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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260386, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1634467

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has led to radical changes in social distancing awareness and affected social relationships. Owing to large-scale lockdown, home quarantine and social distancing requirements, it was anticipated that sexual activities would be severely impacted. However, retrospective self-report studies showed that pornography use and autoerotism increased during the pandemic. AIM: This study used big-data databases available on the Internet to investigate factors that modulated pornography use during the pandemic. METHODS: Daily relative search volume (RSV) data from Google Trends for the period from 24 February 2020 to 13 July 2020 were extracted. Pornhub traffic data were extracted from the Pornhub Insights website, for the period from 24 February 2020 to 13 July 2020. The parameter was defined as 'percent change in traffic compared to an average day in 2019'. The number of daily new cases of COVID-19 was extracted from the database on Our World in Data. OUTCOME MEASURES: The normality of the data was examined using the Shapiro-Wilk test. All variables included in this study were non-normally distributed. Therefore, non-parametric tests or parametric tests with bootstrapping were adopted where appropriate. RESULTS: According to Google Trends, the RSV for 'pornography' increased after late March 2020, which is close to the date when the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. The number of daily new cases of COVID-19 was positively correlated with the traffic of Pornhub, a popular pornography website, and the RSV for 'pornography'. Moderation analysis demonstrated a significant main effect of daily new cases of COVID-19 and the RSV for 'social distancing' in predicting Pornhub traffic/RSV for 'pornography'. Furthermore, the RSV for 'social distancing' significantly moderated the relationship between daily new cases and Pornhub traffic/RSV for 'pornography'. A stronger COVID-pornography use association was observed with increased social distancing awareness. CONCLUSION: Increased pornography consumption during the pandemic was observed, and it was associated with the severity of the pandemic. Social distancing awareness could be a key factor influencing interest in and use of pornography. Further studies on the changes in sexual desire and birth-rate control are worthwhile because long-term public health may be affected by the changes in sexual behaviour during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Erotica , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Big Data , COVID-19/psychology , Humans , Physical Distancing , Regression Analysis
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25363, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on both the physical and mental health of individuals worldwide. Evidence regarding the association between mental health problems and information exposure among Thai citizens during the COVID-19 outbreak is limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the relationship between information exposure and mental health problems during the COVID-19 pandemic in Thailand. METHODS: Between April 21 and May 4, 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional, nationwide online survey of the general population in Thailand. We categorized the duration of exposure to COVID-19-related information as follows: <1 h/day (reference group), 1-2 h/day, and ≥3 h/day. Mental health outcomes were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale, the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and the Insomnia Severity Index for symptoms of depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and insomnia, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between information exposure and the risk of developing the aforementioned symptoms. An ancillary analysis using multivariable multinomial logistic regression models was also conducted to assess the possible dose-response relationship across the severity strata of mental health problems. RESULTS: Of the 4322 eligible participants, 4004 (92.6%) completed the online survey. Of them, 1481 (37.0%), 1644 (41.1%), and 879 (22.0%) participants were exposed to COVID-19-related information for less than 1 hour per day, 1 to 2 hours per day, or 3 or more hours per day, respectively. The major source of information related to the COVID-19 pandemic was social media (95.3%), followed by traditional media (68.7%) and family members (34.9%). Those exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day had a higher risk of developing symptoms of depression (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% CI 1.03-1.76; P=.03), anxiety (adjusted OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.43-2.46; P<.001), and insomnia (adjusted OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.17-1.97; P=.001) than people exposed to information for less than 1 hour per day. Meanwhile, people exposed to information for 1 to 2 hours per day were only at risk of developing symptoms of anxiety (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.08-1.69; P=.008). However, no association was found between information exposure and the risk of perceived stress. In the ancillary analysis, a dose-response relationship was observed between information exposure of 3 or more hours per day and the severity of mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that social media is the main source of COVID-19-related information. Moreover, people who are exposed to information for 3 or more hours per day are more likely to develop psychological problems, including depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Longitudinal studies investigating the long-term effects of COVID-19-related information exposure on mental health are warranted.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Education/statistics & numerical data , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Social Media/supply & distribution , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thailand/epidemiology
4.
Curr Probl Cancer ; 46(1): 100766, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275254

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted breast, colon, prostate, and lung cancer screenings in the U.S. by decreasing screening numbers.​We believe multiple types of cancer screenings may have been impacted during the pandemic as a result of cancellations of elective procedures and patient fear of seeking cancer screenings during a pandemic and that Google Trends may be a marker to estimate screening usage. METHODS: Google Trends (trends.google.com) was utilized to assess public interest in multiple cancer types. We then constructed a forecasting model to determine the expected search interest had the pandemic not occurred. We then compared our models to actual screening usage during the pandemic. RESULTS: Public interest in cancer screenings decreased precipitously at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. We found that the Google Trends estimated the decrease in mammogram usage 25.8% below the actual value. Similarly, Google Trends estimated the decrease in colon cancer screening usage 9.7% below the true value. DISCUSSION: We found the decrease in public interest in breast and colon cancer screenings slightly underestimated the actual screening usage numbers, suggesting Google Trends may be utilized as an indicator for human behavior regarding cancer screening, particularly with colon and breast cancer screenings. If the negative trend in cancer screening continues and missed screenings are not appropriately corrected for, socioeconomic and racial disparities in cancer diagnoses, morbidity, and mortality will widen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Early Detection of Cancer/trends , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Early Detection of Cancer/psychology , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Fear , Female , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Internet Use/trends , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(6): e24947, 2021 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262582

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telehealth is an increasingly important component of health care delivery in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, well-documented disparities persist in the use of digital technologies. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe smartphone and internet use within a diverse sample, to assess the association of smartphone and internet use with markers of health literacy and health access, and to identify the mediating factors in these relationships. METHODS: Surveys were distributed to a targeted sample designed to oversample historically underserved communities from April 2017 to December 2017. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association of internet and smartphone use with outcomes describing health care access and markers of health literacy for the total cohort and after stratifying by personal history of cancer. Health care access was captured using multiple variables, including the ability to obtain medical care when needed. Markers of health literacy included self-reported confidence in obtaining health information. RESULTS: Of the 2149 participants, 1319 (61.38%) were women, 655 (30.48%) were non-Hispanic White, and 666 (30.99%) were non-Hispanic Black. The median age was 51 years (IQR 38-65). Most respondents reported using the internet (1921/2149, 89.39%) and owning a smartphone (1800/2149, 83.76%). Compared with the respondents with smartphone or internet access, those without smartphone or internet access were more likely to report that a doctor was their most recent source of health information (344/1800, 19.11% vs 116/349, 33.2% for smartphone and 380/1921, 19.78% vs 80/228, 35.1% for internet, respectively; both P<.001). Internet use was associated with having looked for information on health topics from any source (odds ratio [OR] 3.81, 95% CI 2.53-5.75) and confidence in obtaining health information when needed (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.00-3.34) compared with noninternet users. Smartphone owners had lower odds of being unable to obtain needed medical care (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.95) than nonsmartphone owners. Among participants with a prior history of cancer, smartphone ownership was significantly associated with higher odds of confidence in ability to obtain needed health information (OR 5.63, 95% CI 1.05-30.23) and lower odds of inability to obtain needed medical care (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.47), although these associations were not significant among participants without a prior history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: We describe widespread use of digital technologies in a community-based cohort, although disparities persist. In this cohort, smartphone ownership was significantly associated with ability to obtain needed medical care, suggesting that the use of smartphone technology may play a role in increasing health care access. Similarly, major illnesses such as cancer have the potential to amplify health engagement. Finally, special emphasis must be placed on reaching patient populations with limited digital access, so these patients are not further disadvantaged in the new age of telehealth.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Ownership , Smartphone/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Self Report , Smartphone/supply & distribution , Vulnerable Populations
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(5): e24742, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identifying new COVID-19 cases is challenging. Not every suspected case undergoes testing, because testing kits and other equipment are limited in many parts of the world. Yet populations increasingly use the internet to manage both home and work life during the pandemic, giving researchers mediated connections to millions of people sheltering in place. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using an online news platform to recruit volunteers willing to report COVID-19-like symptoms and behaviors. METHODS: An online epidemiologic survey captured COVID-19-related symptoms and behaviors from individuals recruited through banner ads offered through Microsoft News. Respondents indicated whether they were experiencing symptoms, whether they received COVID-19 testing, and whether they traveled outside of their local area. RESULTS: A total of 87,322 respondents completed the survey across a 3-week span at the end of April 2020, with 54.3% of the responses from the United States and 32.0% from Japan. Of the total respondents, 19,631 (22.3%) reported at least one symptom associated with COVID-19. Nearly two-fifths of these respondents (39.1%) reported more than one COVID-19-like symptom. Individuals who reported being tested for COVID-19 were significantly more likely to report symptoms (47.7% vs 21.5%; P<.001). Symptom reporting rates positively correlated with per capita COVID-19 testing rates (R2=0.26; P<.001). Respondents were geographically diverse, with all states and most ZIP Codes represented. More than half of the respondents from both countries were older than 50 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: News platforms can be used to quickly recruit study participants, enabling collection of infectious disease symptoms at scale and with populations that are older than those found through social media platforms. Such platforms could enable epidemiologists and researchers to quickly assess trends in emerging infections potentially before at-risk populations present to clinics and hospitals for testing and/or treatment.


Subject(s)
Advertising/methods , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
J Appl Gerontol ; 40(9): 958-962, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226831

ABSTRACT

While U.S. adults living in affordable senior housing represent a vulnerable population during the COVID-19 pandemic, affordable housing may provide a foundation for interventions designed to improve technology access to support health. To better understand technology access among residents of affordable senior housing, we surveyed members of a national association of resident service coordinators to assess their experiences working with residents during the pandemic (n = 1,440). While nearly all service coordinators report that most or all residents have reliable phone access, under a quarter report that most or all have reliable internet access; they also report limited access to technology for video calls. Lack of internet access and technology literacy are perceived as barriers to medical visits and food procurement for low-income older adult residents of affordable housing. Policies to expand internet access as well as training and support to enable use of online services are required to overcome these barriers.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Communication Barriers , Homes for the Aged , Internet Access/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes , Videoconferencing , Aged , COVID-19 , Computer Literacy , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Homes for the Aged/economics , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Male , Nursing Homes/economics , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/supply & distribution , Vulnerable Populations
9.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(4): 251-255, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189529

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The recent COVID-19 pandemic is having profound impacts on every sector of society, and New York City (NYC) emerged as an early epicenter of the disease. Given the novelty and scale of the disease, information surrounding COVID-19 has been marked by considerable uncertainty and confusion. Although various factors have been associated with COVID-19 distress, little is known about the relations between levels of intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and anxiety symptoms and behaviors. This cross-sectional study sought to examine potential correlates and pathways between anxiety and precautionary behaviors with the two levels of IU: prospective and inhibitory. Individuals from NYC (N = 99) completed an online survey through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Findings revealed that fear of COVID-19 accounts for associations between prospective IU and greater anxiety symptoms and behaviors, whereas precaution adherence accounts for associations between prospective IU and reduced anxiety symptoms and behaviors. In addition, precaution adherence accounts for associations between inhibitory IU and greater anxiety symptoms and behaviors. The results shed light on ways in which variations in IU may be associated with anxiety symptoms and behaviors in the context of COVID-19 and future pandemic scenarios.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Uncertainty , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Male , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report
10.
J Psychiatr Res ; 137: 96-103, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104106

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple survey studies have demonstrated a mental health (MH) burden of COVID-19 globally. However, few studies have examined relevant risk factors for pandemic-related MH issues. METHODS: A link to an online survey was posted from April 8th - June 11th, 2020 which included questions regarding COVID-19 experience, perceived impact of the pandemic on life domains (e.g., social communication, finances), behavioural alterations (e.g., online activities, substance use), and MH treatment history. Current psychiatric symptom severity and impairment were evaluated using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Perceived Stress Scale. RESULTS: Overall, 632 individuals (82% female, mean age:42.04 ± 16.56) in Canada and the United States completed the survey. While few reported contracting COVID-19 (0.5%), the impact of the pandemic was evident, with a vast majority reporting anxiety around COVID-19 infecting loved ones (88%). Almost half (43%) reported previous MH treatment and 31% met criteria for GAD, 29% for MDD and 63% reported significantly high levels of stress. Female sex, younger age and past MH treatment emerged as significant predictors of these issues(p < .01). Age-related differences in the impact of COVID-19 on life domains, substance use, and online activity were also noted. CONCLUSION: The findings from the current sample add to the growing literature suggesting negative effects of COVID-19 on MH, while highlighting specific risk factors. Age may be an important factor in predicting MH during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging/psychology , Canada/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 45(3): 677-686, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1047946

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and its resulting social policy changes may result in psychological distress among schoolchildren with overweight. This study thus aimed to (1) compare psychological distress (including fear of COVID-19 infection, stress, anxiety, and depression), perceived weight stigma, and problematic internet-related behaviors between schoolchildren with and without overweight; (2) assess whether perceived weight stigma and problematic internet-related behaviors explained psychological distress. METHODS: Schoolchildren (n = 1357; mean age = 10.7 years) with overweight (n = 236) and without overweight (n = 1121) completed an online survey assessing their fear of COVID-19 infection, stress, anxiety, depression, perceived weight stigma, problematic smartphone application use, problematic social media use, and problematic gaming. RESULTS: Schoolchildren with overweight had significantly higher levels of COVID-19 infection fear, stress, depression, perceived weight stigma, and problematic social media use than those without overweight. Regression models showed that perceived weight stigma and problematic internet-related behaviors were significant predictors of psychological distress among schoolchildren with overweight. CONCLUSION: Strategies to manage perceived weight stigma and problematic internet-related behaviors may have a positive influence on mental health among schoolchildren with overweight under health-threatening circumstances, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Overweight , Psychological Distress , Students , Adolescent , Child , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Overweight/epidemiology , Overweight/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data
12.
Front Public Health ; 8: 609347, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005863

ABSTRACT

Internet use in the youth has increased manifold during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) generally have a higher risk of problematic internet use. The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in internet and related digital media use between children with ASD and their typically developing counterparts during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this online survey in Japan conducted from April 30 to May 8, 2020, we analyzed digital media time of 84 children with ASD and 361 age- and gender-matched controls before and after school closure. Digital media use duration was significantly longer in the ASD group than in the control group before the pandemic. The increase of media use time was more prominent in the control group than in the ASD group. We observed excessive Internet use among children with ASD and without ASD, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is necessary to establish strategies to prevent excessive internet use in not only children and adolescents with ASD but also without ASD in the post-pandemic world.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communications Media/statistics & numerical data , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Sleep Med ; 78: 108-114, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989230

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the sleep habits of school-going children before and during school closure in the national lockdown period (called 'Circuit Breaker' or CB in Singapore) due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional, anonymous, online, population-based survey questionnaire was administered to parents aged 21 years and above with children aged between 3 and 16 years attending pre-school, primary or secondary school (equivalent to kindergarten, middle and-high school) and residing in Singapore. Sleep duration in relation to various daily activities including academic activities, physical exercise, and screen time was evaluated pre-CB and during CB. RESULTS: Data from 593 participants were analyzed. Pre-CB, the overall mean (SD) sleep duration of the study population was 9.01 (1.18) hours on weekdays and 9.99 (0.94) hours on weekends. During CB, mean (SD) sleep duration overall was 9.63 (1.18) hours. Although children generally went to bed later (mean 0.65 h later), they woke up even later during CB (mean 1.27 h later), resulting in longer sleep duration (mean increase of 0.35 h). This was most evident in secondary school children (mean increase of 0.70 h). Children attending private schools (which had later start times) had increased sleep duration (mean 10.01 (SD 0.89) hours pre-CB and 10.05 (SD 0.93) hours during CB) compared to public schools (mean 9.05 (SD 0.91) pre-CB and 9.49 (SD 1.22) hours during CB). CONCLUSIONS: School closure from the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in longer sleep duration in school-going children. Early school/academic activity start times had a significant impact on limiting children's sleep duration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Child Behavior/psychology , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Sleep , Social Environment
16.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(2): 329-334, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871457

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the public interest in rheumatic diseases during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Google Trends was queried to analyze search trends in the United States for numerous rheumatic diseases and also the interest in a rheumatologist. Three 8-week periods in 2020 ((March 15-May 9), (May 10-July 4), and (July 5-August 29)) were compared to similar periods of the prior 4 years (2016-2019). Compared to a similar time period between 2016 and 2019, a significant decrease was found in the relative search volume for more than half of the search terms during the initial March 15-May 9, 2020 period. However, this trend appeared to reverse during the July 5-August 29, 2020 period where the relative volume for nearly half of the search terms were not statistically significant compared to similar periods of the prior 4 years. In addition, this period showed a significant increase in relative volume for the terms: Axial spondyloarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, scleroderma, Kawasaki disease, Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and rheumatologist. There was a significant decrease in relative search volume for many rheumatic diseases between March 15 and May 9, 2020 when compared to similar periods during the prior 4 years. However, the trends reversed after the initial period ended. There was an increase in relative search for the term "rheumatologist" between July and August 2020 suggesting the need for rheumatologists during the COVID-19 pandemic. Policymakers and healthcare providers should address the informational demands on rheumatic diseases and needs for rheumatologists by the general public during pandemics like COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Information Seeking Behavior , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatic Diseases/psychology , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine
18.
Am Heart J ; 231: 157-159, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-812437

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic there has been a reduction in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction. This manuscript presents the analysis of Google Trends meta-data and shows a marked spike in search volume for chest pain that is strongly correlated with COVID-19 case numbers in the United States. This raises a concern that fear of contracting COVID-19 may be leading patients to self-triage using internet searches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chest Pain , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Chest Pain/diagnosis , Chest Pain/epidemiology , Chest Pain/psychology , Correlation of Data , Fear , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , United States/epidemiology
20.
World J Urol ; 39(6): 1997-2003, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-734101

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine how members of the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) are continuing their education in the time of COVID-19. METHODS: A survey was disseminated amongst SIU members worldwide by email. Results were analyzed to examine the influence of age, practice region and settings on continuing medical education (CME) of the respondents. RESULTS: In total, 2494 respondents completed the survey. Internet searching was the most common method of CME (76%; all ps < 0.001), followed by searching journals and textbook including the online versions (62%; all ps < 0.001). Overall, 6% of the respondents reported no time/interest for CME during the pandemic. Although most urologists report using only one platform for their CME (26.6%), the majority reported using ≥ 2 platforms, with approximately 10% of the respondents using up to 5 different platforms. Urologists < 40 years old were more likely to use online literature (69%), podcasts/AV media (38%), online CME courses/webinars (40%), and social media (39%). There were regional variations in the CME modality used but no significant difference in the number of methods by region. There was no significant difference in responses between urologists in academic/public hospitals or private practice. CONCLUSION: During COVID-19, urologists have used web-based learning for their CME. Internet learning and literature were the top frequently cited learning methods. Younger urologists are more likely to use all forms of digital learning methods, while older urologists prefer fewer methods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing , Teaching/trends , Urologists , Urology/education , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Continuing/trends , Humans , Internationality , Internet Use/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologists/education , Urologists/statistics & numerical data
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