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5.
Interface (Botucatu, Online) ; 25(supl.1): e210153, 2021. ilus
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1572181

ABSTRACT

O Programa de Educação pelo Trabalho para Saúde (PET-Saúde) é uma política indutora que fomenta o aprendizado por vivências problematizadoras nos locais de trabalho em saúde com foco na interprofissionalidade. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi relatar a experiência do PET-Saúde Interprofissionalidade durante a pandemia de Covid-19, na perspectiva docente. Desenvolver o PET-Saúde com estudantes, preceptores, equipes dos serviços e usuários demandou (re)descobrir possibilidades das tecnologias de informação e comunicação e o aprendizado da produção de "novas presenças" sem desistir da ação coletiva, participativa e composta pelos diferentes saberes. Apreendeu-se o desenvolvimento de competências como escuta qualificada para resolução de conflitos, comunicação interprofissional e liderança colaborativa. Este PET-Saúde mostrou-se um disparador na formação em saúde, conectando universidade, rede de saúde e comunidade; e contribuindo para o desenvolvimento de competências colaborativas e um espaço de acolhimento para as situações vivenciadas.(AU)


El Programa de Educación por el Trabajo para Salud (PET-Saúde) es una política inductora que fomenta el aprendizaje por vivencias problematizadoras en los locales de trabajo en salud con enfoque en la Interprofesionalidad. El objetivo fue relatar la experiencia del PET-Saúde Interprofesionalidad durante la pandemia de Covid-19, desde la perspectiva docente. Desarrollar el PET-Saúde con estudiantes, preceptores, equipos de los servicios y usuarios demandó (re)descubrir posibilidades de las tecnologías de información y comunicación, aprendiendo a producir "nuevas presencias", sin desistir de la acción colectiva, participativa, compuesta por los diferentes saberes. Se aprendió a desarrollar competencias tales como escuchar de forma calificada para la resolución de conflictos, la comunicación interprofesional y el liderazgo colaborativo. Este PET-Saúde se mostró un gatillo en la formación en salud, conectando universidad, red de salud y comunidad, contribuyendo al desarrollo de competencias colaborativas y un espacio de acogida para las situaciones vividas.(AU)


The Program 'Education through Work for Health' (PET-Health) is a nudging policy that provides learning through problematizing experiences in health workplaces, with a focus on interprofessionality. The aim was to report the experience of PET-Health Interprofessionality during the Covid-19 pandemic, from the teachers' perspective. The development of PET-Health with students, tutors, teams from the health system and users demanded, (re) discovering possibilities of information and communication technologies, learning to produce "new presences", without giving up the collective, participatory action, composed by different knowledge. There was learning of development of skills such as qualified listening for conflict resolution, interprofessional communication and collaborative leadership. This PET-Health proved to be a triggering event towards health education, connecting university, health network and community, and contributed to the development of collaborative skills and constituted a welcoming space for the situations experienced.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Problem-Based Learning , Interdisciplinary Placement , COVID-19 , Interdisciplinary Communication , User Embracement , Faculty
6.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0259965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546945

ABSTRACT

As scientific research becomes increasingly cross-disciplinary, many universities seek to support collaborative activity through new buildings and institutions. This study examines the impacts of spatial proximity on collaboration at MIT from 2005 to 2015. By exploiting a shift in the location of researchers due to building renovations, we evaluate how discrete changes in physical proximity affect the likelihood that researchers co-author. The findings suggest that moving researchers into the same building increases their propensity to collaborate, with the effect plateauing five years after the move. The effects are large when compared to the average rate of collaboration among pairs of researchers, which suggests that spatial proximity is an important tool to support cross-disciplinary collaborative science. Furthermore, buildings that host researchers working in the same or related fields and from multiple departments have a larger effect on their propensity to collaborate.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , Interdisciplinary Communication , Spatial Behavior , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Facility Design and Construction , Humans , Movement , Research Personnel/psychology , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data
7.
Am J Public Health ; 111(11): 1939-1941, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526717

ABSTRACT

Indigenous populations have been disproportionally affected by COVID-19, particularly those in rural and remote locations. Their unique environments and risk factors demand an equally unique public health response. Our rural Native American community experienced one of the highest prevalence outbreaks in the world, and we developed an aggressive management strategy that appears to have had a considerable effect on mortality reduction. The results have implications far beyond pandemic response, and have reframed how our community addresses several complicated health challenges. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(11):1939-1941. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306472).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Indigenous Peoples , Rural Population , Aged , Arizona/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Female , House Calls , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Male , Middle Aged , Public Health , United States , United States Indian Health Service
10.
Infect Dis Clin North Am ; 35(4): 1077-1089, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509830

ABSTRACT

Pandemic preparedness is a key function of any health care facility. Activities pertaining to pandemic preparedness should be developed and maintained within a broader emergency management plan. The use of a Hospital Incident Command System can centralize coordination of the response and facilitate internal and external communication. This review addresses several components of pandemic preparedness, including incident management, health care personnel safety, strategies to support ongoing clinical activities, and organizational communication during a pandemic. Preparations addressing potential ethical challenges and the psychological impact associated with pandemic response are also reviewed.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Disaster Planning , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Interdisciplinary Communication , Pandemics/prevention & control , Civil Defense , Humans , Occupational Health , Safety
11.
Elife ; 92020 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497819

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 presents an unprecedented international challenge, but it will not be the last such threat. Here, we argue that the world needs to be much better prepared to rapidly detect, define and defeat future pandemics. We propose that a Global Immunological Observatory and associated developments in systems immunology, therapeutics and vaccine design should be at the heart of this enterprise.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Global Health , International Cooperation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Population Surveillance , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents , COVID-19 , Climate Change , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/immunology , Drug Development , Forecasting , Global Health/trends , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Models, Animal , Population Surveillance/methods , Serologic Tests , Vaccines , Weather , Zoonoses
13.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 639-651, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437429

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) brought the world to its knees. As each nation grappled with launching an effective response while simultaneously minimizing repercussions on health care systems, economies, and societies, the medical and scientific landscape shifted forever. In particular, COVID-19 has challenged and transformed the field of dermatology and the way we practice. In this article, dermatologists from 11 countries share insights gained from local experience. These global perspectives will help provide a better framework for delivering quality dermatologic care and understanding how the field has evolved during this medical crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Dermatology/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Skin Diseases/therapy , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication
17.
Arch Dis Child ; 107(3): e6, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367406

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the experiences of clinical leads in paediatric critical care units (PCCUs) in England and Wales during the reorganisation of services in the initial surge of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and to learn lessons for future surges and service planning. METHODS: A qualitative study design using semistructured interviews via virtual conferencing was conducted with consultant clinical leads and lead nurses covering 21 PCCUs. Interviews were conducted over a period of 2 weeks, 2 months after the initial SARS-CoV-2 surge. Interview notes underwent thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thematic analysis revealed six themes: leadership, management and planning; communication; workforce development and training; innovation; workforce experience; and infection prevention and control. Leadership was facilitated through clinician-led local autonomy for decision-making and services were better delivered when the workforce was empowered to be flexible in their response. Communication was preferred through collaborative management structures. Further lessons include recognising workforce competencies in surge preparations, the use of virtual technology in facilitating training and meetings, the importance of supporting the well-being of the workforce and the secondary consequences of personal protective equipment use. CONCLUSIONS: During the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, an agile response to a rapidly changing situation was enabled through effective clinical leadership and an adaptive workforce. Open systems of communication across senior clinical and management teams facilitated service planning. Support for all members of the workforce through implementation of appropriate and innovative education and well-being solutions was vital in sustaining resilience. This learning supports planning for future surge capacity across paediatric critical care locally and nationally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Hospital Planning , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Cross Infection/prevention & control , England/epidemiology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Interdisciplinary Communication , Leadership , Organizational Innovation , Patient Care Team , Personal Protective Equipment , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Staff Development , Wales/epidemiology
18.
Isr J Health Policy Res ; 10(1): 48, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365387

ABSTRACT

Among the challenges presented by the SARS-CoV2 pandemic are those related to balancing societal priorities with averting threats to population health. In this exceptional context a group of Israeli physicians and public health scholars (multidisciplinary academic group on children and coronavirus [MACC]) coalesced, examining the role of children in viral transmission and assessing the necessity and consequences of restricted in-class education. Combining critical appraisal and analytical skills with public health experience, MACC advocated for safe and monitored school re-opening, stressing the importance of education as a determinant of health, continuously weighing this stance against evolving COVID-19-risk data. MACC's activities included offering research-based advice to government agencies including Ministries of Health, Finance, and Education. In a setting where government bodies were faced with providing practical solutions to both decreasing disease transmission and maintaining society's vital activities, and various advisors presented decision-makers with disparate views, MACC contributed epidemiological, clinical and health policy expertise to the debate regarding school closure as a pandemic control measure, and adaptations required for safe re-opening. In this paper, we describe the evolution, activities, policy inputs and media profile of MACC, and discuss the role of academics in advocacy and activism in the midst of an unprecedented public health crisis. A general lesson learned is that academics, based on the rigor of their scientific work and their perceived objectivity, can and should be mobilized to pursue and promote policies based on shared societal values as well as empiric data, even when considerable uncertainty exists about the appropriate course of action. Mechanisms should be in place to open channels to multidisciplinary academic groups and bring their input to bear on decision-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Interdisciplinary Communication , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Physicians/psychology , Public Health
19.
Am J Public Health ; 111(7): 1227-1230, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348403

ABSTRACT

Cook County Health partnered with the Chicago Departments of Public Health and Family & Support Services and several dozen community-based organizations to rapidly establish a temporary medical respite shelter during the spring 2020 COVID-19 peak for individuals experiencing homelessness in Chicago and Cook County, Illinois. This program provided low-barrier isolation housing to medically complex adults until their safe return to congregate settings. We describe strategies used by the health care agency, which is not a Health Resource and Services Administration Health Care for the Homeless grantee, to provide medical services and care coordination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Community Networks/organization & administration , Homeless Persons/statistics & numerical data , Interinstitutional Relations , Social Work/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chicago , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Humans , Illinois , Interdisciplinary Communication , Public Housing/statistics & numerical data , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data
20.
Endeavour ; 45(3): 100779, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343207

ABSTRACT

Animals, especially mammals, have played a critical role in the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 virus originated in animals, and the virus can jump back and forth between humans and animals. Moreover, animals have been central to the development of the various vaccines against the virus now employed around the world, continuing a long history. The interrelationships between animals and humans in both disease transmission and its prevention call for an interdisciplinary approach to medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Interdisciplinary Communication , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Interdisciplinary Research
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