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1.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 68(6): 73-82, 2021 Dec.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1609205

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & PROBLEMS: Parent-infant attachment is affected by parent-infant interaction. The limitations on related visitations during the COVID-19 pandemic suspended the opportunity to engage in kangaroo care (skin-to-skin contact) activities. These changes impacted parent-infant attachment in the neonatal intensive care unit. After investigation, the score of premature infant-parent attachment was found to be only 64.6 points during the period in which visitation limitations were in effect. PURPOSE: To enhance maternal-premature infant attachment during the pandemic period by 10% (from an average score of 64.6 to 71.1). RESOLUTION: This project involved nurses playing audio files provided by mothers to their premature infants, and recording a video and taking pictures of the infants during this process. This project used a cloud platform as bidirectional pipelines. Furthermore, emotional support and caring information were provided to the mothers via expressive arts therapy and phone interviews. RESULTS: After the intervention, the premature infant-parent attachment score rose to 74.4 from the pre-intervention score of 64.6. CONCLUSIONS: During pandemic control periods, traditional modes of care aimed at building infant-parent attachment are not applicable. The intervention project used was found to be an effective alternative approach to increasing maternal-premature infant attachment. Breaking the restrictions of time and place, this project applies family-centered care, and may provide a reference for developing software, hardware, and communication equipment for other care units related to newborns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Mothers , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260006, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581786

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the early COVID-19 pandemic travel in Uganda was tightly restricted which affected demand for and access to care for pregnant women and small and sick newborns. In this study we describe changes to neonatal outcomes in one rural central Ugandan newborn unit before and during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We report outcomes from admissions captured in an electronic dataset of a well-established newborn unit before (September 2019 to March 2020) and during the early COVID-19 period (April-September 2020) as well as two seasonally matched periods one year prior. We report excess mortality as the percent change in mortality over what was expected based on seasonal trends. FINDINGS: The study included 2,494 patients, 567 of whom were admitted during the early COVID-19 period. During the pandemic admissions decreased by 14%. Patients born outside the facility were older on admission than previously (median 1 day of age vs. admission on the day of birth). There was an increase in admissions with birth asphyxia (22% vs. 15% of patients). Mortality was higher during COVID-19 than previously [16% vs. 11%, p = 0.017]. Patients born outside the facility had a relative increase of 55% above seasonal expected mortality (21% vs. 14%, p = 0.028). During this period patients had decreased antenatal care, restricted transport and difficulty with expenses and support. The hospital had difficulty with maternity staffing and supplies. There was significant community and staff fear of COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: Increased newborn mortality during the early COVID-19 pandemic at this facility was likely attributed to disruptions affecting maternal and newborn demand for, access to and quality of perinatal healthcare. Lockdown conditions and restrictions to public transit were significant barriers to maternal and newborn wellbeing, and require further focus by national and regional health officials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Rural/statistics & numerical data , Infant Mortality , Adult , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Female , Hospitals, Rural/organization & administration , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Age , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Rural Health/statistics & numerical data , Uganda/epidemiology , Young Adult
3.
Online braz. j. nurs. (Online) ; 20: e20216509, 05 maio 2021.
Article in English, Spanish, Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1518851

ABSTRACT

OBJETIVO: Compreender as vivências e percepções paternas em relação à realização da posição canguru associada ou não a música. MÉTODO: Estudo qualitativo tendo como referencial teórico Cuidado Centrado na Família. A amostra foi constituída por pais com idade entre 19 a 39 anos, possuíam recém-nascidos prematuros hospitalizados e que tiveram a oportunidade de realizar posição canguru associada ou não a musicoterapia. A coleta ocorreu no período de abril a junho de 2020. Para a análise utilizou o referencial metodológico Análise de Conteúdo. RESULTADOS: As falas permitiram a identificação de cinco categorias: Sentimentos proporcionados pelo primeiro canguru; Contato pele a pele e o despertar da paternidade; Ressignificando o canguru por meio da música; Música e seus significados; Sentimento paterno referente à música e COVID-19. CONCLUSÃO: A musicoterapia associada a posição canguru configurou-se para o pai como um momento de fortalecimento do vínculo pai e filho, bem como redução de sentimento de tristeza e ansiedade.


OBJECTIVE: To understand the experiences and perceptions of fathers of premature babies regarding the realization of the kangaroo position with or without music. METHOD: Qualitative study with the Family-Centered Care theoretical framework. The sample consisted of parents aged between 19 and 39 years old, who had hospitalized premature newborns and who had the opportunity to perform a kangaroo position with or without music therapy. The collection took place from April to June 2020. The Content Analysis methodological framework was used. RESULTS: The speeches allowed the identification of five categories: Feelings provided by the first kangaroo position; Skin-to-skin contact and the awakening of fatherhood; Re-signifying the kangaroo care method through music; Music and its meanings; Paternal feelings regarding music and COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Music therapy associated with the kangaroo position for the father was considered a moment which strengthened the father-child bond, as well as reducing sadness and anxiety.


OBJETIVO: Comprender las vivencias y percepciones paternas sobre la realización de la posición canguro asociada o no a la música. MÉTODO: Estudio cualitativo que tiene como marco teórico el Cuidado Centrado en la Familia. La muestra estuvo constituida por padres de entre 19 y 39 años, que habían hospitalizado a recién nacidos prematuros y que tuvieron la oportunidad de realizar una posición canguro con o sin musicoterapia. La recolección sellevó a cabo de abril a junio de 2020. Para el análisis se utilizó el marco metodológico de Análisis de Contenido. RESULTADOS: Los discursos permitieron identificar cinco categorías: Sentimientos proporcionados por el primer canguro; El contacto piel con piel y el despertar de la paternidad; Re-significar el canguro através de la música; Música y sus significados; Sentimiento paterno con respecto a la música y COVID-19. CONCLUSIÓN: La musicoterapia asociada a la posición canguro se configuró para el padre como un momento de fortalecimiento del vínculo padre-hijo, además de reducir la sensación de tristeza y ansiedad.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant, Newborn , Parents , Infant, Premature , Father-Child Relations , Kangaroo-Mother Care Method , Music Therapy , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Child Care , Qualitative Research
4.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258358, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, strict infection control measures including visitation regulations were implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic at Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). These regulations gave restricted access for parents to their hospitalized infants. The consequence was limited ability to involve in the care of their infants. At Oslo University Hospital entry to NICU was denied to all except healthy mothers in March 2020. The absolute access ban for fathers lasted for 10 weeks. The aim of this study was to explore parental experiences with an infant hospitalized in the NICU during this absolute visitation ban period. METHODS: We invited post discharge all parents of surviving infants that had been hospitalized for at least 14 days to participate. They were interviewed during autumn 2020 using an explorative semi-structured interview approach. Data were analyzed via inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Nine mothers and four fathers participated. The COVID-19 regulations strongly impacted the parent's experiences of their stay. The fathers' limited access felt life-impacting. Parents struggled to become a family and raised their voices to be heard. Not being able to experience parenthood together led to emotional loneliness. The fathers struggled to learn how to care for their infant. The regulations might lead to a postponed attachment. On the other hand, of positive aspect the parents got some quietness. Being hospitalized during this first wave was experienced as exceptional and made parents seeking alliances by other parents. Social media was used to keep in contact with the outside world. CONCLUSIONS: The regulations had strong negative impact on parental experiences during the NICU hospitalization. The restriction to fathers' access to the NICU acted as a significant obstacle to early infant-father bonding and led to loneliness and isolation by the mothers. Thus, these COVID-19 measures might have had adverse consequences for families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Pandemics , Parenting/psychology , Parents/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(10): e27261, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care organizations (HCOs) adopt strategies (eg. physical distancing) to protect clinicians and patients in intensive care units (ICUs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many care activities physically performed before the COVID-19 pandemic have transitioned to virtual systems during the pandemic. These transitions can interfere with collaboration structures in the ICU, which may impact clinical outcomes. Understanding the differences can help HCOs identify challenges when transitioning physical collaboration to the virtual setting in the post-COVID-19 era. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to leverage network analysis to determine the changes in neonatal ICU (NICU) collaboration structures from the pre- to the intra-COVID-19 era. METHODS: In this retrospective study, we applied network analysis to the utilization of electronic health records (EHRs) of 712 critically ill neonates (pre-COVID-19, n=386; intra-COVID-19, n=326, excluding those with COVID-19) admitted to the NICU of Vanderbilt University Medical Center between September 1, 2019, and June 30, 2020, to assess collaboration between clinicians. We characterized pre-COVID-19 as the period of September-December 2019 and intra-COVID-19 as the period of March-June 2020. These 2 groups were compared using patients' clinical characteristics, including age, sex, race, length of stay (LOS), and discharge dispositions. We leveraged the clinicians' actions committed to the patients' EHRs to measure clinician-clinician connections. We characterized a collaboration relationship (tie) between 2 clinicians as actioning EHRs of the same patient within the same day. On defining collaboration relationship, we built pre- and intra-COVID-19 networks. We used 3 sociometric measurements, including eigenvector centrality, eccentricity, and betweenness, to quantify a clinician's leadership, collaboration difficulty, and broad skill sets in a network, respectively. We assessed the extent to which the eigenvector centrality, eccentricity, and betweenness of clinicians in the 2 networks are statistically different, using Mann-Whitney U tests (95% CI). RESULTS: Collaboration difficulty increased from the pre- to intra-COVID-19 periods (median eccentricity: 3 vs 4; P<.001). Nurses had reduced leadership (median eigenvector centrality: 0.183 vs 0.087; P<.001), and neonatologists with broader skill sets cared for more patients in the NICU structure during the pandemic (median betweenness centrality: 0.0001 vs 0.005; P<.001). The pre- and intra-COVID-19 patient groups shared similar distributions in sex (~0 difference), race (4% difference in White, and 3% difference in African American), LOS (interquartile range difference in 1.5 days), and discharge dispositions (~0 difference in home, 2% difference in expired, and 2% difference in others). There were no significant differences in the patient demographics and outcomes between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Management of NICU-admitted patients typically requires multidisciplinary care teams. Understanding collaboration structures can provide fine-grained evidence to potentially refine or optimize existing teamwork in the NICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Semin Perinatol ; 45(5): 151431, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454526

ABSTRACT

We discuss the use of tele-mental health in settings serving expectant parents in fetal care centers and parents with children receiving treatment in neonatal intensive care units within a pediatric institution. Our emphasis is on the dramatic rise of tele-mental health service delivery for this population in the wake of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., including relevant practice regulations, challenges and advantages associated with the transition to tele-mental health in these perinatal settings.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/trends , Mental Health/trends , Perinatal Care , Psychosocial Intervention , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Female , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Parents/education , Parents/psychology , Perinatal Care/methods , Perinatal Care/organization & administration , Pregnancy , Prenatal Education/trends , Psychosocial Intervention/methods , Psychosocial Intervention/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12999, 2021 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387481

ABSTRACT

An ever-increasing number of medical staff use mobile phones as a work aid, yet this may pose nosocomial diseases. To assess and report via a survey the handling practices and the use of phones by paediatric wards healthcare workers. 165 paediatric healthcare workers and staff filled in a questionnaire consisting of 14 questions (including categorical, ordinal and numerical data). Analysis of categorical data used non-parametric techniques such as the Chi-squared test. Although 98% of respondents (165 in total) report that their phones may be contaminated, 56% have never cleaned their devices. Of the respondents that clean their devices, 10% (17/165) had done so with alcohol swabs or disinfectant within that day or week; and an additional 12% respondents (20/165) within that month. Of concern, 52% (86/165) of the respondents use their phones in the bathroom, emphasising the unhygienic environments in which mobile phones/smartphones are constantly used. Disinfecting phones is a practice that only a minority of healthcare workers undertake appropriately. Mobile phones, present in billions globally, are therefore Trojan Horses if contaminated with microbes and potentially contributing to the spread and propagation of micro-organisms as per the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the world.


Subject(s)
Bathroom Equipment/virology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Phone/instrumentation , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disinfection/methods , Hospitals, Pediatric , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/virology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Male , Risk Factors , Self Report
9.
Acta Paediatr ; 110(12): 3308-3314, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373786

ABSTRACT

AIM: The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on parental presence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) during the first wave. The NICU team at the Rosie Hospital, Cambridge, endeavoured to explore the impact on parent and staff experiences of supporting parents throughout the period when visiting was restricted, between 13th August and 11th September 2020. METHODS: Bespoke surveys were designed following the first lockdown to gather information on the impact on staff and parents. The questions were developed in the context of initial observations and conversations with staff and parents. RESULTS: The findings of this study have illustrated the extent of the restrictions on parental wellbeing and mood, with the restrictions having had an adverse effect on these. In addition, the findings illustrate the adverse effect that the parents reported due to the restricted presence in terms of their babies' wellbeing, parent-infant bonding, partners' wellbeing, parental confidence, the ability to breastfeed confidently and parents' access to the medical teams. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study have a number of clinical implications for parents and staff. Namely, the data supported the decision not to close NICU again during the second and third waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Asian Nurs Res (Korean Soc Nurs Sci) ; 15(3): 189-196, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370439

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Virtual reality simulation can give nursing students a safe clinical experience involving high-risk infants where access to neonatal intensive care units is limited. This study aimed to examine the effects of a virtual reality simulation program on Korean nursing students' knowledge, performance self-efficacy and learner satisfaction. METHODS: A nonequivalent control group design was applied. Senior nursing students were divided into an experimental group (n = 25) experiencing virtual reality simulation and routine neonatal intensive care unit practice and a control group (n = 25) having routine neonatal intensive care unit practice. The program consisted of three scenarios: basic care, feeding management and skin care and environmental management for prevention of neonatal infection. The total execution time for the three scenarios was 40 minutes. The simulation created immersive virtual reality experiences using a head-mounted display with hand-tracking technology. Data were collected from December 9, 2019, to January 17, 2020, and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the t-test, paired t-tests, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. RESULTS: Compared to the control group, the experimental group showed significantly greater improvements in high-risk neonatal infection control performance self-efficacy (t = -2.16, p = .018) and learner satisfaction (t = -5.59, p < .001). CONCLUSION: The virtual reality simulation program can expand the nursing students' practice experience in safe virtual spaces and enhance their performance self-efficacy and learning satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infant, Newborn, Diseases/prevention & control , Intensive Care, Neonatal/methods , Neonatal Nursing/education , Virtual Reality , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Male , Students, Nursing/psychology , Young Adult
12.
J Perinatol ; 41(8): 2108-2109, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349640
14.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(11): 1201-1208, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294534

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Limited data are available regarding family and financial well-being among parents whose infants were hospitalized during the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The study objective was to evaluate the family and financial well-being of parents whose infants were hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) during COVID-19. STUDY DESIGN: Parents were recruited for this online, cross-sectional survey via support groups on social media. Data collection was completed between May 18, 2020 and July 31, 2020. The final sample consisted of 178 parents, who had an infant hospitalized in an NICU between February 1, 2020 and July 31, 2020. The primary outcomes were impact on family life and financial stability, as measured by the Impact on Family scale, an instrument that evaluates changes to family life as a result of infant or childhood illness. RESULTS: Of the 178 parent respondents, 173 (97%) were mothers, 107 (59.4%) were non-Hispanic White, and 127 (69.5%) of the infants were born prematurely. Parents reported significant family impact and greater financial difficulty. Extremely premature infants, lower household income, parent mental health, and lower parental confidence were predictive of greater impacts on family life. CONCLUSION: Parents reported significant family and financial impacts during their infant's hospitalization amid COVID-19. Further studies are needed to guide clinical practice and inform family-supportive resources that can mitigate consequences to family well-being. KEY POINTS: · Impact of infant hospitalization in the context of COVID-19 is largely unknown.. · In a cohort of NICU parents during COVID-19, they reported changes to family life and finances.. · Greater impacts were reported by parents with lower income, confidence, and very premature infants..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child, Hospitalized/psychology , Family Health , Hospitalization/economics , Mental Health , Parents/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Health/economics , Family Health/statistics & numerical data , Female , Financial Stress , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care, Neonatal/psychology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
15.
Invest Educ Enferm ; 39(2)2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the experiences of parents of hospitalized preterm children regarding the restrictions implemented in the neonatal intensive care unit -NICU- during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between April and October 2020 with 12 parents of preterm children, whose children were hospitalized and discharged from NICU during the pandemic. The analysis was performed with tools from grounded theory through open and axial coding. RESULTS: The study identified four categories regarding the experience: 1) needing information: refers to the need for clear and close information to compensate for the physical distance; 2) limiting the interaction with the children: expressed as a painful situation, which minimizes opportunities for learning to care at home for their preterm child; 3) the pandemic: adding to the fears: in which the virus appears as a new threat for the children, who are vulnerable given their premature condition; and 4) limiting social support after discharge: identifies that the parents had less family and professional support for care after discharge during times of pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Parents of preterm children lived a difficult experience that became complex within the context of the pandemic. The experiences of parents of preterm children during times of COVID-19 indicate that restrictions to enter neonatal units to prevent the virus transmission limited the interaction with the preterm child and with the health staff and increased the needs for information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Parents/psychology , Physical Distancing , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Male , Qualitative Research , Young Adult
16.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13535, 2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287821

ABSTRACT

As the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has spread globally, a significant portion of pregnant and delivering women were infected with COVID-19. While emerging studies examined birth outcomes in COVID-19 positive women, knowledge of the psychological experience of childbirth and maternal wellness remains lacking. This matched-control survey-based study included a sample of women recruited during the first wave of the pandemic in the US who gave birth in the previous six months. Women reporting confirmed/suspected COVID-19 (n = 68) during pregnancy or childbirth were matched on background factors with women reporting COVID-19 negativity (n = 2,276). We found nearly 50% of COVID positive women endorsed acute traumatic stress symptoms at a clinical level in response to childbirth. This group was more than twice as likely to endorse acute stress and to have no visitors during maternity hospitalization than COVID negative women; they were also less likely to room-in with newborns. The COVID positive group reported higher levels of pain in delivery, lower newborn weights, and more infant admission to neonatal intensive care units. Our findings suggest COVID-19 affected populations are at increased risk for traumatic childbirth and associated risk for psychiatric morbidity. Attention to delivering women's wellbeing is warranted during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Parturition/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Birth Weight , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Pain/pathology , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Adv Neonatal Care ; 21(3): 232-241, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284901

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Decades of research supports the benefits of kangaroo care (KC) for the parent and newborn. Supportive KC devices may be an important tool clinicians can use to assist parents with KC. In recent years, there has been a rise in the availability of KC devices. However, the use, needs, and preferences for these supportive devices by neonatal clinicians have not been documented. PURPOSE: To survey clinicians' use, needs, and preferences of KC supportive devices, and examine whether differences exist based on clinician and organizational characteristics. METHODS: A cross-sectional, online survey was sent through neonatal organization Web sites, conferences, and social media. RESULTS: Many clinicians (n = 68, 43%; N = 158) facilitated KC with a supportive device, with 81% of devices provided by the clinician's employer. The most important "Must Have" feature of a KC device was "Safety: Reduces patient falls if caregiver sleeps or needs to use hands" (84% of respondents) followed by washability (82%), and "immediate, effective access to the baby" (78%). Clinicians' responses did not differ based on hospital setting, type of unit, KC experience, or experience using a KC device. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: To support safe use of KC devices in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) clinical care, a device must hold the proper KC position consistently, allow immediate access to the infant, and hold the infant in place without the parent's hands to prevent falls. Training is needed to ensure safe device use. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: Future research should evaluate the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of these devices.


Subject(s)
Kangaroo-Mother Care Method , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Parents , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Neonatal Netw ; 40(3): 183-186, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259285

ABSTRACT

COVID-19's first wave created chaos for new NICU families as they struggled to cope with the challenge of a fragile infant along with a pandemic. Safety was paramount due to a lack of understanding around how the virus transmits, but much has been learned since then. The next wave of the virus needs to have a rethink around family separation. World leader organization European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI) provides insight into the challenges with the first wave and suggests ideas around rethinking how families interact with their baby in the subsequent waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal/standards , Intensive Care, Neonatal/psychology , Intensive Care, Neonatal/standards , Mother-Child Relations/psychology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Family Separation , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Male , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Neoreviews ; 22(6): e392-e397, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256103

ABSTRACT

Breast milk provides optimal nourishment for all infants and has special advantages in preterm infants. Breast milk is associated with lower rates of necrotizing enterocolitis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia and improved neurodevelopmental outcomes in the preterm population. Mothers in the NICU may experience multiple psychological, physical, and social/cultural barriers that impede successful breastfeeding. Professional lactation support is of crucial importance in this population. With the social distancing requirements of the pandemic, many clinicians have adopted novel methods of education and communication to ensure continued timely support for NICU mothers.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Lactation , Referral and Consultation , Telemedicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn
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