Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 51
Filter
1.
Cells ; 11(10)2022 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862727

ABSTRACT

Recent evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 hinders immune responses via dopamine (DA)-related mechanisms. Nonetheless, studies addressing the specific role of DA in the frame of SARS-CoV-2 infection are still missing. In the present study, we investigate the role of DA in SARS-CoV-2 replication along with potential links with innate immune pathways in CaLu-3 human epithelial lung cells. We document here for the first time that, besides DA synthetic pathways, SARS-CoV-2 alters the expression of D1 and D2 DA receptors (D1DR, D2DR), while DA administration reduces viral replication. Such an effect occurs at non-toxic, micromolar-range DA doses, which are known to induce receptor desensitization and downregulation. Indeed, the antiviral effects of DA were associated with a robust downregulation of D2DRs both at mRNA and protein levels, while the amount of D1DRs was not significantly affected. While halting SARS-CoV-2 replication, DA, similar to the D2DR agonist quinpirole, upregulates the expression of ISGs and Type-I IFNs, which goes along with the downregulation of various pro-inflammatory mediators. In turn, administration of Type-I IFNs, while dramatically reducing SARS-CoV-2 replication, converges in downregulating D2DRs expression. Besides configuring the CaLu-3 cell line as a suitable model to study SARS-CoV-2-induced alterations at the level of the DA system in the periphery, our findings disclose a previously unappreciated correlation between DA pathways and Type-I IFN response, which may be disrupted by SARS-CoV-2 for host cell invasion and replication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon Type I , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dopamine , Down-Regulation , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Receptors, Dopamine D2 , SARS-CoV-2 , Up-Regulation
2.
IUBMB Life ; 74(2): 180-189, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1850069

ABSTRACT

The induction of type I interferons (IFN) is critical for antiviral innate immune response. The rapid activation of antiviral innate immune responses is the key to successful clearance of evading pathogens. To achieve this, a series of proteins, including the pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), the adaptor proteins, the accessory proteins, kinases, and the transcription factors, are all involved and finely orchestrated. The magnitude and latitude of type I IFN induction however are distinctly regulated in different tissues. A set of interferon simulated genes (ISGs) are then expressed in response to type I IFN signaling to set the cells in the antiviral state. In this review, how type I IFN is induced by viral infections by intracellular PRRs and how type I IFN triggers the expression of downstream effectors will be discussed.


Subject(s)
Interferon Type I , Nucleic Acids , Viruses , Cytosol , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Type I/genetics
3.
J Exp Med ; 219(6)2022 06 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806201

ABSTRACT

Type I interferons (IFN-I) play a critical role in human antiviral immunity, as demonstrated by the exceptionally rare deleterious variants of IFNAR1 or IFNAR2. We investigated five children from Greenland, Canada, and Alaska presenting with viral diseases, including life-threatening COVID-19 or influenza, in addition to meningoencephalitis and/or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis following live-attenuated viral vaccination. The affected individuals bore the same homozygous IFNAR2 c.157T>C, p.Ser53Pro missense variant. Although absent from reference databases, p.Ser53Pro occurred with a minor allele frequency of 0.034 in their Inuit ancestry. The serine to proline substitution prevented cell surface expression of IFNAR2 protein, small amounts of which persisted intracellularly in an aberrantly glycosylated state. Cells exclusively expressing the p.Ser53Pro variant lacked responses to recombinant IFN-I and displayed heightened vulnerability to multiple viruses in vitro-a phenotype rescued by wild-type IFNAR2 complementation. This novel form of autosomal recessive IFNAR2 deficiency reinforces the essential role of IFN-I in viral immunity. Further studies are warranted to assess the need for population screening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon Type I , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Child , Humans , Inheritance Patterns , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta
4.
Sci Signal ; 15(729): eabg8744, 2022 04 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784765

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused the unprecedented coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Critical cases of COVID-19 are characterized by the production of excessive amounts of cytokines and extensive lung damage, which is partially caused by the fusion of SARS-CoV-2-infected pneumocytes. Here, we found that cell fusion caused by the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein induced a type I interferon (IFN) response. This function of the S protein required its cleavage by proteases at the S1/S2 and the S2' sites. We further showed that cell fusion damaged nuclei and resulted in the formation of micronuclei that were sensed by the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS and led to the activation of its downstream effector STING. Phosphorylation of the transcriptional regulator IRF3 and the expression of IFNB, which encodes a type I IFN, were abrogated in cGAS-deficient fused cells. Moreover, infection with VSV-SARS-CoV-2 also induced cell fusion, DNA damage, and cGAS-STING-dependent expression of IFNB. Together, these results uncover a pathway underlying the IFN response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our data suggest a mechanism by which fused pneumocytes in the lungs of patients with COVID-19 may enhance the production of IFNs and other cytokines, thus exacerbating disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon Type I , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Fusion , Cytokines , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics , Nucleotidyltransferases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
5.
Nat Immunol ; 23(4): 632-642, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751737

ABSTRACT

Although inhibition of T cell coinhibitory receptors has revolutionized cancer therapy, the mechanisms governing their expression on human T cells have not been elucidated. In the present study, we show that type 1 interferon (IFN-I) regulates coinhibitory receptor expression on human T cells, inducing PD-1/TIM-3/LAG-3 while inhibiting TIGIT expression. High-temporal-resolution mRNA profiling of IFN-I responses established the dynamic regulatory networks uncovering three temporal transcriptional waves. Perturbation of key transcription factors (TFs) and TF footprint analysis revealed two regulator modules with different temporal kinetics that control expression of coinhibitory receptors and IFN-I response genes, with SP140 highlighted as one of the key regulators that differentiates LAG-3 and TIGIT expression. Finally, we found that the dynamic IFN-I response in vitro closely mirrored T cell features in acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. The identification of unique TFs controlling coinhibitory receptor expression under IFN-I response may provide targets for enhancement of immunotherapy in cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interferon Type I , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes
6.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(3)2022 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674673

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic caused a massive health and societal crisis, although the fast development of effective vaccines reduced some of the impact. To prepare for future respiratory virus pandemics, a pan-viral prophylaxis could be used to control the initial virus outbreak in the period prior to vaccine approval. The liposomal vaccine adjuvant CAF®09b contains the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, which induces a type I interferon (IFN-I) response and an antiviral state in the affected tissues. When testing CAF09b liposomes as a potential pan-viral prophylaxis, we observed that intranasal administration of CAF09b liposomes to mice resulted in an influx of innate immune cells into the nose and lungs and upregulation of IFN-I-related gene expression. When CAF09b liposomes were administered prior to challenge with mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 virus, it protected from severe disease, although the virus was still detectable in the lungs. However, when CAF09b liposomes were administered after influenza challenge, the mice had a similar disease course to controls. In conclusion, CAF09b may be a suitable candidate as a pan-viral prophylactic treatment for epidemic viruses, but must be administered prior to virus exposure to be effective.


Subject(s)
/therapeutic use , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/prevention & control , /methods , Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , Adjuvants, Immunologic/therapeutic use , /chemistry , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemical synthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Cells, Cultured , Chick Embryo , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza Vaccines/chemistry , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Liposomes/chemistry , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Primary Prevention/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
7.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 679, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671560

ABSTRACT

Emergence of mutant SARS-CoV-2 strains associated with an increased risk of COVID-19-related death necessitates better understanding of the early viral dynamics, host responses and immunopathology. Single cell RNAseq (scRNAseq) allows for the study of individual cells, uncovering heterogeneous and variable responses to environment, infection and inflammation. While studies have reported immune profiling using scRNAseq in terminal human COVID-19 patients, performing longitudinal immune cell dynamics in humans is challenging. Macaques are a suitable model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our longitudinal scRNAseq of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell suspensions from young rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2 (n = 6) demonstrates dynamic changes in transcriptional landscape 3 days post- SARS-CoV-2-infection (3dpi; peak viremia), relative to 14-17dpi (recovery phase) and pre-infection (baseline) showing accumulation of distinct populations of both macrophages and T-lymphocytes expressing strong interferon-driven inflammatory gene signature at 3dpi. Type I interferon response is induced in the plasmacytoid dendritic cells with appearance of a distinct HLADR+CD68+CD163+SIGLEC1+ macrophage population exhibiting higher angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression. These macrophages are significantly enriched in the lungs of macaques at 3dpi and harbor SARS-CoV-2 while expressing a strong interferon-driven innate anti-viral gene signature. The accumulation of these responses correlated with decline in viremia and recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferons/pharmacology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/pharmacology , Interferons/genetics , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Macrophages/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
8.
Nature ; 603(7902): 587-598, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655590

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection is benign in most individuals but, in around 10% of cases, it triggers hypoxaemic COVID-19 pneumonia, which leads to critical illness in around 3% of cases. The ensuing risk of death (approximately 1% across age and gender) doubles every five years from childhood onwards and is around 1.5 times greater in men than in women. Here we review the molecular and cellular determinants of critical COVID-19 pneumonia. Inborn errors of type I interferons (IFNs), including autosomal TLR3 and X-chromosome-linked TLR7 deficiencies, are found in around 1-5% of patients with critical pneumonia under 60 years old, and a lower proportion in older patients. Pre-existing auto-antibodies neutralizing IFNα, IFNß and/or IFNω, which are more common in men than in women, are found in approximately 15-20% of patients with critical pneumonia over 70 years old, and a lower proportion in younger patients. Thus, at least 15% of cases of critical COVID-19 pneumonia can be explained. The TLR3- and TLR7-dependent production of type I IFNs by respiratory epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, respectively, is essential for host defence against SARS-CoV-2. In ways that can depend on age and sex, insufficient type I IFN immunity in the respiratory tract during the first few days of infection may account for the spread of the virus, leading to pulmonary and systemic inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Age Distribution , Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Critical Illness , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Sex Distribution , Toll-Like Receptor 3/deficiency , Toll-Like Receptor 7/deficiency , Toll-Like Receptor 7/genetics
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 767726, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639598

ABSTRACT

Infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has generated a public health crisis worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection and virus-host interactions are still unclear. In this study, we identified four unique microRNA-like small RNAs encoded by SARS-CoV-2. SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-1-3p and SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p play an important role in evasion of type I interferon response through targeting several genes in type I interferon signaling pathway. Particularly worth mentioning is that highly expressed SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p inhibits some key genes in the host innate immune response, such as IRF7, IRF9, STAT2, OAS1, and OAS2. SCV2-miR-ORF1ab-2-5p has also been found to mediate allelic differential expression of COVID-19-susceptible gene OAS1. In conclusion, these results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 uses its miRNAs to evade the type I interferon response and links the functional viral sequence to the susceptible genetic background of the host.


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Line , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , STAT2 Transcription Factor/genetics
10.
J Immunol ; 208(3): 753-761, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614089

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has seriously threatened global public health. Severe COVID-19 has been reported to be associated with an impaired IFN response. However, the mechanisms of how SARS-CoV-2 antagonizes the host IFN response are poorly understood. In this study, we report that SARS-CoV-2 helicase NSP13 inhibits type I IFN production by directly targeting TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) for degradation. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy by genetic knockout of Beclin1 or pharmacological inhibition can rescue NSP13-mediated TBK1 degradation in HEK-293T cells. Subsequent studies revealed that NSP13 recruits TBK1 to p62, and the absence of p62 can also inhibit TBK1 degradation in HEK-293T and HeLa cells. Finally, TBK1 and p62 degradation and p62 aggregation were observed during SARS-CoV-2 infection in HeLa-ACE2 and Calu3 cells. Overall, our study shows that NSP13 inhibits type I IFN production by recruiting TBK1 to p62 for autophagic degradation, enabling it to evade the host innate immune response, which provides new insights into the transmission and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Autophagy , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/biosynthesis , Methyltransferases/physiology , RNA Helicases/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequestosome-1 Protein/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/physiology , Beclin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Cell Line , Down-Regulation , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Immunoprecipitation , Interferon Type I/genetics , Multiprotein Complexes , Protein Aggregates , Protein Interaction Mapping
11.
Virol J ; 18(1): 244, 2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a huge challenge worldwide. Although previous studies have suggested that type I interferon (IFN-I) could inhibit the virus replication, the expression characteristics of IFN-I signaling-related miRNAs (ISR-miRNAs) during acute severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and its relationship with receptor-binding domain (RBD) IgG antibody response at the recovery phase remain unclear. METHODS: Expression profiles of 12 plasma ISR-miRNAs in COVID-19 patients and healthy controls were analyzed using RT-qPCR. The level of RBD-IgG antibody was determined using the competitive ELISA. Spearman correlation was done to measure the associations of plasma ISR-miRNAs with clinical characteristics during acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and RBD-IgG antibody response at the recovery phase. RESULTS: Compared with the healthy controls, COVID-19 patients exhibited higher levels of miR-29b-3p (Z = 3.15, P = 0.002) and miR-1246 (Z = 4.98, P < 0.001). However, the expression of miR-186-5p and miR-15a-5p were significantly decreased. As the results shown, miR-30b-5p was negatively correlated with CD4 + T cell counts (r = - 0.41, P = 0.027) and marginally positively correlated with fasting plasma glucose in COVID-19 patients (r = 0.37, P = 0.052). The competitive ELISA analysis showed the plasma level of miR-497-5p at the acute phase was positively correlated with RBD-IgG antibody response (r = 0.48, P = 0.038). CONCLUSIONS: Our present results suggested that the expression level of ISR-miRNAs was not only associated with acute SARS-CoV-2 infection but also with RBD-IgG antibody response at the recovery phase of COVID-19. Future studies should be performed to explore the biological significance of ISR-miRNAs in SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , MicroRNAs , Virus Replication/genetics , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Case-Control Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Interferon Type I/blood , Male , MicroRNAs/blood , MicroRNAs/genetics , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 22958, 2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537338

ABSTRACT

Understanding key host protective mechanisms against SARS-CoV-2 infection can help improve treatment modalities for COVID-19. We used a blood transcriptome approach to study biomarkers associated with differing severity of COVID-19, comparing severe and mild Symptomatic disease with Asymptomatic COVID-19 and uninfected Controls. There was suppression of antigen presentation but upregulation of inflammatory and viral mRNA translation associated pathways in Symptomatic as compared with Asymptomatic cases. In severe COVID-19, CD177 a neutrophil marker, was upregulated while interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) were downregulated. Asymptomatic COVID-19 cases displayed upregulation of ISGs and humoral response genes with downregulation of ICAM3 and TLR8. Compared across the COVID-19 disease spectrum, we found type I interferon (IFN) responses to be significantly upregulated (IFNAR2, IRF2BP1, IRF4, MAVS, SAMHD1, TRIM1), or downregulated (SOCS3, IRF2BP2, IRF2BPL) in Asymptomatic as compared with mild and severe COVID-19, with the dysregulation of an increasing number of ISGs associated with progressive disease. These data suggest that initial early responses against SARS-CoV-2 may be effectively controlled by ISGs. Therefore, we hypothesize that treatment with type I interferons in the early stage of COVID-19 may limit disease progression by limiting SARS-CoV-2 in the host.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Carrier State/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/genetics , Computational Biology/methods , Female , Gene Expression/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation
13.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e934766, 2021 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1431155

ABSTRACT

During the past two years, clinical studies have attempted to identify risk factors to predict clinical outcomes following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In July 2021, a study using a high-throughput technique detected autoantibodies to chemokines, cytokines, and complement components in patients with symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In August 2021, a study identified pre-existing autoantibodies to type 1 interferons (IFNs) in 10% of patients with severe COVID-19 but not asymptomatic individuals. Autoantibodies may be the long-awaited markers of clinical risk for severe COVID-19 in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. This Editorial aims to present some recent findings of autoantibodies to components of the immune system, including type 1 IFNs, and the risk of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
15.
Scand J Immunol ; 94(5): e13100, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388399

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 epidemic infections in Australia during 2020 were small in number in epidemiological terms and are well described. The SARS-CoV-2 genomic sequence data of many infected patients have been largely curated in a number of publicly available databases, including the corresponding epidemiological data made available by the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services. We have critically analysed the available SARS-CoV-2 haplotypes and genomic sequences in the context of putative deficits in innate immune APOBEC and ADAR deaminase anti-viral responses. It is now known that immune impaired elderly co-morbid patients display clear deficits in interferon type 1 (α/ß) and III (λ) stimulated innate immune gene cascades, of which APOBEC and ADAR induced expression are part. These deficiencies may help explain some of the clear genetic patterns in SARS-CoV-2 genomes isolated in Victoria, Australia, during the 2nd Wave (June-September, 2020). We tested the hypothesis that predicted lowered innate immune APOBEC and ADAR anti-viral deaminase responses in a significant proportion of elderly patients would be consistent with/reflected in a low level of observed mutagenesis in many isolated SARS-CoV-2 genomes. Our findings are consistent with this expectation. The analysis also supports the conclusions of the Victorian government's Department of Health that essentially one variant or haplotype infected Victorian aged care facilities where the great majority (79%) of all 820 SARS-CoV-2 associated deaths occurred. The implications of our data analysis for other localized epidemics and efficient coronavirus vaccine design and delivery are discussed.


Subject(s)
APOBEC Deaminases/genetics , Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , APOBEC Deaminases/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/metabolism , Age Factors , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gene Regulatory Networks , Haplotypes , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes , Interferon Type I/genetics , Male , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Victoria/epidemiology
17.
J Infect Dis ; 224(5): 777-782, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381012

ABSTRACT

We analyzed plasma levels of interferons (IFNs) and cytokines, and expression of IFN-stimulated genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 of varying disease severity. Patients hospitalized with mild disease exhibited transient type I IFN responses, while intensive care unit patients had prolonged type I IFN responses. Type II IFN responses were compromised in intensive care unit patients. Type III IFN responses were induced in the early phase of infection, even in convalescent patients. These results highlight the importance of early type I and III IFN responses in controlling coronavirus disease 2019 progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interferons/immunology , COVID-19/blood , Chemokines/blood , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Interferon Type I/blood , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferons/blood , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
18.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365266

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
19.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(29)2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361688

ABSTRACT

Previous research has linked perceived social isolation (loneliness) to reduced antiviral immunity, but the immunologic effects of the objective social isolation imposed by pandemic "shelter in place" (SIP) policies is unknown. We assessed the immunologic impact of SIP by relocating 21 adult male rhesus macaques from 2,000-m2 field cage communities of 70 to 132 other macaques to 2 wk of individual housing in indoor shelters. SIP was associated with 30% to 50% reductions in all circulating immune cell populations (lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes), down-regulation of Type I interferon (IFN) antiviral gene expression, and a relative up-regulation of CD16- classical monocytes. These effects emerged within the first 48 h of SIP, persisted for at least 2 wk, and abated within 4 wk of return to social housing. A subsequent round of SIP in the presence of a novel juvenile macaque showed comparable reductions in circulating immune cell populations but reversal of Type I IFN reductions and classical monocyte increases observed during individual SIP. Analyses of lymph node tissues showed parallel up-regulation of Type I IFN genes and enhanced control of viral gene expression during juvenile-partnered SIP compared to isolated SIP. These results identify a significant adverse effect of SIP social isolation on antiviral immune regulation in both circulating immune cells and lymphoid tissues, and they suggest a potential behavioral strategy for ameliorating gene regulatory impacts (but not immune cell declines) by promoting prosocial engagement during SIP.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Caregivers , Interferon Type I/genetics , Social Isolation , Animals , Immune System/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Lymphoid Tissue/metabolism , Macaca mulatta , Male
20.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(1): e0077421, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352543

ABSTRACT

The primary target organ of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is the respiratory tract. Currently, there is limited information on the ability of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to infect and regulate innate immunity in human immune cells and lung epithelial cells. Here, we compared the ability of four Finnish isolates of SARS-CoV-2 from COVID-19 patients to replicate and induce interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines in different human cells. All isolates failed to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages, monocytes, and lymphocytes, and no induction of cytokine gene expression was seen. However, most of the isolates replicated in Calu-3 cells, and they readily induced type I and type III IFN gene expression. The hCoV-19/Finland/FIN-25/2020 isolate, originating from a traveler from Milan in March 2020, showed better ability to replicate and induce IFN and inflammatory responses in Calu-3 cells than other isolates of SARS-CoV-2. Our data increase the knowledge on the pathogenesis and antiviral mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human cell systems. IMPORTANCE With the rapid spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, information on the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and regulation of innate immunity in human immune cells and lung epithelial cells is needed. In the present study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 failed to productively infect human immune cells, but different isolates of SARS-CoV-2 showed differential ability to replicate and regulate innate interferon responses in human lung epithelial Calu-3 cells. These findings will open up the way for further studies on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Virus Replication/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cytokines/genetics , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferons/genetics , Kinetics , Lung/virology , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Trypsin
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL