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1.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2105549, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1978130

ABSTRACT

Within the United States, there is a deficit of Geriatricians providing care for older adults, and this deficit will only grow as the population continues to age, meaning all clinicians, particularly Internal Medicine (IM) and Family Medicine (FM) trained physicians, will provide the bulk of primary care for older adults. However, geriatric training requirements for clinicians fall short, and in the case of IM were reduced as of 2022). Serving as a call to action, this article provides insight on ways to enhance geriatric education for all graduate medical trainees, utilizing both conventional teaching and newer, non-traditional media, such as national online journal clubs, podcasts, and online teaching curricula, as well as expanding sites of training to include evidence-based models of care, such as the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Providing geriatric education improves care for older adults and our future selves, ensuring trainees are prepared to care and advocate for this diverse and often vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Geriatrics , Aged , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Graduate , Geriatrics/education , Humans , Internal Medicine/education , United States
2.
West Afr J Med ; 39(7): 678-684, 2022 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1970274

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the perception of the significance of the revision course and satisfaction of resident doctors with the West African College of Physicians (WACP) revision course in internal medicine. METHODS: This was a post-training evaluation of resident doctors who had enrolled for the 2021 membership revision course in internal medicine between August 9-13, 2021. Data were collected through an electronic questionnaire composed of five sections: Sociodemographic characteristics, involvement in research, perception on the significance/expectations from the course, lessons learnt, and perception of the overall coordination of the revision course/recommendations. Descriptive statistics were summarized using frequency tables. Chi-square tests were conducted to determine the association between participants' sociodemographic characteristics and satisfaction with the WACP revision course. RESULTS: The mean age (±SD) of the 119 resident doctors was 34.30 (± 4.81) years and the median duration (range) of residency training was 7 (4-10) years. All participants were currently in medical practice either in teaching hospitals (104,87.4%) or secondary health facilities (15, 12.6%). Overall, 108 (90.8%) doctors were satisfied with the course. Variables that were associated with satisfaction with the WACP revision course included: duration in residency training (doctors that had spent two years or less in the residency training programme) (Chi-square = 21.703, p = <0.001), place of residency training (teaching hospitals) (Chi-square = 67.461, p = <0.001), and participation in research (Chi-square = 47.976, p = <0.001). CONCLUSION: The WACP revision course in internal medicine met its objectives. Engagement of resident doctors in research activities should be undertaken intensely.


OBJECTIFS: Cette étude visait à évaluer la perception de l'importance du cours de révision et la satisfaction des médecins résidents à l'égard du cours de révision en médecine interne du West African College of Physicians (WACP). MÉTHODES: Il s'agissait d'une évaluation post-formation des médecins résidents qui s'étaient inscrits au cours de révision en médecine interne pour les membres de 2021 entre le 9 et le 13 août 2021. Les données ont été recueillies au moyen d'un questionnaire électronique composé de cinq sections : Caractéristiques sociodémographiques, implication dans la recherche, perception de l'importance/attentes du cours, leçons apprises, et perception de la coordination globale du cours de révision/recommandations. Les statistiques descriptives ont été résumées à l'aide de tableaux de fréquence. Des tests de Chi-carré ont été effectués pour déterminer l'association entre les caractéristiques sociodémographiques des participants et la satisfaction du cours de révision WACP. RÉSULTATS: L'âge moyen (±SD) des 119 médecins résidents était de 34,30 (± 4,81) ans et la durée médiane (fourchette) de la formation en résidence était de 7 (4-10) ans. Tous les participants exerçaient actuellement la médecine dans des hôpitaux universitaires (104, 87,4%) ou des établissements de santé secondaires (15, 12,6 %). Dans l'ensemble, 108 (90,8%) médecins étaient satisfaits de la formation. Les variables qui étaient associées à la satisfaction du cours de révision du WACP comprenaient : la durée de la formation en résidence (les médecins ayant passé deux ans ou moins dans le programme de formation en résidence) (Chi-carré = 21.703, p = <0.001), le lieu de formation en résidence (hôpitaux universitaires) (Chi-carré = 67.461, p = <0.001), et la participation à la recherche (Chi-carré = 47.976, p = <0.001). CONCLUSION: Le cours de révision WACP en médecine interne a atteint ses objectifs. L'engagement des médecins résidents dans des activités de recherche devrait être entrepris de manière intensive. Mots-clés: Pratique médicale, Enseignement médical, Formation des résidents, Médecine interne, Afrique.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Child , Humans , Internal Medicine/education , Pandemics , Perception , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(9): 2149-2155, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1894664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 disrupted undergraduate clinical education when medical schools removed students from clinical rotations following AAMC recommendations. Clerkship directors (CDs) had to adapt rapidly and modify clerkship curricula. However, the scope and effects of these modifications are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the initial phase of COVID-19 on the internal medicine (IM) undergraduate clinical education. DESIGN: A nationally representative web survey. PARTICIPANTS: IM CDs from 137 LCME-accredited US medical schools in 2020. MAIN MEASURES: Items (80) assessed clerkship structure and curriculum, assessment in clerkships, post-clerkship IM clinical experiences, and CD roles and support. The framework of Understanding Crisis Response (Royal Society for Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce) was used to determine whether curricular modifications were "amplified," "restarted," "let go," or "ended." KEY RESULTS: Response rate was 74%. In response to COVID-19, 32% (32/101) of clerkships suspended all clinical activities and 66% (67/101) only in-person. Prior to clinical disruption, students spent a median of 8.0 weeks (IQR: 2) on inpatient and 2.0 weeks (IQR: 4) on ambulatory rotations; during clinical re-entry, students were spending 5.0 (IQR: 3) and 1.0 (IQR: 2) weeks, respectively. Bedside teaching and physical exam instruction were "let go" during the early phase. Students were removed from direct patient care for a median of 85.5 days. The sub-internship curriculum remained largely unaffected. Before the pandemic, 11% of schools were using a pass/fail grading system; at clinical re-entry 47% and during the survey period 23% were using it. Due to the pandemic, 78.2% of CDs assumed new roles or had expanded responsibilities; 51% reported decreased scholarly productivity. CONCLUSIONS: Curricular adaptations occurred in IM clerkships across US medical schools as a result of COVID-19. More research is needed to explore the long-term implications of these changes on medical student education and clinical learning environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Humans , Internal Medicine/education
4.
South Med J ; 115(6): 389-393, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1863369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: For resident wellness, it is important to understand and discern the relative contributions of each factor to resident stress. METHODS: After institutional review board approval, a 20-question survey instrument was provided to 90 residents across four specialties (Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, General Surgery, and Orthopedic Surgery) at a university-affiliated health system. The survey was completed from October through November 2020 by 63 residents for a 70% participation rate. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used. RESULTS: The results showed a mean change in status in either direction of 2.66 points on an 11-point scale. Status changes were both positive (less stress) and negative (more stress). Related to the source of change in stress levels, 8 items were seen as predominantly influenced by residency training and 11 factors were predominantly influenced by the pandemic. One item was equally influenced by both. No item was primarily influenced by the sociopolitical climate. For 16 of the 20 items, changes in a negative direction were statistically greater than in a positive direction. CONCLUSIONS: Both positive and negative changes in resident stress status occurred during the pandemic period. Traditional residency stressors remained and because all of the factors were affected by both the pandemic and residency training, efforts to mitigate the negative effects of both need to continue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medicine , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medicine/education , Humans , Internal Medicine/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Hosp Med ; 17(2): 104-111, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700182

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hazard pay for resident physicians has been controversial in the COVID-19 pandemic. Program director (PD) beliefs about hazard pay and the extent of provision to internal medicine (IM) residents are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate hazard pay provision to residents early in the COVID-19 pandemic and pandemic and residency program characteristics associated with hazard pay. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A nationally representative survey was conducted of 429 US/US territory-based IM PDs from August to December 2020. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: Hazard pay provision and PD beliefs about hazard pay were tested for association with factors related to the pandemic surge and program characteristics. RESULTS: Response rate was 61.5% (264/429); 19.5% of PDs reported hazard pay provision. PD belief about hazard pay was equivocal: 33.2% agreed, 43.1% disagreed, and 23.7% were uncertain. Hazard pay occurred more commonly in the Middle-Atlantic Census Division (including New York City) and with earlier surges and greater resident participation in COVID-19 patient care. Hazard pay occurred more commonly where PDs supported hazard pay (74.5% vs. 22.1%, p = .018). Reasons most frequently given in support of hazard pay were essential worker status, equity, and schedule disruption. Those opposed cited professional obligation and equity. CONCLUSION: Hazard pay for IM residents early in the COVID-19 pandemic was nominal but more commonly associated with heavily impacted institutions. Although PD beliefs were mixed, positive belief was associated with provision. The unique role of residents as both essential workers and trainees might explain our varied results. Further investigation may inform future policy, especially in times of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Physicians , Humans , Internal Medicine/education , Pandemics
6.
Acad Med ; 96(12): 1706-1710, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528193

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: In March 2020, medical students at the University of Washington School of Medicine were removed from clinical settings in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. As subinternships are required for graduation and an important way to prepare for internship, a virtual subinternship was created to include practical elements of in-person learning and to address limited teaching faculty from COVID-19 inpatient surges. APPROACH: A virtual, interactive subinternship was developed with case-based teaching sessions, communication and critical literature evaluation skill building, professional development, and creation of independent learning plans. Near-peer teachers (NPTs) were selected from graduating senior medical students who matched into internal medicine. In addition to teaching topics from the Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine curriculum, NPTs engaged in course development, recruited teaching faculty, gathered feedback, and facilitated small groups. Participating students completed pre- and postcourse surveys. OUTCOMES: The 10 students (100%) enrolled in the course who completed both surveys indicated significant improvement in mean scores across 4 domains: evaluating medical literature (3.1/5 to 4.5/5; +1.4, P < .001); developing individual learning plans (3.6/5 to 4.7/5; +1.1, P = .001); perceived ability to efficiently evaluate patients with common internal medicine concerns (3.7/5 to 4.6/5; +0.9, P = .004); and formulating initial diagnostic and therapeutic plans (3.6/5 to 4.6/5; +1.0, P < .001). Themes extracted from open-ended responses included initial skepticism of an online format, the course exceeding expectations, and feeling prepared for internship. NEXT STEPS: Although a virtual subinternship lacks direct patient care, students reported improvement in all 4 domains studied. Future courses would benefit from greater use of simulation and role-playing scenarios for practical skills. The experience with NPTs was encouraging, aiding in the success of the subinternship. The role of NPTs should be cultivated to fill gaps in content delivery and enhance the development of students as educators.


Subject(s)
Internal Medicine/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Peer Group , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Humans , Program Evaluation , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1946237, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287910

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most graduate medical education (GME) training programs conducted virtual interviews for prospective trainees during the 2020-2021 application cycle. Many internal medicine (IM) subspecialty fellowship programs hosted virtual interviews for the first time with little published data to guide best practices.To evaluate how IM subspecialty fellowship applicants perceived the virtual interview day experience.We designed a 38-item questionnaire that was sent via email to applicants in eight IM subspecialty programs at a single tertiary academic medical center (University of California, San Francisco) from September-November, 2020.Seventy-five applicants completed the survey (75/244, 30.7%), including applicants from all eight fellowship programs. Most survey respondents agreed that the length of the virtual interview day (mean = 6.4 hours) was long enough to gather the information they needed (n = 65, 86.7%) and short enough to prevent fatigue (n = 55, 73.3%). Almost all survey respondents agreed that they could adequately assess the clinical experience (n = 71, 97.3%), research opportunities (n = 72, 98.6%), and program culture (n = 68, 93.2%). Of the respondents who attended a virtual educational conference, most agreed it helped to provide a sense of the program's educational culture (n = 20, 66.7%). Areas for improvement were identified, with some survey respondents reporting that the virtual interview day was too long (n = 11) or that they would have preferred to meet more fellows (n = 10).Survey respondents indicated that the virtual interview was an adequate format to learn about fellowship programs. These findings can inform future virtual interviews for GME training programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Internal Medicine/education , Interviews as Topic/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco , School Admission Criteria
10.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(6): 729-730, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279401
11.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 51(2): 177-183, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271025

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has had a significant impact on internal medicine training in the UK. Many unprecedented changes have been made to prioritise the care of affected patients. The medical workforce was re-shaped, training programmes were disrupted, Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (MRCP) examinations were cancelled and their format changed on re-commencement, teaching programmes were suspended and delivery methods amended, out of programme (OOP) opportunities deferred, non-COVID related research halted, trainee progression impacted and trainee mental health and wellbeing suffered. Despite this, the pandemic has undoubtedly created a plethora of unique learning opportunities for trainees that could make them better doctors and healthcare leaders in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internal Medicine/education , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
14.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11106, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154923

ABSTRACT

Introduction: During the COVID-19 pandemic, third-year medical students were temporarily unable to participate in onsite clinical activities. We identified the curricular components of an internal medicine (IM) clerkship that would be compromised if students learned solely from online didactics, case studies, and simulations (i.e., prerounding, oral presentations, diagnostic reasoning, and medical management discussions). Using these guiding principles, we created a virtual rounds (VR) curriculum to provide IM clerkship students with clinical exposure during a virtual learning period. Methods: Held three times a week for 2 weeks, VR consisted of three curricular components. First, clerkship students prerounded on an assigned hospitalized patient by remotely accessing the electronic health record and calling into hospital rounds. Second, each student prepared an oral presentation on their assigned patient. Third, using videoconferencing, students delivered these oral presentations to telemedicine VR small groups consisting of three to four students and three tele-instructors. Tele-instructors then provided feedback on oral presentations and taught clinical concepts. We assessed the effectiveness of VR by anonymously surveying students and tele-instructors. Results: Twenty-nine students and 34 volunteer tele-instructors participated in VR over four blocks. A majority of students felt VR improved their prerounding abilities (86%), oral presentation abilities (93%), and clinical reasoning skills (62%). All students found small group to be useful. Discussion: VR allowed students to practice rounding skills in a supportive team-based setting. The lessons learned from its implementation could facilitate education during future pandemics and could also supplement in-person clerkship education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Internal Medicine/education , Teaching Rounds/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Hospital Medicine/education , Hospital Medicine/trends , Humans , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Telemedicine/methods
18.
West J Emerg Med ; 22(1): 115-118, 2020 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013509

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic forced a rapid transition of in-class residency conferences to online residency conferences; little is known about learners' perceptions of this new didactic environment. Understanding learners' perceptions of virtual classrooms can help inform current and future best practices for online, synchronous, graduate medical education. METHODS: We surveyed emergency medicine and internal medicine residency programs at a large urban academic medical center about their perceptions of synchronous online residency conferences. RESULTS: Residents reported a preference for in-class interactions with peers (85%) and lecturers (80%), with 62% reporting decreased levels of engagement with lecturers during online conferences. Residents reported performing nearly twice as many non-conference-related activities (eg, email, exercise) during online conferences vs in-class conferences. Residents felt that the following methods improved engagement during online conferences: lecturers answering chat questions; small group sessions; and gamification of lectures. CONCLUSION: Synchronous online residency conferences were associated with decreased engagement and attention by learners. Simple methods to increase interactivity may help improve the online classroom experience and cultivate novel teaching environments that better support current learning styles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic , Education, Distance/methods , Emergency Medicine/education , Internal Medicine/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Chicago , Congresses as Topic/organization & administration , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Perception , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc84, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972788

ABSTRACT

Objective: The contact restrictions caused by the Covid-19 pandemic fundamentally limit patient-centered teaching. To realize a patient-oriented education in the block training "Internal Medicine" at the University Hospital Halle (Saale) despite the challenges, the already established teaching module "Interprofessional Teleconsultation" was adapted. The short article outlines the interprofessional teaching module including first evaluation results and describes the adapted block training. Method: In the "Internal Medicine" block training, students in a lecture hall navigated a telepresence system, which was accompanied by a physician across the ward and conducted an anamnesis via video and audio transmission without actual patient contact. Results: Students, physicians, and patients were open-minded about this form of communication during the Covid-19 pandemic and quickly got accustomed to the use of the telepresence system. To be able to react to technical challenges (e.g. unstable connection between the communication partners), a careful preparation of the lecturers is necessary. Conclusion: In using a telepresence system, patient-oriented teaching of students in the block training "Internal Medicine" can be ensured with low-threshold technical effort during the Covid-19 pandemic. The telepresence system allows for the involvement of patients into teaching while adhering to the necessary hygiene measures. Despite technical challenges, the teaching format based on telepresence is suitable as an alternative to face-to-face teaching if actual patient contact is not possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Internal Medicine/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Communication , Humans , Interprofessional Education/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Hosp Med ; 15(12): 709-715, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Academic medical centers have expanded their inpatient medicine services with advanced practice clinicians (APCs) or nonteaching hospitalists in response to patient volumes, residency work hour restrictions, and recently, COVID-19. Reports of clinical outcomes, cost, and resource utilization differ among inpatient team structures. OBJECTIVE: Directly compare outcomes among resident, APC, and solo hospitalist inpatient general medicine teams. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using multivariable analysis adjusted for time of admission, interhospital transfer, and comorbidities that compares clinical outcomes, cost, and resource utilization. SUBJECTS: Patients 18 years or older discharged from an inpatient medicine service between July 2015 and July 2018 (N = 12,716). MAIN MEASURES: Length of stay (LOS), 30-day readmission, inpatient mortality, normalized total direct cost, discharge time, and consultation utilization. KEY RESULTS: Resident teams admitted fewer patients at night (32.0%; P < .001) than did APC (49.5%) and hospitalist (48.6%) teams. APCs received nearly 4% more outside transfer patients (P = .015). Hospitalists discharged patients 26 minutes earlier than did residents (mean hours after midnight [95% CI], 14.58 [14.44-14.72] vs 15.02 [14.97-15.08]). Adjusted consult utilization was 15% higher for APCs (adjusted mean consults per admission [95% CI], 1.00 [0.96-1.03]) and 8% higher for residents (0.93 [0.90-0.95]) than it was for hospitalists (0.85 [0.80-0.90]). No differences in LOS, readmission, mortality, or cost were observed between the teams. CONCLUSION: We observed similar costs, LOS, 30-day readmission, and mortality among hospitalist, APC, and resident teams. Our results suggest clinical outcomes are not significantly affected by team structure. The addition of APC or hospitalist teams represent safe and effective alternatives to traditional inpatient resident teams.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , Health Resources/economics , Hospitalists/economics , Internal Medicine , Internship and Residency , Patient Outcome Assessment , Female , Humans , Internal Medicine/economics , Internal Medicine/education , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Readmission , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies
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