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1.
Cytokine ; 151: 155804, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630370

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious respiratory disorder caused by a new coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. The pathophysiology of severe COVID-19 is associated with a "cytokine storm". IL-32 is a key modulator in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions and is mostly induced by IL-8. IL-32 modulates important inflammatory pathways (including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1b), contributing to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Il-32 was never evaluated before in COVID-19 patients stratifying as mild-moderate and severe patients. A total of 64 COVID-19 patients, 27 healthy controls were consecutively enrolled in the study. Serum concentrations of biomarkers including IL-1ß, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 were quantified by bead-based multiplex analysis and Serum concentration of IL-8 and IL-32 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Interestingly, among the blood parameters, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower in severe COVID-19 patients than in the other, on the contrary, CRP was significantly higher in severe patients than in other groups. The cytokines that best distinguished controls from COVID-19 patients were IL-8 and IL-32, while IL-6 resulted the better variables for discriminate severe group. The best model performance for severe group was obtained by the combination of IL-32, IL-6, IFN-γ, and CRP serum concentration showing an AUC = 0.83. A cut off of 15 pg/ml of IL-6 greatly discriminate survivor from death patients. New insights related to the cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients, highlighting different severity of disease infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokines/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Interleukins/blood , Lung/immunology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Interleukins/immunology , Lymphocyte Count/methods , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572672

ABSTRACT

Uncontrolled inflammatory responses play a critical role in coronavirus disease (COVID-19). In this context, because the triggering-receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is considered an intrinsic amplifier of inflammatory signals, this study investigated the role of soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1) as a biomarker of the severity and mortality of COVID-19. Based on their clinical scores, we enrolled COVID-19 positive patients (n = 237) classified into mild, moderate, severe, and critical groups. Clinical data and patient characteristics were obtained from medical records, and their plasma inflammatory mediator profiles were evaluated with immunoassays. Plasma levels of sTREM-1 were significantly higher among patients with severe disease compared to all other groups. Additionally, levels of sTREM-1 showed a significant positive correlation with other inflammatory parameters, such as IL-6, IL-10, IL-8, and neutrophil counts, and a significant negative correlation was observed with lymphocyte counts. Most interestingly, sTREM-1 was found to be a strong predictive biomarker of the severity of COVID-19 and was related to the worst outcome and death. Systemic levels of sTREM-1 were significantly correlated with the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-8, which can release TREM-1 from the surface of peripheral blood cells. Our findings indicated that quantification of sTREM-1 could be used as a predictive tool for disease outcome, thus improving the timing of clinical and pharmacological interventions in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Leukocytes/metabolism , Matrix Metalloproteinase 8/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/blood , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil , Female , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/metabolism , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1/metabolism , Young Adult
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 418, 2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565706

ABSTRACT

The systemic processes involved in the manifestation of life-threatening COVID-19 and in disease recovery are still incompletely understood, despite investigations focusing on the dysregulation of immune responses after SARS-CoV-2 infection. To define hallmarks of severe COVID-19 in acute disease (n = 58) and in disease recovery in convalescent patients (n = 28) from Hannover Medical School, we used flow cytometry and proteomics data with unsupervised clustering analyses. In our observational study, we combined analyses of immune cells and cytokine/chemokine networks with endothelial activation and injury. ICU patients displayed an altered immune signature with prolonged lymphopenia but the expansion of granulocytes and plasmablasts along with activated and terminally differentiated T and NK cells and high levels of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. The core signature of seven plasma proteins revealed a highly inflammatory microenvironment in addition to endothelial injury in severe COVID-19. Changes within this signature were associated with either disease progression or recovery. In summary, our data suggest that besides a strong inflammatory response, severe COVID-19 is driven by endothelial activation and barrier disruption, whereby recovery depends on the regeneration of the endothelial integrity.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blood Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Lymphopenia/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CXCL10/blood , Chemokine CXCL9/blood , Cluster Analysis , Convalescence , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Progression , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Granulocytes/immunology , Granulocytes/virology , Hematopoietic Cell Growth Factors/blood , Hepatocyte Growth Factor/blood , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-12 Subunit p40/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Lectins, C-Type/blood , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Lymphopenia/virology , Plasma Cells/immunology , Plasma Cells/virology , Survival Analysis , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/virology
4.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 86-102, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1529016

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunological markers have been described during COVID-19 and persist after recovery. These immune markers are associated with clinical features among SARSCoV-2 infected individuals. Nevertheless, studies reporting a comprehensive analysis of the immune changes occurring during SARS-CoV-2 infection are still limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the antibody response, and the phenotype and function of NK cells and T cells in a Colombian family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA. The frequency, phenotype, and function of NK cells (cocultures with K562 cells) and T-cells (stimulated with spike/RdRp peptides) were assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralization assay. RESULTS: During COVID-19, we observed a high proinflammatory-cytokine production and a reduced CD56bright-NK cell and cytotoxic response. Compared with healthy controls, infected individuals had a higher frequency of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells CD38+HLA-DR-. During the acute phase, CD8+ T cells stimulated with viral peptides exhibited a monofunctional response characterized by high IL-10 production. However, during recovery, we observed a bifunctional response characterized by the co-expression of CD107a and granzyme B or perforin. CONCLUSION: Although the proinflammatory response is a hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection, other phenotypic and functional alterations in NK cells and CD8+ T cells could be associated with the outcome of COVID-19. However, additional studies are required to understand these alterations and to guide future immunotherapy strategies.


Introducción. Se han descrito diferentes marcadores inmunológicos durante la COVID-19, los cuales persisten incluso después de la convalecencia y se asocian con los estadios clínicos de la infección. Sin embargo, aún son pocos los estudios orientados al análisis exhaustivo de las alteraciones del sistema inmunológico en el curso de la infección. Objetivo. Evaluar la producción de citocinas proinflamatorias, la reacción de anticuerpos, y el fenotipo y la función de las células NK y los linfocitos T en una familia colombiana con infección por SARS-CoV-2. Materiales y métodos. Se evaluaron las citocinas proinflamatorias mediante RT-PCR y ELISA; la frecuencia, el fenotipo y la función de las células NK (en cocultivos con células K562) y linfocitos T CD8+ (estimulados con péptidos spike/RdRp) mediante citometría de flujo, y los anticuerpos anti-SARS-CoV-2, mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta y prueba de neutralización por reducción de placa. Resultados. Durante la COVID-19 hubo una producción elevada de citocinas proinflamatorias, con disminución de las células NK CD56bright y reacción citotóxica. Comparados con los controles sanos, los individuos infectados presentaron con gran frecuencia linfocitos T CD8+ disfuncionales CD38+HLA-DR-. Además, en los linfocitos T CD8+ estimulados con péptidos virales, predominó una reacción monofuncional con gran producción de IL-10 durante la fase aguda y una reacción bifuncional caracterizada por la coexpresión de CD107a y granzima B o perforina durante la convalecencia. Conclusión. Aunque la reacción inflamatoria caracteriza la infección por SARS-CoV-2, hay otras alteraciones fenotípicas y funcionales en células NK y linfocitos T CD8+ que podrían asociarse con la progresión de la infección. Se requieren estudios adicionales para entender estas alteraciones y guiar futuras estrategias de inmunoterapia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , CD56 Antigen/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Colombia , Family Health , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, CCR7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
6.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463839

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection in children can trigger cardiovascular manifestations potentially requiring an intensive treatment and defining a new entity named Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), whose features partially overlap with Kawasaki Disease (KD). A cross-sectional study including all diagnoses of MIS-C and KD from April 2020 to May 2021 in our metropolitan area was conducted evaluating clinical, laboratory (including immunological response, cytokines, and markers of myocardial damage), and cardiac (coronary and non-coronary) features at onset of the diseases. Evolution of ventricular dysfunction, valve regurgitations, and coronary lesions was documented. The severity of the disease was also considered based on the need for inotropic support and ICU admission. Twenty-four MIS-C were diagnosed (14 boys, median age 82 months): 13/24 cases (54.17%) presented left ventricular dysfunction, 12/24 (50%) required inotropic support, and 10/24 (41.67%) developed coronary anomalies (CALs). All patients received steroids and IVIG at a median time of 5 days (IQR1:4, IQR3:6.5) from onset of fever and heart function normalized 6 days (IQR1: 5, IQR3: 7) after therapy, while CALs persisted in one. One patient (12.5%) required infliximab because of refractory disease and still presented CALs 18 days after therapy. During the same study period, 15 KD were diagnosed: none had ventricular dysfunction, while 7/15 (46.67%) developed CALs. Three out of 15 patients (20%) still presented CALs 46 days from onset. Compared to KD, MIS-C pts have significantly higher IL8 and similar lymphocytes subpopulations. Despite a more severe presentation and initial cardiac findings compared to KD, the myocardial injury in MIS-C has a rapid response to immunomodulatory treatment (median time 6 days), in terms of ventricular function, valve regurgitations, and troponin. Incidence of CALs is similar at onset, but it tends to regress in most of the cases of MIS-C differently than in KD where CALs persist in up to 40% in the subacute stage after treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/pathology , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/virology
7.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 73(10): 1791-1799, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1391545

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Infection with the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 triggers severe illness with high mortality in a subgroup of patients. Such a critical course of COVID-19 is thought to be associated with the development of cytokine storm, a condition seen in macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). However, specific data demonstrating a clear association of cytokine storm with severe COVID-19 are still lacking. The aim of this study was to directly address whether immune activation in COVID-19 does indeed mimic the conditions found in these classic cytokine storm syndromes. METHODS: Levels of 22 biomarkers were quantified in serum samples from patients with COVID-19 (n = 30 patients, n = 83 longitudinal samples in total), patients with secondary HLH/MAS (n = 50), and healthy controls (n = 9). Measurements were performed using bead array assays and single-marker enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum biomarker levels were assessed for correlations with disease outcome. RESULTS: In patients with secondary HLH/MAS, we observed pronounced activation of the interleukin-18 (IL-18)-interferon-γ axis, increased serum levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and IL-8, and strongly reduced levels of soluble Fas ligand in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. These observations appeared to discriminate immune dysregulation in critical COVID-19 from the well-recognized characteristics of other cytokine storm syndromes. CONCLUSION: Serum biomarker profiles clearly separate COVID-19 from MAS or secondary HLH in terms of distinguishing the severe systemic hyperinflammation that occurs following SARS-CoV-2 infection. These findings could be useful in determining the efficacy of drugs targeting key molecules and pathways specifically associated with systemic cytokine storm conditions in the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Interleukin-18/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/diagnosis , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/blood , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/complications , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/blood , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
8.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5432-5437, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363681

ABSTRACT

This case series describes three patients affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, who developed polyradiculoneuritis as a probable neurological complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In all of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 gr/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases, a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential cMAP. Due to the potential role of inflammation on symptoms development and prognosis, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 levels were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid during the acute phase, while only serum was tested after recovery. Both IL-6 and IL-8 were found increased during the acute phase, both in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid, whereas 4 months after admission (at complete recovery), only IL-8 remained elevated in the serum. These results confirm the inflammatory response that might be linked to peripheral nervous system complications and encourage the use of IL-6 and IL-8 as prognostic biomarkers in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Interleukin-6/cerebrospinal fluid , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Action Potentials/drug effects , Acute Disease , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Neural Conduction/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/pathology , Peripheral Nervous System/virology , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
9.
Biomedica ; 41(Sp. 2): 86-102, 2021 10 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332335

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunological markers have been described during COVID-19 and persist after recovery. These immune markers are associated with clinical features among SARSCoV-2 infected individuals. Nevertheless, studies reporting a comprehensive analysis of the immune changes occurring during SARS-CoV-2 infection are still limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, the antibody response, and the phenotype and function of NK cells and T cells in a Colombian family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA. The frequency, phenotype, and function of NK cells (cocultures with K562 cells) and T-cells (stimulated with spike/RdRp peptides) were assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were determined using indirect immunofluorescence and plaque reduction neutralization assay. RESULTS: During COVID-19, we observed a high proinflammatory-cytokine production and a reduced CD56bright-NK cell and cytotoxic response. Compared with healthy controls, infected individuals had a higher frequency of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells CD38+HLA-DR-. During the acute phase, CD8+ T cells stimulated with viral peptides exhibited a monofunctional response characterized by high IL-10 production. However, during recovery, we observed a bifunctional response characterized by the co-expression of CD107a and granzyme B or perforin. CONCLUSION: Although the proinflammatory response is a hallmark of SARS-CoV-2 infection, other phenotypic and functional alterations in NK cells and CD8+ T cells could be associated with the outcome of COVID-19. However, additional studies are required to understand these alterations and to guide future immunotherapy strategies.


Introducción. Se han descrito diferentes marcadores inmunológicos durante la COVID-19, los cuales persisten incluso después de la convalecencia y se asocian con los estadios clínicos de la infección. Sin embargo, aún son pocos los estudios orientados al análisis exhaustivo de las alteraciones del sistema inmunológico en el curso de la infección. Objetivo. Evaluar la producción de citocinas proinflamatorias, la reacción de anticuerpos, y el fenotipo y la función de las células NK y los linfocitos T en una familia colombiana con infección por SARS-CoV-2. Materiales y métodos. Se evaluaron las citocinas proinflamatorias mediante RT-PCR y ELISA; la frecuencia, el fenotipo y la función de las células NK (en cocultivos con células K562) y linfocitos T CD8+ (estimulados con péptidos spike/RdRp) mediante citometría de flujo, y los anticuerpos anti-SARS-CoV-2, mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta y prueba de neutralización por reducción de placa. Resultados. Durante la COVID-19 hubo una producción elevada de citocinas proinflamatorias, con disminución de las células NK CD56bright y reacción citotóxica. Comparados con los controles sanos, los individuos infectados presentaron con gran frecuencia linfocitos T CD8+ disfuncionales CD38+HLA-DR-. Además, en los linfocitos T CD8+ estimulados con péptidos virales, predominó una reacción monofuncional con gran producción de IL-10 durante la fase aguda y una reacción bifuncional caracterizada por la coexpresión de CD107a y granzima B o perforina durante la convalecencia. Conclusión. Aunque la reacción inflamatoria caracteriza la infección por SARS-CoV-2, hay otras alteraciones fenotípicas y funcionales en células NK y linfocitos T CD8+ que podrían asociarse con la progresión de la infección. Se requieren estudios adicionales para entender estas alteraciones y guiar futuras estrategias de inmunoterapia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , CD56 Antigen/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Colombia , Family Health , Granzymes/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , K562 Cells , Killer Cells, Natural/cytology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Perforin/metabolism , Phenotype , Receptors, CCR7/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes/cytology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood , Young Adult
10.
Cell Transplant ; 30: 9636897211024942, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285159

ABSTRACT

The aim of this clinical trial was to control the cytokine storm by administering mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to critically-ill COVID-19 patients, to evaluate the healing effect, and to systematically investigate how the treatment works. Patients with moderate and critical COVID-19 clinical manifestations were separated as Group 1 (moderate cases, n = 10, treated conventionally), Group 2 (critical cases, n = 10, treated conventionally), and Group 3 (critical cases, n = 10, treated conventionally plus MSCs transplantation therapy of three consecutive doses on treatment days 0, 3, and 6, (as 3 × 106 cells/kg, intravenously). The treatment mechanism of action was investigated with evaluation markers of the cytokine storm, via biochemical parameters, levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, analyses of tissue regeneration via the levels of growth factors, apoptosis markers, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, and granzyme-B, and by the assessment of the immunomodulatory effects via total oxidant/antioxidant status markers and the levels of lymphocyte subsets. In the assessment of the overall mortality rates of all the cases, six patients in Group-2 and three patients in Group-3 died, and there was no loss in Group-1. Proinflammatory cytokines IFNγ, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-2, IL-12, anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-1ra, and growth factors TGF-ß, VEGF, KGF, and NGF levels were found to be significant in Group-3. When Group-2 and Group-3 were compared, serum ferritin, fibrinogen and CRP levels in Group-3 had significantly decreased. CD45 +, CD3 +, CD4 +, CD8 +, CD19 +, HLA-DR +, and CD16 + / CD56 + levels were evaluated. In the statistical comparison of the groups, significance was only determined in respect of neutrophils. The results demonstrated the positive systematic and cellular effects of MSCs application on critically ill COVID-19 patients in a versatile way. This effect plays an important role in curing and reducing mortality in critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation , Adult , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Interferon-gamma/blood , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Leukocyte Common Antigens/metabolism , Lymphocytes/cytology , Lymphocytes/metabolism , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
11.
Virol J ; 18(1): 117, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259206

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, specific cytokines associated with development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and extrapulmonary multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) in COVID-19 patients have not been systematically described. We determined the levels of inflammatory cytokines in patients with COVID-19 and their relationships with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. METHODS: The clinical and laboratory data of 94 COVID-19 patients with and without ARDS were analyzed. The levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α [TNF-α]) were measured on days 1, 3, and 5 following admission. Seventeen healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. Correlations in the levels of inflammatory cytokines with clinical and laboratory variables were analyzed, furthermore, we also explored the relationships of different cytokines with ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD. RESULTS: The ARDS group had higher serum levels of all 4 inflammatory cytokines than the controls, and these levels steadily increased after admission. The ARDS group also had higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 than the non-ARDS group, and the levels of these cytokines correlated significantly with coagulation parameters and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The levels of IL-6 and TNF-α correlated with the levels of creatinine and urea nitrogen, and were also higher in ARDS patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). All 4 inflammatory cytokines had negative correlations with PaO2/FiO2. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α had positive correlations with the APACHE-II score. Relative to survivors, non-survivors had higher levels of IL-6 and IL-10 at admission, and increasing levels over time. CONCLUSIONS: The cytokine storm apparently contributed to the development of ARDS and extrapulmonary MOD in COVID-19 patients. The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 correlated with DIC, and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with AKI. Relative to survivors, patients who died within 28 days had increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokines/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Aged , Blood Urea Nitrogen , COVID-19/pathology , Creatinine/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/pathology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
12.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5432-5437, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258081

ABSTRACT

This case series describes three patients affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, who developed polyradiculoneuritis as a probable neurological complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome was made on the basis of clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and electroneurography. In all of them, the therapeutic approach included the administration of intravenous immunoglobulin (0.4 gr/kg for 5 days), which resulted in the improvement of neurological symptoms. Clinical neurophysiology revealed the presence of conduction block, absence of F waves, and in two cases, a significant decrease in amplitude of compound motor action potential cMAP. Due to the potential role of inflammation on symptoms development and prognosis, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 levels were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid during the acute phase, while only serum was tested after recovery. Both IL-6 and IL-8 were found increased during the acute phase, both in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid, whereas 4 months after admission (at complete recovery), only IL-8 remained elevated in the serum. These results confirm the inflammatory response that might be linked to peripheral nervous system complications and encourage the use of IL-6 and IL-8 as prognostic biomarkers in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Interleukin-6/cerebrospinal fluid , Interleukin-8/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Action Potentials/drug effects , Acute Disease , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/cerebrospinal fluid , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/drug therapy , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Neural Conduction/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/drug effects , Peripheral Nervous System/pathology , Peripheral Nervous System/virology , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/cerebrospinal fluid , Respiratory Insufficiency/drug therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/virology , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
14.
Iran J Immunol ; 18(1): 65-73, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159031

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The role of cytokine storm in the immunopathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been implicated. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of microRNA (miRNA)-10b and serum levels of IL-2 and IL-8 in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from 33 COVID-19 patients and 29 healthy subjects. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, the transcript level of miR-10b was determined by Real-time PCR. In addition, the serum levels of IL-2 and IL-8 were measured in subjects using ELISA. RESULTS: The patient group comprised of 33 patients with COVID-19 (62.4 ± 3.7 years old), 13 (39%) males and 20 (61%) females. In the control group, 29 subjects (56.6 ± 1.6 years old), 9 (31%) males and 20 (69%) females, were included. The expression of miR-10b was significantly downregulated in the peripheral blood of COVID-19 patients in comparison to the healthy controls (fold change= 0.12, P< 0.0001). The levels of IL-2 (P< 0.001) and IL-8 (P< 0.001) were significantly increased in the serum samples of COVID-19 patients compared to the healthy subjects. The expression level of miR-10b was correlated significantly with the serum levels of IL-2 and IL-8 as well as with the age of patients, ESR and CRP levels. CONCLUSIONS: miR-10b is downregulated in the COVID-19 patients and might result in increased levels of IL-2 and IL-8, hence contributing to cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Interleukin-2/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , MicroRNAs/blood , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Circulating MicroRNA/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , MicroRNAs/genetics , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(11): e23656, 2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138003

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Inflammation has been believed to contribute to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Risk factors for death of COVID-19 pneumonia have not yet been well established.In this retrospective cohort study, we included the deceased patients in COVID-19 specialized ICU with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from Guanggu hospital area of Tongji Hospital from February 8th to March 30th. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and outcome data were extracted from electronic medical records using a standard data collection form. We used Spearman rank correlation and Cox regression analysis to explore the risk factors associated with in-hospital death, especially the association between inflammatory cytokines and death.A total of 205 severe/critical COVID-19 pneumonia patients were admitted in the COVID-19 specialized ICU and 75 deceased patients were included in the final analysis. The median age of the deceasing patients was 70 years (IQR 65-79). The common symptoms were fever (78.9%), cough (70.4%), and expectoration (39.4%). The BNP and CRP levels were far beyond the normal reference range. In the Spearman rank correlation analysis, IL-8 was found to be significantly associated with the time from onset to death (rs= -0.30, P = .034) and that from admission to death (rs= -0.32, P = .019). Cox regression showed after adjusting age and sex, IL-8 levels were still significantly associated with the time from onset to death (P = .003) and that from admission to death (P  = .01).IL-8 levels were associated with in-hospital death in severe/critical COVID-19 patients, which could help clinicians to identify patients with high risk of death at an early stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Interleukin-8/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , China , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/mortality , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
16.
J Infect Dis ; 223(4): 568-580, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The immune protective mechanisms during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection remain to be deciphered for the development of an effective intervention approach. METHODS: We examined early responses of interleukin 37 (IL-37), a powerful anti-inflammatory cytokine, in 254 SARS-CoV-2-infected patients before any clinical intervention and determined its correlation with clinical prognosis. RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 infection causes elevation of plasma IL-37. Higher early IL-37 responses were correlated with earlier viral RNA negative conversion, chest computed tomographic improvement, and cough relief, consequently resulted in earlier hospital discharge. Further assays showed that higher IL-37 was associated with lower interleukin 6 and interleukin 8 (IL-8) and higher interferon α responses and facilitated biochemical homeostasis. Low IL-37 responses predicted severe clinical prognosis in combination with IL-8 and C-reactive protein. In addition, we observed that IL-37 administration was able to attenuate lung inflammation and alleviate respiratory tissue damage in human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-transgenic mice infected with SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found that IL-37 plays a protective role by antagonizing inflammatory responses while retaining type I interferon, thereby maintaining the functionalities of vital organs. IL-37, IL-8, and C-reactive protein might be formulated as a precise prediction model for screening severe clinical cases and have good value in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Interleukin-1/blood , Adult , Animals , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Interleukin-8/blood , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Middle Aged
17.
In Vivo ; 35(2): 1295-1298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Lately, studies have reported contradicting results on the cytokine storm seen in critically-ill COVID-19 patients. Depending on the control group used, cytokines have been found to be higher, similar or even lower in COVID-19 compared to critical illnesses associated with elevated cytokine concentrations. However, most of these studies do not take into account critical illness severity. Hence, we decided to compare cytokine levels in critically-ill COVID-19 patients and critically-ill patients of a general intensive care unit (ICU), who did not have sepsis or septic shock, but had an equal disease severity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured on ICU admission in mechanically ventilated, COVID-19 (N=36) and non-COVID-19 (N=30) patients, who had not received dexamethasone, and had equal critical illness severity. Non-COVID-19 patients did not have sepsis or septic shock. RESULTS: In our case control study, circulating IL-6 and IL-10 were lower, while TNF-α and IL-8 levels were higher in critically-ill COVID-19 patients, compared to critically-ill non-COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: It is difficult to infer whether the cytokine storm seen in COVID-19 differs from other critical conditions. It is important to recognize that the conclusions of related studies may depend on control group selection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/metabolism , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Control Groups , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/blood
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 626235, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1082695

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The coordinated immune response of the host is the key of the successful combat of the body against SARS-CoV-2 infection and is decisive for the development and progression of COVID-19. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the immunological phenotype of patients are associated with duration of illness in patients with severe COVID-19. Method: In this single-center study, 69 patients with severe or critical COVID-19 were recruited retrospectively. Immunological parameters including counts of white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, and levels of circulating cytokines and cytokine receptors were screened for their association with disease severity, survival and duration of illness of COVID-19. Results: Our data confirmed previous results that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and circulating levels of IL-6 represent prominent biomarker for the prediction of disease severity and survival of COVID-19. However, this study shows for the first time that duration of illness in patients with severe COVID-19 is positively associated with serum levels of IL-8 (P=0.004) and soluble IL-2Rα (P=0.025). Conclusion: The significant association of duration of illness with circulating levels of IL-8 and soluble IL-2Rα in patients with severe COVID-19 implicates that neutrophils and T cells are involved in the evolution of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Interleukin-8/blood , Receptors, Interleukin-2/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-8/immunology , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Receptors, Interleukin-2/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Int Immunol ; 33(4): 241-247, 2021 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066348

ABSTRACT

An expanded myeloid cell compartment is a hallmark of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, data regarding myeloid cell expansion have been collected in Europe, where the mortality rate by COVID-19 is greater than those in other regions including Japan. Thus, characteristics of COVID-19-induced myeloid cell subsets remain largely unknown in the regions with low mortality rates. Here, we analyzed cellular dynamics of myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) subsets and examined whether any of them correlate with disease severity and prognosis, using blood samples from Japanese COVID-19 patients. We observed that polymorphonuclear (PMN)-MDSCs, but not other MDSC subsets, transiently expanded in severe cases but not in mild or moderate cases. Contrary to previous studies in Europe, this subset selectively expanded in survivors of severe cases and subsided before discharge, but such transient expansion was not observed in non-survivors in Japanese cohort. Analysis of plasma cytokine/chemokine levels revealed positive correlation of PMN-MDSC frequencies with IL-8 levels, indicating the involvement of IL-8 on recruitment of PMN-MDSCs to peripheral blood following the onset of severe COVID-19. Our data indicate that transient expansion of the PMN-MDSC subset results in improved clinical outcome. Thus, this myeloid cell subset may be a predictor of prognosis in cases of severe COVID-19 in Japan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Interleukin-8/blood , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Humans , Interleukin-8/immunology , Japan , Leukocyte Count , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Neutrophil Activation/immunology
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