Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 4.096
Filter
1.
Respir Med ; 203: 107006, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Post-COVID syndrome includes several clinical identities, with both physical and mental alterations lasting several months from the acute phase of COVID-19 disease. However, to date, data concerning the relationship between healthcare settings during COVID-19 disease and post-COVID mood disorders are lacking. METHODS: We performed a prospective study enrolling 440 patients with post-COVID syndrome. Each patient underwent a complete clinical evaluation, along with blood and functional tests. Patients were divided according to the healthcare setting needed during COVID-19 disease. RESULTS: Patients admitted to RICU were more prone to develop mental alterations, even when compared to ICU-admitted patients. Other risk factors for mood disorders included female gender and some post-COVID symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare needs during COVID-19 can explain the higher incidence of mood disorders in post-COVID syndrome. RICU arises as an important but underexplored risk factor for post-COVID psychic sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/etiology , Prospective Studies , Intensive Care Units , Delivery of Health Care
2.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 45, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Commentators believe that the ethical decision-making climate is instrumental in enhancing interprofessional collaboration in intensive care units (ICUs). Our aim was twofold: (1) to determine the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave one's job among nurses and physicians, and between the different ICU types and (2) determine the association between the ethical climate, moral distress, and intention to leave. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study between May 2021 and August 2021 involving 206 nurses and physicians in a large urban academic hospital. We used the validated Ethical Decision-Making Climate Questionnaire (EDMCQ) and the Measure of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP) tools and asked respondents their intention to leave their jobs. We also made comparisons between the different ICU types. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to identify statistically significant associations between the Ethical Climate, Moral Distress, and Intention to Leave. RESULTS: Nurses perceived the ethical climate for decision-making as less favorable than physicians (p < 0.05). They also had significantly greater levels of moral distress and higher intention to leave their job rates than physicians. Regarding the ICU types, the Neonatal/Pediatric unit had a significantly higher overall ethical climate score than the Medical and Surgical units (3.54 ± 0.66 vs. 3.43 ± 0.81 vs. 3.30 ± 0.69; respectively; both p ≤ 0.05) and also demonstrated lower moral distress scores (both p < 0.05) and lower "intention to leave" scores compared with both the Medical and Surgical units. The ethical climate and moral distress scores were negatively correlated (r = -0.58, p < 0.001); moral distress and "intention to leave" was positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.001); and ethical climate and "intention to leave" were negatively correlated (r = -0.50, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Significant differences exist in the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave between nurses and physicians and between the different ICU types. Inspecting the individual factors of the ethical climate and moral distress tools can help hospital leadership target organizational factors that improve interprofessional collaboration, lessening moral distress, decreasing turnover, and improved patient care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Intention , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Job Satisfaction , Morals , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 106, 2020 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global public health emergency. Here, we developed and validated a practical model based on the data from a multi-center cohort in China for early identification and prediction of which patients will be admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Data of 1087 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were collected from 49 sites between January 2 and February 28, 2020, in Sichuan and Wuhan. Patients were randomly categorized into the training and validation cohorts (7:3). The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator and logistic regression analyzes were used to develop the nomogram. The performance of the nomogram was evaluated for the C-index, calibration, discrimination, and clinical usefulness. Further, the nomogram was externally validated in a different cohort. RESULTS: The individualized prediction nomogram included 6 predictors: age, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, smoking status, fever, and chronic kidney disease. The model demonstrated a high discriminative ability in the training cohort (C-index = 0.829), which was confirmed in the external validation cohort (C-index = 0.776). In addition, the calibration plots confirmed good concordance for predicting the risk of ICU admission. Decision curve analysis revealed that the prediction nomogram was clinically useful. CONCLUSION: We established an early prediction model incorporating clinical characteristics that could be quickly obtained on hospital admission, even in community health centers. This model can be conveniently used to predict the individual risk for ICU admission of patients with COVID-19 and optimize the use of limited resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Nomograms , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Eur Respir Rev ; 31(166)2022 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As mortality from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is strongly age-dependent, we aimed to identify population subgroups at an elevated risk for adverse outcomes from COVID-19 using age-/gender-adjusted data from European cohort studies with the aim to identify populations that could potentially benefit from booster vaccinations. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to investigate the role of underlying medical conditions as prognostic factors for adverse outcomes due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), including death, hospitalisation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mechanical ventilation within three separate settings (community, hospital and ICU). Cohort studies that reported at least age and gender-adjusted data from Europe were identified through a search of peer-reviewed articles published until 11 June 2021 in Ovid Medline and Embase. Results are presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals and absolute risk differences in deaths per 1000 COVID-19 patients. FINDINGS: We included 88 cohort studies with age-/gender-adjusted data from 6 653 207 SARS-CoV-2 patients from Europe. Hospital-based mortality was associated with high and moderate certainty evidence for solid organ tumours, diabetes mellitus, renal disease, arrhythmia, ischemic heart disease, liver disease and obesity, while a higher risk, albeit with low certainty, was noted for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure. Community-based mortality was associated with a history of heart failure, stroke, diabetes and end-stage renal disease. Evidence of high/moderate certainty revealed a strong association between hospitalisation for COVID-19 and solid organ transplant recipients, sleep apnoea, diabetes, stroke and liver disease. INTERPRETATION: The results confirmed the strong association between specific prognostic factors and mortality and hospital admission. Prioritisation of booster vaccinations and the implementation of nonpharmaceutical protective measures for these populations may contribute to a reduction in COVID-19 mortality, ICU and hospital admissions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Humans , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Europe/epidemiology , Male , Female
7.
Acta Biomed ; 93(5): e2022313, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The pandemic caused by SARS-COV-2 has increased Semi-Intensive Care Unit (SICU) admission, causing an increase in healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Mostly HAI reveals the same risk factors, but fewer studies have analyzed the possibility of multiple coinfections in these patients. The study aimed was to identify patterns of co-presence of different species describing at the same time the association between such patterns and patient demographics and, finally, comparing the patterns between the two cohorts of COVID-19 patients admitted at Policlinico during the first wave and the second one). METHODS: All the patients admitted to SICUs during two COVID-19 waves, from March to June 2020 months and from October to December 2020, were screened following the local infection control surveillance program; whoever manifested fever has undergone on microbiological culture to detect bacterial species. Statistical analysis was performed to observe the existence of microbiological patterns through DBSCAN method. RESULTS: 246 patients were investigated and 83 patients were considered in our study because they presented infection symptoms with a mean age of 67 years and 33.7% of female patients. During the first and second waves were found respectively 10 and 8 bacterial clusters with no difference regarding the most frequent species. CONCLUSIONS: The results show the importance of an analysis which considers the risk factors for the possibility of co- and superinfection (such as age and gender) to structure a good prognostic tool to predict which patients will encounter severe coinfections during hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Cross Infection , Humans , Female , Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Coinfection/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Retrospective Studies
9.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(6): 771-787, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084534

ABSTRACT

Influenza infection causes severe illness in 3 to 5 million people annually, with up to an estimated 650,000 deaths per annum. As such, it represents an ongoing burden to health care systems and human health. Severe acute respiratory infection can occur, resulting in respiratory failure requiring intensive care support. Herein we discuss diagnostic approaches, including development of CLIA-waived point of care tests that allow rapid diagnosis and treatment of influenza. Bacterial and fungal coinfections in severe influenza pneumonia are associated with worse outcomes, and we summarize the approach and treatment options for diagnosis and treatment of bacterial and Aspergillus coinfection. We discuss the available drug options for the treatment of severe influenza, and treatments which are no longer supported by the evidence base. Finally, we describe the supportive management and ventilatory approach to patients with respiratory failure as a result of severe influenza in the intensive care unit.


Subject(s)
Coinfection , Influenza, Human , Respiratory Insufficiency , Critical Care , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Intensive Care Units , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy
10.
Int J Clin Pract ; 2022: 1682986, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088967

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In late February 2020, after we had informed about the presence of some cases of COVID-19 in Iran and its rapid spread throughout the country, we decided to make the necessary arrangements for patients with critical conditions in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at Children's Medical Center. There are a little data on critically ill children with COVID-19 infection with ICU requirements. The aim of this study was to describe clinical characteristics, laboratory parameters, treatment, and outcomes of the pediatrics population infected by SARS-CoV-2 admitted to PICU. Materials and Methods: This study was performed between February 2020 and May 2020 in the COVID PICU of the Children's Medical Center Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Patients were evaluated in terms of demographic categories, primary symptoms and signs at presentation, underlying disease, SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test result, laboratory findings at PICU admission, chest X-ray (CXR) and lung CT findings, and treatment. Moreover, the need to noninvasive ventilation (NIV) or mechanical ventilation, the length of hospital stay in the PICU, and outcomes were assessed. Results: In total, 99 patients were admitted to COVID PICU, 42.4% (42 patients) were males, and 66 patients had positive SARS-CoV-2 real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of clinical signs and symptoms (except for fever) among patients with positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR and negative ones. Among all admitted patients, the presence of underlying diseases was noticed in 81 (82%) patients. Of 99 patients, 34 patients were treated with NIV during their admission. Furthermore, 35 patients were intubated and treated with mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately, 11 out of 35 mechanically ventilated patients (31%) passed away. Conclusion: No laboratory and radiological findings in children infected with COVID-19 were diagnostic in cases with COVID-19 admitted to PICU. There are higher risks of severe COVID-19, PICU admission, and mortality in children with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Iran/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Hospitals , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Intensive Care Units
11.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 686-694, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087888

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We aim to describe the extent of psychological trauma and moral distress in healthcare workers (HCW) working in the intensive care unit (ICU) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, we review reports on prevalence of mental health symptoms, highlight vulnerable populations and summarize modifiable risk factors associated with mental health symptoms in ICU HCW. RECENT FINDINGS: The pandemic has resulted in a multitude of closely intertwined professional and personal challenges for ICU HCW. High rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (14-47%), burnout (45-85%), anxiety (31-60%), and depression (16-65%) have been reported, and these mental health symptoms are often interrelated. Most studies suggest that nurses and female HCW are at highest risk for developing mental health symptoms. The main personal concerns associated with reporting mental health symptoms among ICU HCW were worries about transmitting COVID-19 to their families, worries about their own health, witnessing colleagues contract the disease, and experiencing stigma from their communities. Major modifiable work-related risk factors were experiencing poor communication from supervisors, perceived lack of support from administrative leadership, and concerns about insufficient access to personal protective equipment, inability to rest, witnessing hasty end-of-life decisions, and restriction of family visitation policies. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted ICU HCW worldwide. The psychological trauma, manifesting as posttraumatic stress disorder, burnout, anxiety, and depression, is substantial and concerning. Urgent action by lawmakers and healthcare administrators is required to protect ICU HCW and sustain a healthy workforce.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Psychological Trauma , Female , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Intensive Care Units , Psychological Trauma/epidemiology
12.
Can J Anaesth ; 69(11): 1399-1404, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085600

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: SARS-CoV-2 vaccines have been proven effective at preventing poor outcomes from COVID-19; however, voluntary vaccination rates have been suboptimal. We assessed the potential avoidable intensive care unit (ICU) resource use and associated costs had unvaccinated or partially vaccinated patients hospitalized with COVID-19 been fully vaccinated. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study of persons aged 12 yr or greater in Alberta (2021 population ~ 4.4 million) admitted to any ICU with COVID-19 from 6 September 2021 to 4 January 2022. We used publicly available aggregate data on COVID-19 infections, vaccination status, and health services use. Intensive care unit admissions, bed-days, lengths of stay, and costs were estimated for patients with COVID-19 and stratified by vaccination status. RESULTS: In total, 1,053 patients admitted to the ICU with COVID-19 were unvaccinated, 42 were partially vaccinated, and 173 were fully vaccinated (cumulative incidence 230.6, 30.8, and 5.5 patients/100,000 population, respectively). Cumulative incidence rate ratios of ICU admission were 42.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.7 to 44.9) for unvaccinated patients and 5.6 (95% CI, 4.1 to 7.6) for partially vaccinated patients when compared with fully vaccinated patients. During the study period, 1,028 avoidable ICU admissions and 13,015 bed-days were recorded for unvaccinated patients and the total avoidable costs were CAD 61.3 million. The largest opportunity to avoid ICU bed-days and costs was in unvaccinated patients aged 50 to 69 yr. CONCLUSIONS: Unvaccinated patients with COVID-19 had substantially greater rates of ICU admissions, ICU bed-days, and ICU-related costs than vaccinated patients did. This increased resource use would have been potentially avoidable had these unvaccinated patients been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2.


RéSUMé: OBJECTIF: Les vaccins contre le SRAS-CoV-2 se sont avérés efficaces pour prévenir les devenirs défavorables associés à la COVID-19; toutefois, les taux de vaccination volontaire ont été sous-optimaux. Nous avons évalué l'utilisation potentiellement évitable des ressources des unités de soins intensifs (USI) et les coûts associés si les patients non vaccinés ou partiellement vaccinés qui ont dû être hospitalisés pour la COVID-19 avaient été complètement vaccinés. MéTHODE: Nous avons réalisé une étude de cohorte rétrospective basée sur la population de personnes âgées de 12 ans ou plus en Alberta (population de 2021 ~ 4,4 millions) admises dans une unité de soins intensifs et atteintes de COVID-19 du 6 septembre 2021 au 4 janvier 2022. Nous avons utilisé des données agrégées accessibles au public sur les infections à la COVID-19, le statut vaccinal et l'utilisation des services de santé. Les admissions aux soins intensifs, les journées-patients, les durées de séjour et les coûts ont été estimés pour les patients atteints de la COVID-19 et stratifiés selon le statut vaccinal. RéSULTATS: Au total, 1053 patients admis à l'USI souffrant de la COVID-19 n'étaient pas vaccinés, 42 étaient partiellement vaccinés et 173 étaient complètement vaccinés (incidence cumulative 230,6, 30,8 et 5,5 patients / 100 000 habitants, respectivement). Les taux d'incidence cumulés des admissions aux soins intensifs étaient de 42,2 (intervalle de confiance [IC] à 95 %, 39,7 à 44,9) pour les patients non vaccinés et de 5,6 (IC 95 %, 4,1 à 7,6) pour les patients partiellement vaccinés par rapport aux patients entièrement vaccinés. Au cours de la période à l'étude, 1028 admissions évitables aux soins intensifs et 13 015 journées-patients ont été enregistrées pour les patients non vaccinés, et les coûts totaux évitables étaient de 61,3 millions de dollars canadiens. L'économie potentielle la plus importante en matière de journées-patients et de coûts en soins intensifs touchait les patients non vaccinés âgés de 50 à 69 ans. CONCLUSION: Les patients non vaccinés atteints de COVID-19 ont affiché des taux beaucoup plus élevés d'admissions à l'USI, de journées-patients à l'USI et de coûts liés à l'USI que les patients vaccinés. Cette utilisation accrue des ressources aurait été potentiellement évitable si ces patients non vaccinés avaient été vaccinés contre le SRAS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , Intensive Care Units
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(10): e2238871, 2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084948

ABSTRACT

Importance: Data on the association of COVID-19 vaccination with intensive care unit (ICU) admission and outcomes of patients with SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia are scarce. Objective: To evaluate whether COVID-19 vaccination is associated with preventing ICU admission for COVID-19 pneumonia and to compare baseline characteristics and outcomes of vaccinated and unvaccinated patients admitted to an ICU. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study on regional data sets reports: (1) daily number of administered vaccines and (2) data of all consecutive patients admitted to an ICU in Lombardy, Italy, from August 1 to December 15, 2021 (Delta variant predominant). Vaccinated patients received either mRNA vaccines (BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273) or adenoviral vector vaccines (ChAdOx1-S or Ad26.COV2). Incident rate ratios (IRRs) were computed from August 1, 2021, to January 31, 2022; ICU and baseline characteristics and outcomes of vaccinated and unvaccinated patients admitted to an ICU were analyzed from August 1 to December 15, 2021. Exposures: COVID-19 vaccination status (no vaccination, mRNA vaccine, adenoviral vector vaccine). Main Outcomes and Measures: The incidence IRR of ICU admission was evaluated, comparing vaccinated people with unvaccinated, adjusted for age and sex. The baseline characteristics at ICU admission of vaccinated and unvaccinated patients were investigated. The association between vaccination status at ICU admission and mortality at ICU and hospital discharge were also studied, adjusting for possible confounders. Results: Among the 10 107 674 inhabitants of Lombardy, Italy, at the time of this study, the median [IQR] age was 48 [28-64] years and 5 154 914 (51.0%) were female. Of the 7 863 417 individuals who were vaccinated (median [IQR] age: 53 [33-68] years; 4 010 343 [51.4%] female), 6 251 417 (79.5%) received an mRNA vaccine, 550 439 (7.0%) received an adenoviral vector vaccine, and 1 061 561 (13.5%) received a mix of vaccines and 4 497 875 (57.2%) were boosted. Compared with unvaccinated people, IRR of individuals who received an mRNA vaccine within 120 days from the last dose was 0.03 (95% CI, 0.03-0.04; P < .001), whereas IRR of individuals who received an adenoviral vector vaccine after 120 days was 0.21 (95% CI, 0.19-0.24; P < .001). There were 553 patients admitted to an ICU for COVID-19 pneumonia during the study period: 139 patients (25.1%) were vaccinated and 414 (74.9%) were unvaccinated. Compared with unvaccinated patients, vaccinated patients were older (median [IQR]: 72 [66-76] vs 60 [51-69] years; P < .001), primarily male individuals (110 patients [79.1%] vs 252 patients [60.9%]; P < .001), with more comorbidities (median [IQR]: 2 [1-3] vs 0 [0-1] comorbidities; P < .001) and had higher ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (Pao2) and fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FiO2) at ICU admission (median [IQR]: 138 [100-180] vs 120 [90-158] mm Hg; P = .007). Factors associated with ICU and hospital mortality were higher age, premorbid heart disease, lower Pao2/FiO2 at ICU admission, and female sex (this factor only for ICU mortality). ICU and hospital mortality were similar between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, mRNA and adenoviral vector vaccines were associated with significantly lower risk of ICU admission for COVID-19 pneumonia. ICU and hospital mortality were not associated with vaccinated status. These findings suggest a substantial reduction of the risk of developing COVID-19-related severe acute respiratory failure requiring ICU admission among vaccinated people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Critical Illness/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , Retrospective Studies , Cohort Studies , BNT162 Vaccine , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Oxygen
14.
Respir Care ; 67(10): 1282-1290, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Postextubation monitoring helps identify patients at risk of developing respiratory failure. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of our standard respiratory therapist (RT) assessment tool versus an automated continuous monitoring alert to initiate postextubation RT-driven care on the re-intubation rate. METHODS: This was a single-center randomized clinical trial from March 2020 to September 2021 of adult subjects who received mechanical ventilation for > 24 h and underwent planned extubation in the ICU. The subjects were assigned to the standard RT assessment tool or an automated monitoring alert to identify the need for postextubation RT-driven care. The primary outcome was the need for re-intubation due to respiratory failure within 72 h. Secondary outcomes included re-intubation within 7 d, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, hospital mortality, ICU cost, and RT time associated with patient assessment and therapy provision. RESULTS: Of 234 randomized subjects, 32 were excluded from the primary analysis due to disruption in RT-driven care during the surge of patients with COVID-19, and 1 subject was excluded due to delay in the automated monitoring initiation. Analysis of the primary outcome included 85 subjects assigned to the standard RT assessment group and 116 assigned to the automated monitoring alert group to initiate RT-driven care. There was no significant difference between the study groups in re-intubation rate, median length of stay, mortality, or ICU costs. The RT time associated with patient assessment (P < .001) and therapy provided (P = .031) were significantly lower in the automated continuous monitoring alert group. CONCLUSIONS: In subjects who received mechanical ventilation for > 24 h, there were no significant outcome or cost differences between our standard RT assessment tool or an automated monitoring alert to initiate postextubation RT-driven care. Using an automated continuous monitoring alert to initiate RT-driven care saved RT time. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT04231890).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , Adult , Airway Extubation/adverse effects , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Ventilator Weaning
15.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(19): 7290-7296, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081433

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Lymphocytes are the most important cells in defending the human body against viral pathogens. In this study, we aimed at investigating the relationship between lymphocyte blood levels and patient survival in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia in the intensive care unit. Patients were divided into two groups in terms of blood lymphocyte levels; increased lymphocyte and decreased lymphocyte groups on the 5th day of hospitalization. Mortality rates were compared between groups. RESULTS: Two groups were similar in terms of laboratory tests and comorbidities. Overall survival was 63.8% (n=102) in patients with increased lymphocytes and 33.2% (n=68) in patients with decreased lymphocytes. Mortality rates were significantly higher in decreased lymphocyte group than in increased lymphocyte group (p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Our study reveals that mortality is higher in patients with a lower lymphocyte count on the 5th day compared to the day of hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Intensive Care Units , Lymphocytes
16.
Psychiatr Danub ; 34(3): 602-605, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081409

ABSTRACT

An increase of psychopathology such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is described in patients affected with COVID-19 that stayed at an intensive care unit (ICU). However, data on follow-up and on impact of contextual factors are limited. In a single-center, observational study, PTSD symptomatology was prevalent among 38% of participants (n=8), persisting in clinical PTSD in 2 participants after one year. In patients with initial PTSD symptoms, scores on depression, anxiety and insomnia scales were significantly higher. A higher mental burden due to avoidance of contact and a reduced quality of life was also retained in patients with PTSD symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Quality of Life , Critical Care , Anxiety/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Depression
17.
Acta Biomed ; 93(S2): e2022152, 2022 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The time interval between the patients' intubation and the performance of a tracheostomy has been considered as critical for the disease prognosis and outcome. The aim of the present study was to compare and contrast the outcomes of early vs late tracheostomy with regard to ICU patients' weaning from respiratory support. METHODS: This retrospective observational study, involved patients who were hospitalized in two general and one Covid-19 ICUs of two tertiary hospitals in Athens and were subjected to tracheostomy. Data were collected from the patients' medical records in order to estimate the duration of patient weaning and the number of days from the patients' intubation until the time of tracheostomy. In the present study the term earlytracheostomy denotes tracheostomy performed within 14 days from patient intubation and late tracheostomydefines the tracheostomy carried out after 14 days. For Covid-19 patients, guidelines suggested that tracheostomies should be performed 21 days following intubation, due to the high risk of virus transmission. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-one patients who underwent tracheostomy participated in the study. Most tracheostomies were performed using the percutaneous technique. The group of patients tracheostomized within 14 days after their admission in ICU weaned faster from respiratory support compared to ones who were tracheostomized after 14 days. CONCLUSIONS: The most common distinction between early and late tracheostomy is 14 days, with early tracheostomy being more beneficial in terms of patients' outcomes, and specifically ICU patients' weaning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tracheostomy , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Tracheostomy/methods
18.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 88(4): 259-271, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: High levels of procalcitonin (PCT) have been associated with a higher risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients. We explored the prognostic role of early PCT assessment in critically ill COVID-19 patients and whether PCT predictive performance would be influenced by immunosuppression. METHODS: Retrospective multicentric analysis of prospective collected data in COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to 36 intensive care units (ICUs) in Spain and Andorra from March to June 2020. Adult (>18 years) patients with confirmed COVID-19 and available PCT values (<72 hours from ICU admission) were included. Patients were considered as "no immunosuppression" (NI), "chronic immunosuppression" (CI) and "acute immunosuppression" (AIT if only tocilizumab; AIS if only steroids, AITS if both). The primary outcome was the ability of PCT to predict ICU mortality. RESULTS: Of the 1079 eligible patients, 777 patients were included in the analysis. Mortality occurred in 227 (28%) patients. In the NI group 144 (19%) patients were included, 67 (9%) in the CI group, 66 (8%) in the AIT group, 262 (34%) in the AIS group and 238 (31%) in the AITS group; PCT was significantly higher in non-survivors when compared with survivors (0.64 [0.17-1.44] vs. 0.23 [0.11-0.60] ng/mL; P<0.01); however, in the multivariable analysis, PCT values was not independently associated with ICU mortality. PCT values and ICU mortality were significantly higher in patients in the NI and CI groups. CONCLUSIONS: PCT values are not independent predictors of ICU mortality in COVID-19 patients. Acute immunosuppression significantly reduced PCT values, although not influencing its predictive value.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Procalcitonin , Adult , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies
19.
Cent Eur J Public Health ; 30(3): 196-200, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081264

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this retrospective study was to estimate the prevalence of healthcare-associated infections (HAI), microbiological data including resistance patterns and impact of HAI on patients' survival. METHODS: Two-centre study on 172 patients was performed. Medical records of patients hospitalized in the two COVID-19 intensive care units (ICU) localized in Bydgoszcz between 1 October 2020 and 30 March 2021 were analysed retrospectively. Data collection included demographics, microbiological, clinical variables, and patient outcome. All infections were defined according to the HAI-Net ICU protocol of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Detailed data concerning bloodstream infection (BSI), pneumonia (PN) and urinary tract infection (UTI) were collected. RESULTS: In 97 patients (56.4%), 138 HAI cases were identified. Patients with HAI statistically more often had been administered antimicrobial therapy prior to the admission to ICU (59.8% vs. 34.7%, p < 0.05), and needed catecholamines during hospitalization (93.8% vs. 70.7%, p < 0.001). The risk of HAI increased by 50% if antimicrobial therapy had been applied before the admission to ICU, and was three times higher if during the hospitalization in ICU catecholamines infusion was needed. Mortality was higher in patients diagnosed with HAI (72.2% vs. 65.3%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.34). CONCLUSIONS: Further investigation of co-infections in critically ill patients with COVID-19 is required in order to identify HAI risk factors, define the role of empiric antimicrobial therapy and proper prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , COVID-19 , Cross Infection , Urinary Tract Infections , Anti-Bacterial Agents , COVID-19/epidemiology , Catecholamines , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Retrospective Studies , Urinary Tract Infections/epidemiology , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology
20.
Front Immunol ; 13: 942192, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080137

ABSTRACT

The cellular immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in response to full mRNA COVID-19 vaccination could be variable among healthy individuals. Studies based only in specific antibody levels could show an erroneous immune protection at long times. For that, we analyze the antibody levels specific to the S protein and the presence of SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells by ELISpot and AIM assays in intensive care unit (ICU) workers with no antecedents of COVID-19 and vaccinated with two doses of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. All individuals were seronegative for the SARS-CoV-2 protein S before vaccination (Pre-v), but 34.1% (14/41) of them showed pre-existing T lymphocytes specific for some viral proteins (S, M and N). One month after receiving two doses of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine (Post-v1), all cases showed seroconversion with high levels of total and neutralizing antibodies to the spike protein, but six of them (14.6%) had no T cells reactive to the S protein. Specifically, they lack of specific CD8+ T cells, but maintain the contribution of CD4+ T cells. Analysis of the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 at 10 months after full vaccination (Post-v10), exhibited a significant reduction in the antibody levels (p<0.0001) and protein S-reactive T cells (p=0.0073) in all analyzed individuals, although none of the individuals become seronegative and 77% of them maintained a competent immune response. Thus, we can suggest that the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 elicited by the mRNA vaccines was highly variable among ICU workers. A non-negligible proportion of individuals did not develop a specific T cell response mediated by CD8+ T cells after vaccination, that may condition the susceptibility to further viral infections with SARS-CoV-2. By contrast, around 77% of individuals developed strong humoral and cellular immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 that persisted even after 10 months. Analysis of the cellular immune response is highly recommended for providing exact information about immune protection against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Humans , Antibodies, Neutralizing , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Intensive Care Units , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Vaccination , T-Lymphocytes
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL