecnología destinadas a reducir las barreras y aliviar la angustia en los entornos de atención de salud deben promoverse junto con la capacitación para la mejora de habilidades para profesionales de la salud especialmente en términos de comunicarse en línea y comunicar temáticas difíciles a pacientes y familiares.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Family/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Inpatients/psychology , Psychological Distress , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine , Technology
16.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 347, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438304

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Restricted visitation policies in acute care settings because of the COVID-19 pandemic have negative consequences. The objective of this scoping review is to identify impacts of restricted visitation policies in acute care settings, and describe perspectives and mitigation approaches among patients, families, and healthcare professionals. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Healthstar, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials on January 01/2021, unrestricted, for published primary research records reporting any study design. We included secondary (e.g., reviews) and non-research records (e.g., commentaries), and performed manual searches in web-based resources. We excluded records that did not report primary data. Two reviewers independently abstracted data in duplicate. RESULTS: Of 7810 citations, we included 155 records. Sixty-six records (43%) were primary research; 29 (44%) case reports or case series, and 26 (39%) cohort studies; 21 (14%) were literature reviews and 8 (5%) were expert recommendations; 54 (35%) were commentary, editorial, or opinion pieces. Restricted visitation policies impacted coping and daily function (n = 31, 20%) and mental health outcomes (n = 29, 19%) of patients, families, and healthcare professionals. Participants described a need for coping and support (n = 107, 69%), connection and communication (n = 107, 69%), and awareness of state of well-being (n = 101, 65%). Eighty-seven approaches to mitigate impact of restricted visitation were identified, targeting families (n = 61, 70%), patients (n = 51, 59%), and healthcare professionals (n = 40, 46%). CONCLUSIONS: Patients, families, and healthcare professionals were impacted by restricted visitation polices in acute care settings during COVID-19. The consequences of this approach on patients and families are understudied and warrant evaluation of approaches to mitigate their impact. Future pandemic policy development should include the perspectives of patients, families, and healthcare professionals. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The review was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42020221662) and a protocol peer-reviewed prior to data extraction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care , Family , Health Policy , Inpatients , Physical Distancing , Visitors to Patients , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Family/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Mental Health Services , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone , Visitors to Patients/psychology
17.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 272(1): 67-79, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315333

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is an inherently stressful situation, which may lead to adverse psychosocial outcomes in various populations. Yet, individuals may not be affected equally by stressors posed by the pandemic and those with pre-existing mental disorders could be particularly vulnerable. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the psychological response to the pandemic in a case-control design. We used an age-, sex- and employment status-matched case-control sample (n = 216) of psychiatric inpatients, recruited from the LMU Psychiatry Biobank Munich study and non-clinical individuals from the general population. Participants completed validated self-report measures on stress, anxiety, depression, paranoia, rumination, loneliness, well-being, resilience, and a newly developed index of stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the effects of group, COVID-19-specific stressors, and their interaction on the different psychosocial outcomes. While psychiatric inpatients reported larger mental health difficulties overall, the impact of COVID-19-specific stressors was lower in patients and not associated with worse psychological functioning compared to non-clinical individuals. In contrast, depressive symptoms, rumination, loneliness, and well-being were more strongly associated with COVID-19-specific stressors in non-clinical individuals and similar to the severity of inpatients for those who experienced the greatest COVID-19-specific stressor impact Contrary to expectations, the psychological response to the pandemic may not be worse in psychiatric inpatients compared to non-clinical individuals. Yet, individuals from the general population, who were hit hardest by the pandemic, should be monitored and may be in need of mental health prevention and treatment efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inpatients , Mental Disorders , Pandemics , COVID-19/psychology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy
18.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(2): 137-144, 2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292182

ABSTRACT

The widespread prevalence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) means that inpatient psychiatric units will necessarily manage patients who have COVID-19 that is comorbid with acute psychiatric symptoms. We report a case of recurrence of respiratory symptoms and positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing in a patient on an inpatient psychiatric unit occurring 42 days after the initial positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test, 38 days after initial symptom resolution, and 30 days after the first of 3 negative SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR tests. Over the course of the admission, the patient was safely initiated on clozapine. Recent literature on COVID-19's potential recurrence and neuropsychiatric effects is reviewed and implications for the management of COVID-19 on inpatient psychiatric units are discussed. In the era of COVID-19 and our still-developing understanding of this illness, psychiatrists' role as advocates and collaborators in our patients' physical health care has become even more critical.


Subject(s)
Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Depressive Disorder, Major/complications , Depressive Disorder, Major/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Adult , Alcoholism/complications , Alcoholism/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Clozapine , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Male , Mirtazapine/therapeutic use , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sertraline/therapeutic use , Suicide, Attempted
19.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1717-1721, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270757

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic presented numerous challenges to inpatient care, including overtaxed inpatient medicine services, surges in patient censuses, disrupted patient care and educational activities for trainees, underused providers in certain specialties, and personal protective equipment shortages and new requirements for physical distancing. In March 2020, as the COVID-19 surge began, an interdisciplinary group of administrators, providers, and trainees at Brigham and Women's Hospital created an inpatient virtual staffing model called the Virtual Team Rounding Program (VTRP). APPROACH: The conceptual framework guiding VTRP development was rapid-cycle innovation. The VTRP was designed iteratively using feedback from residents, physician assistants, attendings, and administrators from March to June 2020. The VTRP trained and deployed a diverse set of providers across specialties as "virtual rounders" to support inpatient teams by joining and participating in rounds via videoconference and completing documentation tasks during and after rounds. The program was rapidly scaled up from March to June 2020. OUTCOMES: In a survey of inpatient providers at the end of the pilot phase, 10/10 (100%) respondents reported they were getting either "a lot" or "a little" benefit from the VTRP and did not find the addition of the virtual rounder burdensome. During the scaling phase, the program grew to support 24 teams. In a survey at the end of the contraction phase, 117/187 (62.6%) inpatient providers who worked with a virtual rounder felt the rounder saved them time. VTRP leadership collaboratively and iteratively developed best practices for challenges encountered during implementation. NEXT STEPS: Virtual rounding provides a valuable extension of inpatient teams to manage COVID-19 surges. Future work will quantitatively and qualitatively assess the impact of the VTRP on inpatient provider satisfaction and well-being, virtual rounders' experiences, and patient care outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Education, Distance/methods , Medical Staff, Hospital/supply & distribution , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Teaching Rounds/methods , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Patient Satisfaction , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL