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1.
Front Immunol ; 12: 740260, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506482

ABSTRACT

Increased left ventricular fibrosis has been reported in patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is unclear whether this fibrosis is a consequence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection or a risk factor for severe disease progression. We observed increased fibrosis in the left ventricular myocardium of deceased COVID-19 patients, compared with matched controls. We also detected increased mRNA levels of soluble interleukin-1 receptor-like 1 (sIL1-RL1) and transforming growth factor ß1 (TGF-ß1) in the left ventricular myocardium of deceased COVID-19 patients. Biochemical analysis of blood sampled from patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with COVID-19 revealed highly elevated levels of TGF-ß1 mRNA in these patients compared to controls. Left ventricular strain measured by echocardiography as a marker of pre-existing cardiac fibrosis correlated strongly with blood TGF-ß1 mRNA levels and predicted disease severity in COVID-19 patients. In the left ventricular myocardium and lungs of COVID-19 patients, we found increased neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) RNA levels, which correlated strongly with the prevalence of pulmonary SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid. Cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis may therefore predispose these patients to increased cellular viral entry in the lung, which may explain the worse clinical outcome observed in our cohort. Our study demonstrates that patients at risk of clinical deterioration can be identified early by echocardiographic strain analysis and quantification of blood TGF-ß1 mRNA performed at the time of first medical contact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Heart Ventricles/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Fibrosis , Heart Ventricles/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/genetics , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Risk , Severity of Illness Index , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/genetics , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Viral Load
2.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259026, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496522

ABSTRACT

Interleukin (IL)-33 and its unique receptor, ST2, play a pivotal role in the immune response to infection and stress. However, there have been conflicting reports of the role of IL-33 in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the potential of this axis in differentiating CVD patients and controls and with CVD disease severity, remains unclear. AIMS: 1) To quantify differences in circulating IL-33 and/or sST2 levels between CVD patients versus controls. 2) Determine association of these biomarkers with mortality in CVD and community cohorts. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Pubmed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, Prospero and Cochrane databases, systematic review of studies published on IL-33 and/or sST2 levels in patients with CVD (heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, atrial fibrillation, stroke, coronary artery disease and hypertension) vs controls, and in cohorts of each CVD subtype was performed. Pooled standardised mean difference (SMD) of biomarker levels between CVD-cases versus controls and hazard ratios (HRs) for risk of mortality during follow-up in CVD patients, were assessed by random effects meta-analyses. Heterogeneity was evaluated with random-effects meta-regressions. From 1071 studies screened, 77 were meta-analysed. IL-33 levels were lower in HF and CAD patients vs controls, however levels were higher in stroke patients compared controls [Meta-SMD 1.455, 95% CI 0.372-2.537; p = 0.008, I2 = 97.645]. Soluble ST2 had a stronger association with risk of all-cause mortality in ACS (Meta-multivariate HR 2.207, 95% CI 1.160-4.198; p = 0.016, I2 = 95.661) than risk of all-cause mortality in HF (Meta-multivariate HR 1.425, 95% CI 1.268-1.601; p<0.0001, I2 = 92.276). There were insufficient data to examine the association of IL-33 with clinical outcomes in CVD. CONCLUSIONS: IL-33 and sST2 levels differ between CVD patients and controls. Higher levels of sST2 are associated with increased mortality in individuals with CVD. Further study of IL-33/ST2 in cardiovascular studies is essential to progress diagnostic and therapeutic advances related to IL-33/ST2 signalling.


Subject(s)
Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Interleukin-33/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Acute Coronary Syndrome/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Confidence Intervals , Heart Failure/metabolism , Humans , Multivariate Analysis , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Immunology ; 164(3): 541-554, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488214

ABSTRACT

IL-33 and ATP are alarmins, which are released upon damage of cellular barriers or are actively secreted upon cell stress. Due to high-density expression of the IL-33 receptor T1/ST2 (IL-33R), and the ATP receptor P2X7, mast cells (MCs) are one of the first highly sensitive sentinels recognizing released IL-33 or ATP in damaged peripheral tissues. Whereas IL-33 induces the MyD88-dependent activation of the TAK1-IKK2-NF-κB signalling, ATP induces the Ca2+ -dependent activation of NFAT. Thereby, each signal alone only induces a moderate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators (LMs). However, MCs, which simultaneously sense (co-sensing) IL-33 and ATP, display an enhanced and prolonged activation of the TAK1-IKK2-NF-κB signalling pathway. This resulted in a massive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and GM-CSF as well as of arachidonic acid-derived cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs) and thromboxanes (TXs), hallmarks of strong MC activation. Collectively, these data show that co-sensing of ATP and IL-33 results in hyperactivation of MCs, which resembles to MC activation induced by IgE-mediated crosslinking of the FcεRI. Therefore, the IL-33/IL-33R and/or the ATP/P2X7 signalling axis are attractive targets for therapeutical intervention of diseases associated with the loss of integrity of cellular barriers such as allergic and infectious respiratory reactions.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Hypersensitivity/immunology , Interleukin-33/metabolism , Mast Cells/immunology , Animals , Anti-Allergic Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Allergic Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Degranulation/drug effects , Cytokines/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Eicosanoids/metabolism , Humans , Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Interleukin-33/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipidomics , Mast Cells/drug effects , Mast Cells/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Knockout , NFATC Transcription Factors/genetics , Primary Cell Culture , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/immunology
4.
Vascul Pharmacol ; 138: 106857, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144980

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic illness caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2). It has been estimated that 80% of subject infected are asymptomatic or have mild to moderate symptoms. Differently, in severe cases of COVID-19, cytokine storm, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), severe systemic inflammatory response and cardiovascular diseases were observed Even if all molecular mechanisms leading to cardiovascular dysfunction in COVID-19 patients remain to be clarified, the evaluation of biomarkers of cardiac injury, stress and inflammation proved to be an excellent tool to identify the COVID-19 patients with worse outcome. However, the number of biomarkers used to manage COVID-19 patients is expected to increase with the increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease. It is our view that soluble suppressor of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) can be used as biomarker in COVID-19. sST2 is routinely used as prognostic biomarker in patients with HF. Moreover, high circulating levels of sST2 have also been found in subjects with ARDS, pulmonary fibrosis and sepsis. Keeping in mind these considerations, in this review the possible mechanisms through which the SARS-CoV2 infection could damage the cardiovascular system were summarized and the possible role of sST2 in COVID-19 patients with CVD was discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Animals , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Prognosis
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