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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(7): e2013880, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621959

ABSTRACT

Importance: During the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, case reports have suggested that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may lead to adverse outcomes. Objective: To study the association of NSAID use with adverse outcomes in patients hospitalized with influenza or influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used propensity score matching among 7747 individuals aged 40 years or older who were hospitalized with influenza, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction or antigen testing, between 2010 and 2018. Data were collected using Danish nationwide registers. All analyses reported were performed on May 29, 2020. Exposures: Prescription fill of an NSAID within 60 days before admission. Main Outcomes and Measures: Risk ratio (RR) and risk difference (RD) with 95% CIs for intensive care unit admission and death within 30 days of admission. Results: A total of 7747 patients (median [interquartile range] age, 71 [59-80] years, 3980 [51.4%] men) with confirmed influenza were identified. Of these, 520 (6.7%) were exposed to NSAIDs. In the unmatched cohorts, 104 of 520 patients (20.0%) who used NSAIDs and 958 of 7227 patients (13.3%) who did not use NSAIDs were admitted to the intensive care unit. For death within 30 days of admission, we observed 37 events (7.1%) among those who used NSAIDs compared with 563 events (7.8%) among those who did not. Current NSAID use was associated with intensive care unit admission (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.81; RD, 6.7%; 95% CI, 3.2% to 10.3%), while NSAID use was not associated with death (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.26; RD, -0.7%; 95% CI, -3.0% to 1.6%). In the matched cohorts, risks were unchanged for patients who used NSAIDs, while 83 ICU admissions (16.0%) and 36 deaths (6.9%) were observed among matched individuals who did not use NSAIDs. Matched (ie, adjusted) analyses yielded attenuated risk estimates for intensive care unit admission (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.63; RD, 4.0%; 95% CI, -0.6% to 8.7%) and death (RR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.60; RD, 0.2%; 95% CI, -2.9% to 3.3%). Associations were more pronounced among patients who used NSAIDs for a longer period (eg, for intensive care unit admission: RR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.19 to 3.06; RD, 13.4%; 95% CI, 4.0% to 22.8%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of adult patients hospitalized with influenza, the use of NSAIDs was not associated with 30-day intensive care unit admission or death in adjusted analyses. There was an association between long-term use of NSAIDs and intensive care unit admission.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Influenza, Human , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Pneumonia , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology
2.
Zhonghua Jie He He Hu Xi Za Zhi ; 43(9): 737-743, 2020 Sep 12.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-749117

ABSTRACT

The critically illsurvivors with COVID-19 have Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) manifestations of varying degrees of physical, cognitive, and mental disorders after discharge from the Intensive Care Unit. Comprehensive respiratory rehabilitation interventions for patients are essential to minimize disability rate, reduce medical costs, and increase social participation. Integrated the existing treatment experience and relevant literature evidence, we recommend the evaluation and intervention of respiratory rehabilitation in the two stages of discharge ICUto ward and home. Based on Chinese experience, a PCCM physician-led multidisciplinary team management process was constructed. Personal protection recommendations were made based on the potential risk of infection among critically ill COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Humans , Intensive Care Units
3.
Yonsei Med J ; 61(9): 826-830, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745127

ABSTRACT

We retrospectively reviewed patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections who were admitted to an intensive care unit in Daegu, South Korea. The outcomes of patients who did (cases) or did not (controls) receive darunavir-cobicistat (800-150 mg) therapy were compared. Fourteen patients received darunavir-cobicistat treatment, and 96 received other antiviral therapy (controls). Overall, the darunavir-cobicistat group comprised patients with milder illness, and the crude mortality rate of all patients in the darunavir-cobicistat group was lower than that in the controls [odds ratio (OR) 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-0.89, p=0.035]. After 1:2 propensity-score matching, there were 14 patients in the darunavir-cobicistat group, and 28 patients in the controls. In propensity score-matched analysis, the darunavir-cobicistat group had lower mortality than the controls (OR 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.52, p=0.009). In conclusion, darunavir-cobicistat therapy was found to be associated with a significant survival benefit in critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Cobicistat/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Darunavir/therapeutic use , HIV Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Anti-HIV Agents/administration & dosage , Anti-HIV Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Case-Control Studies , Cobicistat/administration & dosage , Cobicistat/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Illness , Darunavir/administration & dosage , Darunavir/adverse effects , Female , HIV Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , HIV Protease Inhibitors/adverse effects , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
4.
S Afr Med J ; 110(7): 625-628, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743569

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought discussions around the appropriate and fair rationing of scare resources to the forefront. This is of special importance in a country such as South Africa (SA), where scarce resources interface with high levels of need. A large proportion of the SA population has risk factors associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes. Many people are also potentially medically and socially vulnerable secondary to the high levels of infection with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) in the country. This is the second of two articles. The first examined the clinical evidence regarding the inclusion of HIV and TB as comorbidities relevant to intensive care unit (ICU) admission triage criteria. Given the fact that patients with HIV or TB may potentially be excluded from admission to an ICU on the basis of an assumption of lack of clinical suitability for critical care, in this article we explore the ethicolegal implications of limiting ICU access of persons living with HIV or TB. We argue that all allocation and rationing decisions must be in terms of SA law, which prohibits unfair discrimination. In addition, ethical decision-making demands accurate and evidence-based strategies for the fair distribution of limited resources. Rationing decisions and processes should be fair and based on visible and consistent criteria that can be subjected to objective scrutiny, with the ultimate aim of ensuring accountability, equity and fairness.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing/methods , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Patient Selection/ethics , Pneumonia, Viral , Resource Allocation , Triage , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Services Needs and Demand/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/economics , Intensive Care Units/standards , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Resource Allocation/ethics , Resource Allocation/legislation & jurisprudence , South Africa/epidemiology , Triage/economics , Triage/ethics , Triage/legislation & jurisprudence
5.
S Afr Med J ; 110(7): 621-624, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743568

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases pandemics have devastating health, social and economic consequences, especially in developing countries such as South Africa. Scarce medical resources must often be rationed effectively to contain the disease outbreak. In the case of COVID-19, even the best-resourced countries will have inadequate intensive care facilities for the large number of patients needing admission and ventilation. The scarcity of medical resources creates the need for national governments to establish admission criteria that are evidence-based and fair. Questions have been raised whether infection with HIV or tuberculosis (TB) may amplify the risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes and therefore whether these conditions should be factored in when deciding on the rationing of intensive care facilities. In light of these questions, clinical evidence regarding inclusion of these infections as comorbidities relevant to intensive care unit admission triage criteria is investigated in the first of a two-part series of articles. There is currently no evidence to indicate that HIV or TB infection on their own predispose to an increased risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 or worse outcomes for COVID-19. It is recommended that, as for other medical conditions, validated scoring systems for poor prognostic factors should be applied. A subsequent article examines the ethicolegal implications of limiting intensive care access of persons living with HIV or TB.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Health Care Rationing/methods , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Triage/organization & administration , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Services Needs and Demand/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/economics , Intensive Care Units/standards , Pandemics/economics , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , South Africa/epidemiology
6.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 81(8): 1-3, 2020 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743030

ABSTRACT

The UK death toll from COVID-19 is currently the fourth worst in the world behind the USA, Brazil and Mexico. Possible reasons include delays in lockdown, the provision of scientific advice to government and the decisions that government made based on the information they were given. When we review our performance and plan for the next public health crisis, we need to be brave enough to dare to challenge the NHS and its advisors.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , State Medicine/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Public Health Administration , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
In Vivo ; 34(5): 3029-3032, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Reports indicate that coronaviridae may inhibit insulin secretion. In this report we aimed to describe the course of glycemia in critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 36 SARS-CoV-2 patients (with no history of diabetes) in one intensive care unit (ICU). All the patients were admitted for hypoxemic respiratory failure; all but four required mechanical ventilation. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64.7 (9.7) years; 27 were men; the mean (±SD) duration of ICU stay was 12.9 (8.3 days). RESULTS: Twenty of 36 patients presented with hyperglycemia; brief intravenous infusions of short-acting insulin were administered in six patients. As of May 29 2020, 11 patients had died (seven with hyperglycemia). In 17 patients the Hyperglycemia Index [HGI; defined as the area under the curve of (hyper)glycemia level*time (h) divided by the total time in the ICU] was <16.21 mg/dl (0.90 mmol/l), whereas in three patients the HGI was ≥16.21 mg/dl (0.90 mol/l) and <32.25 mg/dl (1.79 mmol/l). CONCLUSION: In our series of ICU patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and no history of diabetes, a substantial number of patients had hyperglycemia, to a higher degree than would be expected by the stress of critical illness, lending credence to reports that speculated a tentative association between SARS-CoV-2 and hyperglycemia. This finding is important, since hyperglycemia can lead to further infectious complications.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Insulin/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/virology , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/physiopathology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
8.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 37(2): 195-202, 2020.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740608

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the probability of controlling the outbreak of COVID-19 in Peru, in a pre- and post-quarantine scenario using mathematical simulation models. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Outbreak si mulations for the COVID-19 pandemic are performed, using stochastic equations under the following assumptions: a pre-quarantine population R0 of 2.7 or 3.5, a post-quarantine R0 of 1.5, 2 or 2.7, 18% or 40%, of asymptomatic positives and a maximum response capacity of 50 or 150 patients in the intensive care units. The success of isolation and contact tracing is evaluated, no other mitigation measures are included. RESULTS: In the pre-quarantine stage, success in controlling more than 80% of the simulations occurred only if the isolation of positive cases was implemented from the first case, after which there was less than 40% probability of success. In post-quarantine, with 60 positive cases it is necessary to isolate them early, track all of their contacts and decrease the R0 to 1.5 for outbreak control to be successful in more than 80% of cases. Other scenarios have a low probability of success. CONCLUSIONS: The control of the outbreak in Peru during pre-quarantine stage demanded requirements that were difficult to comply with, therefore quarantine was necessary; to successfully suspend it would require a significant reduction in the spread of the disease, early isolation of positives and follow-up of all contacts of positive patients.


Subject(s)
Computer Simulation , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Contact Tracing/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peru/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Probability , Quarantine
9.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 75: e2294, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740557

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We designed a cohort study to describe characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in the largest public hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, as Latin America becomes the epicenter of the pandemic. METHODS: This is the protocol for a study being conducted at an academic hospital in Brazil with 300 adult ICU beds dedicated to COVID-19 patients. We will include adult patients admitted to the ICU with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 during the study period. The main outcome is ICU survival at 28 days. Data will be collected prospectively and retrospectively by trained investigators from the hospital's electronic medical records, using an electronic data capture tool. We will collect data on demographics, comorbidities, severity of disease, and laboratorial test results at admission. Information on the need for advanced life support and ventilator parameters will be collected during ICU stay. Patients will be followed up for 28 days in the ICU and 60 days in the hospital. We will plot Kaplan-Meier curves to estimate ICU and hospital survival and perform survival analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model to identify the main risk factors for mortality. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04378582. RESULTS: We expect to include a large sample of patients with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU and to be able to provide data on admission characteristics, use of advanced life support, ICU survival at 28 days, and hospital survival at 60 days. CONCLUSIONS: This study will provide epidemiological data about critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Brazil, which could inform health policy and resource allocation in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Brazil , Cohort Studies , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Research Design
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 646, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is known as a new viral infection. Viral-bacterial co-infections are one of the biggest medical concerns, resulting in increased mortality rates. To date, few studies have investigated bacterial superinfections in COVID-19 patients. Hence, we designed the current study on COVID-19 patients admitted to ICUs. METHODS: Nineteen patients admitted to our ICUs were enrolled in this study. To detect COVID-19, reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed. Endotracheal aspirate samples were also collected and cultured on different media to support the growth of the bacteria. After incubation, formed colonies on the media were identified using Gram staining and other biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out based on the CLSI recommendations. RESULTS: Of nineteen COVID-19 patients, 11 (58%) patients were male and 8 (42%) were female, with a mean age of ~ 67 years old. The average ICU length of stay was ~ 15 days and at the end of the study, 18 cases (95%) expired and only was 1 case (5%) discharged. In total, all patients were found positive for bacterial infections, including seventeen Acinetobacter baumannii (90%) and two Staphylococcus aureus (10%) strains. There was no difference in the bacteria species detected in any of the sampling points. Seventeen of 17 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii were resistant to the evaluated antibiotics. No metallo-beta-lactamases -producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain was found. One of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates was detected as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and isolated from the patient who died, while another Staphylococcus aureus strain was susceptible to tested drugs and identified as methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings emphasize the concern of superinfection in COVID-19 patients due to Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus. Consequently, it is important to pay attention to bacterial co-infections in critical patients positive for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections/complications , Acinetobacter baumannii/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Acinetobacter Infections/epidemiology , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Heart Diseases/complications , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Intensive Care Units , Male , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory System/microbiology , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology , Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
11.
Sci. med. (Porto Alegre, Online) ; 30(1): 38468, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-739470

ABSTRACT

A doença causada pelo novo coronavírus (COVID-19), foi identificada em dezembro de 2019, na China. Por ter uma disseminação extremamente rápida, de pessoa por pessoa, em janeiro de 2020 foi declarada uma urgência em saúde pública internacional e, em março, a COVID-19 foi declarada como uma pandemia. Os profissionais de saúde têm grande probabilidade de contrair ou transmitir essa doença, decorrente de sua alta exposição ao vírus. Com essa preocupação, o presente estudo fez uma revisão bibliográfica para descrever as rotinas e protocolos relacionados às melhores práticas para assistência de enfermagem aos pacientes com a COVID-19. No momento crítico como esse, cabe ao enfermeiro montar estratégias para qualificar a assistência e, ao mesmo tempo, promover a segurança dos profissionais que atuam diretamente no cuidado aos pacientes com a COVID-19.


The disease caused by the new coronavirus (COVID-19) was identified in December 2019, in China. By an extremely rapid dissemination of one person per person, in January 2020, COVID-19 was declared an international public health emergency, and, in March, it was declared as a pandemic. Health professionals are very likely to contract or transmit this disease, due to their high exposure to the virus. With this concern, the present study makes a bibliographic review to describe the routines and protocols related to the best nursing care practices for patients with a COVID-19. In the critical moment like this, the nurse is the responsible to develop strategies to qualify assistance and, at the same time, promote the safety of professionals who work directly in the patients care with a COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Nursing , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Care
13.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720954687, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-737527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a highly infectious disease which usually presents with respiratory symptoms. This virus is disseminated through respiratory droplets, and, therefore, individuals residing in close quarters are at a higher risk for the acquisition of infection. The prison population is at a significantly increased risk for infection. METHODS: Prisoners from the Montford Correctional facility in Lubbock, Texas, hospitalized in the medical intensive care unit at University Medical Center between March 1, 2020 and May 15, 2020 were compared to community-based patients hospitalized in the same medical intensive care unit. Clinical information, laboratory results, radiographic results, management requirements, and outcomes were compared. RESULTS: A total of 15 community-based patients with a mean age of 67.4 ± 15.5 years were compared to 5 prisoners with a mean age of 56.0 ± 9.0 years. All prisoners were men; 10 community-based patients were men. Prisoners presented with fever, dyspnea, and GI symptoms. The mean number of comorbidities in prisoners was 2.4 compared to 1.8 in community-based patients. Prisoners had significantly lower heart rates and respiratory rates at presentation than community-based patients. The mean length of stay in prisoners was 12.6 ± 8.9 days; the mean length of stay in community-based patients was 8.6 ± 6.5. The case fatality rate was 60% in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Prisoners were younger than community-based patients but required longer lengths of stay and had the same mortality rate. This study provides a basis for comparisons with future studies which could involve new treatment options currently under study.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prisoners/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Texas/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
14.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 100, 2020 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736810

ABSTRACT

Background: Brazil faces some challenges in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic, including: the risks for cross-infection (community infection) increase in densely populated areas; low access to health services in areas where the number of beds in intensive care units (ICUs) is scarce and poorly distributed, mainly in states with low population density. Objective: To describe and intercorrelate epidemiology and geographic data from Brazil about the number of intensive care unit (ICU) beds at the onset of COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The epidemiology and geographic data were correlated with the distribution of ICU beds (public and private health systems) and the number of beneficiaries of private health insurance using Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The same data were correlated using partial correlation controlled by gross domestic product (GDP) and number of beneficiaries of private health insurance. Findings: Brazil has a large geographical area and diverse demographic and economic aspects. This diversity is also present in the states and the Federal District regarding the number of COVID-19 cases, deaths and case fatality rate. The effective management of severe COVID-19 patients requires ICU services, and the scenario was also dissimilar as for ICU beds and ICU beds/10,000 inhabitants for the public (SUS) and private health systems mainly at the onset of COVID-19 pandemic. The distribution of ICUs was uneven between public and private services, and most patients rely on SUS, which had the lowest number of ICU beds. In only a few states, the number of ICU beds at SUS was above 1 to 3 by 10,000 inhabitants, which is the number recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Conclusions: Brazil needed to improve the number of ICU beds units to deal with COVID-19 pandemic, mainly for the SUS showing a late involvement of government and health authorities to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Pandemics , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral , Private Sector/statistics & numerical data , Public Sector/statistics & numerical data , Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Brazil/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Patient Care Management/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Severity of Illness Index
15.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(34): e316, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The predictors of poor prognosis in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) using computed tomography (CT) have not been investigated in a large cohort. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the adverse initial CT features to predict poor prognosis in COVID-19. METHODS: From February to April 2020, 281 COVID-19 patients who underwent CT at the time of admission were included. We divided the patients into the severe and non-severe disease groups. The severe group included patients with severe pneumonia or critical events. Intensive care unit admission or death were the critical events in this study. We compared the clinical and CT findings between the severe and non-severe groups and investigated the prognostic factors and critical events of the severe group using the regression analysis. RESULTS: Among the 281 patients, 36 (12.8%) patients were in the severe group and 245 (87.2%) patients were in the non-severe group. Critical events occurred in 10 patients (3.6%). In the severe group, patients showed significantly more pneumonia with consolidation, crazy-paving appearance, pleural effusion, and higher CT scores than those in the non-severe group (all, P < 0.05). In the multivariate regression, pleural effusion (odds ratio [OR], 8.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81-44.42; P = 0.007), CT score > 5 (OR, 3.70; 95% CI, 1.44-9.53; P = 0.007), old age (> 77 years, OR, 9.96; 95% CI, 3.78-26.28; P < 0.001), and elevated C-reactive protein (OR, 4.15; 95% CI, 1.62-10.6; P = 0.003) were significant prognostic factors of severe disease. CT score > 5 (OR, 7.29; 95% CI, 1.37-38.68; P = 0.020), pleural effusion (OR, 5.67; 95% CI, 1.04-30.8; P = 0.045) and old age (OR, 8.6; 95% CI, 1.80-41.0; P = 0.007) were also significant predictors of critical events. CONCLUSION: Pleural effusion and the extent of pneumonia on initial CT scans are associated with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Pleural Effusion/diagnostic imaging , Pleural Effusion/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(34): e21824, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733318

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a cluster of coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. The present study was conducted to report the clinical characteristics of 201 COVID-19 patients in Changsha, China, a city outside of Wuhan. All of the patients with confirmed COVID-19 were admitted to the First Hospital of Changsha City, the designated hospital for COVID-19 assigned by the Changsha City Government. The clinical and epidemiological characteristics, data of laboratory, radiological picture, treatment, and outcomes records of 201 COVID-19 patients were collected using electronic medical records. This study population consisted of 201 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 in Changsha by April 28, 2020. The median age of the patients was 45 years (IQR 34-59). About half (50.7%) of the patients were male, and most of the infected patients were staff (96 [47.8%]). Concerning the epidemiologic history, the number of patients linked to Wuhan was 92 (45.8%). The most common symptoms were fever (125 [62.2%]), dry cough (118 [58.7%]), fatigue (65 [32.3%]), and pharyngalgia (31 [15.4%]). One hundred and forty-four (71.6%) enrolled patients showed bilateral pneumonia. Fifty-four (26.9%) patients showed unilateral involvement, and three (1.5%) patients showed no abnormal signs or symptoms. The laboratory findings differed significantly between the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and non-ICU groups. Compared with non-ICU patients, ICU patients had depressed white blood cell (WBC), neutrocytes, lymphocytes, and prolonged prothrombin time (PT). Moreover, higher plasma levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), alanine aminotransferase (ALA), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), creatinine (CREA), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were detected in the ICU group. In this single-center study of 201 COVID-19 patients in Changsha, China, 22.4% of patients were admitted to ICU. Based on our findings, we propose that the risk of cellular immune deficiency, hepatic injury, and kidney injury should be monitored. Previous reports focused on the clinical features of patients from Wuhan, China. With the global epidemic of COVID-19, we should pay more attention to the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients outside of Wuhan.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Cough/epidemiology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(34): e21874, 2020 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733315

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused serious damage to public health. COVID-19 has no vaccine or specific therapy; its mortality rate increases significantly once patients deteriorate. Furthermore, intensive monitoring of COVID-19 is limited by insufficient medical resources and increased risks of exposure to medical staff. We therefore aim to build an early warning and rapid response system (EWRRS) to address these problems. METHOD: The research is designed as a prospective cohort study, to verify a dynamic and interactive evaluation system; it includes patient self-reporting, active monitoring, early alarming and treatment recommendations. Adult patients diagnosed with COVID-19 will be recruited from Sept 2020 to Aug 2021 at a tertiary contagious hospital. Patients with life expectancy <48 hours, pregnant or lactating, in immunosuppression states or end-stage diseases will be excluded. The intervention is implementation of EWRRS to detect early signs of clinical deterioration of COVID-19 patients, to provide timely and efficient treatment suggestions by the system. EWRRS can determine the classification and interactive evaluation of patient information; the determination is based on the application of 3 different scenario modules, separately driven by patients, nurses, and physicians. The primary outcome is change in disease severity category after treatment. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients with different disease severity types; critical deterioration events; patients who had unplanned transfers to an intensive care unit (ICU) and required critical care interventions; intervals from warning to implementation of clinical interventions; hospital mortality; length of ICU and hospital stay; workload of medical staff and risks of exposure to COVID-19. DISCUSSION: Our hypothesis is that EWRRS provides an example of an early identification, warning, and response system for COVID-19. In addition, EWRRS can potentially be extended to use as a grading metric for general critically ill patients in an ICU setting.


Subject(s)
Clinical Deterioration , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Research Design , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 529, 2020 08 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733031

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether respiratory physiology of COVID-19-induced respiratory failure is different from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) of other etiologies is unclear. We conducted a single-center study to describe respiratory mechanics and response to positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in COVID-19 ARDS and to compare COVID-19 patients to matched-control subjects with ARDS from other causes. METHODS: Thirty consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted to an intensive care unit in Rome, Italy, and fulfilling moderate-to-severe ARDS criteria were enrolled within 24 h from endotracheal intubation. Gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and ventilatory ratio were measured at PEEP of 15 and 5 cmH2O. A single-breath derecruitment maneuver was performed to assess recruitability. After 1:1 matching based on PaO2/FiO2, FiO2, PEEP, and tidal volume, COVID-19 patients were compared to subjects affected by ARDS of other etiologies who underwent the same procedures in a previous study. RESULTS: Thirty COVID-19 patients were successfully matched with 30 ARDS from other etiologies. At low PEEP, median [25th-75th percentiles] PaO2/FiO2 in the two groups was 119 mmHg [101-142] and 116 mmHg [87-154]. Average compliance (41 ml/cmH2O [32-52] vs. 36 ml/cmH2O [27-42], p = 0.045) and ventilatory ratio (2.1 [1.7-2.3] vs. 1.6 [1.4-2.1], p = 0.032) were slightly higher in COVID-19 patients. Inter-individual variability (ratio of standard deviation to mean) of compliance was 36% in COVID-19 patients and 31% in other ARDS. In COVID-19 patients, PaO2/FiO2 was linearly correlated with respiratory system compliance (r = 0.52 p = 0.003). High PEEP improved PaO2/FiO2 in both cohorts, but more remarkably in COVID-19 patients (p = 0.005). Recruitability was not different between cohorts (p = 0.39) and was highly inter-individually variable (72% in COVID-19 patients and 64% in ARDS from other causes). In COVID-19 patients, recruitability was independent from oxygenation and respiratory mechanics changes due to PEEP. CONCLUSIONS: Early after establishment of mechanical ventilation, COVID-19 patients follow ARDS physiology, with compliance reduction related to the degree of hypoxemia, and inter-individually variable respiratory mechanics and recruitability. Physiological differences between ARDS from COVID-19 and other causes appear small.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/physiopathology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult/therapy , Respiratory Function Tests , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology
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