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1.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 8400241, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476886

ABSTRACT

This study is aimed at examining the feasibility and effectiveness of aerobic and resistance training (WeActive) and mindful exercise (WeMindful) interventions in improving physical activity (PA), psychological well-being (PWB), and subjective vitality among college students. Participants in this study were 77 college students who were randomly assigned to either the WeActive group (n = 43) or the WeMindful group (n = 28). The WeActive group attended two 30-minute aerobic and resistance training sessions per week, and the WeMindful group attended two 30-minute yoga and mindful exercise sessions per week for eight weeks. All participants completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, the World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index, and the Subjective Vitality Scale before and after the intervention, as well as the Assessing Feasibility and Acceptability Questionnaire at the end of the intervention. The primary study outcome measures were PA, PWB, and subjective vitality. A repeated-measures ANCOVA indicated a significant main effect of time for total PA (F = 7.89, p = 0.006, η 2 = 0.049), vigorous PA (F = 5.36, p = 0.024, η 2 = 0.022), and walking (F = 7.34, p = 0.009, η 2 = 0.042) in both intervention groups. There was a significant interaction effect of time and group for PWB (F = 11.26, p = 0.001, η 2 = 0.022), where the WeActive group experienced a decrease in PWB scores while participants in the WeMindful group experienced an increase in PWB scores over time. There was a main effect of group for subjective vitality (F = 8.91, p = 0.007, η 2 = 0.088), indicating that the WeMindful group experienced a greater increase in subjective vitality than the WeActive group. Further, the participants in both groups indicated that the synchronized and asynchronized Zoom-based WeActive and WeMindful interventions were acceptable, appropriate, and feasible for participants. This study demonstrated that mindful exercise is effective in increasing PA, PWB, and subjective vitality while aerobic and resistance training may only be effective in increasing PA.


Subject(s)
Exercise/psychology , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Physical Fitness/psychology , Students/psychology , Yoga/psychology , Adult , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(5): e26573, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236646

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for first responders (eg, police, fire, and emergency medical services) and nonmedical essential workers (eg, workers in food, transportation, and other industries). Health systems may be uniquely suited to support these workers given their medical expertise, and mobile apps can reach local communities despite social distancing requirements. Formal evaluation of real-world mobile app-based interventions is lacking. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the adoption, acceptability, and appropriateness of an academic medical center-sponsored app-based intervention (COVID-19 Guide App) designed to support access of first responders and essential workers to COVID-19 information and testing services. We also sought to better understand the COVID-19-related needs of these workers early in the pandemic. METHODS: To understand overall community adoption, views and download data of the COVID-19 Guide App were described. To understand the adoption, appropriateness, and acceptability of the app and the unmet needs of workers, semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted by telephone, by video, and in person with first responders and essential workers in the San Francisco Bay Area who were recruited through purposive, convenience, and snowball sampling. Interview transcripts and field notes were qualitatively analyzed and presented using an implementation outcomes framework. RESULTS: From its launch in April 2020 to September 2020, the app received 8262 views from unique devices and 6640 downloads (80.4% conversion rate, 0.61% adoption rate across the Bay Area). App acceptability was mixed among the 17 first responders interviewed and high among the 10 essential workers interviewed. Select themes included the need for personalized and accurate information, access to testing, and securing personal safety. First responders faced additional challenges related to interprofessional coordination and a "culture of heroism" that could both protect against and exacerbate health vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS: First responders and essential workers both reported challenges related to obtaining accurate information, testing services, and other resources. A mobile app intervention has the potential to combat these challenges through the provision of disease-specific information and access to testing services but may be most effective if delivered as part of a larger ecosystem of support. Differentiated interventions that acknowledge and address the divergent needs between first responders and non-first responder essential workers may optimize acceptance and adoption.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Responders/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(5): e25446, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has broader geographic spread and potentially longer lasting effects than those of previous disasters. Necessary preventive precautions for the transmission of COVID-19 has resulted in delays for in-person health care services, especially at the outset of the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: Among a US sample, we examined the rates of delays (defined as cancellations and postponements) in health care at the outset of the pandemic and characterized the reasons for such delays. METHODS: As part of an internet-based survey that was distributed on social media in April 2020, we asked a US-based convenience sample of 2570 participants about delays in their health care resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Participant demographics and self-reported worries about general health and the COVID-19 pandemic were explored as potent determinants of health care delays. In addition to all delays, we focused on the following three main types of delays, which were the primary outcomes in this study: dental, preventive, and diagnostic care delays. For each outcome, we used bivariate statistical tests (t tests and chi-square tests) and multiple logistic regression models to determine which factors were associated with health care delays. RESULTS: The top reported barrier to receiving health care was the fear of SARS-CoV-2 infection (126/374, 33.6%). Almost half (1227/2570, 47.7%) of the participants reported experiencing health care delays. Among those who experienced health care delays and further clarified the type of delay they experienced (921/1227, 75.1%), the top three reported types of care that were affected by delays included dental (351/921, 38.1%), preventive (269/921, 29.2%), and diagnostic (151/921, 16.4%) care. The logistic regression models showed that age (P<.001), gender identity (P<.001), education (P=.007), and self-reported worry about general health (P<.001) were significantly associated with experiencing health care delays. Self-reported worry about general health was negatively related to experiencing delays in dental care. However, this predictor was positively associated with delays in diagnostic testing based on the logistic regression model. Additionally, age was positively associated with delays in diagnostic testing. No factors remained significant in the multiple logistic regression for delays in preventive care, and although there was trend between race and delays (people of color experienced fewer delays than White participants), it was not significant (P=.06). CONCLUSIONS: The lessons learned from the initial surge of COVID-19 cases can inform systemic mitigation strategies for potential future disruptions. This study addresses the demand side of health care delays by exploring the determinants of such delays. More research on health care delays during the pandemic is needed, including research on their short- and long-term impacts on patient-level outcomes such as mortality, morbidity, mental health, people's quality of life, and the experience of pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
J Psychosoc Oncol ; 39(3): 416-427, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) rapidly shifted psychosocial services to telepsychology, including psychosocial oncology (PSO) practices. PSO providers work with patients undergoing treatment, experiencing treatment delays and/or immuno-suppression in the context of a global pandemic. There is evidence to support the acceptability of telepsychology among cancer patients and an emerging need for data to inform the design and provision of telepsychology PSO care during the pandemic and beyond. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES: This study examined engagement in telepsychology PSO care at an outpatient community cancer center. METHODS: The current study analyzed practice data from a PSO department from March 2020 through September 2020. The sample included 354 patients (91 established; 263 newly referred). Descriptive, correlational, and comparative analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Among established patients, 93% continued with telepsychology PSO care after the pandemic and 94% completed at least one telepsychology appointment. Among newly referred patients, 50.6% scheduled a telepsychology appointment, consistent with the scheduling rate for the proceeding calendar year (50%). Across patients scheduling telepsychology PSO appointments (N = 194), 68 initially engaged in phone-based services with 20 converting to video, for a total of 127 (76.5%) patients utilizing video-based PSO services. Common reasons for phone-based services included 'patient preference' (N = 14), 'lack of access' (N = 9), and 'technology barriers' (N = 8). During this timeframe, 18% had at least one no-show, which is significantly less than the preceding year (23%). Phone-based patients were significantly older (p =.007). A greater proportion of males engaged in phone-based services compared to females (p = .006). CONCLUSIONS: Telepsychology PSO engages new and existing patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. There may be an increased demand for services and increased utilization in the context of the pandemic and the availability of telepsychology. There are disparities and access issues that should be considered and addressed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/rehabilitation , Psychosocial Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Community Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Psycho-Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telephone/statistics & numerical data
5.
Eur Psychiatry ; 64(1): e20, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123674

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health measures to curb SARS-CoV-2 transmission rates may have negative psychosocial consequences in youth. Digital interventions may help to mitigate these effects. We investigated the associations between social isolation, COVID-19-related cognitive preoccupation, worries, and anxiety, objective social risk indicators, and psychological distress, as well as use of, and attitude toward, mobile health (mHealth) interventions in youth. METHODS: Data were collected as part of the "Mental Health And Innovation During COVID-19 Survey"-a cross-sectional panel study including a representative sample of individuals aged 16-25 years (N = 666; Mage = 21.3; assessment period: May 5, 2020 to May 16, 2020). RESULTS: Overall, 38% of youth met criteria for moderate or severe psychological distress. Social isolation worries and anxiety, and objective risk indicators were associated with psychological distress, with evidence of dose-response relationships for some of these associations. For instance, psychological distress was progressively more likely to occur as levels of social isolation increased (reporting "never" as reference group: "occasionally": adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 9.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.3-19.1, p < 0.001; "often": aOR 22.2, CI 9.8-50.2, p < 0.001; "very often": aOR 42.3, CI 14.1-126.8, p < 0.001). There was evidence that psychological distress, worries, and anxiety were associated with a positive attitude toward using mHealth interventions, whereas psychological distress, worries, and anxiety were associated with actual use. CONCLUSIONS: Public health measures during pandemics may be associated with poor mental health outcomes in youth. Evidence-based digital interventions may help mitigate the negative psychosocial impact without risk of viral infection given there is an objective need and subjective demand.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Quarantine , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Young Adult
6.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 67: 136-140, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893777

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on help-seeking behaviors among individuals with eating disorders and caregivers. METHODS: We analyzed service utilization data from the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC). We compared the number of contacts and symptom frequency between the pandemic period and previous years. RESULTS: NEDIC was contacted 609 times during March 1-April 30, 2020 (72.1% individuals affected by disordered eating, 20.4% caregivers). The number of total contacts significantly increased from 2018 to 2019 and 2018 to 2020 (X2(3) = 50.34, p < .001). Among affected individuals (80.4% women), the number of contacts during the pandemic period was significantly higher (n = 439; X2(2) = 92.74, p < .001) compared to 2018 (n = 197) and 2019 (n = 312). There were higher rates of eating disorder symptoms, anxiety, and depression in 2020 compared to previous years. Thematic analysis of instant chats from the pandemic year revealed four emerging themes: 1) lack of access to treatment, 2) worsening of symptoms, 3) feeling out of control, and 4) need for support. CONCLUSION: These findings point toward the impact of COVID-19 in individuals affected by disordered eating and hold implications for service delivery during times of crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Feeding and Eating Disorders/epidemiology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/physiopathology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/psychology , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Female , Humans , Internal-External Control , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Psychotherapy/statistics & numerical data , Social Support , Symptom Flare Up , Young Adult
7.
Trials ; 21(1): 870, 2020 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883592

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The acknowledgment of the mental health toll of the COVID-19 epidemic in healthcare workers has increased considerably as the disease evolved into a pandemic status. Indeed, high prevalence rates of depression, sleep disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been reported in Chinese healthcare workers during the epidemic peak. Symptoms of psychological distress are expected to be long-lasting and have a systemic impact on healthcare systems, warranting the need for evidence-based psychological treatments aiming at relieving immediate stress and preventing the onset of psychological disorders in this population. In the current COVID-19 context, internet-based interventions have the potential to circumvent the pitfalls of face-to-face formats and provide the flexibility required to facilitate accessibility to healthcare workers. Online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in particular has proved to be effective in treating and preventing a number of stress-related disorders in populations other than healthcare workers. The aim of our randomized controlled trial study protocol is to evaluate the efficacy of the 'My Health too' CBT program-a program we have developed for healthcare workers facing the pandemic-on immediate perceived stress and on the emergence of psychiatric disorders at 3- and 6-month follow-up compared to an active control group (i.e., bibliotherapy). METHODS: Powered for superiority testing, this six-site open trial involves the random assignment of 120 healthcare workers with stress levels > 16 on the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) to either the 7-session online CBT program or bibliotherapy. The primary outcome is the decrease of PSS-10 scores at 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes include depression, insomnia, and PTSD symptoms; self-reported resilience and rumination; and credibility and satisfaction. Assessments are scheduled at pretreatment, mid-treatment (at 4 weeks), end of active treatment (at 8 weeks), and at 3-month and 6-month follow-up. DISCUSSION: This is the first study assessing the efficacy and the acceptability of a brief online CBT program specifically developed for healthcare workers. Given the potential short- and long-term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers' mental health, but also on healthcare systems, our findings can significantly impact clinical practice and management of the ongoing, and probably long-lasting, health crisis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04362358 , registered on April 24, 2020.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Internet-Based Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , Bibliotherapy/methods , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mental Health/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/prevention & control , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/prevention & control , Treatment Outcome
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