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1.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 86-102, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1529016

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunological markers have been described during COVID-19 and persist after recovery. These immune markers are associated with clinical features among SARSCoV-2 infected individuals. Nevertheless, studies reporting a comprehensive analysis of the immune changes occurring during SARS-CoV-2 infection are still limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the antibody response, and the phenotype and function of NK cells and T cells in a Colombian family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA. The frequency, phenotype, and function of NK cells (cocultures with K562 cells) and T-cells (stimulated with spike/RdRp peptides) were assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralization assay. RESULTS: During COVID-19, we observed a high proinflammatory-cytokine production and a reduced CD56bright-NK cell and cytotoxic response. Compared with healthy controls, infected individuals had a higher frequency of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells CD38+HLA-DR-. During the acute phase, CD8+ T cells stimulated with viral peptides exhibited a monofunctional response characterized by high IL-10 production. However, during recovery, we observed a bifunctional response characterized by the co-expression of CD107a and granzyme B or perforin. CONCLUSION: Although the proinflammatory response is a hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection, other phenotypic and functional alterations in NK cells and CD8+ T cells could be associated with the outcome of COVID-19. However, additional studies are required to understand these alterations and to guide future immunotherapy strategies.


Introducción. Se han descrito diferentes marcadores inmunológicos durante la COVID-19, los cuales persisten incluso después de la convalecencia y se asocian con los estadios clínicos de la infección. Sin embargo, aún son pocos los estudios orientados al análisis exhaustivo de las alteraciones del sistema inmunológico en el curso de la infección. Objetivo. Evaluar la producción de citocinas proinflamatorias, la reacción de anticuerpos, y el fenotipo y la función de las células NK y los linfocitos T en una familia colombiana con infección por SARS-CoV-2. Materiales y métodos. Se evaluaron las citocinas proinflamatorias mediante RT-PCR y ELISA; la frecuencia, el fenotipo y la función de las células NK (en cocultivos con células K562) y linfocitos T CD8+ (estimulados con péptidos spike/RdRp) mediante citometría de flujo, y los anticuerpos anti-SARS-CoV-2, mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta y prueba de neutralización por reducción de placa. Resultados. Durante la COVID-19 hubo una producción elevada de citocinas proinflamatorias, con disminución de las células NK CD56bright y reacción citotóxica. Comparados con los controles sanos, los individuos infectados presentaron con gran frecuencia linfocitos T CD8+ disfuncionales CD38+HLA-DR-. Además, en los linfocitos T CD8+ estimulados con péptidos virales, predominó una reacción monofuncional con gran producción de IL-10 durante la fase aguda y una reacción bifuncional caracterizada por la coexpresión de CD107a y granzima B o perforina durante la convalecencia. Conclusión. Aunque la reacción inflamatoria caracteriza la infección por SARS-CoV-2, hay otras alteraciones fenotípicas y funcionales en células NK y linfocitos T CD8+ que podrían asociarse con la progresión de la infección. Se requieren estudios adicionales para entender estas alteraciones y guiar futuras estrategias de inmunoterapia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , CD56 Antigen/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Colombia , Family Health , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, CCR7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
2.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Nov 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to establish an acute treatment protocol to increase serum vitamin D, evaluate the effectiveness of vitamin D3 supplementation, and reveal the potential mechanisms in COVID-19. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 867 COVID-19 cases. Then, a prospective study was conducted, including 23 healthy individuals and 210 cases. A total of 163 cases had vitamin D supplementation, and 95 were followed for 14 days. Clinical outcomes, routine blood biomarkers, serum levels of vitamin D metabolism, and action mechanism-related parameters were evaluated. RESULTS: Our treatment protocol increased the serum 25OHD levels significantly to above 30 ng/mL within two weeks. COVID-19 cases (no comorbidities, no vitamin D treatment, 25OHD <30 ng/mL) had 1.9-fold increased risk of having hospitalization longer than 8 days compared with the cases with comorbidities and vitamin D treatment. Having vitamin D treatment decreased the mortality rate by 2.14 times. The correlation analysis of specific serum biomarkers with 25OHD indicated that the vitamin D action in COVID-19 might involve regulation of INOS1, IL1B, IFNg, cathelicidin-LL37, and ICAM1. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D treatment shortened hospital stay and decreased mortality in COVID-19 cases, even in the existence of comorbidities. Vitamin D supplementation is effective on various target parameters; therefore, it is essential for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/blood , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/genetics , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Dietary Supplements , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/blood , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/genetics , Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/blood , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/genetics , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Vitamins/administration & dosage , Vitamins/pharmacology
3.
Inflammopharmacology ; 29(6): 1769-1776, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is seen in COVID-19 patients, and reducing malnutrition with appropriate therapies may improve these patients' health. This case-control study aimed to assess and compare serum levels of some inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and appetite in COVID-19 patients with respiratory infections that receive glutamine treatment with a control group. METHODS: In this study, patients who consented to use glutamine were considered as the case group and other patients who did not use glutamine were considered as a control group. Two hundred twenty-two COVID-19 patients (51.2 ± 6.7) using L-Glutamine and 230 COVID-19 patients (51.3 ± 8.2) with similar age, gender, and clinical status, as the control group, were included in the study. For 5 days, the case group consumed 10 g of glutamine supplement three times per day. At the end of the 5 days, blood samples were taken again to test for serum levels of IL1ß, tumor necrosis factor-α, malondialdehyde, and total antioxidant capacity, then all data were analyzed. RESULTS: Serum levels of ß-1 interleukin, tumor necrosis factor-α and hs-CRP were significantly reduced with five days of glutamine supplementation (p < 0.05), and patients' appetite during 5 days of glutamine supplementation compared with the control group had a significant increase (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Glutamine supplementation in COVID-19 patients with respiratory infection significantly reduces serum levels of interleukin-1 ß, hs-CRP, and tumor necrosis factor-α and significantly increases appetite, so glutamine supplementation may be useful for COVID-19 patients in the hospital.


Subject(s)
Appetite/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Glutamine/therapeutic use , Inflammation/prevention & control , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Malondialdehyde/blood , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Dietary Supplements , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritional Status
4.
J Clin Invest ; 131(20)2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDMultisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a rare but potentially severe illness that follows exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Kawasaki disease (KD) shares several clinical features with MIS-C, which prompted the use of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), a mainstay therapy for KD. Both diseases share a robust activation of the innate immune system, including the IL-1 signaling pathway, and IL-1 blockade has been used for the treatment of both MIS-C and KD. The mechanism of action of IVIG in these 2 diseases and the cellular source of IL-1ß have not been defined.METHODSThe effects of IVIG on peripheral blood leukocyte populations from patients with MIS-C and KD were examined using flow cytometry and mass cytometry (CyTOF) and live-cell imaging.RESULTSCirculating neutrophils were highly activated in patients with KD and MIS-C and were a major source of IL-1ß. Following IVIG treatment, activated IL-1ß+ neutrophils were reduced in the circulation. In vitro, IVIG was a potent activator of neutrophil cell death via PI3K and NADPH oxidase, but independently of caspase activation.CONCLUSIONSActivated neutrophils expressing IL-1ß can be targeted by IVIG, supporting its use in both KD and MIS-C to ameliorate inflammation.FUNDINGPatient Centered Outcomes Research Institute; NIH; American Asthma Foundation; American Heart Association; Novo Nordisk Foundation; NIGMS; American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Foundation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Cell Death/immunology , Cell Lineage/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Fas Ligand Protein/immunology , Female , Humans , Infant , Interleukin-1beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/blood , Neutrophil Activation , Neutrophils/classification , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood
6.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 86-102, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332335

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunological markers have been described during COVID-19 and persist after recovery. These immune markers are associated with clinical features among SARSCoV-2 infected individuals. Nevertheless, studies reporting a comprehensive analysis of the immune changes occurring during SARS-CoV-2 infection are still limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the antibody response, and the phenotype and function of NK cells and T cells in a Colombian family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA. The frequency, phenotype, and function of NK cells (cocultures with K562 cells) and T-cells (stimulated with spike/RdRp peptides) were assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralization assay. RESULTS: During COVID-19, we observed a high proinflammatory-cytokine production and a reduced CD56bright-NK cell and cytotoxic response. Compared with healthy controls, infected individuals had a higher frequency of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells CD38+HLA-DR-. During the acute phase, CD8+ T cells stimulated with viral peptides exhibited a monofunctional response characterized by high IL-10 production. However, during recovery, we observed a bifunctional response characterized by the co-expression of CD107a and granzyme B or perforin. CONCLUSION: Although the proinflammatory response is a hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection, other phenotypic and functional alterations in NK cells and CD8+ T cells could be associated with the outcome of COVID-19. However, additional studies are required to understand these alterations and to guide future immunotherapy strategies.


Introducción. Se han descrito diferentes marcadores inmunológicos durante la COVID-19, los cuales persisten incluso después de la convalecencia y se asocian con los estadios clínicos de la infección. Sin embargo, aún son pocos los estudios orientados al análisis exhaustivo de las alteraciones del sistema inmunológico en el curso de la infección. Objetivo. Evaluar la producción de citocinas proinflamatorias, la reacción de anticuerpos, y el fenotipo y la función de las células NK y los linfocitos T en una familia colombiana con infección por SARS-CoV-2. Materiales y métodos. Se evaluaron las citocinas proinflamatorias mediante RT-PCR y ELISA; la frecuencia, el fenotipo y la función de las células NK (en cocultivos con células K562) y linfocitos T CD8+ (estimulados con péptidos spike/RdRp) mediante citometría de flujo, y los anticuerpos anti-SARS-CoV-2, mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta y prueba de neutralización por reducción de placa. Resultados. Durante la COVID-19 hubo una producción elevada de citocinas proinflamatorias, con disminución de las células NK CD56bright y reacción citotóxica. Comparados con los controles sanos, los individuos infectados presentaron con gran frecuencia linfocitos T CD8+ disfuncionales CD38+HLA-DR-. Además, en los linfocitos T CD8+ estimulados con péptidos virales, predominó una reacción monofuncional con gran producción de IL-10 durante la fase aguda y una reacción bifuncional caracterizada por la coexpresión de CD107a y granzima B o perforina durante la convalecencia. Conclusión. Aunque la reacción inflamatoria caracteriza la infección por SARS-CoV-2, hay otras alteraciones fenotípicas y funcionales en células NK y linfocitos T CD8+ que podrían asociarse con la progresión de la infección. Se requieren estudios adicionales para entender estas alteraciones y guiar futuras estrategias de inmunoterapia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , CD56 Antigen/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Colombia , Family Health , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, CCR7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
7.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228897

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the syndrome caused by the infection with SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, is characterized, in its severe form, by interstitial diffuse pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS and systemic manifestations of COVID-19 are mainly due to an exaggerated immune response triggered by the viral infection. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), an inflammatory syndrome characterized by elevated levels of circulating cytokines, and endothelial dysfunction are systemic manifestations of COVID-19. CRS is also an adverse event of immunotherapy (IMTX), the treatment of diseases using drugs, cells, and antibodies to stimulate or suppress the immune system. Graft-versus-host disease complications after an allogeneic stem cell transplant, toxicity after the infusion of chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies can all lead to CRS. It is hypothesized that anti-inflammatory drugs used for treatment of CRS in IMTX may be useful in reducing the mortality in COVID-19, whereas IMTX itself may help in ameliorating effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this paper, we focused on the potential shared mechanisms and differences between COVID-19 and IMTX-related toxicities. We performed a systematic review of the clinical trials testing anti-inflammatory therapies and of the data published from prospective trials. Preliminary evidence suggests there might be a benefit in targeting the cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of COVID-19, especially by inhibiting the interleukin-6 pathway. Many other approaches based on novel drugs and cell therapies are currently under investigation and may lead to a reduction in hospitalization and mortality due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Immunotherapy/methods , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Nitriles , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyrimidines , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
8.
Life Sci ; 276: 119376, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157590

ABSTRACT

The severe forms and worsened outcomes of COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 19) are closely associated with hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cells express Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is the entrance door for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The hallmarks of severe illness caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection are increased levels of IL-6, C-reactive protein, D-dimer, ferritin, neutrophilia and lymphopenia, pulmonary intravascular coagulopathy and microthrombi of alveolar capillaries. The endothelial glycocalyx, a proteoglycan- and glycoprotein-rich layer covering the luminal side of endothelial cells, contributes to vascular homeostasis. It regulates vascular tonus and permeability, prevents thrombosis, and modulates leukocyte adhesion and inflammatory response. We hypothesized that cytokine production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with COVID-19 leads to glycocalyx degradation. A cohort of 20 hospitalized patients with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis and healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. Mechanisms associated with glycocalyx degradation in COVID-19 were investigated. Increased plasma concentrations of IL-6 and IL1-ß, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and glycocalyx components were detected in plasma from COVID-19 patients compared to plasma from healthy subjects. Plasma from COVID-19 patients induced glycocalyx shedding in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and disrupted redox balance. Treatment of HUVECs with low molecular weight heparin inhibited the glycocalyx perturbation. In conclusion, plasma from COVID-19 patients promotes glycocalyx shedding and redox imbalance in endothelial cells, and heparin treatment potentially inhibits glycocalyx disruption.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Glycocalyx/pathology , Heparin/pharmacology , Aged , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/virology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , Cell Adhesion/physiology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Female , Glycocalyx/metabolism , Glycocalyx/virology , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Oxidation-Reduction , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/metabolism
9.
Sci Signal ; 14(673)2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127536

ABSTRACT

IL-1ß is a key mediator of the cytokine storm linked to high morbidity and mortality from COVID-19, and IL-1ß blockade with anakinra and canakinumab during COVID-19 infection has entered clinical trials. Using mass cytometry of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we identified effector memory CD4+ T cells and CD4-CD8low/-CD161+ T cells, specifically those positive for the chemokine receptor CCR6, as the circulating immune subtypes with the greatest response to IL-1ß. This response manifested as increased phosphorylation and, thus, activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB and was also seen in other subsets, including CD11c+ myeloid dendritic cells, classical monocytes, two subsets of natural killer cells (CD16-CD56brightCD161- and CD16-CD56dimCD161+), and lineage- (Lin-) cells expressing CD161 and CD25. IL-1ß also induced a rapid but less robust increase in the phosphorylation of the kinase p38 as compared to that of NF-κB in most of these immune cell subsets. Prolonged IL-1ß stimulation increased the phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT3 and to a lesser extent that of STAT1 and STAT5 across various immune cell types. IL-1ß-induced production of IL-6 likely led to the activation of STAT1 and STAT3 at later time points. Interindividual heterogeneity and inhibition of STAT activation by anakinra raise the possibility that assays measuring NF-κB phosphorylation in response to IL-1ß in CCR6+ T cell subtypes could identify those patients at higher risk of cytokine storm and most likely to benefit from IL-1ß-neutralizing therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/blood , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/pharmacology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Monocytes/classification , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , NF-kappa B/blood , Pandemics , Phosphorylation , Receptors, CCR6/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , STAT Transcription Factors/blood , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/blood
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 156, 2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069547

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) worldwide, it is necessary to ascertain essential immune inflammatory parameters that describe the severity of the disease and provide guidance for treatment. We performed network meta-analyses to determine differences in blood cells, lymphocyte subsets, and cytokines in COVID-19 patients with different clinical stages. METHODS: Databases were systematically searched to May 2, 2020, and updated on June 1, 2020. Network meta-analyses were conducted via Stata 15.0, and the mean difference (MD) and its 95% CI were used as the effect values of the pooled analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-one studies were included involving 8647 COVID-19 patients, White blood cell (WBC), neutrophil (NEUT), IL-6, and IL-10 counts increased significantly with worsening of the COVID-19, while lymphocyte (LYM) counts decreased. The levels of platelet (PLT), CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells in severe and critical patients were significantly lower than those in mild patients. IL-1ß count was significantly elevated in critical patients. CONCLUSIONS: Immune suppression and inflammatory injury play crucial roles in the progression of COVID-19, and the identification of susceptible cells and cytokines provide guidance for the early and accurate treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Cells , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Lymphocyte Subsets , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Network Meta-Analysis , Neutrophils , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 156(7): 332-335, 2021 04 09.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957301

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Rise of central cytokines resulting from infections produces neuronal changes. Covid-19 allows the study of depressive symptoms in sustained stress and its relationship with molecular mechanisms. OBJECTIVES: To assess correlation between IL-6, IL-1ß and TNF-α and depressive symptoms. Characterize the depressive symptoms present. METHODS: Observational study. Patients admitted for Covid-19 older than 60 years with a interleukin determination were included. The Yesavage Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used, associating each item with a neurotransmitter. RESULTS: 27 patients included. We did not find correlation between IL-6 levels and the GDS scale score (rho=0.204; 95% CI -0.192 to 0.543); with IL-1ß levels (rho=-0.126; 95% CI -0.490 to 0.276); nor of TNF-α (rho=-0.033; 95% CI -0.416 to 0.360). 3 patients (11.1%) presented score compatible with depressive disorder. It was associated with a deficiency of noradrenaline and serotonin. CONCLUSIONS: We found no correlation between the levels of IL-6, IL-1ß, and TNF-α with the GDS score. Depressive symptomatology is similar to vascular depressions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/immunology , Depression/virology , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Depression/blood , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors
12.
Lab Chip ; 21(2): 331-343, 2021 01 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933730

ABSTRACT

Despite widespread concern regarding cytokine storms leading to severe morbidity in COVID-19, rapid cytokine assays are not routinely available for monitoring critically ill patients. We report the clinical application of a digital protein microarray platform for rapid multiplex quantification of cytokines from critically ill COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at the University of Michigan Hospital. The platform comprises two low-cost modules: (i) a semi-automated fluidic dispensing/mixing module that can be operated inside a biosafety cabinet to minimize the exposure of the technician to the virus infection and (ii) a 12-12-15 inch compact fluorescence optical scanner for the potential near-bedside readout. The platform enabled daily cytokine analysis in clinical practice with high sensitivity (<0.4 pg mL-1), inter-assay repeatability (∼10% CV), and rapid operation providing feedback on the progress of therapy within 4 hours. This test allowed us to perform serial monitoring of two critically ill patients with respiratory failure and to support immunomodulatory therapy using the selective cytopheretic device (SCD). We also observed clear interleukin-6 (IL-6) elevations after receiving tocilizumab (IL-6 inhibitor) while significant cytokine profile variability exists across all critically ill COVID-19 patients and to discover a weak correlation between IL-6 to clinical biomarkers, such as ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP). Our data revealed large subject-to-subject variability in patients' response to COVID-19, reaffirming the need for a personalized strategy guided by rapid cytokine assays.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Digital Technology/methods , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Protein Array Analysis/methods , Algorithms , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Critical Illness , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Equipment Design , Ferritins/analysis , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Limit of Detection , Monitoring, Physiologic/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
13.
Cell Death Dis ; 11(10): 921, 2020 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894382

ABSTRACT

The immunological mechanisms underlying the clinical presentation of SARS-CoV-2 infection and those influencing the disease outcome remain to be defined. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described to be highly increased during COVID-19, however, their role remains elusive. We performed an in depth analysis of MDSC in 128 SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. Polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSC expanded during COVID-19, in particular in patients who required intensive care treatments, and correlated with IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α plasma levels. PMN-MDSC inhibited T-cells IFN-γ production upon SARS-CoV-2 peptides stimulation, through TGF-ß- and iNOS-mediated mechanisms, possibly contrasting virus elimination. Accordingly, a multivariate regression analysis found a strong association between PMN-MDSC percentage and fatal outcome of the disease. The PMN-MDSC frequency was higher in non-survivors than survivors at the admission time, followed by a decreasing trend. Interestingly, this trend was associated with IL-6 increase in non-survivors but not in survivors. In conclusion, this study indicates PMN-MDSC as a novel factor in the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV2 infection, and open up to new therapeutic options.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Aged , Area Under Curve , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism , Pandemics , Peptides/immunology , Peptides/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , Transforming Growth Factor beta/blood , Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism
14.
JCI Insight ; 5(17)2020 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676865

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDElevated levels of inflammatory cytokines have been associated with poor outcomes among COVID-19 patients. It is unknown, however, how these levels compare with those observed in critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or sepsis due to other causes.METHODSWe used a Luminex assay to determine expression of 76 cytokines from plasma of hospitalized COVID-19 patients and banked plasma samples from ARDS and sepsis patients. Our analysis focused on detecting statistical differences in levels of 6 cytokines associated with cytokine storm (IL-1ß, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, and TNF-α) between patients with moderate COVID-19, severe COVID-19, and ARDS or sepsis.RESULTSFifteen hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 9 of whom were critically ill, were compared with critically ill patients with ARDS (n = 12) or sepsis (n = 16). There were no statistically significant differences in baseline levels of IL-1ß, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, and TNF-α between patients with COVID-19 and critically ill controls with ARDS or sepsis.CONCLUSIONLevels of inflammatory cytokines were not higher in severe COVID-19 patients than in moderate COVID-19 or critically ill patients with ARDS or sepsis in this small cohort. Broad use of immunosuppressive therapies in ARDS has failed in numerous Phase 3 studies; use of these therapies in unselected patients with COVID-19 may be unwarranted.FUNDINGFunding was received from NHLBI K23 HL125663 (AJR); The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation OPP1113682 (AJR and CAB); Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases #1016687 NIH/NIAID U19AI057229-16; Stanford Maternal Child Health Research Institute; and Chan Zuckerberg Biohub (CAB).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Sepsis/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/blood , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/immunology , Interleukin-18/blood , Interleukin-18/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-6/immunology , Interleukin-8/blood , Interleukin-8/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Sepsis/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
15.
Cytokine ; 134: 155190, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-642386

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID19) is a life-threatening infection with uncertain progression and outcome. Assessing the severity of the disease for worsening patients is of importance in making decisions related to supportive mechanical ventilation and aggressive treatments. This was a prospective, non-randomized study that included hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID19. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed during hospitalization, and we calculated a prediction paradigm for 30-day mortality based on the serum levels of interleukin1ß (IL1ß), interleukin6 (IL6), interleukin8 (IL8), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) measured by next-generation ELISA. Data of 71 COVID19 patients, mean age 62 years, SD13.8, 50 males, 21 females, were analyzed. Twelve (16.9%) patients died within 7-39 days of their first COVID19 positive nasopharyngeal test. Levels of IL6 and TNFα were significantly higher in patients that did not survive. IL6 predicted mortality at the cut-off value of 163.4 pg/ml, with a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 57.6%. Our findings demonstrate that IL6 expression is significant for the prediction of 30-day mortality in hospitalized COVID19 patients and, therefore, may assist in treatment decisions.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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