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1.
Inflamm Res ; 71(1): 39-56, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525531

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created a worldwide debilitating health crisis with the entire humanity suffering from the deleterious effects associated with the high infectivity and mortality rates. While significant evidence is currently available online and targets various aspects of the disease, both inflammatory and noninflammatory kidney manifestations secondary to COVID-19 infection are still largely underrepresented. In this review, we summarized current knowledge about COVID-19-related kidney manifestations, their pathologic mechanisms as well as various pharmacotherapies used to treat patients with COVID-19. We also shed light on the effect of these medications on kidney functions that can further enhance renal damage secondary to the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Kidney Diseases/physiopathology , Kidney/injuries , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Aldosterone/metabolism , Angiotensins/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Autopsy , Biopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Enoxaparin/administration & dosage , Heparin/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Kidney Diseases/complications , Kidney Transplantation , Lopinavir/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Renal Replacement Therapy , Renin-Angiotensin System , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Postgrad Med ; 133(8): 994-1000, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a rare but severe condition resulting in excessive response of the immune system after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We report a single-center cohort of children with MIS-C, describing the spectrum of presentation, therapies, clinical course, and short-term outcomes. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study from to a tertiary pediatric rheumatology center including patients (aged 1 month to 21 years) diagnosed with MIS-C between April 2020-April 2021. Demographic, clinical, laboratory results and follow-up data were collected through the electronic patient record system and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 67 patients with MIS-C were included in the study. Fever was detected in all patients; gastrointestinal system symptoms were found in 67.2% of the patients, rash in 38.8%, conjunctivitis in 31.3%, hypotension in 26.9% myocarditis, and/or pericarditis in 22.4%, respectively. Respiratory symptoms were only in five patients (7.5%). Kawasaki Disease like presentation was found 37.3% of the patients. The mean duration of hospitalization was 11.8 7.07 days. Fifty-seven patients (85%) received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 45 (67%) received corticosteroids, 17 (25.3%) received anakinra, and one (1.5%) received tocilizumab. Seven of the patients (10.4%) underwent therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). In 21 (31.3%) patients, a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was required in a median of 2 days. The first finding to improve was fever, while the first parameter to decrease was ferritin (median 6.5 days (IQR, 4-11.2 days)). Sixty-five patients were discharged home with a median duration of hospital stay of 10 days (IQR, 7-15 days). CONCLUSION: Patients with MIS-C may have severe cardiac findings and intensive care requirements in admission and hospital follow-up. The vast majority of these findings improve with effective treatment without any sequelae until discharge and in a short time in follow-up. Although the pathogenesis and treatment plan of the disease are partially elucidated, follow-up studies are needed in terms of long-term prognosis and relapse probabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Administration, Intravesical , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins/administration & dosage , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Male , Oxytocin/administration & dosage , Oxytocin/analogs & derivatives , Oxytocin/therapeutic use , Plasma Exchange , Prospective Studies
3.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(9): e29102, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272230

ABSTRACT

The cytokine storm of secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (sHLH)/macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can cause life-threatening multiorgan failure. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor blockade with anakinra can be effective in the management of sHLH/MAS. Subcutaneous (SC) dosing regimens are widely described; however, intravenous (IV) dosing is advantageous where time-critical intervention is vital and where SC oedema and/or hypoperfusion limits absorption. We review three critically ill children (aged 9, 11 and 17) with sHLH and rapidly progressive multiorgan dysfunction, successfully treated with continuous IV anakinra infusion. This case series significantly enhances the incipient knowledge regarding the safety and efficacy of IV anakinra for life-threatening sHLH.


Subject(s)
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Macrophage Activation Syndrome , Administration, Intravenous , Child , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/drug therapy , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/drug therapy , Multiple Organ Failure/drug therapy , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 675678, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Restraining maladaptive inflammation is considered a rationale strategy to treat severe coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) but available studies with selective inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cytokines have not provided unequivocal evidence of survival advantage. Late administration is commonly regarded as a major cause of treatment failure but the optimal timing for anti-cytokine therapy initiation in COVID-19 patients has never been clearly established. OBJECTIVES: To identify a window of therapeutic opportunity for maximizing the efficacy of interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 blockade in COVID-19. METHODS: Survival at the longest available follow-up was assessed in severe hyper-inflamed COVID-19 patients treated with anakinra, tocilizumab, sarilumab, or standard of care, stratified according to respiratory impairment at the time of treatment initiation. RESULTS: 107 patients treated with biologics and 103 contemporary patients treated with standard of care were studied. After a median of 106 days of follow-up (range 3-186), treatment with biologics was associated with a significantly higher survival rate compared to standard therapy when initiated in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ≥ 100 mmHg (p < 0.001). Anakinra reduced mortality also in patients with PaO2/FiO2 < 100 mmHg (p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: IL-1 and IL-6 blocking therapies are more likely to provide survival advantage in hyper-inflamed COVID-19 patients when initiated before the establishment of severe respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Interleukin-1/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
5.
Elife ; 102021 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121691

ABSTRACT

Background: It was studied if early suPAR-guided anakinra treatment can prevent severe respiratory failure (SRF) of COVID-19. Methods: A total of 130 patients with suPAR ≥6 ng/ml were assigned to subcutaneous anakinra 100 mg once daily for 10 days. Primary outcome was SRF incidence by day 14 defined as any respiratory ratio below 150 mmHg necessitating mechanical or non-invasive ventilation. Main secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and inflammatory mediators; 28-day WHO-CPS was explored. Propensity-matched standard-of care comparators were studied. Results: 22.3% with anakinra treatment and 59.2% comparators (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.20-0.46) progressed into SRF; 30-day mortality was 11.5% and 22.3% respectively (hazard ratio 0.49; 95% CI 0.25-0.97). Anakinra was associated with decrease in circulating interleukin (IL)-6, sCD163 and sIL2-R; IL-10/IL-6 ratio on day 7 was inversely associated with SOFA score; patients were allocated to less severe WHO-CPS strata. Conclusions: Early suPAR-guided anakinra decreased SRF and restored the pro-/anti-inflammatory balance. Funding: This study was funded by the Hellenic Institute for the Study of Sepsis, Technomar Shipping Inc, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, and the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme. Clinical trial number: NCT04357366.


People infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, can develop severe respiratory failure and require a ventilator to keep breathing, but this does not happen to every infected individual. Measuring a blood protein called suPAR (soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor) may help identify patients at the greatest risk of developing severe respiratory failure and requiring a ventilator. Previous investigations have suggested that measuring suPAR can identify pneumonia patients at highest risk for developing respiratory failure. The protein can be measured by taking a blood sample, and its levels provide a snapshot of how the body's immune system is reacting to infection, and of how it may respond to treatment. Anakinra is a drug that forms part of a class of medications called interleukin antagonists. It is commonly prescribed alone or in combination with other medications to reduce pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Kyriazopoulou et al. investigated whether treating COVID-19 patients who had developed pneumonia with anakinra could prevent the use of a ventilator and lower the risk of death. The findings show that treating COVID-19 patients with an injection of 100 milligrams of anakinra for ten days may be an effective approach because the drug combats inflammation. Kyriazopoulou et al. examined various markers of the immune response and discovered that anakinra was able to improve immune function, protecting a significant number of patients from going on a ventilator. The drug was also found to be safe and cause no significant adverse side effects. Administering anakinra decreased of the risk of progression into severe respiratory failure by 70%, and reduced death rates significantly. These results suggest that it may be beneficial to use suPAR as an early biomarker for identifying those individuals at highest risk for severe respiratory failure, and then treat them with anakinra. While the findings are promising, they must be validated in larger studies.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Respiratory Insufficiency/prevention & control , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antigens, CD/blood , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Incidence , Injections, Subcutaneous , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Cell Surface/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/metabolism , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Standard of Care , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 147(4): 1217-1225, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111670

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: IL-1 plays a pivotal role in the inflammatory response during cytokine storm syndromes. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to analyze the efficacy and safety of early anti-inflammatory treatment (AIT) with intravenous anakinra with or without glucocorticoids in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. METHODS: We performed a retrospective single-center cohort study of patients admitted for COVID-19 pneumonia from February 26 to April 29, 2020, to assess the efficacy of early AIT with intravenous anakinra (100 mg every 8 hours for 3 days, with tapering) alone or in combination with a glucocorticoid (intravenous methylprednisolone, 1-2 mg/kg daily, with tapering). The standard of care (SOC) treatment was hydroxychloroquine and/or azithromycin with or without antivirals and anticoagulants. Late rescue AIT with anakinra or tocilizumab was also evaluated. Treatment effect on overall survival was assessed by a propensity score-adjusted Cox model. RESULTS: A total of 128 patients were analyzed; 63 patients received early AIT (30 received anakinra alone and 33 received anakinra plus a glucocorticoid) at admission, and 65 patients did not receive early AIT and were used as controls; of the latter 65 patients, 44 received the SOC treatment alone and 21 received the SOC treatment plus late rescue AIT. After adjustment for all the unbalanced baseline covariates, early AIT reduced the hazard of mortality by 74% (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.26; P < .001). The effect was similar in patients receiving anakinra alone (adjusted HR = 0.28; P = .04) and anakinra plus a glucocorticoid (adjusted HR = 0.33; P = .07). Late rescue treatment did not show a significant advantage over SOC treatment alone (adjusted HR = 0.82; P = .70). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests, on a larger series of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, the potential efficacy and safety of the early use of high doses of intravenous anakinra with or without glucocorticoids.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Drug Administration Schedule , Female , Humans , Injections, Intravenous , Italy/epidemiology , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Immunol ; 206(7): 1569-1575, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067833

ABSTRACT

The IL-1 receptor antagonist, anakinra, may represent a therapeutic option for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, COVID-19 ARDS patients admitted to the Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale of Lecco, Italy, between March 5th to April 15th, 2020, and who had received anakinra off-label were retrospectively evaluated and compared with a cohort of matched controls who did not receive immunomodulatory treatment. The primary end point was survival at day 28. The population consisted of 112 patients (56 treated with anakinra and 56 controls). Survival at day 28 was obtained in 69 patients (61.6%) and was significantly higher in anakinra-treated patients than in the controls (75.0 versus 48.2%, p = 0.007). When stratified by continuous positive airway pressure support at baseline, anakinra-treated patients' survival was also significant compared with the controls (p = 0.008). Univariate analysis identified anakinra usage (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-7.17) as a significant survival predictor. This was not supported by multivariate modeling. The rate of infectious-related adverse events was similar between groups. In conclusion, anakinra improved overall survival and invasive ventilation-free survival and was well tolerated in patients with ARDS associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Survival Rate
8.
Chest ; 159(3): 933-948, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064923

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine storm is a marker of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) illness severity and increased mortality. Immunomodulatory treatments have been repurposed to improve mortality outcomes. RESEARCH QUESTION: Do immunomodulatory therapies improve survival in patients with COVID-19 cytokine storm (CCS)? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health records across the Northwell Health system. COVID-19 patients hospitalized between March 1, 2020, and April 24, 2020, were included. CCS was defined by inflammatory markers: ferritin, > 700 ng/mL; C-reactive protein (CRP), > 30 mg/dL; or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), > 300 U/L. Patients were subdivided into six groups: no immunomodulatory treatment (standard of care) and five groups that received either corticosteroids, anti-IL-6 antibody (tocilizumab), or anti-IL-1 therapy (anakinra) alone or in combination with corticosteroids. The primary outcome was hospital mortality. RESULTS: Five thousand seven hundred seventy-six patients met the inclusion criteria. The most common comorbidities were hypertension (44%-59%), diabetes (32%-46%), and cardiovascular disease (5%-14%). Patients most frequently met criteria with high LDH (76.2%) alone or in combination, followed by ferritin (63.2%) and CRP (8.4%). More than 80% of patients showed an elevated D-dimer. Patients treated with corticosteroids and tocilizumab combination showed lower mortality compared with patients receiving standard-of-care (SoC) treatment (hazard ratio [HR], 0.44; 95% CI, 0.35-0.55; P < .0001) and with patients treated with corticosteroids alone (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.53-0.83; P = .004) or in combination with anakinra (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50-0.81; P = .003). Corticosteroids when administered alone (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.57-0.76; P < .0001) or in combination with tocilizumab (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.35-0.55; P < .0001) or anakinra (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81; P < .0001) improved hospital survival compared with SoC treatment. INTERPRETATION: The combination of corticosteroids with tocilizumab showed superior survival outcome when compared with SoC treatment as well as treatment with corticosteroids alone or in combination with anakinra. Furthermore, corticosteroid use either alone or in combination with tocilizumab or anakinra was associated with reduced hospital mortality for patients with CCS compared with patients receiving SoC treatment.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Immunomodulation , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Drug Repositioning , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Medication Therapy Management/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , United States/epidemiology
10.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(4): 843-852, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1008089

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Little evidence appears to exist for the use of anakinra, a recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, after non-response to treatment with corticosteroids alone or combined with tocilizumab in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia and moderate hyperinflammatory state. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was carried out involving 143 patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia and moderate hyperinflammation. They received standard therapy along with pulses of methylprednisolone (group 1) or methylprednisolone plus tocilizumab (group 2), with the possibility of receiving anakinra (group 3) according to protocol. The aim of this study was to assess the role of anakinra in the clinical course (death, admission to the intensive care ward) during the first 60 days after the first corticosteroid pulse. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging characteristics as well as infectious complications were also analyzed. RESULTS: 74 patients (51.7%) in group 1, 59 (41.3%) patients in group 2, and 10 patients (7%) in group 3 were included. 8 patients (10.8%) in group 1 died, 6 (10.2%) in group 2, and 0 (0%) in group 3. After adjustment for age and clinical severity indices, treatment with anakinra was associated with a reduced risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 0.518, 95% CI 0.265-0.910; p = 0.0437). Patients in group 3 had a lower mean CD4 count after 3 days of treatment. No patients in this group presented infectious complications. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with moderate hyperinflammatory state associated with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, treatment with anakinra after non-response to corticosteroids or corticosteroids plus tocilizumab therapy may be an option for the management of these patients and may improve their prognosis.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antirheumatic Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Spain , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
11.
Trials ; 21(1): 1005, 2020 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The peak of the global COVID-19 pandemic has not yet been reached, and many countries face the prospect of a second wave of infections before effective vaccinations will be available. After an initial phase of viral replication, some patients develop a second illness phase in which the host thrombotic and inflammatory responses seem to drive complications. Severe COVID-19 disease is linked to high mortality, hyperinflammation, and a remarkably high incidence of thrombotic events. We hypothesize a crucial pathophysiological role for the contact pathway of coagulation and the kallikrein-bradykinin pathway. Therefore, drugs that modulate this excessive thromboinflammatory response should be investigated in severe COVID-19. METHODS: In this adaptive, open-label multicenter randomized clinical trial, we compare low molecular weight heparins at 50 IU anti-Xa/kg twice daily-or 75 IU anti-Xa twice daily for intensive care (ICU) patients-in combination with aprotinin to standard thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. In the case of hyperinflammation, the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra will be added on top of the drugs in the interventional arm. In a pilot phase, the effect of the intervention on thrombotic markers (D-dimer) will be assessed. In the full trial, the primary outcome is defined as the effect of the interventional drugs on clinical status as defined by the WHO ordinal scale for clinical improvement. DISCUSSION: In this trial, we target the thromboinflammatory response at multiple levels. We intensify the dose of low molecular weight heparins to reduce thrombotic complications. Aprotinin is a potent kallikrein pathway inhibitor that reduces fibrinolysis, activation of the contact pathway of coagulation, and local inflammatory response. Additionally, aprotinin has shown in vitro inhibitory effects on SARS-CoV-2 cellular entry. Because the excessive thromboinflammatory response is one of the most adverse prognostic factors in COVID-19, we will add anakinra, a recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, to the regimen in case of severely increased inflammatory parameters. This way, we hope to modulate the systemic response to SARS-CoV-2 and avoid disease progressions with a potentially fatal outcome. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The EU Clinical Trials Register 2020-001739-28 . Registered on April 10, 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Antirheumatic Agents/administration & dosage , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Aprotinin/administration & dosage , Aprotinin/therapeutic use , Belgium/epidemiology , Bradykinin/drug effects , Bradykinin/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/administration & dosage , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Incidence , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Kallikreins/drug effects , Kallikreins/metabolism , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/metabolism , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control
13.
J Clin Invest ; 130(11): 5942-5950, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670865

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDPediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection can be complicated by a dangerous hyperinflammatory condition termed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). The clinical and immunologic spectrum of MIS-C and its relationship to other inflammatory conditions of childhood have not been studied in detail.METHODSWe retrospectively studied confirmed cases of MIS-C at our institution from March to June 2020. The clinical characteristics, laboratory studies, and treatment response were collected. Data were compared with historic cohorts of Kawasaki disease (KD) and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS).RESULTSTwenty-eight patients fulfilled the case definition of MIS-C. Median age at presentation was 9 years (range: 1 month to 17 years); 50% of patients had preexisting conditions. All patients had laboratory confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Seventeen patients (61%) required intensive care, including 7 patients (25%) who required inotrope support. Seven patients (25%) met criteria for complete or incomplete KD, and coronary abnormalities were found in 6 cases. Lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevation in inflammatory markers, D-dimer, B-type natriuretic peptide, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were common but not ubiquitous. Cytopenias distinguished MIS-C from KD and the degree of hyperferritinemia and pattern of cytokine production differed between MIS-C and MAS. Immunomodulatory therapy given to patients with MIS-C included intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) (71%), corticosteroids (61%), and anakinra (18%). Clinical and laboratory improvement were observed in all cases, including 6 cases that did not require immunomodulatory therapy. No mortality was recorded in this cohort.CONCLUSIONMIS-C encompasses a broad phenotypic spectrum with clinical and laboratory features distinct from KD and MAS.FUNDINGThis work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Rheumatology Research Foundation Investigator Awards and Medical Education Award; Boston Children's Hospital Faculty Career Development Awards; the McCance Family Foundation; and the Samara Jan Turkel Center.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Immunomodulation , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Infant , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/diagnosis , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/drug therapy , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/immunology , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/blood , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/drug therapy , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology
14.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 146(4): 786-789, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664612

Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Drug Hypersensitivity/etiology , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/administration & dosage , Adenosine Monophosphate/adverse effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Alanine/administration & dosage , Alanine/adverse effects , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Amides/administration & dosage , Amides/adverse effects , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Drug Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Drug Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Drug Hypersensitivity/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Indoles/administration & dosage , Indoles/adverse effects , Infliximab/administration & dosage , Infliximab/adverse effects , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/adverse effects , Nitriles , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pyrazines/administration & dosage , Pyrazines/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/administration & dosage , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrimidines , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
15.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(32): 18951-18953, 2020 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662427

ABSTRACT

Around the tenth day after diagnosis, ∼20% of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated pneumonia evolve toward severe oxygen dependence (stage 2b) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (stage 3) associated with systemic inflammation often termed a "cytokine storm." Because interleukin-1 (IL-1) blocks the production of IL-6 and other proinflammatory cytokines, we treated COVID-19 patients early in the disease with the IL-1 receptor antagonist, anakinra. We retrospectively compared 22 patients from three different centers in France with stages 2b and 3 COVID-19-associated pneumonia presenting with acute severe respiratory failure and systemic inflammation who received either standard-of-care treatment alone (10 patients) or combined with intravenous anakinra (12 patients). Treatment started at 300 mg⋅d-1 for 5 d, then tapered with lower dosing over 3 d. Both populations were comparable for age, comorbidities, clinical stage, and elevated biomarkers of systemic inflammation. All of the patients treated with anakinra improved clinically (P < 0.01), with no deaths, significant decreases in oxygen requirements (P < 0.05), and more days without invasive mechanical ventilation (P < 0.06), compared with the control group. The effect of anakinra was rapid, as judged by significant decrease of fever and C-reactive protein at day 3. A mean total dose of 1,950 mg was infused with no adverse side effects or bacterial infection. We conclude that early blockade of the IL-1 receptor is therapeutic in acute hyperinflammatory respiratory failure in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Injections, Intravenous , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology
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