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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1268, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internet medical care has been advancing steadily, especially during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the development momentum of Internet medical care in China is more vigorous. This study aimed to explore the factors associated with using the Internet for medical information, to examine the popularisation and implementation of Internet medical treatment and feasible strategies, and promote the further development of Internet medical treatment. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 408 medical patients who had used online medical services. The one-way analysis of variance or independent samples t-test was used to compare the differences in the influence of demographic characteristics on behavioural intentions of different people seeking medical care. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between different measurement variables. A mediation regression analysis was used to explore the mediating role of trust in Internet medical care. RESULTS: The difference in the influence of Internet medical use frequency on the behavioural intention of different participants was statistically significant (F = 3.311, P = 0.038). Among the influencing factors, personal trust propensity (r = 0.387, P < 0.01), website credibility (r = 0.662, P < 0.01), hospital credibility (r = 0.629, P < 0.01), doctor's credibility (r = 0.746, P < 0.01), and online patient trust (r = 0.874, P < 0.01) were positively correlated with patients' behavioural intentions. In the analysis of intermediary factors, the total effect of the credibility of the diagnosis and treatment website on the behavioural intention of patients was 0.344. The total effect of the credibility of the diagnosis and treatment hospital on the behavioural intention of patients was 0.312; the total effect of the service doctor's credibility on the patient's behavioural intention was 0.385; the total effect of the personal trust tendency on the patient's behavioural intention was 0.296. CONCLUSIONS: This study found defects in various factors that produce distrust in Internet medical treatment. It also reveals the positive effect of trust factors on the development and implementation of Internet medical treatment and provides some ideas for improving the use of Internet medical treatment by the masses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Trust , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Movimento (Porto Alegre) ; 27: e27011, 2021. tab, graf
Article | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1609147

ABSTRACT

The situation created by the novel coronavirus disease has affected education worldwide, resulting in the urgent need for programs that promote physical activity at home and responsible use of internet-connected devices. This work provides a didactic proposal to perform Expressive Movement & Creative Dance (EMCD) at home adaptable to distinct educational levels and useful as a valuable online or face-to-face education experience even when the coronavirus crisis ends. The proposal is based on the Laban Movement Analysis, the Theatre of the Oppressed, and Lipdub. It seeks to develop students' own artistic body language, emotional intelligence, healthy physical activity and social awareness. Furthermore, it intends to promote the creation of a new social movement (#VIDLOP) using art and popular media as empowering and democratic channels for building a better world. In conclusion, this may be a promising proposal to develop the EMCD and human awareness in challenging scenarios and distinct educational settings.


A situação causada pela nova doença do coronavírus afetou a educação em todo o mundo, sendo urgente a aplicação de programas que promovam a atividade física em casa e o uso responsável de dispositivos conectados à internet. O presente trabalho apresenta uma proposta didática de Expressão Corporal (EC) para a sua prática desde casa, adaptável a diferentes níveis educacionais, e útil também como uma valiosa experiência educacional on-line ou presencial mesmo quando a crise do coronavírus acabe. Esta proposta baseia-se na Análise Laban de Movimento, no Teatro do Oprimido e no Lipdub. Procura desenvolver a linguagem corporal artística própria, a inteligência emocional, comportamentos saudáveis de atividade física e a consciência social dos alunos; e promover a criação de um novo movimento social (#VIDLOP), usando a arte e a mídia popular como canais democráticos e de poder para construir um mundo melhor. Em conclusão, esta pode ser uma proposta promissora para o desenvolvimento da EC e da consciência humana em cenários desafiadores e em diferentes ambientes educacionais.


La situación provocada por la nueva enfermedad del coronavirus ha afectado a la educación en todo el mundo, por lo que es urgente la aplicación de programas que promuevan la actividad física en el hogar y el uso responsable de dispositivos conectados a internet. El presente trabajo presenta una propuesta didáctica de Expresión Corporal (EC) para practicar desde casa, adaptable a diferentes niveles educativos, y útil también como una valiosa experiencia educativa online o presencial, incluso cuando la crisis del coronavirus acabe. Esta propuesta se basa en el Análisis del Movimiento de Laban, en el Teatro del Oprimido y en el Lipdub. Busca desarrollar el lenguaje corporal artístico propio, la inteligencia emocional, comportamientos saludables de actividad física y la conciencia social de los alumnos, además de promover la creación de un nuevo movimiento social (#VIDLOP), utilizando arte y medios de comunicación populares como canales democráticos y de poder para construir un mundo mejor. En conclusión, esta puede ser una propuesta prometedora para el desarrollo de la EC y la conciencia humana en escenarios desafiantes y en diferentes entornos educativos.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Social Isolation , Health , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Motor Activity , Physical Education and Training , Internet , Kinesics
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(1): e28368, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a fundamental reexamination of how human psychological research can be conducted safely and robustly in a new era of digital working and physical distancing. Online web-based testing has risen to the forefront as a promising solution for the rapid mass collection of cognitive data without requiring human contact. However, a long-standing debate exists over the data quality and validity of web-based studies. This study examines the opportunities and challenges afforded by the societal shift toward web-based testing and highlights an urgent need to establish a standard data quality assurance framework for online studies. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to develop and validate a new supervised online testing methodology, remote guided testing (RGT). METHODS: A total of 85 healthy young adults were tested on 10 cognitive tasks assessing executive functioning (flexibility, memory, and inhibition) and learning. Tasks were administered either face-to-face in the laboratory (n=41) or online using remote guided testing (n=44) and delivered using identical web-based platforms (Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, Inquisit, and i-ABC). Data quality was assessed using detailed trial-level measures (missed trials, outlying and excluded responses, and response times) and overall task performance measures. RESULTS: The results indicated that, across all data quality and performance measures, RGT data was statistically-equivalent to in-person data collected in the lab (P>.40 for all comparisons). Moreover, RGT participants out-performed the lab group on measured verbal intelligence (P<.001), which could reflect test environment differences, including possible effects of mask-wearing on communication. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the RGT methodology could help ameliorate concerns regarding online data quality-particularly for studies involving high-risk or rare cohorts-and offer an alternative for collecting high-quality human cognitive data without requiring in-person physical attendance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Internet , Neuropsychological Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
4.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 9(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591928

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are limited data on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine reactogenicity in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and how reactogenicity is affected by disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). The objective of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to generate real-world multiple sclerosis-specific vaccine safety information, particularly in the context of specific DMTs, and provide information to mitigate specific concerns in vaccine hesitant PwMS. METHODS: Between 3/2021 and 6/2021, participants in iConquerMS, an online people-powered research network, reported SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, experiences of local (itch, pain, redness, swelling, or warmth at injection site) and systemic (fever, chills, fatigue, headache, joint pain, malaise, muscle ache, nausea, allergic, and other) reactions within 24 hours (none, mild, moderate, and severe), DMT use, and other attributes. Multivariable models characterized associations between clinical factors and reactogenicity. RESULTS: In 719 PwMS, 64% reported experiencing a reaction after their first vaccination shot, and 17% reported a severe reaction. The most common reactions were pain at injection site (54%), fatigue (34%), headache (28%), and malaise (21%). Younger age, being female, prior SARS-CoV-2 infection, and receiving the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) vs BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) vaccine were associated with experiencing a reaction after the first vaccine dose. Similar relationships were observed for a severe reaction, including higher odds of reactions among PwMS with more physical impairment and lower odds of reactions for PwMS on an alpha4-integrin blocker or sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator. In 442 PwMS who received their second vaccination shot, 74% reported experiencing a reaction, whereas 22% reported a severe reaction. Reaction profiles after the second shot were similar to those reported after the first shot. Younger PwMS and those who received the mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vs BNT162b2 vaccine reported higher reactogenicity after the second shot, whereas those on a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator or fumarate were significantly less likely to report a reaction. DISCUSSION: SARS-CoV-2 vaccine reactogenicity profiles and the associated factors in this convenience sample of PwMS appear similar to those reported in the general population. PwMS on specific DMTs were less likely to report vaccine reactions. Overall, the short-term vaccine reactions experienced in the study population were mostly self-limiting, including pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, and fever.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary/adverse effects , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599612

ABSTRACT

Parents of children with ASD experience a higher incidence of mental health difficulties, including stress, depression, and anxiety, than parents of children without ASD. According to studies related to ASD, parent-child physical activity programs are an effective approach to encourage both parents and their children with ASD to exercise together, thus improving the mental health of parents due to this interactive family activity. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of this web-based parent-child physical activity program on the mental health of parents of children with ASD. A total of 94 parent-child pairs consented to participate in this study, and 75 parent-child pairs completed the study. Three instruments-DASS-21, PSI-4-SF, and WHOQOL-26-were used to measure mental health, parental stress, and quality of life, respectively. A randomized controlled trial design was implemented to examine the effectiveness of the 10-week web-based parent-child physical activity program on improving the mental health of parents of children with ASD. The results showed that after the 10-week parent-child physical activity program, there were significant differences in overall DASS-21 and PSI-4-SF for the experimental group, compared with control group (p < 0.05), which indicated that the parent-child physical activity program has a positive influence on mental health in parents of children with ASD. One sub-area of WHOQOL-26 between the experimental and control groups across pre-/post-testing intervals also showed greater reductions in the item of psychological health (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the findings demonstrated the efficacy of the web-based parent-child physical activity program for improving mental health in parents of children with ASD.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , Mental Health , Exercise , Humans , Internet , Parent-Child Relations , Quality of Life
6.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0252972, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598722

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has clearly shown that efficient management of infectious diseases requires a top-down approach which must be complemented with a bottom-up response to be effective. Here we investigate a novel approach to surveillance for transboundary animal diseases using African Swine (ASF) fever as a model. We collected data both at a population level and at the local level on information-seeking behavior respectively through digital data and targeted questionnaire-based surveys to relevant stakeholders such as pig farmers and veterinary authorities. Our study shows how information-seeking behavior and resulting public attention during an epidemic, can be identified through novel data streams from digital platforms such as Wikipedia. Leveraging attention in a critical moment can be key to providing the correct information at the right moment, especially to an interested cohort of people. We also bring evidence on how field surveys aimed at local workers and veterinary authorities remain a crucial tool to assess more in-depth preparedness and awareness among front-line actors. We conclude that these two tools should be used in combination to maximize the outcome of surveillance and prevention activities for selected transboundary animal diseases such as ASF.


Subject(s)
African Swine Fever/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Epidemiological Monitoring , Livestock/virology , Animals , Awareness , Estonia/epidemiology , Farmers , Internet , Statistics, Nonparametric , Surveys and Questionnaires , Swine
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e056077, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583092

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to identify populations at a high risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection but who are less likely to present for testing, by determining which sociodemographic and household factors are associated with a lower propensity to be tested and, if tested, with a higher risk of a positive test result. DESIGN AND SETTING: Internet-based participatory surveillance data from the general population of the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Weekly survey data collected over a 5-month period (17 November 2020 to 18 April 2021) from a total of 12 026 participants who had contributed at least 2 weekly surveys was analysed. METHODS: Multivariable analyses using generalised estimating equations for binomial outcomes were conducted to estimate the adjusted ORs of testing and of test positivity associated with participant and household characteristics. RESULTS: Male sex (adjusted OR for testing (ORt): 0.92; adjusted OR for positivity (ORp): 1.30, age groups<20 (ORt: 0.89; ORp: 1.27), 50-64 years (ORt: 0.94; ORp: 1.06) and 65+ years (ORt: 0.78; ORp: 1.24), diabetics (ORt: 0.97; ORp: 1.06) and sales/administrative employees (ORt: 0.93; ORp: 1.90) were distinguished as lower test propensity/higher test positivity factors. CONCLUSIONS: The factors identified using this approach can help identify potential target groups for improving communication and encouraging testing among those with symptoms, and thus increase the effectiveness of testing, which is essential for the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and for public health strategies in the longer term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Internet , Male , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Regen Med ; 17(2): 81-90, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581477

ABSTRACT

Aim: To attend stem cell (SC) seminars hosted by US-based direct-to-consumer SC businesses either in person or via online 'webinars' to determine accuracy and regulatory oversight of the advertised SC therapies. Methods: The therapeutic claims, costs, risks, scientific evidence in support of a therapy and any regulatory oversight were collated using pre-established checklists. Participation consisted of one live attendance of a seminar, and following COVID-19 restrictions, review of seven recorded presentations available on the internet from SC businesses. Results & conclusion: None of the SC therapies advertised by direct-to-consumer clinics reviewed were supported by proper clinical evidence nor substantiated by peer reviewed literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Advertising , Humans , Internet , SARS-CoV-2 , Stem Cell Transplantation
9.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 620-625, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579391

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Physicians across the world have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was designed and conducted to assess the emotional and behavioural reactions of physicians to the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: An online survey questionnaire using the google forms platform was constructed by the authors. The items in the questionnaire were based on clinical experience, relevant literature review and discussion with peers. A list of issues that were deemed as essential components of the experience of the pandemic relevant to physicians was arrived at. Thereafter these issues were operationalized into question form and hosted on the google forms platform. The link to this questionnaire was circulated by the authors among their peer groups in the month of April 2020. RESULTS: We received 295 responses and 3 were unusable. Most of the responses were from India, the United States of America, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. About 60% of the respondents identified themselves as frontline and had a decade of clinical experience. Most respondents reported being anxious due to the pandemic and also observed the same in their peers and families. A majority also observed changes in behaviour in self and others and advanced a variety of reasons and concerns. A sense of duty was the most commonly employed coping mechanism. CONCLUSION: Physicians are not immune from information and misinformation, or cues in the environment. Behavioural choices are not always predicted by knowledge but by a combination of knowledge, emotional state, personality and environment. Healthcare settings need to be ready for emergencies and should focus on reducing uncertainty in physicians. These factors may also be gainfully used in the mental health promotion of physicians in COVID-19 care roles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 634-638, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579389

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To explore the effect of social work intervention on psychological intervention of medical workers after the epidemic under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy". SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The observation objects in this study were all medical workers in fever clinic under the epidemic situation in COVID-19. A total of 60 cases were selected, and the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers in fever clinic was investigated by electronic questionnaire. After completing the investigation, social work intervention measures under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" were implemented. RESULTS: After implementation, the proportion of anxiety and depression of medical workers were significantly lower than those before intervention (P<0.05). The development of music therapy activities has alleviated the job anxiety of medical workers to a great extent, and the job anxiety test, total score and scores of various factors have all decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Social work intervention under the mode of "internet plus Music Therapy" can relieve anxiety and depression, and ensure the mental health of frontline medical staff during the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music Therapy , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Work
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24165, 2021 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sending emergency messages via mobile phone text messaging can be a promising communication tool to rapidly disseminate information and promote preventive behavior among the public during epidemic outbreaks. The battle to overcome COVID-19 is not yet over; thus, it is essential that the public practices preventive measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of reading and obtaining information via emergency alert SMS text messages and their effects on the individual's practice of preventive behaviors during the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak in South Korea. METHODS: A cross-sectional web-based survey comprising 990 participants was conducted over 3 days (March 25-27, 2020). A multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed the sociodemographic factors that might influence the behavior of reading emergency alert text messages. A hierarchical linear regression model estimated the associations between reading emergency alert text messages for each precautionary behavior practiced against COVID-19. Additionally, the indirect effects of reading the text messages on each precautionary behavior via psychological factors (ie, perceived risk and response efficacy) were calculated. All data were weighted according to the 2019 Korea census data. RESULTS: Overall, 49.2% (487/990) of the participants reported that they always read emergency alert text messages and visited the linked website to obtain more information. Factors such as female sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% CI 1.28-2.21) and older age (30-39 years: OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.25-3.28; 40-49 years: OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.80-4.47; 50-59 years: OR 3.19, 95% CI 2.01-5.06; 60 years and above: OR 3.12, 95% CI 2.00-4.86 versus 18-29 years) were identified to be associated with a higher frequency of reading the text messages. Participants who always read the text messages practiced wearing facial masks (ß=.074, P=.01) more frequently than those who did not. In terms of social distancing, participants who reported they always read the text messages avoided crowded places (ß=.078, P=.01) and canceled or postponed social gatherings (ß=.103, P<.001) more frequently than those who did not read the text messages. Furthermore, reading text messages directly and indirectly affected practicing precautionary behaviors, as the mediation effect of response efficacy between reading text messages and practicing preventive behaviors was significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that emergency alert text messages sent to individuals' mobile phones are timely and effective strategies for encouraging preventive behavior in public. Sending emergency alert text messages to provide the public with accurate and reliable information could be positively considered by the health authorities, which might reduce the negative impact of infodemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Phone , Internet , Text Messaging , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25682, 2021 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574621

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the development of dashboards as dynamic, visual tools for communicating COVID-19 data has surged worldwide. Dashboards can inform decision-making and support behavior change. To do so, they must be actionable. The features that constitute an actionable dashboard in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic have not been rigorously assessed. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics of public web-based COVID-19 dashboards by assessing their purpose and users ("why"), content and data ("what"), and analyses and displays ("how" they communicate COVID-19 data), and ultimately to appraise the common features of highly actionable dashboards. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive assessment and scoring using nominal group technique with an international panel of experts (n=17) on a global sample of COVID-19 dashboards in July 2020. The sequence of steps included multimethod sampling of dashboards; development and piloting of an assessment tool; data extraction and an initial round of actionability scoring; a workshop based on a preliminary analysis of the results; and reconsideration of actionability scores followed by joint determination of common features of highly actionable dashboards. We used descriptive statistics and thematic analysis to explore the findings by research question. RESULTS: A total of 158 dashboards from 53 countries were assessed. Dashboards were predominately developed by government authorities (100/158, 63.0%) and were national (93/158, 58.9%) in scope. We found that only 20 of the 158 dashboards (12.7%) stated both their primary purpose and intended audience. Nearly all dashboards reported epidemiological indicators (155/158, 98.1%), followed by health system management indicators (85/158, 53.8%), whereas indicators on social and economic impact and behavioral insights were the least reported (7/158, 4.4% and 2/158, 1.3%, respectively). Approximately a quarter of the dashboards (39/158, 24.7%) did not report their data sources. The dashboards predominately reported time trends and disaggregated data by two geographic levels and by age and sex. The dashboards used an average of 2.2 types of displays (SD 0.86); these were mostly graphs and maps, followed by tables. To support data interpretation, color-coding was common (93/158, 89.4%), although only one-fifth of the dashboards (31/158, 19.6%) included text explaining the quality and meaning of the data. In total, 20/158 dashboards (12.7%) were appraised as highly actionable, and seven common features were identified between them. Actionable COVID-19 dashboards (1) know their audience and information needs; (2) manage the type, volume, and flow of displayed information; (3) report data sources and methods clearly; (4) link time trends to policy decisions; (5) provide data that are "close to home"; (6) break down the population into relevant subgroups; and (7) use storytelling and visual cues. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 dashboards are diverse in the why, what, and how by which they communicate insights on the pandemic and support data-driven decision-making. To leverage their full potential, dashboard developers should consider adopting the seven actionability features identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Data Display , Information Dissemination , Internet , Adult , Computer Graphics , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e23795, 2021 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574557

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been widely communicated that individuals with underlying health conditions are at higher risk of severe disease due to COVID-19 than healthy peers. As social distancing measures continue during the COVID-19 pandemic, experts encourage individuals with underlying conditions to engage in telehealth appointments to maintain continuity of care while minimizing risk exposure. To date, however, little information has been provided regarding telehealth uptake among this high-risk population. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe the telehealth use, resource needs, and information sources of individuals with chronic conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Secondary objectives include exploring differences in telehealth use by sociodemographic characteristics. METHODS: Data for this study were collected through an electronic survey distributed between May 12-14, 2020, to members of 26 online health communities for individuals with chronic disease. Descriptive statistics were run to explore telehealth use, support needs, and information sources, and z tests were run to assess differences in sociodemographic factors and information and support needs among those who did and did not use telehealth services. RESULTS: Among the 2210 respondents, 1073 (49%) reported engaging in telehealth in the past 4 months. Higher proportions of women engaged in telehealth than men (890/1781, 50% vs 181/424, 43%; P=.007), and a higher proportion of those earning household incomes of more than US $100,000 engaged in telehealth than those earning less than US $30,000 (195/370, 53% vs 241/530 45%; P=.003). Although 59% (133/244) of those younger than 40 years and 54% (263/486) of those aged 40-55 years used telehealth, aging populations were less likely to do so, with only 45% (677/1500) of individuals 56 years or older reporting telehealth use (P<.001 and P=.001, respectively). Patients with cystic fibrosis, lupus, and ankylosing spondylitis recorded the highest proportions of individuals using telehealth when compared to those with other diagnoses. Of the 2210 participants, 1333 (60%) participants either looked up information about the virus online or planned to in the future, and when asked what information or support would be most helpful right now, over half (1151/2210, 52%) responded "understanding how COVID-19 affects people with my health condition." CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of the study sample reported participating in telehealth in the past 4 months. Future efforts to engage individuals with underlying medical conditions in telehealth should focus on outreach to men, members of lower-income households, and aging populations. These results may help inform and refine future health communications to further engage this at-risk population in telehealth as the pandemic continues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Telemedicine/methods , Chronic Disease , Female , Humans , Internet , Learning Health System , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e25283, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573903

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has affected the lives of millions of people by causing a dramatic impact on many health care systems and the global economy. This devastating pandemic has brought together communities across the globe to work on this issue in an unprecedented manner. OBJECTIVE: This case study describes the steps and methods employed in the conduction of a remote online health hackathon centered on challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. It aims to deliver a clear implementation road map for other organizations to follow. METHODS: This 4-day hackathon was conducted in April 2020, based on six COVID-19-related challenges defined by frontline clinicians and researchers from various disciplines. An online survey was structured to assess: (1) individual experience satisfaction, (2) level of interprofessional skills exchange, (3) maturity of the projects realized, and (4) overall quality of the event. At the end of the event, participants were invited to take part in an online survey with 17 (+5 optional) items, including multiple-choice and open-ended questions that assessed their experience regarding the remote nature of the event and their individual project, interprofessional skills exchange, and their confidence in working on a digital health project before and after the hackathon. Mentors, who guided the participants through the event, also provided feedback to the organizers through an online survey. RESULTS: A total of 48 participants and 52 mentors based in 8 different countries participated and developed 14 projects. A total of 75 mentorship video sessions were held. Participants reported increased confidence in starting a digital health venture or a research project after successfully participating in the hackathon, and stated that they were likely to continue working on their projects. Of the participants who provided feedback, 60% (n=18) would not have started their project without this particular hackathon and indicated that the hackathon encouraged and enabled them to progress faster, for example, by building interdisciplinary teams, gaining new insights and feedback provided by their mentors, and creating a functional prototype. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insights into how online hackathons can contribute to solving the challenges and effects of a pandemic in several regions of the world. The online format fosters team diversity, increases cross-regional collaboration, and can be executed much faster and at lower costs compared to in-person events. Results on preparation, organization, and evaluation of this online hackathon are useful for other institutions and initiatives that are willing to introduce similar event formats in the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Internet , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
15.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 62(3): E586-E591, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575500

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of the current study was to assess if the frequency of internet searches for influenza are aligned with Italian National Institute of Health (ISS) cases and deaths. Also, we evaluate the distribution over time and the correlation between search volume of flu and flu symptoms with reported new cases of SARS-CoV-2. Materials and methods: The reported cases and deaths of flu and the reported cases of SARS-CoV-2 were selected from the reports of ISS, the data have been aggregated by week. The search volume provided by Google Trends (GT) has a relative nature and is calculated as a percentage of query related to a specific term in connection with a determined place and time-frame. Results: The strongest correlation between GT search and influenza cases was found at a lag of +1 week particularly for the period 2015-2019. A strong correlation was also found at a lag of +1 week between influenza death and GT search. About the correlation between GT search and SARS-CoV-2 new cases the strongest correlation was found at a lag of +3 weeks for the term flu. Conclusion: In the last years research in health care has used GT data to explore public interest in various fields of medicine. Caution should be used when interpreting the findings of digital surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Internet , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine
16.
Comput Math Methods Med ; 2021: 1546343, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574507

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, the need for a better health care facility is highlighted more than ever. Besides physical health, mental health conditions have become a significant concern. Unfortunately, there are few opportunities for people to receive mental health care. There are inadequate facilities for seeking mental health support even in big cities, let alone remote areas. This paper presents the structure and implementation procedures for a mental health support system combining technology and professionals. The system is a web platform where mental health seekers can register and use functionalities like NLP-based chatbot for personality assessment, chatting with like-minded people, and one-to-one video conferencing with a mental health professional. The video calling feature of the system has emotion detection capabilities using computer vision. The system also includes downloadable prescription facilities and a payment gateway for secure transactions. From a technological aspect, the conversational NLP-based chatbot and computer vision-powered video calling are the system's most important features. The system has a documentation facility to analyze the mental health condition over time. The web platform is built using React.js for the frontend and Express.js for the backend. MongoDB is used as the database of the platform. The NLP chatbot is built on a three-layered deep neural network model that is programmed in the Python language and uses the NLTK, TensorFlow, and Keras sequential API. Video conference is one of the most important features of the platform. To create the video calling feature, Express.js, Socket.io, and Socket.io-client have been used. The emotion detection feature is implemented on video conferences using computer vision, Haar Cascade, and TensorFlow. All the implemented features are tested and work fine. The targeted users for the platform are teenagers, youth, and the middle-aged population. Mental health-seeking is still considered taboo in some societies today. Apart from basic established facilities, this social dilemma of undergoing treatment for mental health is causing severe damage to individuals. A solution to this problem can be a remote platform for mental health support. With this goal in mind, this system is designed to provide mental health support to people remotely from anywhere worldwide.


Subject(s)
Mental Health , Software , Telemedicine , Humans , Internet , Natural Language Processing , User-Computer Interface , Videoconferencing
17.
Int J Dev Biol ; 65(7-8-9): 457-464, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571997

ABSTRACT

The Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (SEBD) organized its 17th meeting in November 2020 (herein referred to as SEBD2020). This meeting, originally programmed to take place in the city of Bilbao, was forced onto an online format due to the SARS-CoV2, COVID-19 pandemic. Although, we missed the live personal interactions and missed out on the Bilbao social scene, we were able to meet online to present our work and discuss our latest results. An overview of the activities that took place around the meeting, the different scientific sessions and the speakers involved are presented here. The pros and cons of virtual meetings are discussed.


Subject(s)
Developmental Biology/methods , Developmental Biology/trends , Animals , Cell Biology/trends , Developmental Biology/education , Humans , Internet , Models, Animal , Nervous System , Peer Review , Publications , Publishing , Regeneration , Schools , Societies, Medical , Spain
18.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1584-1592, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572704

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study aims to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of people towards COVID-19 and to evaluate compliance with practices such as social isolation, curfews, mask use and hand hygiene. METHODOLOGY: A month after the COVID-19 infection was observed in Turkey, a standard questionnaire link was sent to participants via the online questionnaire platform to determine the knowledge, attitude, and behavior of the public. The survey results of 503 people were evaluated. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 pandemic 81.2% of the participants stayed at home, 79.1% of the participants wore a mask, 74% of the participants expressed to be following social distancing rules, 54.1% confirmed the use of hand sanitizers and 43.9% confirmed the use of gloves (43.9%), which are considered to be personal protective measures. The knowledge of terms such as 'quarantine' and 'isolation' was 94% and 97.4% respectively and 37.2% of the participants were of the opinion that the COVID-19 virus was produced in a laboratory environment. Within the research group, a rate of 65.6% of the participants found their own knowledge of COVID-19 to be sufficient. The participants found the announcements of official institutions more reliable than the announcements on television programs, the internet and social media. CONCLUSIONS: The public information on COVID-19 was found to be sufficient. In order to prevent the spreading of the pandemic, participants were partially compliant to rules such as staying at home, using masks, maintaining hand hygiene and social isolation. Compared to men, women's use of protective equipment was higher.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572489

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Internet has been a major source of information for people to keep updated with news and guidelines. However, concerns have been raised about the 'infodemic', which includes the overabundance of online information and the spread of misleading information. Adequate eHealth literacy skills among world citizens have therefore been emphasized as vital during the pandemic. Persons with type 2 diabetes have been at increased risk of severe outcomes of COVID-19 disease. This study aimed to explore online COVID-19 information acquisition experiences among persons with type 2 diabetes and varying eHealth literacy. Fifty-eight participants filled out the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS), along with a qualitative questionnaire with free-text questions. Additionally, 10 participants were interviewed. Thematic analysis was applied to identify patterns in participants' experiences. Two domains were identified: perceived challenges with online information about COVID-19, and coping strategies to manage challenges. The perceived challenges were: being exposed to information overload, dealing with conflicting information, and being strongly emotionally affected. The related coping strategies were: protecting oneself, trusting authorities, taking command, and using common sense. These strategies often involved triangulation of the information obtained, including participants consulting their common sense, various sources, or family and friends. This paper highlights the crucial role of authorities in delivering online information, that according to health literacy principles, is easy to access, understand, and use. Furthermore, our results reinforce the importance of diabetes nurses, as well as healthcare professionals in general, in encouraging patients to share their Internet findings, promote information from reliable sources, and deliver tailored information that suits individual needs. Because our results underline the importance of social support in eHealth literacy and the assessment of online health information, the inclusion of family and friends needs to be increasingly considered in diabetes care. Due to the small homogenous sample, the results of this study cannot be generalized. However, the reader can assess the transferability to other situations and settings based on our contextual descriptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Health Literacy , Telemedicine , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , Internet , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572446

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Face-to-face therapy is unavailable to many young people with mental health difficulties in the UK. Internet-based treatments are a low-cost, flexible, and accessible option that may be acceptable to young people. This pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of an English-language adaptation of internet-based psychodynamic treatment (iPDT) for depressed adolescents, undertaken during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. Methods: A single-group, uncontrolled design was used. A total of 23 adolescents, 16-18 years old and experiencing depression, were recruited to this study. Assessments were made at baseline and end of treatment, with additional weekly assessments of depression and anxiety symptoms. Results: Findings showed that it was feasible to recruit to this study during the pandemic, and to deliver the iPDT model with a good level of treatment acceptability. A statistically significant reduction in depressive symptoms and emotion dysregulation was found, with large effect size, by the end of treatment. Whilst anxiety symptoms decreased, this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: The findings suggest that this English-language adaptation of iPDT, with some further revisions, is feasible to deliver and acceptable for adolescents with depression. Preliminary data indicate that iPDT appears to be effective in reducing depressive symptoms in adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Pandemics , Adolescent , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Humans , Internet , Pilot Projects , United Kingdom
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