Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 44
Filter
2.
Pesqui. bras. odontopediatria clín. integr ; 21: e0185, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1596303

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the difference in the on-line searches for terms related to hand hygiene during the COVID-19 pandemic in developed and middle-income countries. Material and Methods: The cross-sectional study analyzed the digital data through the Google Trends website to obtain the variation of the relative search volume (RSV) through the terms "alcohol gel" and "handwashing." According to socio-economic development, the countries were divided into two groups: countries from different continents and hemispheres, with more than 15 million inhabitants, with more than 50% of the population with access to the Internet network and over 1,000 confirmed cases of infected with COVID-19. The paired t-test was applied to compare the means. The significance value adopted was p<0.010. Results: The searches related to the term "hand washing" were more significant when compared to the term "alcohol gel," and the term "alcohol gel" presented a higher average volume of research in developed countries (p<0.010). The developed countries had a higher average relative volume of research than middle-income countries (p<0.010). Developed countries sought more for the term "alcohol gel," and the term "hand washing" showed no difference in the volume of research about the country's socio-economic aspect. Conclusion: Developed countries have a higher volume of search for hand hygiene terms. The middle-income countries must create proposals for raising awareness outside the on-line environment so that this information reaches the entire population during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Humans , Socioeconomic Factors , Developed Countries , Hand Hygiene , Internet Access , COVID-19 , Primary Prevention , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies/methods , Data Interpretation, Statistical , Ethanol
3.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 9-13, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs in the United States rapidly adopted telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding factors that promote or impede telehealth will inform planning for future telehealth-enabled care models. METHODS: Adult, pediatric, and affiliate CF care programs in the United States (n = 287) were surveyed twice eight months apart in 2020-2021 about telehealth use. Programs were asked to describe barriers to and promoters of telehealth. RESULTS: Ninety-seven percent of programs provided telehealth services. In the first CF Care Program State of Care Survey (SoC1), programs estimated that 57% of patients exclusively received in-person care, 36% of patients received telehealth by phone/computer with video, and 8% of patients received telephone-only care. In the second CF Care Program State of Care Survey (SoC2), programs estimated that 80% of visits were in-person and 15% were via audio and video telehealth. Pediatric programs (21%) were less likely than adult (37%) or affiliate (41%) programs to recommend telehealth (p = 0.007). All programs ranked lack of internet access as the highest barrier to patient engagement with telehealth. Promoters of telehealth were increased accessibility and avoidance of infection transmission. Top ranked changes to improve telehealth were expanded provision of remote monitoring devices and technology access. Similar proportions of program types anticipated institutional telehealth expansion. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CF programs in the United States identified factors to improve future care delivery via telehealth. Targeting specific barriers and promoters will improve the use and quality of telehealth throughout the care center network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication Barriers , Cystic Fibrosis , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Participation , Telemedicine , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/psychology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Female , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Internet Access , Male , Needs Assessment , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
4.
Nutrients ; 13(12)2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542685

ABSTRACT

Perceived changes in diet quality, emotional eating, physical activity, and lifestyle were evaluated in a group of Mexican adults before and during COVID-19 confinement. In this study, 8289 adults answered an online questionnaire between April and May 2020. Data about sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported weight and height, diet quality, emotional eating, physical activity, and lifestyle changes were collected. Before and after confinement, differences by sociodemographic characteristics were assessed with Wilcoxon, Anova, and linear regression analyses. Most participants were women (80%) between 18 and 38 years old (70%), with a low degree of marginalisation (82.8%) and a high educational level (84.2%); 53.1% had a normal weight and 31.4% were overweight. Half (46.8%) of the participants perceived a change in the quality of their diet. The Diet Quality Index (DQI) was higher during confinement (it improved by 3 points) in all groups, regardless of education level, marginalisation level, or place of residence (p < 0.001). Lifestyle changes were present among some of the participants, 6.1% stopped smoking, 12.1% stopped consuming alcohol, 53.3% sleep later, 9% became more sedentary, and increased their screen (43%) as well as sitting and lying down time (81.6%). Mexicans with Internet access staying at home during COVID-19 confinement perceived positive changes in the quality of their diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption, but negative changes in the level of physical activity and sleep quality. These results emphasise the relevance of encouraging healthy lifestyle behaviours during and after times of crisis to prevent the risk of complications due to infectious and chronic diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feeding Behavior , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Sedentary Behavior , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet Access , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(10): e27723, 2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463397

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internet access is increasingly critical for adolescents with regard to obtaining health information and resources, participating in web-based health promotion, and communicating with health practitioners. However, past work demonstrates that access is not uniform among youth in the United States, with lower access found among groups with higher health-related needs. Population-level data yield important insights about access and internet use in the United States. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine internet access and mode of access by social class and race and ethnicity among youth (aged 14-17 years) in the United States. METHODS: Using the Current Population Survey, we examined internet access, cell phone or smartphone access, and modes of connecting to the internet for adolescents in 2015 (unweighted N=6950; expanded weights N=17,103,547) and 2017 (unweighted N=6761; expanded weights N=17,379,728). RESULTS: Internet access increased from 2015 to 2017, but socioeconomic status (SES) and racial and ethnic disparities remained. In 2017, the greatest disparities were found for youth in low-income households (no home access=23%) and for Black youth (no home access=18%) and Hispanic youth (no home access=14%). Low-income Black and Hispanic youth were the most likely to lack home internet access (no home access, low SES Black youth=29%; low SES Hispanic youth=21%). The mode of access (eg, from home and smartphone) and smartphone-only analyses also revealed disparities. CONCLUSIONS: Without internet access, web-based dissemination of information, health promotion, and health care will not reach a significant segment of youth. Currently, SES and racial and ethnic disparities in access prolong health inequalities. Moreover, the economic impact of COVID-19 on Black, Hispanic, and low-income communities may lead to losses in internet access for youth that will further exacerbate disparities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet Access , Adolescent , African Americans , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
Fam Community Health ; 44(4): 257-265, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455384

ABSTRACT

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, interest in using telehealth to increase access to health and mental health care has grown, and school transitions to remote learning have heightened awareness of broadband inequities. The purpose of this study was to examine access and barriers to technology and broadband Internet service ("broadband") among rural and urban youth. Washington State public school districts were surveyed about youth's access to technology (ie, a device adequate for online learning) and broadband availability in spring 2020. Availability of and barriers to broadband (ie, geography, affordability, and smartphone-only connectivity) were assessed across rurality. Among responding districts, 64.2% (n = 172) were rural and 35.8% (n = 96) were urban. Rural districts reported significantly fewer students with access to an Internet-enabled device adequate for online learning (80.0% vs 90.1%, P < .01). Access to reliable broadband varied significantly across geography (P < .01). Compared with their urban peers, rural youth face more challenges in accessing the technology and connectivity needed for remote learning and telehealth. Given that inadequate broadband infrastructure is a critical barrier to the provision of telehealth services and remote learning in rural areas, efforts to improve policies and advance technology must consider geographical disparities to ensure health and education equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities , Internet Access , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology
7.
Kennedy Inst Ethics J ; 31(3): 327-341, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440974

ABSTRACT

Crises illustrate the value of digital connectedness. When our physical routines are disrupted, having alternative options to connect with others is important. Yet there are clear divisions in access to the internet, and in the distribution of the skills required to take advantage of the internet. I argue that the COVID-19 pandemic is but one example of a more general idea; that everyone has a moral claim to internet access. We ought to use this opportunity to address the continued inequities in internet access and use amongst our population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet Access/ethics , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics , Social Isolation , Social Justice , COVID-19/psychology , Digital Technology , Humans , Internet , Morals , Resilience, Psychological
8.
Med Care ; 59(11): 1014-1022, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429357

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Under emergency coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic regulations, Medicare granted temporary payment parity with in-person visits for audio-only (telephone) telemedicine visits. This policy was designed to expand telemedicine to patients without camera-equipped devices and broadband internet. However, audio-only telemedicine use has been substantial. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore whether the rate of audio-only telemedicine during the pandemic is related to patient access to technology or provider behavior. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of the Summer and Fall 2020 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey coronavirus disease 2019 supplements, using multivariable logistic models and accounting for complex survey design. SUBJECTS: A total of 3375 participants in the summer survey and 2633 participants in the fall 2020 were offered a telemedicine visit to replace a scheduled in-person visit by their usual care provider. MEASURES: We compared beneficiaries who were exclusively offered audio-only telemedicine to beneficiaries who were offered video telemedicine or both audio and video. RESULTS: We found that among Medicare beneficiaries who were offered telemedicine to replace a scheduled in-person appointment, ~35% were exclusively offered audio-only. 65.8% of beneficiaries exclusively offered audio-only reported having a smartphone/tablet and home internet. After controlling for personal access to technology, Hispanic [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.09, P<0.001], dually eligible (AOR=1.63, P=0.002), nonprimary English speaking (AOR=1.64, P<0.001), and nonmetro beneficiaries (AOR=1.71, P=0.003) were more likely to be offered audio-only during July-November 2020. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest audio-only telemedicine use during the pandemic is only partially related to patient access to technology. Policymakers must work to both expand programs that provide smartphones and broadband internet to disparity communities and telemedicine infrastructure to providers.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/prevention & control , Insurance Benefits , Medicare , Telemedicine/methods , Telephone , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Internet Access , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
10.
Fam Community Health ; 44(4): 257-265, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315710

ABSTRACT

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, interest in using telehealth to increase access to health and mental health care has grown, and school transitions to remote learning have heightened awareness of broadband inequities. The purpose of this study was to examine access and barriers to technology and broadband Internet service ("broadband") among rural and urban youth. Washington State public school districts were surveyed about youth's access to technology (ie, a device adequate for online learning) and broadband availability in spring 2020. Availability of and barriers to broadband (ie, geography, affordability, and smartphone-only connectivity) were assessed across rurality. Among responding districts, 64.2% (n = 172) were rural and 35.8% (n = 96) were urban. Rural districts reported significantly fewer students with access to an Internet-enabled device adequate for online learning (80.0% vs 90.1%, P < .01). Access to reliable broadband varied significantly across geography (P < .01). Compared with their urban peers, rural youth face more challenges in accessing the technology and connectivity needed for remote learning and telehealth. Given that inadequate broadband infrastructure is a critical barrier to the provision of telehealth services and remote learning in rural areas, efforts to improve policies and advance technology must consider geographical disparities to ensure health and education equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities , Internet Access , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , Rural Population , SARS-CoV-2 , Technology
11.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E65, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291281

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telehealth plays a role in the continuum of care, especially for older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our objective was to examine factors associated with the accessibility of telehealth services during the COVID-19 pandemic among older adults. METHODS: We analyzed the nationally representative Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey COVID-19 Rapid Response Supplement Questionnaire of beneficiaries aged 65 years or older. Two weighted multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between usual providers who offered telehealth 1) during the COVID-19 pandemic and 2) to replace a regularly scheduled appointment. We examined factors including sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, and digital access and literacy. RESULTS: Of the beneficiaries (n = 6,172, weighted n = 32.4 million), 81.2% reported that their usual providers offered telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Among those offered telehealth services, 56.8% reported that their usual providers offered telehealth to replace a regularly scheduled appointment. Disparities in accessibility of telehealth services by sex, residing area (metropolitan vs nonmetropolitan), income level, and US Census region were observed. Beneficiaries who reported having internet access (vs no access) (OR, 1.75, P < .001) and who reported ever having participated in video, voice, or conference calls over the internet before (vs not) (OR, 2.18, P < .001) were more likely to report having access to telehealth. Non-Hispanic Black beneficiaries (versus White) (OR, 1.57, P = .007) and beneficiaries with comorbidities (vs none) (eg, 2 or 3 comorbidities, OR, 1.25, 95% P = .044) were more likely to have their usual provider offer telehealth to replace a regularly scheduled appointment. CONCLUSION: Although accessibility of telehealth has increased, inequities raise concern. Educational outreach and training, such as installing and launching an online web conferencing platform, should be considered for improving accessibility of telehealth to vulnerable populations beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities , Infection Control/methods , Medicare/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Healthcare Disparities/organization & administration , Humans , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Male , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
12.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(1): 6-11, 2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231560

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic contributed to the worldwide implementation of telemedicine because of the need for medical care for patients, especially those with chronic diseases. This perspective paper presents the current situation of telemedicine in Peru, showing advances in regulation, cases of successful implementation, and the current challenges. Access to health should be available to all, and more efforts need to be implemented to offer access to the internet to achieve high-quality telemedicine to all the vulnerable groups in Peru.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Chronic Disease , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Internet Access , Peru/epidemiology , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends
13.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(9): 958-962, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226831

ABSTRACT

While U.S. adults living in affordable senior housing represent a vulnerable population during the COVID-19 pandemic, affordable housing may provide a foundation for interventions designed to improve technology access to support health. To better understand technology access among residents of affordable senior housing, we surveyed members of a national association of resident service coordinators to assess their experiences working with residents during the pandemic (n = 1,440). While nearly all service coordinators report that most or all residents have reliable phone access, under a quarter report that most or all have reliable internet access; they also report limited access to technology for video calls. Lack of internet access and technology literacy are perceived as barriers to medical visits and food procurement for low-income older adult residents of affordable housing. Policies to expand internet access as well as training and support to enable use of online services are required to overcome these barriers.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Communication Barriers , Homes for the Aged , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes , Videoconferencing , Aged , COVID-19 , Computer Literacy , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Homes for the Aged/economics , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Male , Nursing Homes/economics , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/supply & distribution , Vulnerable Populations
14.
Health Promot Pract ; 22(5): 605-610, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218287

ABSTRACT

According to the Pew Research Center, approximately one quarter of American adults do not have access to broadband internet. This number does not account for the millions of people who are underconnected or lacking a stable internet connection. Although digital disparity in America is not new, the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic has increased our societal dependence on the internet and widened the digital divide. Access to broadband internet has become a basic need in this connected society, linking people to vital resources, such as jobs, education, health care, food, and information. However, it is still an overlooked and understudied issue in public health. In this article, we highlight five key points for why advocating for the expansion of affordable and accessible internet for all should be a priority issue for public health and health promotion. Recent studies offer evidence that digital disenfranchisement contributes to negative health outcomes, economic oppression, and racial injustice. Now more than ever, health advocacy to promote digital equity and inclusion is critical to our meaningful progress toward health equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Internet , Internet Access , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health
15.
BMC Mol Cell Biol ; 22(1): 23, 2021 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201947

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 virus, the causative agent of COVID-19, consists of an assembly of proteins that determine its infectious and immunological behavior, as well as its response to therapeutics. Major structural biology efforts on these proteins have already provided essential insights into the mode of action of the virus, as well as avenues for structure-based drug design. However, not all of the SARS-CoV-2 proteins, or regions thereof, have a well-defined three-dimensional structure, and as such might exhibit ambiguous, dynamic behaviour that is not evident from static structure representations, nor from molecular dynamics simulations using these structures. MAIN: We present a website ( https://bio2byte.be/sars2/ ) that provides protein sequence-based predictions of the backbone and side-chain dynamics and conformational propensities of these proteins, as well as derived early folding, disorder, ß-sheet aggregation, protein-protein interaction and epitope propensities. These predictions attempt to capture the inherent biophysical propensities encoded in the sequence, rather than context-dependent behaviour such as the final folded state. In addition, we provide the biophysical variation that is observed in homologous proteins, which gives an indication of the limits of their functionally relevant biophysical behaviour. CONCLUSION: The https://bio2byte.be/sars2/ website provides a range of protein sequence-based predictions for 27 SARS-CoV-2 proteins, enabling researchers to form hypotheses about their possible functional modes of action.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Viral Proteins/chemistry , Databases, Protein , Humans , Internet Access , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Analysis, Protein , Software , Viral Proteins/metabolism
16.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 28(1): 149-157, 2021 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156232

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic all schools in Poland were closed and obliged to conduct lessons remotely. The aim of the study is to present the demographic analysis of difficulties with remote learning, as perceived by students during coronavirus pandemic in Poland. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In April 2020, a nationwide online survey was conducted among adolescents aged 11-18 (N=2408). Quantitative and qualitative data were used. Teenagers were asked about the problems connected with remote learning. In order to examine the overall level of remote learning difficulties, a scale of remote learning difficulties (RLD) was devised (range 0-23 points). Differences connected with gender, age and place of residence were analysed. RESULTS: More than a half of the teenagers surveyed rated the increased demands from teachers as a major problem. This answer appeared statistically more often among girls than boys (59.6% v. 53.2%). Almost every third adolescent saw the lack of consultation (31.6%) as a significant problem. Difficulties related to learning in the remote system were most often described as considerable by the oldest students (17-18-years-old) and those living in rural areas. The big problem for them was usually much higher requirements of teachers and poor organization of distance learning. The mean level on the scale of remote learning burden was M=11.9 (SD=7.1). Technical difficulties and insufficient skills in using software constituted additional problems most frequently mentioned by students. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to pay particular attention to organizing appropriate technical conditions for remote learning, especially in rural areas, where students have complained more often than in cities about equipment and problems with access to the Internet during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Teaching , Adolescent , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Poland , Rural Population , Students/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248758, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: e-learning was underutilized in the past especially in developing countries. However, the current crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic forced the entire world to rely on it for education. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the university medical staff perceptions, evaluate their experiences, recognize their barriers, challenges of e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, and investigate factors influencing the acceptance and use of e-learning as a tool teaching within higher education. METHODS: Data was collected using an electronic questionnaire with a validated Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) for exploring factors that affect the acceptance and use of e-learning as a teaching tool among medical staff members, Zagazig University, Egypt. RESULTS: The majority (88%) of the staff members agreed that the technological skills of giving the online courses increase the educational value of the experience of the college staff. The rate of participant agreement on perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and acceptance of e-learning was (77.1%, 76.5%, and 80.9% respectively). The highest barriers to e-learning were insufficient/ unstable internet connectivity (40%), inadequate computer labs (36%), lack of computers/ laptops (32%), and technical problems (32%). Younger age, teaching experience less than 10 years, and being a male are the most important indicators affecting e-learning acceptance. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the challenges and factors influencing the acceptance, and use of e-learning as a tool for teaching within higher education. Thus, it will help to develop a strategic plan for the successful implementation of e-learning and view technology as a positive step towards evolution and change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Education, Distance , Medical Staff/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt , Female , Humans , Internet Access , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching , Universities
18.
Urology ; 152: 2-8, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144971

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the response to a virtual educational curriculum in reconstructive urology presented during the COVID-19 pandemic. To assess learner satisfaction with the format and content of the curriculum, including relevance to learners' education and practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A webinar curriculum of fundamental reconstructive urology topics was developed through the Society of Genitourinary Reconstructive Surgeons and partnering institutions. Expert-led sessions were broadcasted. Registered participants were asked to complete a survey regarding the curriculum. Responses were used to assess the quality of the curriculum format and content, as well as participants' practice demographics. RESULTS: Our survey yielded a response rate of 34%. Survey responses showed >50% of practices offer reconstructive urologic services, with 37% offered by providers without formal fellowship training. A difference in self-reported baseline knowledge was seen amongst junior residents and attendings (P < .05). Regardless of level of training, all participants rated the topics presented as relevant to their education/practice (median response = 5/5). Responders also indicated that the curriculum supplemented their knowledge in reconstructive urology (median response = 5/5). The webinar format and overall satisfaction with the curriculum was highly rated (median response = 5/5). Participants also stated they were likely to recommend the series to others. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate success of an online curriculum in reconstructive urology. Given >50% of practices surveyed offer reconstruction, we believe the curriculum's educational benefits (increasing access and collaboration while minimizing the risk of in-person contact) will continue beyond the COVID-19 pandemic and that this will remain a relevant educational platform for urologists moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Urologic Surgical Procedures/education , Urology/education , Curriculum , Humans , Internet Access , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Kennedy Inst Ethics J ; 31(1): 1-15, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133662

ABSTRACT

One consequence of the lockdowns that many countries have introduced in response to the COVID-19 pandemic is that people have become more vulnerable to loneliness. In this contribution, I argue that even if this does not render lockdowns unjustified, it is morally incumbent upon states to make reasonable efforts to protect their residents from loneliness for as long as their social confinement measures remain in place. Without attempting to provide an exhaustive list of ways in which this might be done, I identify four broad measures that I believe many, if not most, states ought to take. These require states to (i) help ensure that people have affordable access to the internet, as well as opportunities for learning how to use this medium so as that they can digitally connect to others; (ii) help people to have harmonious and rewarding intimate relationships; and try to make (iii) non-human companionship as well as (iv) various non-social solutions to loneliness widely available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Loneliness , Quarantine , State Government , Animals , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Internet Access , Interpersonal Relations , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pets , Social Isolation , United States
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100110

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: This article examines whether connection to digital technologies helps connect young Indigenous people in Australia to culture, community and country to support good mental health and well-being and protect against indirect and potentially long-term effects of COVID-19. (2) Method: We reviewed literature published between February and November 2020 and policy responses related to digital strategies. We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, government policy websites and key Indigenous literature sources, identifying 3460 articles. Of these, 30 articles and 26 policy documents were included and analysed to identify existing and expected mental health outcomes among Indigenous young people associated with COVID-19 and more broadly. (3) Results: There are inequities in affordable access to digital technologies. Only 63% of Indigenous people have access to internet at home. Digital technologies and social media contribute to strong cultural identity, enhance connections to community and country and improve mental health and social and emotional well-being outcomes. (4) Discussion: Access to digital technologies can facilitate healing and cultural continuity, self-determination and empowerment for young people to thrive, not just survive, in the future. (5) Conclusion: More targeted policies and funding is urgently needed to promote digital technologies to enhance Indigenous young people's access to mental health and well-being services, maintain cultural connections and evaluate the effectiveness of these initiatives using Indigenous well-being indicators.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services, Indigenous , Indigenous Peoples/psychology , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Adolescent , Australia , Humans , Social Media , Telemedicine
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL