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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 809713, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776007

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Despite the theoretical and practical interest in Internet use among older adults, evidence examining the impacts of Internet use on late-in-life health is limited. This study examines how Internet use affects depression and cognitive function in older adults and investigates if Internet use moderates the relationship between social isolation and depression/cognitive function. Method: We performed regression analyses using data came from the second wave of the China Longitudinal Aging Social Survey of 2016. Our final sample featured 8,835 older adults. Results: The results show 11.4% of Chinese older adults often used the Internet to engage in at least one activity. Internet use was negatively associated with depression, but it was positively related to cognitive function. Socially isolated older adults were more likely to have more depressive symptoms and higher level of cognitive function. There was also an interaction effect between Internet use and social isolation on depression/cognitive function. The negative effect of social isolation was stronger for older adults who used the Internet less. The moderating effect of Internet use was significant for both males and females. However, among those who used the Internet more, the depression levels of socially isolated male participants were much lower than female participants. Conclusions: Our results reveal the importance of considering Internet use in buffering the negative effects of social isolation and the associated health burdens for aging populations. Recommendations for service practice and future research are discussed.


Subject(s)
Cognition , Depression , Social Isolation , Aged , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Internet Use , Male , Social Isolation/psychology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760603

ABSTRACT

Older adults were advised to avoid social activities during the outbreak of COVID-19. Consequently, they no longer received the social and emotional support they had gained from such activities. Internet use might be a solution to remedy the situation. Therefore, this scoping review sought to map the literature on Internet use and mental health in the older population during the pandemic to examine the extent and nature of the research. A scoping review was conducted using eight databases-PubMed, Scopus, Ebscohost Medline, Ebscohost Academic Search, Ebscohost CINAHL Plus, Ebscohost Cochrane, Ebscohost Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, and Ebscohost SPORTDiscus, according to PRISMA guidelines. Two pre-tested templates (quantitative and qualitative studies) were developed to extract data and perform descriptive analysis and thematic summary. A total of ten articles met the eligibility criteria. Seven out of ten studies were quantitative, while the remainder were qualitative. Five common themes were identified from all the included studies. Our review revealed that Internet use for communication purposes seems to be associated with better mental health in older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Directions for future research and limitations of review are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Internet Use , Pandemics
3.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw ; 25(3): 189-193, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1746973

ABSTRACT

This study explores the phenomenon of hikikomori, or extreme social isolation, which for the past 20 years has been associated with a range of negative outcomes, including psychological, financial, and social. As hikikomori is associated with marked social withdrawal in one's home and increased Internet use, it has been suggested that the social and technological changes brought about by COVID-19 restrictions may exacerbate the risk of hikikomori in young adults. This study, therefore, sought to identify the relationship between hikikomori risk and changes in Internet use for young people aged 16-24 years during COVID-19 restrictions. An international sample of 826 participants completed an online survey consisting of questions about demographics, experience of lockdown restrictions in the previous 12 months, changes to Internet use in the previous 12 months and a hikikomori risk scale. Higher hikikomori risk was associated with being male, greater time spent in lockdown, and leaving the house less frequently. An increase in Internet use during lockdown was associated with reduced risk of hikikomori. Findings are discussed in relation to gender differences in the type of Internet use engaged in by males and females. It is concluded that online social interaction may be a means of mitigating hikikomori risk in post-COVID-19 societies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Phobia, Social , Adolescent , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Internet Use , Male , Shame , Social Isolation/psychology , Young Adult
4.
Stroke ; 53(3): e90-e91, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673586

ABSTRACT

Despite evidence-based guidelines,1 stroke rehabilitation remains underutilized, particularly among women and minorities.2 Telerehabilitation is a promising alternative to traditional in-person rehabilitation and offers a novel strategy to overcome access barriers,3 which intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic.4 A broadband connection is a prerequisite for its wide adoption but its availability varies across the United States (https://broadbandnow.com/national-broadband-map). Little is known about demographic and geographic variation in internet use among stroke survivors. In this study, we sought to compare internet use in a nationally representative sample of individuals with and without stroke.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet Use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Survivors , United States/epidemiology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650545

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments have attempted to reduce virus transmission by implementing lockdown procedures, leading to increased social isolation and a new reliance on technology and the internet for work and social communication. We examined people's experiences working from home in the UK to identify risk factors of problematic internet use during the first lockdown period, specifically looking at life satisfaction, loneliness, and gender. A total of 299 adults completed the Problematic Internet Use Questionnaire-Short-Form-6, UCLA-3 Item Loneliness Scale, and Satisfaction with Life Scale online. Through structural equation modelling, we found that loneliness positively predicted problematic internet use while gender had no effect. Life satisfaction and age positively predicted loneliness but had no direct effect on problematic internet use, suggesting loneliness fully mediated their relationship with problematic internet use. Our study serves as a benchmark study of problematic internet use among those working from home during lockdown conditions, which may be utilized by future researchers exploring longitudinal patterns post-pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , Loneliness , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
6.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260386, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634467

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to radical changes in social distancing awareness and affected social relationships. Owing to large-scale lockdown, home quarantine and social distancing requirements, it was anticipated that sexual activities would be severely impacted. However, retrospective self-report studies showed that pornography use and autoerotism increased during the pandemic. AIM: This study used big-data databases available on the Internet to investigate factors that modulated pornography use during the pandemic. METHODS: Daily relative search volume (RSV) data from Google Trends for the period from 24 February 2020 to 13 July 2020 were extracted. Pornhub traffic data were extracted from the Pornhub Insights website, for the period from 24 February 2020 to 13 July 2020. The parameter was defined as 'percent change in traffic compared to an average day in 2019'. The number of daily new cases of COVID-19 was extracted from the database on Our World in Data. OUTCOME MEASURES: The normality of the data was examined using the Shapiro-Wilk test. All variables included in this study were non-normally distributed. Therefore, non-parametric tests or parametric tests with bootstrapping were adopted where appropriate. RESULTS: According to Google Trends, the RSV for 'pornography' increased after late March 2020, which is close to the date when the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The number of daily new cases of COVID-19 was positively correlated with the traffic of Pornhub, a popular pornography website, and the RSV for 'pornography'. Moderation analysis demonstrated a significant main effect of daily new cases of COVID-19 and the RSV for 'social distancing' in predicting Pornhub traffic/RSV for 'pornography'. Furthermore, the RSV for 'social distancing' significantly moderated the relationship between daily new cases and Pornhub traffic/RSV for 'pornography'. A stronger COVID-pornography use association was observed with increased social distancing awareness. CONCLUSION: Increased pornography consumption during the pandemic was observed, and it was associated with the severity of the pandemic. Social distancing awareness could be a key factor influencing interest in and use of pornography. Further studies on the changes in sexual desire and birth-rate control are worthwhile because long-term public health may be affected by the changes in sexual behaviour during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Erotica , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Big Data , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Physical Distancing , Regression Analysis
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24767, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575466

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Online medical records are being used to organize processes in clinical and outpatient settings and to forge doctor-patient communication techniques that build mutual understanding and trust. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to understand the reasons why patients tend to avoid using online medical records and to compare the perceptions that patients have of online medical records based on demographics and cancer diagnosis. METHODS: We used data from the Health Information National Trends Survey Cycle 3, a nationally representative survey, and assessed outcomes using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. The patients (N=4328) included in the analysis had experienced an outpatient visit within the previous 12 months and had answered the online behavior question regarding their use of online medical records. RESULTS: Patients who were nonusers of online medical records consisted of 58.36% of the sample (2526/4328). The highest nonuser rates were for patients who were Hispanic (460/683, 67.35%), patients who were non-Hispanic Black (434/653, 66.46%), and patients who were older than 65 years (968/1520, 63.6%). Patients older than 65 years were less likely to use online medical records (odds ratio [OR] 1.51, 95% CI 1.24-1.84, P<.001). Patients who were White were more likely to use online medical records than patients who were Black (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.43-2.05, P<.001) or Hispanic (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.37-1.98, P<.001). Patients who were diagnosed with cancer were more likely to use online medical records compared to patients with no cancer (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.55, 95% CI 1.11-1.55, P=.001). Among nonusers, older patients (≥65 years old) preferred speaking directly to their health care providers (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.35-2.31, P<.001), were more concerned about privacy issues caused by online medical records (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.22-2.66, P<.001), and felt uncomfortable using the online medical record systems (OR 10.55, 95% CI 6.06-19.89, P<.001) compared to those aged 18-34 years. Patients who were Black or Hispanic were more concerned about privacy issues (OR 1.42, 1.09-1.84, P=.007). CONCLUSIONS: Studies should consider social factors such as gender, race/ethnicity, and age when monitoring trends in eHealth use to ensure that eHealth use does not induce greater health status and health care disparities between people with different backgrounds and demographic characteristics.


Subject(s)
Electronic Health Records/standards , Health Information Exchange/standards , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Data Analysis , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Internet Use , Male , Middle Aged , Physician-Patient Relations , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25404, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite Saudi Arabia's free and well-established cancer care program, breast cancer incidence and mortality are rising. Husbands' knowledge, and wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening are not well understood in Saudi Arabia. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate husbands' knowledge, and wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected data from 403 husbands in the holy city of Makkah through an online self-reported questionnaire over a period of 2 months, from May 6 to July 7, 2020. Tabulation, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses were the major tools used for data analysis. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the association between husbands' knowledge and wives' behavior regarding breast cancer screening methods. RESULTS: Husbands' knowledge score (a 1-point increase) was significantly associated with the wives' utilization of mammograms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.089, 95% CI 1.024-1.159) and breast self-examination (AOR 1.177, 95% CI 1.105-1.255). Husbands' knowledge also influenced the wives' attitudes toward learning about breast self-examination (AOR 1.138, 95% CI 1.084-1.195). There was no significant association between husbands' knowledge and wives' utilization of clinical breast examination. However, richer husbands showed a socioeconomic gradient concerning their wives' utilization of clinical breast examinations (AOR 2.603, 95% CI 1.269-5.341). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, husbands' knowledge of breast cancer influences wives' attitudes and practices related to breast cancer screening methods in Saudi Arabia. Thus, interventions delivered to husbands might increase breast cancer awareness and survival.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Internet Use/trends , Adult , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia , Self Report , Spouses , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25363, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on both the physical and mental health of individuals worldwide. Evidence regarding the association between mental health problems and information exposure among Thai citizens during the COVID-19 outbreak is limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the relationship between information exposure and mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand. METHODS: Between April 21 and May 4, 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide online survey of the general population in Thailand. We categorized the duration of exposure to COVID-19-related information as follows: <1 h/day (reference group), 1-2 h/day, and ≥3 h/day. Mental health outcomes were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale, the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and the Insomnia Severity Index for symptoms of depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and insomnia, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between information exposure and the risk of developing the aforementioned symptoms. An ancillary analysis using multivariable multinomial logistic regression models was also conducted to assess the possible dose-response relationship across the severity strata of mental health problems. RESULTS: Of the 4322 eligible participants, 4004 (92.6%) completed the online survey. Of them, 1481 (37.0%), 1644 (41.1%), and 879 (22.0%) participants were exposed to COVID-19-related information for less than 1 hour per day, 1 to 2 hours per day, or 3 or more hours per day, respectively. The major source of information related to the COVID-19 pandemic was social media (95.3%), followed by traditional media (68.7%) and family members (34.9%). Those exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day had a higher risk of developing symptoms of depression (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% CI 1.03-1.76; P=.03), anxiety (adjusted OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.43-2.46; P<.001), and insomnia (adjusted OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.17-1.97; P=.001) than people exposed to information for less than 1 hour per day. Meanwhile, people exposed to information for 1 to 2 hours per day were only at risk of developing symptoms of anxiety (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69; P=.008). However, no association was found between information exposure and the risk of perceived stress. In the ancillary analysis, a dose-response relationship was observed between information exposure of 3 or more hours per day and the severity of mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that social media is the main source of COVID-19-related information. Moreover, people who are exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day are more likely to develop psychological problems, including depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Longitudinal studies investigating the long-term effects of COVID-19-related information exposure on mental health are warranted.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Education/statistics & numerical data , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Social Media/supply & distribution , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand/epidemiology
13.
BMJ ; 374: n2324, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511445
14.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480893

ABSTRACT

We obtained data from Google Trends and Wikipedia in order to assess whether an analysis of Internet searches could provide information on the Internet users' behaviour/interest in diets. Differences in seasonality, year and before/during COVID-19 pandemic were assessed. From Wikipedia, we extracted the number of times a page is viewed by users, aggregated on monthly and seasonal bases. We also used Google Trends to evaluate the frequency of the users' web searches. The Mediterranean diet was the most frequently (33.9%), followed by the pescatarian diet (9.0%). Statistically, significant seasonal differences were found for the Mediterranean, vegetarian, Atkins, Scarsdale, and zone diets and pescetarianism. The most commonly searched diet and consequent diet-related queries on Google resulted to be: Dukan diet, Dukan and weight loss. Ketogenic, FODMAP and intermittent fasting diets were statistically more frequently searched during the pandemic compared with before. Our data show a different trend of searches based on the seasonality, year and the pandemic. These data could be useful for scientists, practitioners and policy makers because they can inform educational campaigns via the Internet, especially in periods when the population is more receptive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information/trends , Diet, Healthy/trends , Internet Use/trends , Search Engine/trends , Humans , Italy , Nutritive Value , Seasons , Time Factors , Weight Loss
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470832

ABSTRACT

Previous studies on internet use frequency were focused on mental health impact, with little known about the impact on physical health during the COVID-19 lockdown. This study examined the impact of internet use frequency on self-reported physical health during the COVID-19 lockdown in Bangladesh. A web-based cross-sectional study on 3242 individuals was conducted from 2 August-1 October 2020. The survey covered demographics, internet use frequency and self-reported physical health questions. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the impact of internet use frequency on physical health. 72.5%, 69.9%, 65.1% and 55.3% respondents reported headache, back pain, numbness of the fingers and neck pain, respectively. The analyses showed increased physical health impact among regular (coefficient ß = 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18-0.85, p = 0.003), frequent (ß = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.88-1.54, p < 0.001) and intense (ß = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.91-2.57, p < 0.001) internet users. Other important predictors were gender, income, occupation, regions, and working status. Frequent and extensive uses of the internet were strong predictors of physical health problems, and our findings suggest the need for increased awareness about the physical health problems that can be triggered by excessive internet usage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463648

ABSTRACT

The aims of this cross-sectional study were: (i) to establish the prevalence of problematic Internet use (PIU) and eating disorders (EDs) among Polish students; (ii) to investigate potential correlations between the two phenomena; and (iii) to identify predictors of eating disorders among socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics in this population. To this end, a total of 1008 Polish students aged 18-40, completed the Problematic Internet Use Test (TPIU22), the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and a self-designed Socio-demographic and Internet Use Survey. Men received more PIU scores (p < 0.001), while women received more EAT-26 scores (p < 0.05) with a significant correlation observed between those variables (rho = 0.212; p < 0.001). The strongest predictors of EDs were as follows: preoccupation with the Internet, neglect of sleep in favor of Internet use, alleviation of negative feelings while online, higher mean number of hours spent online on weekends for academic and work-related purposes, extracurricular activity, lower height and higher BMI. An association has been demonstrated between problematic internet use and eating disorders. Somewhat surprisingly, our results suggest that people at risk of EDs use the Internet primarily to fulfill their routine duties. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the causality of EDs and PIU.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , Male , Students
17.
Transl Psychiatry ; 11(1): 491, 2021 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437671

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has adversely influenced human physical and mental health, including emotional disorders and addictions. This study examined substance and Internet use behavior and their associations with anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online self-report questionnaire was administered to 2196 Chinese adults between February 17 and 29, 2020. The questionnaire contained the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), questions on demographic information, and items about substance and Internet use characteristics. Our results revealed that males consumed less alcohol (p < 0.001) and areca-nut (p = 0.012) during the pandemic than before the pandemic. Age, gender, education status, and occupation significantly differed among increased substance users, regular substance users, and nonsubstance users. Time spent on the Internet was significantly longer during the pandemic (p < 0.001) and 72% of participants reported increased dependence on the Internet. Compared to regular Internet users, increased users were more likely to be younger and female. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age <33 years (OR = 2.034, p < 0.001), increased substance use (OR = 3.439, p < 0.001), and increased Internet use (OR = 1.914, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with depression. Moreover, anxiety was significantly related to female gender (OR = 2.065, p < 0.001), "unmarried" status (OR = 1.480, p = 0.017), nonstudents (OR = 1.946-3.030, p = 0.001), and increased substance use (OR = 4.291, p < 0.001). Although there was a significant decrease in social substance use during the pandemic, more attention should be paid to increased Internet use. Increased Internet use was significantly associated with both anxiety and depression, and increased substance use was related to depression. Professional support should be provided to vulnerable individuals to prevent addiction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , Male , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Am J Addict ; 30(6): 585-592, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416264

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of problematic Internet use (PIU) in the post-COVID-19 pandemic era is not known. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of PIU among baccalaureate nursing students (hereafter: nursing students) in the post-COVID-19 era. METHODS: A total of 1070 nursing students were consecutively invited to participate in this study from the nursing schools of five universities. PIU and quality of life (QOL) were assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), respectively. t Tests, χ2 , tests, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare basic demographic and clinical characteristics between participants with and without PIU. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine independent correlates. RESULTS: The prevalence of PIU was 23.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7%-25.8%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that second- (p = .024) and third-year (p = .012) students were more likely to suffer from PIU compared with first year students. Students with more severe depressive (p = .014) and anxiety symptoms (p = .011) were independently and significantly associated with more severe PIU. After controlling for covariates, nursing students with PIU had a lower overall QOL score (p = .002). CONCLUSION AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE: Problematic Internet use (PIU) was common among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. Considering the negative impact of PIU on QOL and academic performance, regular screening should be conducted and effective interventions implemented for nursing students with PIU. This was the first study on the prevalence of PIU among nursing students in the post-COVID-19 era. The findings of this study could help health professionals and education authorities to understand the patterns of PIU and its influence on QOL among nursing students and to allocate health resources and develop effective measures to reduce the risk of PIU in this population.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e045840, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341322

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In May 2019, the WHO classified internet gaming disorder (IGD) as a mental disorder in the upcoming International Classification of Diseases 11th Revision. However, individuals affected by IGD or internet use disorders (IUDs) are often not provided with adequate therapy due to a lack of motivation or absence of adequate local treatment options. To close the gap between individuals with IUDs and the care system, we conduct an online-based motivational intervention to reduce problematic internet use and promote treatment motivation in internet gaming disorder and internet use disorder (OMPRIS). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Within the randomised controlled trial, a total of n=162 participants will be allocated by sequential balancing randomisation to the OMPRIS intervention or a waitlist control group. The study includes an extensive diagnostic, followed by a 4-week psychological intervention based on motivational interviewing, (internet-related) addiction therapy, behavioural therapy techniques and additional social counselling. The primary outcome is the reduction of problematic internet use measured by the Assessment of Internet and Computer Game Addiction Scale. Secondary outcomes include time spent on the internet, motivation for change (Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale for Internet Use Disorder), comorbid mental symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Screener-7), quality of life (EuroQoL Standardised Measure of Health-related Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, General Life Satisfaction-1), self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale), personality traits (Big Five Inventory-10), therapeutic alliance (Helping Alliance Questionnaire) and health economic costs. The diagnosis of (comorbid) mental disorders is carried out with standardised clinical interviews. The measurement will be assessed before (T0), at midpoint (T1) and after the OMPRIS intervention (T2), representing the primary endpoint. Two follow-up assessments will be conducted after 6 weeks (T3) and 6 months (T4) after the intervention. The outcomes will be analysed primarily via analysis of covariance. Both intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses will be conducted. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Participants will provide written informed consent. The trial has been approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine, Ruhr University Bochum (approval number 19-6779). Findings will be disseminated through presentations, peer-reviewed journals and conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: DRKS00019925.


Subject(s)
Motivation , Quality of Life , Anxiety Disorders , Humans , Internet , Internet Addiction Disorder , Internet Use , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
20.
J Psychiatr Res ; 142: 218-225, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340739

ABSTRACT

Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and problematic internet use (PIU) are becoming increasingly detrimental to modern society, with serious consequences for daily functioning. IGD and PIU may be exacerbated by lifestyle changes imposed by the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study investigated changes in IGD and PIU during the pandemic and risk factors for them. This study is a part of a larger online study of problematic smartphone use in Japan, originally planned in 2019, and expanded in August 2020 to include the impact of COVID-19. 51,246 adults completed an online survey during the pandemic (August 2020), in Japan. Of these, 3,938 had also completed the survey before the onset of the pandemic (December 2019) and were used as the study population to determine how the pandemic has influenced IGD and PIU. IGD was assessed using the Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS). PIU was measured using the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS). The prevalence of probable IGD during COVID-19 was 4.1% overall [95%CI, 3.9%-4.2%] (N = 51,246), and 8.6% among younger people (age < 30), 1-2.5% higher than reported before the pandemic. Probable PIU was 7.8% overall [95%CI, 7.6%-8.1%], and 17.0% [95%CI, 15.9%-18.2%] among younger people, 3.2-3.7% higher than reported before the pandemic. Comparisons before and during the pandemic, revealed that probable IGD prevalence has increased 1.6 times, and probable PIU prevalence by 1.5 times (IGD: χ2= 619.9, p < .001, PIU: χ2= 594.2, p < .001). Youth (age < 30) and COVID-19 infection were strongly associated with IGD exacerbation (odds ratio, 2.10 [95%CI, 1.18 to 3.75] and 5.67 [95%CI, 1.33 to 24.16]). Internet gaming disorder and problematic internet use appear to be aggravated by the pandemic. In particular, younger persons and people infected with COVID-19 are at higher risk for Internet Gaming Disorder. Prevention and treatment of these problems are needed.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , COVID-19 , Video Games , Adolescent , Adult , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Internet Addiction Disorder , Internet Use , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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