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1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 796682, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731771

ABSTRACT

In the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), natural killer T (NKT) cells act as primary initiators of immune responses. However, a decrease of circulating NKT cells has been observed in COVID-19 different stages, of which the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, by performing single-cell RNA sequencing analysis in three large cohorts of COVID-19 patients, we found that increased expression of Tim-3 promotes depletion of NKT cells during the progression stage of COVID-19, which is associated with disease severity and outcome of patients with COVID-19. Tim-3+ NKT cells also expressed high levels of CD147 and CD26, which are potential SARS-CoV-2 spike binding receptors. In the study, Tim-3+ NKT cells showed high enrichment of apoptosis, higher expression levels of mitochondrial genes and caspase genes, with a larger pseudo time value. In addition, Tim-3+ NKT cells in COVID-19 presented a stronger capacity to secrete IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 compared with healthy individuals, they also demonstrated high expression of co-inhibitory receptors such as PD-1, CTLA-4, and LAG-3. Moreover, we found that IL-12 secreted by dendritic cells (DCs) was positively correlated with up-regulated expression of Tim-3 in NKT cells in COVID-19 patients. Overall, this study describes a novel mechanism by which up-regulated Tim-3 expression induced the depletion and dysfunction of NKT cells in COVID-19 patients. These findings not only have possible implications for the prediction of severity and prognosis in COVID-19 but also provide a link between NKT cells and future new therapeutic strategies in SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/immunology , Natural Killer T-Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-4/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology
3.
Cytokine ; 151: 155804, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630370

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious respiratory disorder caused by a new coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. The pathophysiology of severe COVID-19 is associated with a "cytokine storm". IL-32 is a key modulator in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions and is mostly induced by IL-8. IL-32 modulates important inflammatory pathways (including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1b), contributing to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Il-32 was never evaluated before in COVID-19 patients stratifying as mild-moderate and severe patients. A total of 64 COVID-19 patients, 27 healthy controls were consecutively enrolled in the study. Serum concentrations of biomarkers including IL-1ß, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 were quantified by bead-based multiplex analysis and Serum concentration of IL-8 and IL-32 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Interestingly, among the blood parameters, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower in severe COVID-19 patients than in the other, on the contrary, CRP was significantly higher in severe patients than in other groups. The cytokines that best distinguished controls from COVID-19 patients were IL-8 and IL-32, while IL-6 resulted the better variables for discriminate severe group. The best model performance for severe group was obtained by the combination of IL-32, IL-6, IFN-γ, and CRP serum concentration showing an AUC = 0.83. A cut off of 15 pg/ml of IL-6 greatly discriminate survivor from death patients. New insights related to the cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients, highlighting different severity of disease infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokines/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Interleukins/blood , Lung/immunology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Interleukins/immunology , Lymphocyte Count/methods , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
5.
Nat Immunol ; 23(1): 62-74, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514418

ABSTRACT

The molecular mechanisms governing orderly shutdown and retraction of CD4+ type 1 helper T (TH1) cell responses remain poorly understood. Here we show that complement triggers contraction of TH1 responses by inducing intrinsic expression of the vitamin D (VitD) receptor and the VitD-activating enzyme CYP27B1, permitting T cells to both activate and respond to VitD. VitD then initiated the transition from pro-inflammatory interferon-γ+ TH1 cells to suppressive interleukin-10+ cells. This process was primed by dynamic changes in the epigenetic landscape of CD4+ T cells, generating super-enhancers and recruiting several transcription factors, notably c-JUN, STAT3 and BACH2, which together with VitD receptor shaped the transcriptional response to VitD. Accordingly, VitD did not induce interleukin-10 expression in cells with dysfunctional BACH2 or STAT3. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CD4+ T cells of patients with COVID-19 were TH1-skewed and showed de-repression of genes downregulated by VitD, from either lack of substrate (VitD deficiency) and/or abnormal regulation of this system.


Subject(s)
Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase/metabolism , Basic-Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors/metabolism , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Complement C3a/immunology , Complement C3b/immunology , Humans , JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Receptors, Calcitriol/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , STAT3 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Signal Transduction/immunology , Transcription, Genetic/genetics
6.
J Virol ; 96(2): e0106321, 2022 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476388

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 affects multiple organs. Clinical data from the Mount Sinai Health System show that substantial numbers of COVID-19 patients without prior heart disease develop cardiac dysfunction. How COVID-19 patients develop cardiac disease is not known. We integrated cell biological and physiological analyses of human cardiomyocytes differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the presence of interleukins (ILs) with clinical findings related to laboratory values in COVID-19 patients to identify plausible mechanisms of cardiac disease in COVID-19 patients. We infected hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes from healthy human subjects with SARS-CoV-2 in the absence and presence of IL-6 and IL-1ß. Infection resulted in increased numbers of multinucleated cells. Interleukin treatment and infection resulted in disorganization of myofibrils, extracellular release of troponin I, and reduced and erratic beating. Infection resulted in decreased expression of mRNA encoding key proteins of the cardiomyocyte contractile apparatus. Although interleukins did not increase the extent of infection, they increased the contractile dysfunction associated with viral infection of cardiomyocytes, resulting in cessation of beating. Clinical data from hospitalized patients from the Mount Sinai Health System show that a significant portion of COVID-19 patients without history of heart disease have elevated troponin and interleukin levels. A substantial subset of these patients showed reduced left ventricular function by echocardiography. Our laboratory observations, combined with the clinical data, indicate that direct effects on cardiomyocytes by interleukins and SARS-CoV-2 infection might underlie heart disease in COVID-19 patients. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 infects multiple organs, including the heart. Analyses of hospitalized patients show that a substantial number without prior indication of heart disease or comorbidities show significant injury to heart tissue, assessed by increased levels of troponin in blood. We studied the cell biological and physiological effects of virus infection of healthy human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes in culture. Virus infection with interleukins disorganizes myofibrils, increases cell size and the numbers of multinucleated cells, and suppresses the expression of proteins of the contractile apparatus. Viral infection of cardiomyocytes in culture triggers release of troponin similar to elevation in levels of COVID-19 patients with heart disease. Viral infection in the presence of interleukins slows down and desynchronizes the beating of cardiomyocytes in culture. The cell-level physiological changes are similar to decreases in left ventricular ejection seen in imaging of patients' hearts. These observations suggest that direct injury to heart tissue by virus can be one underlying cause of heart disease in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Myocytes, Cardiac , Cells, Cultured , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/immunology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/pathology , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/virology , Myocytes, Cardiac/immunology , Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology , Myocytes, Cardiac/virology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 642860, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231336

ABSTRACT

Cytokine storm (CS), an excessive release of proinflammatory cytokines upon overactivation of the innate immune system, came recently to the focus of interest because of its role in the life-threatening consequences of certain immune therapies and viral diseases, including CAR-T cell therapy and Covid-19. Because complement activation with subsequent anaphylatoxin release is in the core of innate immune stimulation, studying the relationship between complement activation and cytokine release in an in vitro CS model holds promise to better understand CS and identify new therapies against it. We used peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured in the presence of autologous serum to test the impact of complement activation and inhibition on cytokine release, testing the effects of liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome), zymosan and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as immune activators and heat inactivation of serum, EDTA and mini-factor H (mfH) as complement inhibitors. These activators induced significant rises of complement activation markers C3a, C4a, C5a, Ba, Bb, and sC5b-9 at 45 min of incubation, with or without ~5- to ~2,000-fold rises of IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13 and TNFα at 6 and 18 h later. Inhibition of complement activation by the mentioned three methods had differential inhibition, or even stimulation of certain cytokines, among which effects a limited suppressive effect of mfH on IL-6 secretion and significant stimulation of IL-10 implies anti-CS and anti-inflammatory impacts. These findings suggest the utility of the model for in vitro studies on CS, and the potential clinical use of mfH against CS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Complement Activation , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Complement Factor H/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology
9.
Life Sci ; 276: 119437, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157592

ABSTRACT

In Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a decreased number of regulatory T (Treg) cells and their mediated factors lead to a hyperinflammatory state due to overactivation of the inflammatory cells and factors during the infection. In the current study, we evaluated the Nanocurcumin effects on the Treg cell population and corresponding factors in mild and severe COVID-19 patients. To investigate the Nanocurcumin effects, 80 COVID-19 patients (40 at the severe stage and 40 at the mild stage) were selected and classified into Nanocurcumin and placebo arms. In both the Nanocurcumin and placebo groups, the Treg cell frequency, the gene expression of Treg transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), and cytokines (IL-10, IL-35, and TGF-ß), as well as the serum levels of cytokines were measured before and after treatment. In both mild and severe COVID-19 patients, Nanocurcumin could considerably upregulate the frequency of Treg cells, the expression levels of FoxP3, IL-10, IL-35, and TGF-ß, as well as the serum secretion levels of cytokines in the Nanocurcumin-treated group compared to the placebo group. The abovementioned factors were remarkably increased in the post-treatment with Nanocurcumin before pre-treatment conditions. By contrast, it has been observed no notable alteration in the placebo group. Our findings revealed the SinaCurcumin® effective function in a significant increase in the number of Treg cells and their mediated factors in the Nanocurcumin group than in the placebo group in both mild and severe patients. Hence, it would be an efficient therapeutic agent in rehabilitating COVID-19 infected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Curcumin/pharmacology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/drug effects , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/drug effects , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Forkhead Transcription Factors/genetics , Forkhead Transcription Factors/metabolism , Gene Expression/drug effects , Humans , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukins/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Nanomedicine/methods , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Transforming Growth Factor beta/immunology
10.
J Int Med Res ; 49(3): 3000605211002695, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145418

ABSTRACT

Over the past several decades, studies have demonstrated the existence of bi-directional relationships between periodontal disease and systemic conditions. Periodontitis is a polymicrobial and multifactorial disease involving both host and environmental factors. Tissue destruction is primarily associated with hyperresponsiveness of the host resulting in release of inflammatory mediators. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a major role in bacterial stimulation and tissue destruction. In addition, these cytokines are thought to underlie the associations between periodontitis and systemic conditions. Current research suggests that increased release of cytokines from host cells, referred to as the cytokine storm, is associated with disease progression in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). An intersection between periodontitis and pulmonary disease is biologically plausible. Hence, we reviewed the evidence linking COVID-19, cytokines, and periodontal disease. Plaque control is essential to prevent exchange of bacteria between the mouth and the lungs, reducing the risk of lung disease. Understanding these associations may help identify individuals at high risk and deliver appropriate care at early stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Dental Plaque/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Periodontitis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress, Psychological/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Dental Plaque/complications , Dental Plaque/genetics , Dental Plaque/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/immunology , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/metabolism , Periodontitis/complications , Periodontitis/genetics , Periodontitis/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/genetics , Stress, Psychological/virology , Tooth/immunology , Tooth/pathology , Tooth/virology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
11.
Trends Immunol ; 42(1): 3-5, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065236

ABSTRACT

A unique feature of the cytokine storm in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is the dramatic elevation of interleukin 10 (IL-10). This was thought to be a negative feedback mechanism to suppress inflammation. However, several lines of clinical evidence suggest that dramatic early proinflammatory IL-10 elevation may play a pathological role in COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Epidemics , Humans , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Cytokine ; 141: 155456, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062308

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Olfactory and gustatory dysfunction (OD/GD) are now recognized as typical symptoms of COVID-19 infection. However, their pathogenesis remains unclear and no clear prognostic factors have been identified. We have analyzed a cohort of mild/moderate hospitalized patients to identify possible clinical or immunological predictors of recovery from OD/GD. METHODS: Clinical and biological parameters were reviewed along with associated comorbidities. Chemosensory Complaint Score was administered on admission and 30 days after the first negative swab. Unpaired Wilcoxon and chi-squared tests were used to compare the variables in the patients who recovered versus those who did not. RESULTS: From a cohort of 119 hospitalized patients, 43 (36%) reported OD/GD on admission. 60.6% had a full recovery from OD and 69.2% from GD. Only the concentration of IL-10 on admission emerged as significantly associated with recovery of taste (p = 0.041) while allergic respiratory disease was more prevalent in the group who did not recover from OD (p = 0.049) and GD (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that COVID-19 associated OD/GD is an inflammatory-mediated condition and that clinical and immunological parameters could predict the evolution of these symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Interleukin-10/blood , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Olfaction Disorders/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Taste Disorders/etiology , Taste Disorders/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Inflammation Mediators/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Olfaction Disorders/blood , Prognosis , Recovery of Function/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Taste Disorders/blood
13.
Nat Immunol ; 22(3): 322-335, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060966

ABSTRACT

Immune system dysfunction is paramount in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and fatality rate. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells involved in mucosal immunity and protection against viral infections. Here, we studied the immune cell landscape, with emphasis on MAIT cells, in cohorts totaling 208 patients with various stages of disease. MAIT cell frequency is strongly reduced in blood. They display a strong activated and cytotoxic phenotype that is more pronounced in lungs. Blood MAIT cell alterations positively correlate with the activation of other innate cells, proinflammatory cytokines, notably interleukin (IL)-18, and with the severity and mortality of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. We also identified a monocyte/macrophage interferon (IFN)-α-IL-18 cytokine shift and the ability of infected macrophages to induce the cytotoxicity of MAIT cells in an MR1-dependent manner. Together, our results suggest that altered MAIT cell functions due to IFN-α-IL-18 imbalance contribute to disease severity, and their therapeutic manipulation may prevent deleterious inflammation in COVID-19 aggravation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Interleukin-18/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Case-Control Studies , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cohort Studies , Female , France , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-15/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , RNA-Seq , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Vero Cells , Young Adult
14.
Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets ; 22(1): 1-5, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052469

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been a challenge for emergency care units worldwide due to the large numbers of patients, the scarcity of information, the medical resources, and the uncertainty regarding the disease's etiology and pathogenesis. The transmission of the virus and a probable post-pandemic of SARS-CoV-2 will depend on how deep this disease, the duration of immunity and the degree of cross immunity between SARS-CoV-2 and other pathogens either bacteria or fungi can be understood. Most mortalities have been related to an atypical pneumonia consisted of a sudden worsening of general condition of the admitted positive COVID-19 patients. The severe thromboembolism, often characterized by violent pulmonary and systemic complications, have been described with a blend of inflammatory-infectious patterns that rapidly shifted into a typical systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or into an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that eventually concluded into a multi-organ failure (MOF) and death. The fatality rate reported in our Covid-19 structure, SG Moscati Hospital of Taranto province in Italy, was higher in elderly male people with preexisting chronic pulmonary disease (COPD), patients with cancer and preexisting cardio-vascular diseases (CVD). We assumed a different theoretical position to clarify the higher mortality seen among those patients that was not as obvious as it appeared, we thus offered different pathophysiological picture that could help to recent solutions in therapy and prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interleukin-10/deficiency , Interleukin-10/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
15.
JCI Insight ; 6(1)2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027164

ABSTRACT

Immune and inflammatory responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contribute to disease severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the utility of specific immune-based biomarkers to predict clinical outcome remains elusive. Here, we analyzed levels of 66 soluble biomarkers in 175 Italian patients with COVID-19 ranging from mild/moderate to critical severity and assessed type I IFN-, type II IFN-, and NF-κB-dependent whole-blood transcriptional signatures. A broad inflammatory signature was observed, implicating activation of various immune and nonhematopoietic cell subsets. Discordance between IFN-α2a protein and IFNA2 transcript levels in blood suggests that type I IFNs during COVID-19 may be primarily produced by tissue-resident cells. Multivariable analysis of patients' first samples revealed 12 biomarkers (CCL2, IL-15, soluble ST2 [sST2], NGAL, sTNFRSF1A, ferritin, IL-6, S100A9, MMP-9, IL-2, sVEGFR1, IL-10) that when increased were independently associated with mortality. Multivariate analyses of longitudinal biomarker trajectories identified 8 of the aforementioned biomarkers (IL-15, IL-2, NGAL, CCL2, MMP-9, sTNFRSF1A, sST2, IL-10) and 2 additional biomarkers (lactoferrin, CXCL9) that were substantially associated with mortality when increased, while IL-1α was associated with mortality when decreased. Among these, sST2, sTNFRSF1A, IL-10, and IL-15 were consistently higher throughout the hospitalization in patients who died versus those who recovered, suggesting that these biomarkers may provide an early warning of eventual disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Calgranulin B/genetics , Calgranulin B/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Chemokine CCL2/immunology , Chemokine CXCL9/genetics , Chemokine CXCL9/immunology , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Ferritins/genetics , Ferritins/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/genetics , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/immunology , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-15/genetics , Interleukin-15/immunology , Interleukin-2/genetics , Interleukin-2/immunology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lactoferrin/genetics , Lactoferrin/immunology , Lipocalin-2/genetics , Lipocalin-2/immunology , Male , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/genetics , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/immunology , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology
16.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 23(2): e13556, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999164

ABSTRACT

This retrospective matched cohort study describes 30 solid organ transplant (SOT) patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) matched 1:2 to 60 non-SOT patients (control group) based on age, body mass index (BMI), and comorbidities (hypertension and diabetes mellitus with hemoglobin A1c > 8.0%). The SOT group had a higher proportion of cardiovascular disease (P < .05). During the index hospitalization, there were no significant differences with regard to disease severity or critical care needs (mechanical intubation, vasopressors, and renal replacement therapy). At 28 days, 4 (13%) patients died in the SOT group and 8 (13%) patients died in the control group (P = 1.0). Nineteen patients received tocilizumab in the SOT group compared to 29 patients in the control group. Among these patients, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL2R) levels increased after tocilizumab and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels decreased after tocilizumab. Overall, SOT patients had comparable mortality to non-SOT patients, although numerically more SOT patients received tocilizumab (63% vs 48%) and steroids (37% vs 20%). Larger, multi-center studies are needed to ascertain these findings. Lastly, the complex cytokine release syndrome in COVID-19 remains an area of intense research and the analysis of key interleukin levels (IL-6, IL-10, and sIL2R) in this study contributes to the understanding of this process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Transplantation , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/physiopathology , Female , Heart Transplantation , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Liver Transplantation , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Interleukin-2/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
17.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(23): 12536-12544, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-995014

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to study the dynamics of cytokines and lymphocyte subsets and their correlation with the prognosis of patients with severe COVID-19. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The lymphocyte subsets and cytokines of 31 patients with severe COVID-19 (7 deaths and 24 survivals) were longitudinally analyzed. RESULTS: The mean age of enrolled patients was 64 years, 24 (77.4%) patients were men, and 23 (74.2%) patients had comorbidities. Compared with survival group, the death group showed significant and sustained increases in the levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 from baseline to 28 days after admission (all p<0.05). No significant differences were observed in the levels of TNF-α, IL-1b, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-12P70, IL-17, IFN-α, and IFN-γ between the death group and survival group during the follow-up (all p>0.05). The absolute counts of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and CD45+ T cells were lower in both survival group and death group patients from hospital admission to 3 days after admission, and gradually recovered in 4 to 35 days in the survival group, but continually stayed at low levels in the death group during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The kinetic changes of cytokines and lymphocyte subsets are related with the prognosis of patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-12/immunology , Interleukin-17/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-2/immunology , Interleukin-4/immunology , Interleukin-5/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Leukocyte Common Antigens/immunology , Longitudinal Studies , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
18.
BMC Pulm Med ; 20(1): 301, 2020 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-925848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) rapidly reached pandemic proportions. Given that the main target of SARS-CoV-2 are lungs leading to severe pneumonia with hyperactivation of the inflammatory cascade, we conducted a prospective study to assess alveolar inflammatory status in patients with moderate to severe COVID-19. METHODS: Diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed in 33 adult patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection by real-time PCR on nasopharyngeal swab admitted to the Intensive care unit (ICU) (n = 28) and to the Intermediate Medicine Ward (IMW) (n = 5). We analyze the differential cell count, ultrastructure of cells and Interleukin (IL)6, 8 and 10 levels. RESULTS: ICU patients showed a marked increase in neutrophils (1.24 × 105 ml- 1, 0.85-2.07), lower lymphocyte (0.97 × 105 ml- 1, 0.024-0.34) and macrophages fractions (0.43 × 105 ml- 1, 0.34-1.62) compared to IMW patients (0.095 × 105 ml- 1, 0.05-0.73; 0.47 × 105 ml- 1, 0.28-1.01 and 2.14 × 105 ml- 1, 1.17-3.01, respectively) (p < 0.01). Study of ICU patients BAL by electron transmission microscopy showed viral particles inside mononuclear cells confirmed by immunostaining with anti-viral capsid and spike antibodies. IL6 and IL8 were significantly higher in ICU patients than in IMW (IL6 p < 0.01, IL8 p < 0.0001), and also in patients who did not survive (IL6 p < 0.05, IL8 p = 0.05 vs. survivors). IL10 did not show a significant variation between groups. Dividing patients by treatment received, lower BAL concentrations of IL6 were found in patients treated with steroids as compared to those treated with tocilizumab (p < 0.1) or antivirals (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Alveolitis, associated with COVID-19, is mainly sustained by innate effectors which showed features of extensive activation. The burden of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL6 and IL8 in the broncho-alveolar environment is associated with clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Leukocytes/immunology , Lung/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Bronchoalveolar Lavage , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Drug Combinations , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-10/immunology , Italy , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Lung/cytology , Lung/virology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Rate , Virion/metabolism , Virion/ultrastructure
19.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 51(1): e13429, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873289

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus pandemic has affected more than 20 million people so far. Elevated cytokines and suppressed immune responses have been hypothesized to set off a cytokine storm, contributing to ARDS, multiple-organ failure and, in the most severe cases, death. We aimed to quantify the differences in the circulating levels of major inflammatory and immunological markers between severe and nonsevere COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Relevant studies were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS and preprint servers. Risk of bias was assessed for each study, using appropriate checklists. All studies were described qualitatively and a subset was included in the meta-analysis, using forest plots. RESULTS: Based on 23 studies, mean cytokine levels were significantly higher (IL-6: MD, 19.55 pg/mL; CI, 14.80, 24.30; IL-8: MD, 19.18 pg/mL; CI, 2.94, 35.43; IL-10: MD, 3.66 pg/mL; CI, 2.41, 4.92; IL-2R: MD, 521.36 U/mL; CI, 87.15, 955.57; and TNF-alpha: MD, 1.11 pg/mL; CI, 0.07, 2.15) and T-lymphocyte levels were significantly lower (CD4+ T cells: MD, -165.28 cells/µL; CI, -207.58, -122.97; CD8+ T cells: MD, -106.51 cells/µL; CI, -128.59, -84.43) among severe cases as compared to nonsevere ones. There was heterogeneity across studies due to small sample sizes and nonuniformity in outcome assessment and varied definitions of disease severity. The overall quality of studies was sub-optimal. CONCLUSION: Severe COVID-19 is characterized by significantly increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced T lymphocytes. Well-designed and adequately powered prospective studies are needed to amplify the current evidence and provide definitive answers to dilemmas regarding timing and type of anti-COVID-19 therapy particularly in severe patients.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19/blood , Humans , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Lymphocyte Count , Receptors, Interleukin-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
20.
Expert Rev Mol Diagn ; 20(11): 1087-1097, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-800633

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) can trigger a cytokine response storm (CRS) that is associated with high mortality but for which the underlying pathophysiology and diagnostics are not yet well characterized. This review provides an overview of the underlying immune profile of COVID-19-related CRS as well as laboratory markers for acute diagnosis and chronic follow-up of patients with SARS-CoV-2 and CRS. AREAS COVERED: Innate and acquired immune profiles in COVID-19-CRS, RNA-detection methods for SARS-CoV-2 in the setting of CRS including factors that affect assay performance, serology for SARS-CoV-2 in the setting of CRS, and other biomarkers for COVID-19 will be discussed. EXPERT OPINION: Studies support the implication of CRS in the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of COVID-19 through the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines from activated innate and adaptive immune cells. Although these inflammatory molecules, including IL-6, IL-2 R, IL-10, IP-10 and MCP-1, often correlate with disease severity as possible biomarkers, the pathogenic contributions of individual molecules and the therapeutic benefits of targeting them are yet to be demonstrated. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA is the gold standard method for diagnosis of COVID-19 in the context of CRS but assay performance varies and is susceptible to false-negative results even as patients clinically deteriorate due to decreased viral shedding in the setting of CRS. Biomarkers including CRP, ferritin, D-dimer and procalcitonin may provide early clues about progression to CRS and help identify thrombotic and infectious complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CCL2/biosynthesis , Chemokine CCL2/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Interleukin-10/biosynthesis , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-6/biosynthesis , Interleukin-6/immunology , Pandemics , Receptors, Interleukin-2/biosynthesis , Receptors, Interleukin-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
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