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1.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 679, 2022 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671560

ABSTRACT

Emergence of mutant SARS-CoV-2 strains associated with an increased risk of COVID-19-related death necessitates better understanding of the early viral dynamics, host responses and immunopathology. Single cell RNAseq (scRNAseq) allows for the study of individual cells, uncovering heterogeneous and variable responses to environment, infection and inflammation. While studies have reported immune profiling using scRNAseq in terminal human COVID-19 patients, performing longitudinal immune cell dynamics in humans is challenging. Macaques are a suitable model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our longitudinal scRNAseq of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell suspensions from young rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2 (n = 6) demonstrates dynamic changes in transcriptional landscape 3 days post- SARS-CoV-2-infection (3dpi; peak viremia), relative to 14-17dpi (recovery phase) and pre-infection (baseline) showing accumulation of distinct populations of both macrophages and T-lymphocytes expressing strong interferon-driven inflammatory gene signature at 3dpi. Type I interferon response is induced in the plasmacytoid dendritic cells with appearance of a distinct HLADR+CD68+CD163+SIGLEC1+ macrophage population exhibiting higher angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression. These macrophages are significantly enriched in the lungs of macaques at 3dpi and harbor SARS-CoV-2 while expressing a strong interferon-driven innate anti-viral gene signature. The accumulation of these responses correlated with decline in viremia and recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferons/pharmacology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/pharmacology , Interferons/genetics , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Macaca mulatta , Macrophages/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
2.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639272

ABSTRACT

Inactivated vaccines based on cell culture are very useful in the prevention and control of many diseases. The most popular strategy for the production of inactivated vaccines is based on monkey-derived Vero cells, which results in high productivity of the virus but has a certain carcinogenic risk due to non-human DNA contamination. Since human diploid cells, such as MRC-5 cells, can produce a safer vaccine, efforts to develop a strategy for inactivated vaccine production using these cells have been investigated using MRC-5 cells. However, most viruses do not replicate efficiently in MRC-5 cells. In this study, we found that rabies virus (RABV) infection activated a robust interferon (IFN)-ß response in MRC-5 cells but almost none in Vero cells, suggesting that the IFN response could be a key limiting factor for virus production. Treatment of the MRC-5 cells with IFN inhibitors increased RABV titers by 10-fold. Additionally, the RABV titer yield was improved five-fold when using IFN receptor 1 (IFNAR1) antibodies. As such, we established a stable IFNAR1-deficient MRC-5 cell line (MRC-5IFNAR1-), which increased RABV production by 6.5-fold compared to normal MRC-5 cells. Furthermore, in a pilot-scale production in 1500 square centimeter spinner flasks, utilization of the MRC-5IFNAR1- cell line or the addition of IFN inhibitors to MRC cells increased RABV production by 10-fold or four-fold, respectively. Thus, we successfully established a human diploid cell-based pilot scale virus production platform via inhibition of IFN response for rabies vaccines, which could also be used for other inactivated virus vaccine production.


Subject(s)
Diploidy , Interferons/pharmacology , Rabies Vaccines/immunology , Rabies virus , Rabies/prevention & control , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vero Cells
3.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001065, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594053

ABSTRACT

The pandemic spread of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), represents an ongoing international health crisis. A key symptom of SARS-CoV-2 infection is the onset of fever, with a hyperthermic temperature range of 38 to 41°C. Fever is an evolutionarily conserved host response to microbial infection that can influence the outcome of viral pathogenicity and regulation of host innate and adaptive immune responses. However, it remains to be determined what effect elevated temperature has on SARS-CoV-2 replication. Utilizing a three-dimensional (3D) air-liquid interface (ALI) model that closely mimics the natural tissue physiology of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the respiratory airway, we identify tissue temperature to play an important role in the regulation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Respiratory tissue incubated at 40°C remained permissive to SARS-CoV-2 entry but refractory to viral transcription, leading to significantly reduced levels of viral RNA replication and apical shedding of infectious virus. We identify tissue temperature to play an important role in the differential regulation of epithelial host responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection that impact upon multiple pathways, including intracellular immune regulation, without disruption to general transcription or epithelium integrity. We present the first evidence that febrile temperatures associated with COVID-19 inhibit SARS-CoV-2 replication in respiratory epithelia. Our data identify an important role for tissue temperature in the epithelial restriction of SARS-CoV-2 independently of canonical interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral immune defenses.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/immunology , Hot Temperature , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interferons/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Replication/immunology , Adolescent , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Biological , RNA-Seq/methods , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tissue Culture Techniques , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/physiology
4.
Virol J ; 18(1): 221, 2021 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has elevated several clinical and scientific questions. These include how host genetic factors influence the pathogenesis and disease susceptibility. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of interferon lambda 3 and 4 (IFNL3/4) gene polymorphisms and clinical parameters on the resistance and susceptibility to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: A total of 750 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients (375 survivors and 375 nonsurvivors) were included in this study. All single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on IFNL3 (rs12979860, rs8099917, and rs12980275) and IFNL4 rs368234815 were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. RESULTS: In this study, a higher viral load (low PCR Ct value) was shown in nonsurvivor patients. In survivor patients, the frequency of the favorable genotypes of IFNL3/4 SNPs (rs12979860 CC, rs12980275 AA, rs8099917 TT, and rs368234815 TT/TT) was significantly higher than in nonsurvivor patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis has shown that a higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and PCR Ct value, and lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and also IFNL3 rs12979860 TT, IFNL3 rs8099917 GG, IFNL3 rs12980275 GG, and IFNL4 rs368234815 ∆G/∆G genotypes were associated with the severity of COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study proved that the severity of COVID-19 infection was associated with clinical parameters and unfavorable genotypes of IFNL3/IFNL4 SNPs. Further studies in different parts of the world are needed to show the relationship between severity of COVID-19 infection and host genetic factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Interferons/genetics , Interleukins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Genotype , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index
5.
J Mol Biol ; 434(6): 167277, 2022 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440208

ABSTRACT

Establishment of the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral state provides a crucial initial line of defense against viral infection. Numerous genes that contribute to this antiviral state remain to be identified. Using a loss-of-function strategy, we screened an original library of 1156 siRNAs targeting 386 individual curated human genes in stimulated microglial cells infected with Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging RNA virus that belongs to the flavivirus genus. The screen recovered twenty-one potential host proteins that modulate ZIKV replication in an IFN-dependent manner, including the previously known IFITM3 and LY6E. Further characterization contributed to delineate the spectrum of action of these genes towards other pathogenic RNA viruses, including Hepatitis C virus and SARS-CoV-2. Our data revealed that APOL3 acts as a proviral factor for ZIKV and several other related and unrelated RNA viruses. In addition, we showed that MTA2, a chromatin remodeling factor, possesses potent flavivirus-specific antiviral functions induced by IFN. Our work identified previously unrecognized genes that modulate the replication of RNA viruses in an IFN-dependent manner, opening new perspectives to target weakness points in the life cycle of these viruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Flavivirus , Zika Virus Infection , Zika Virus , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Flavivirus/genetics , Histone Deacetylases , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Membrane Proteins , RNA-Binding Proteins , Repressor Proteins , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication/genetics , Zika Virus/genetics , Zika Virus Infection/genetics
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 720205, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403477

ABSTRACT

Patients with the monogenic immune dysregulatory syndrome autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), which is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, uniformly carry neutralizing autoantibodies directed against type-I interferons (IFNs) and many develop autoimmune pneumonitis, both of which place them at high risk for life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. Bamlanivimab and etesevimab are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and block entry of SARS-CoV-2 in host cells. The use of bamlanivimab and etesevimab early during infection was associated with reduced COVID-19-associated hospitalization and death in patients at high risk for progressing to severe disease, which led the US Food and Drug Administration to issue an emergency use authorization for their administration in non-hypoxemic, non-hospitalized high-risk patients. However, the safety and efficacy of these mAbs has not been evaluated in APECED patients. We enrolled two siblings with APECED on an IRB-approved protocol (NCT01386437) and admitted them prophylactically at the NIH Clinical Center for evaluation of mild-to-moderate COVID-19. We assessed the safety and clinical effects of early treatment with bamlanivimab and etesevimab. The administration of bamlanivimab and etesevimab was well tolerated and was associated with amelioration of COVID-19 symptoms and prevention of invasive ventilatory support, admission to the intensive care, and death in both patients without affecting the production of antibodies to the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2. If given early in the course of COVID-19 infection, bamlanivimab and etesevimab may be beneficial in APECED and other high-risk patients with neutralizing autoantibodies directed against type-I IFNs.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Male , Mutation , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/complications , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/genetics , Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Transcription Factors/genetics , Transcription Factors/immunology
7.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388457

ABSTRACT

Mammalian cells detect microbial molecules known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as indicators of potential infection. Upon PAMP detection, diverse defensive responses are induced by the host, including those that promote inflammation and cell-intrinsic antimicrobial activities. Host-encoded molecules released from dying or damaged cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), also induce defensive responses. Both DAMPs and PAMPs are recognized for their inflammatory potential, but only the latter are well established to stimulate cell-intrinsic host defense. Here, we report a class of DAMPs that engender an antiviral state in human epithelial cells. These DAMPs include oxPAPC (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), PGPC (1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl phosphatidylcholine), and POVPC [1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine], oxidized lipids that are naturally released from dead or dying cells. Exposing cells to these DAMPs prior to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection limits viral replication. Mechanistically, these DAMPs prevent viral entry, thereby limiting the percentage of cells that are productively infected and consequently restricting viral load. We found that the antiviral actions of oxidized lipids are distinct from those mediated by the PAMP Poly I:C, in that the former induces a more rapid antiviral response without the induction of the interferon response. These data support a model whereby interferon-independent defensive activities can be induced by DAMPs, which may limit viral replication before PAMP-mediated interferon responses are induced. This antiviral activity may impact viruses that disrupt interferon responses in the oxygenated environment of the lung, such as influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2.IMPORTANCE In this work, we explored how a class of oxidized lipids, spontaneously created during tissue damage and unprogrammed cell lysis, block the earliest events in RNA virus infection in the human epithelium. This gives us novel insight into the ways that we view infection models, unveiling a built-in mechanism to slow viral growth that neither engages the interferon response nor is subject to known viral antagonism. These oxidized phospholipids act prior to infection, allowing time for other, better-known innate immune mechanisms to take effect. This discovery broadens our understanding of host defenses, introducing a soluble factor that alters the cellular environment to protect from RNA virus infection.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , A549 Cells , Cell Death/drug effects , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Kinetics , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/pharmacology , Phosphatidylcholines/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vesiculovirus/drug effects , Vesiculovirus/physiology , Viral Load
8.
J Exp Med ; 218(8)2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387679

ABSTRACT

Initial replication of SARS-CoV-2 in the upper respiratory tract is required to establish infection, and the replication level correlates with the likelihood of viral transmission. Here, we examined the role of host innate immune defenses in restricting early SARS-CoV-2 infection using transcriptomics and biomarker-based tracking in serial patient nasopharyngeal samples and experiments with airway epithelial organoids. SARS-CoV-2 initially replicated exponentially, with a doubling time of ∼6 h, and induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the upper respiratory tract, which rose with viral replication and peaked just as viral load began to decline. Rhinovirus infection before SARS-CoV-2 exposure accelerated ISG responses and prevented SARS-CoV-2 replication. Conversely, blocking ISG induction during SARS-CoV-2 infection enhanced viral replication from a low infectious dose. These results show that the activity of ISG-mediated defenses at the time of SARS-CoV-2 exposure impacts infection progression and that the heterologous antiviral response induced by a different virus can protect against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Nasopharynx/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Interferons/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Picornaviridae Infections/immunology , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Load , Virus Replication
9.
Molecules ; 25(12)2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389454

ABSTRACT

Viruses can be spread from one person to another; therefore, they may cause disorders in many people, sometimes leading to epidemics and even pandemics. New, previously unstudied viruses and some specific mutant or recombinant variants of known viruses constantly appear. An example is a variant of coronaviruses (CoV) causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), named SARS-CoV-2. Some antiviral drugs, such as remdesivir as well as antiretroviral drugs including darunavir, lopinavir, and ritonavir are suggested to be effective in treating disorders caused by SARS-CoV-2. There are data on the utilization of antiretroviral drugs against SARS-CoV-2. Since there are many studies aimed at the identification of the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and the development of novel therapeutic approaches against HIV-1, we used HIV-1 for our case study to identify possible molecular pathways shared by SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1. We applied a text and data mining workflow and identified a list of 46 targets, which can be essential for the development of infections caused by SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1. We show that SARS-CoV-2 and HIV-1 share some molecular pathways involved in inflammation, immune response, cell cycle regulation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Data Mining/methods , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antigens, Differentiation/genetics , Antigens, Differentiation/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Complement System Proteins/genetics , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Expression Regulation , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV-1/drug effects , HIV-1/immunology , HIV-1/pathogenicity , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Inflammation , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Interleukins/genetics , Interleukins/immunology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/immunology , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/immunology
11.
Cell ; 184(19): 4953-4968.e16, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363913

ABSTRACT

Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by overproduction of immune mediators, but the role of interferons (IFNs) of the type I (IFN-I) or type III (IFN-III) families remains debated. We scrutinized the production of IFNs along the respiratory tract of COVID-19 patients and found that high levels of IFN-III, and to a lesser extent IFN-I, characterize the upper airways of patients with high viral burden but reduced disease risk or severity. Production of specific IFN-III, but not IFN-I, members denotes patients with a mild pathology and efficiently drives the transcription of genes that protect against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In contrast, compared to subjects with other infectious or noninfectious lung pathologies, IFNs are overrepresented in the lower airways of patients with severe COVID-19 that exhibit gene pathways associated with increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. Our data demonstrate a dynamic production of IFNs in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients and show IFNs play opposing roles at distinct anatomical sites.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Interferons/metabolism , Respiratory System/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Age Factors , Aging/pathology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Leukocytes/pathology , Leukocytes/virology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Viral Load
12.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5376-5389, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363676

ABSTRACT

The suppression of types I and III interferon (IFN) responses by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contributes to the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The strategy used by SARS-CoV-2 to evade antiviral immunity needs further investigation. Here, we reported that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited types I and III IFN production by targeting multiple molecules of innate antiviral signaling pathways. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b impaired the induction of types I and III IFNs by Sendai virus and poly (I:C). SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b inhibited the activation of types I and III IFNs induced by the components of cytosolic dsRNA-sensing pathways of RIG-I/MDA5-MAVS signaling, including RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TBK1, and IKKε, rather than IRF3-5D, which is the active form of IRF3. SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b also suppressed the induction of types I and III IFNs by TRIF and STING, which are the adaptor protein of the endosome RNA-sensing pathway of TLR3-TRIF signaling and the adaptor protein of the cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway of cGAS-STING signaling, respectively. A mechanistic analysis revealed that the SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b protein interacted with RIG-I, MDA-5, MAVS, TRIF, STING, and TBK1 and impeded the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b facilitated the replication of the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, the results showed that SARS-CoV-2 ORF9b negatively regulates antiviral immunity and thus facilitates viral replication. This study contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanism through which SARS-CoV-2 impairs antiviral immunity and provides an essential clue to the pathogenesis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
DEAD Box Protein 58/immunology , Immune Evasion/genetics , Interferons/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/immunology , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , DEAD Box Protein 58/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Humans , I-kappa B Kinase/genetics , I-kappa B Kinase/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/immunology , Interferons/genetics , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/immunology , Nucleotidyltransferases/genetics , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Plasmids/chemistry , Plasmids/metabolism , /immunology , Receptors, Immunologic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Transfection , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/immunology
13.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1589-1597, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354261

ABSTRACT

Safe and effective vaccines are still urgently needed to cope with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Recently, we developed a recombinant COVID-19 vaccine (V-01) containing fusion protein (IFN-PADRE-RBD-Fc dimer) as antigen verified to induce protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in pre-clinical study, which supported progression to Phase I clinical trials in humans. A Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase I clinical trial was initiated at the Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Gaozhou, China) in February 2021. Healthy adults aged between 18 and 59 years and over 60 years were sequentially enrolled and randomly allocated into three subgroups (1:1:1) either to receive the vaccine (10, 25, and 50 µg) or placebo (V-01: Placebo = 4:1) intramuscularly with a 21-day interval by a sentinel and dose escalation design. The data showed a promising safety profile with approximately 25% vaccine-related overall adverse events (AEs) within 30 days and no grade 3 or worse AEs. Besides, V-01 provoked rapid and strong immune responses, elicited substantially high-titre neutralizing antibodies and anti-RBD IgG peaked at day 35 or 49 after first dose, presented with encouraging immunogenicity at low dose (10 µg) subgroup and elderly participants, which showed great promise to be used as all-aged (18 and above) vaccine against COVID-19. Taken together, our preliminary findings indicate that V-01 is safe and well tolerated, capable of inducing rapid and strong immune responses, and warrants further testing in Phase II/III clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Interferons/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , China , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Interferons/administration & dosage , Interferons/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Placebos , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Young Adult
14.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355052

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a global pandemic characterized by an exaggerated immune response and respiratory illness. Age (>60 years) is a significant risk factor for developing severe COVID-19. To better understand the host response of the aged airway epithelium to SARS-CoV-2 infection, we performed an in vitro study using primary human bronchial epithelial cells from donors >67 years of age differentiated on an air-liquid interface culture. We demonstrate that SARS-CoV-2 infection leads to early induction of a proinflammatory response and a delayed interferon response. In addition, we observed changes in the genes and pathways associated with cell death and senescence throughout infection. In summary, our study provides new and important insights into the temporal kinetics of the airway epithelial innate immune response to SARS-CoV-2 in older individuals.


Subject(s)
Bronchi/immunology , Bronchi/virology , Immunity, Innate , Respiratory Mucosa/immunology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aging/immunology , Bronchi/cytology , Bronchi/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Death/genetics , Cells, Cultured , Cellular Senescence/genetics , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/genetics , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Interferons/biosynthesis , Interferons/genetics , Male , RNA-Seq , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Respiratory Mucosa/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/genetics
15.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(1): e0077421, 2021 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352543

ABSTRACT

The primary target organ of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection is the respiratory tract. Currently, there is limited information on the ability of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to infect and regulate innate immunity in human immune cells and lung epithelial cells. Here, we compared the ability of four Finnish isolates of SARS-CoV-2 from COVID-19 patients to replicate and induce interferons (IFNs) and other cytokines in different human cells. All isolates failed to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages, monocytes, and lymphocytes, and no induction of cytokine gene expression was seen. However, most of the isolates replicated in Calu-3 cells, and they readily induced type I and type III IFN gene expression. The hCoV-19/Finland/FIN-25/2020 isolate, originating from a traveler from Milan in March 2020, showed better ability to replicate and induce IFN and inflammatory responses in Calu-3 cells than other isolates of SARS-CoV-2. Our data increase the knowledge on the pathogenesis and antiviral mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection in human cell systems. IMPORTANCE With the rapid spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, information on the replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and regulation of innate immunity in human immune cells and lung epithelial cells is needed. In the present study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 failed to productively infect human immune cells, but different isolates of SARS-CoV-2 showed differential ability to replicate and regulate innate interferon responses in human lung epithelial Calu-3 cells. These findings will open up the way for further studies on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 in human cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Virus Replication/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cytokines/genetics , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferons/genetics , Kinetics , Lung/virology , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Trypsin
16.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335222

ABSTRACT

Viral infections cause a variety of acute and chronic human diseases, sometimes resulting in small local outbreaks, or in some cases spreading across the globe and leading to global pandemics. Understanding and exploiting virus-host interactions is instrumental for identifying host factors involved in viral replication, developing effective antiviral agents, and mitigating the severity of virus-borne infectious diseases. The diversity of CRISPR systems and CRISPR-based tools enables the specific modulation of innate immune responses and has contributed impressively to the fields of virology and immunology in a very short time. In this review, we describe the most recent advances in the use of CRISPR systems for basic and translational studies of virus-host interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , RNA Editing , Transcriptome , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/drug effects
17.
RNA ; 27(11): 1318-1329, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329126

ABSTRACT

The transcriptional induction of interferon (IFN) genes is a key feature of the mammalian antiviral response that limits viral replication and dissemination. A hallmark of severe COVID-19 disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 is the low presence of IFN proteins in patient serum despite elevated levels of IFN-encoding mRNAs, indicative of post-transcriptional inhibition of IFN protein production. Here, we performed single-molecule RNA visualization to examine the expression and localization of host mRNAs during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our data show that the biogenesis of type I and type III IFN mRNAs is inhibited at multiple steps during SARS-CoV-2 infection. First, translocation of the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) transcription factor to the nucleus is limited in response to SARS-CoV-2, indicating that SARS-CoV-2 inhibits RLR-MAVS signaling and thus weakens transcriptional induction of IFN genes. Second, we observed that IFN mRNAs primarily localize to the site of transcription in most SARS-CoV-2 infected cells, suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 either inhibits the release of IFN mRNAs from their sites of transcription and/or triggers decay of IFN mRNAs in the nucleus upon exiting the site of transcription. Lastly, nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of IFN mRNAs is inhibited during SARS-CoV-2 infection, which we propose is a consequence of widespread degradation of host cytoplasmic basal mRNAs in the early stages of SARS-CoV-2 replication by the SARS-CoV-2 Nsp1 protein, as well as the host antiviral endoribonuclease, RNase L. Importantly, IFN mRNAs can escape SARS-CoV-2-mediated degradation if they reach the cytoplasm, making rescue of mRNA export a viable means for promoting the immune response to SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Interferons/genetics , RNA Stability , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Endoribonucleases/genetics , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Humans , In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence/methods , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Single Molecule Imaging
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 14536, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315609

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) hospitalizations and deaths disportionally affect males and older ages. Here we investigated the impact of male sex and age comparing sex-matched or age-matched ferrets infected with SARS-CoV-2. Differences in temperature regulation was identified for male ferrets which was accompanied by prolonged viral replication in the upper respiratory tract after infection. Gene expression analysis of the nasal turbinates indicated that 1-year-old female ferrets had significant increases in interferon response genes post infection which were delayed in males. These results provide insight into COVID-19 and suggests that older males may play a role in viral transmission due to decreased antiviral responses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Ferrets/virology , Interferons/metabolism , Age Factors , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Ferrets/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions , Interferons/genetics , Male , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sex Factors , Viral Load , Virus Replication
19.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(14)2021 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308364

ABSTRACT

Children with the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have milder symptoms and a better prognosis than adult patients. Several investigations assessed type I, II, and III interferon (IFN) signatures in SARS-CoV-2 infected adults, however no data are available for pediatric patients. TRIM28 and SETDB1 regulate the transcription of multiple genes involved in the immune response as well as of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). Exogenous viral infections can trigger the activation of HERVs, which in turn can induce inflammatory and immune reactions. Despite the potential cross-talks between SARS-CoV-2 infection and TRIM28, SETDB1, and HERVs, information on their expressions in COVID-19 patients is lacking. We assessed, through a PCR real time Taqman amplification assay, the transcription levels of six IFN-I stimulated genes, IFN-II and three of its sensitive genes, three IFN-lIIs, as well as of TRIM28, SETDB1, pol genes of HERV-H, -K, and -W families, and of env genes of Syncytin (SYN)1, SYN2, and multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus (MRSV) in peripheral blood from COVID-19 children and in control uninfected subjects. Higher expression levels of IFN-I and IFN-II inducible genes were observed in 36 COVID-19 children with mild or moderate disease as compared to uninfected controls, whereas their concentrations decreased in 17 children with severe disease and in 11 with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). Similar findings were found for the expression of TRIM-28, SETDB1, and every HERV gene. Positive correlations emerged between the transcriptional levels of type I and II IFNs, TRIM28, SETDB1, and HERVs in COVID-19 patients. IFN-III expressions were comparable in each group of subjects. This preserved induction of IFN-λs could contribute to the better control of the infection in children as compared to adults, in whom IFN-III deficiency has been reported. The upregulation of IFN-I, IFN-II, TRIM28, SETDB1, and HERVs in children with mild symptoms, their declines in severe cases or with MIS-C, and the positive correlations of their transcription in SARS-CoV-2-infected children suggest that they may play important roles in conditioning the evolution of the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Endogenous Retroviruses/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics , Female , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/metabolism , Humans , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Tripartite Motif-Containing Protein 28/genetics , Tripartite Motif-Containing Protein 28/metabolism
20.
Rev Med Virol ; 32(2): e2275, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305140

ABSTRACT

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are defined as RNA molecules longer than 200 nucleotides that can regulate gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels. Both human lncRNAs and lncRNAs encoded by viruses can modulate the expression of host genes which are critical for viral replication, latency, activation of signalling pathways, cytokine and chemokine production, RNAi processing, expression of interferons (IFNs) and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Studies on lncRNAs as key regulators of host-virus interactions may give new insights into therapeutic strategies for the treatment of related diseases. This current review focuses on the role of lncRNAs, and their interactions with respiratory viruses including influenza A virus (IAV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A virus , RNA, Long Noncoding , Humans , Influenza A virus/genetics , Interferons/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Virus Replication
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