Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.137
Filter
1.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 205, 2022 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793956

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many residents are exposed to negative attitudes towards primary care during hospital training. Attractive add-on training programs exist, but it is unclear whether these need to be tailored to the location of training (hospital vs. office). We report differences in learner attitudes from a large German add-on training program. METHODS: Between 2017 and 2020, a regional network offered 31 quarterly seminars to primary care residents. The seminars addressed medical content, practice management and mentoring. We elicited participants' satisfaction, perceived topic relevance, preferences for future seminars, work situation and employer support for participation. A proportionate odds model was used to assess predictors of ratings; results were stratified by training location (hospital vs. office). RESULTS: Most respondents were female (380/575 = 70.0%), aged between 26 and 40 (80.8%), and had on average 3.54 ± 1.64 years of residency training. The majority (83.8%) was working in an office and full-time (63.0%). Overall evaluations were positive (very satisfactory 72.1%). Comparing residents in the hospital phase vs. the office phase, overall seminar ratings of the perceived impact on the motivation for primary care did not differ (p = 0.73 vs. 0.18, respectively). Hospital-based residents were less likely to rate the topics as relevant (39.4% vs. 55.7%, p = 0.02) and had different preferences for future seminar topics (top 3: palliative care, emergencies and chronic care vs. billing, disease management and practice finances for hospital and office phase, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Keeping primary care residents motivated may require education tailored to training location. Our findings may be of interest to teachers, administrators and policymakers.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Adult , Attitude , Curriculum , Female , Hospitals , Humans
7.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 38(4): e1207-e1212, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774458

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate both applicant and interviewer satisfaction with the virtual interviewing process for pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellowship in hopes to improve the fellowship interviewing process. It was proposed that fellowship programs and applicants would prefer virtual interviews over traditional interviews. METHODS: A survey developed in collaboration with UT Southwestern PEM fellowship leaders and national PEM leaders was sent to all PEM fellowship applicants and programs at the conclusion of the 2020 interview season and rank list submission. The applicant survey obtained information on ease of virtual interviews and whether applicants felt that they obtained adequate information from virtual interviews to make informed program selections. Program director surveys collected data on thoughts and feelings about virtual interviews and obstacles encountered during the recruitment season. Both surveys asked about costs for interviews and interview type preference. RESULTS: A response rate of 49% from applicants and 47% from programs was obtained. Virtual interview days were similar in the amount of time and staff hours used compared with traditional days. Applicants spent less on virtual interviews compared with those who underwent traditional interviews (average $725 vs $4312). Programs received more applications than the prior year and spent less money during the virtual cycle. The majority of the applicants (90%) were comfortable with the virtual interview platform, and most (66%) agreed that virtual interviews provided adequate information to determine program rank. Geography was the number 1 rank determining factor. Programs and applicants preferred a form of in-person interviews. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual interviews provide cost savings for both applicants and programs. Despite this, both parties prefer a form of in-person interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Pediatric Emergency Medicine , Child , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
South Med J ; 115(4): 239-243, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771839

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A paucity of data exists on the role of the interview day in programs and applicants' final rank list. The objective of our study was to investigate the impact interview day has on our programs and our interviewees' final rank list. METHODS: For the 2020 appointment year, our program used an Electronic Residency Application System Application Scoring Tool and Interview Scoring Tool to generate the preliminary rank list for our pulmonary and critical care fellowship applicants. The final rank list was decided after interviewers' discussion during the program's rank list meeting. We aimed to correlate the preliminary and final lists. We also surveyed applicants on the importance of interview day in generating their rank list. RESULTS: The final and the preliminary rank lists were strongly correlated (rs(47) = 0.87, P < 0.001). There was a stronger correlation between the final rank and the rank based on the application score (rs(47) = 0.84, P < 0.001) than the rank based on the interview score (rs(47) = 0.64, P < 0.001). For the postinterview survey, 48 applicants were surveyed-20 replied with a response rate of 42% and 18 respondents (90%) rated the interview experience as important or very important in their rank list decisions. CONCLUSIONS: The programs rank list correlated more with the candidates' written application than their interview day performance; however, interview experience greatly influenced the applicants' rank lists. In the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, in which all interviews are virtual, programs should make diligent efforts to construct virtual interview days, given their importance to applicants in generating their final rank list for the match.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266284, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770767

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Interruptions in undergraduate clinical clerkship during the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced the confidence and preparedness of residents beginning their postgraduate training. We explore the thoughts of new residents about this transition and reflect on the support needed. METHODS: An exploratory qualitative case study was conducted with 51 residents. All had experienced interruptions in clinical training due to the pandemic and had just started their postgraduate training. Qualitative data were collected through 6 focus groups and 12 individual follow-up interviews. A thematic analysis was undertaken, and the data were categorised using a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) framework. RESULTS: Graduates beginning their residency were aware of their professionalism and independence during the transition. They also faced the predicament of needing close supervision while their supervisors managed pandemic conditions. Residents emphasised the importance of developing relationships with colleagues and supervisors during the transition to residency and wanted direct observation and detailed feedback from their supervisors during procedures. CONCLUSIONS: The experiences of residents were not uniformly negative. In fact, some had developed a positive mindset when entering the clinical field. Medical faculty members reflecting on interactions with new residents and planning future clinical internships could benefit from placing a high value on building relationships among residents, who may expect direct observation and detailed feedback from their supervisors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Motivation , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
11.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266228, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770763

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Medical residents' mental health is currently an issue of concern for medical educators worldwide. The COVID-19 pandemic has raised the greatest concerns given the psychological effects of this scenario on medical residents on the frontlines of the pandemic. To assess the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on physicians in residency training, the collective symptoms of burnout, depression and anxiety are used to identify the residents' beliefs and clinical practices related to COVID-19 patients and their behaviors concerning disease prevention. METHOD: This observational study involved 3071 medical residents from all regions of Brazil. An online questionnaire assessed the presence of burnout using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionaire-9, anxiety symptoms using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, and COVID-19 Impact Questions to assess the residents' beliefs and clinical practices related to COVID-19 patients. Exploratory analyses, logistic regression and multinomial regression analysis were performed in this investigation. RESULTS: Moderate and severe depressive symptoms were the most common (67.7%) followed by anxiety symptoms (52.8%) and burnout (48.6%). The difference between residents with or without contact with COVID-19 patients was significant increased when analyzing different aspects of clinical practice, behavior, substance use and mental health. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest an increase in depression and anxiety symptoms among medical residents dealing with COVID-19, upstaging previous concerns about medical residents' mental health. The prevalence of burnout is similar to that of a nonpandemic scenario. Considering the severity of the pandemic scenario and the overburden of healthcare services, medical residents' mental health deserves special care.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 234, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dental residents in Guangdong, China, had fewer medical practice opportunities because of the pandemic of COVID-19. This study aimed to evaluate whether a case-based learning (CBL) approach using a periodontal clinical database software (PCDS) could improve residents' achievement in the exam of the standardized residency training (SRT) program. METHODS: Forty-four dental residents volunteered and completed this trial. Within 12 weeks, all residents admitted periodontal patients 5 days a week and participated in a case-based learning course using PCDS once a week. Two online case-based examinations were used to evaluate their diagnostic and therapeutic performance before and after training. The total accuracy rate of examinations and the accuracy rate of subitems were analyzed using paired samples T-test. The Bonferroni correction is used for multiple testing adjustments, and p < 0.05 was considered statistical significance. RESULTS: After training, the total accuracy rate of SRT exams raised from 65 to 76%. There was a significant difference in the accuracy rate before and after training (Mean = 0.103, SD = 0.141, p < 0.001). The accuracy of radiographic examination (type of alveolar bone absorption and hard tissue lesion of tooth) and making treatment plan was significantly improved after training (p < 0.005). However, residents' performance in diagnosing periodontitis and predicting the prognosis of affected teeth was not improved. CONCLUSIONS: The PCDS and CBL method effectively improved the residents' achievement in SRT examination, especially in identifying the type of resorption of alveolar bone and the hard tissue lesion of a tooth by radiographic examination and making an appropriate treatment plan for a periodontitis patient. More effective teaching approaches are needed to improve residents' accuracy of diagnosis of periodontitis using the 2018 classification in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Educational Measurement , Humans , Prospective Studies , Software
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 229, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical training program and hospital response to the COVID-19 pandemic has varied greatly and has impacted trainee well-being. Which factors have specifically related to trainee wellness, however, has not yet been examined in depth. The aim of the study was to understand trainee perspectives on the individual psychiatry trainee programs' hospitals' objective COVID-19 preparedness management. We also sought and to gauge how program changes, and general pandemic-related concerns, have been associated with trainee satisfaction and burnout. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey study of psychiatric trainees was distributed electronically throughout the country via various psychiatry residency program listservs in April 2020. Statistical analyses were performed utilizing simple linear regression. RESULTS: From 352 respondents (346 complete responses and 6 partial responses), the most frequent program changes were "decreased number of rotations requiring in-person patient care" and "increased call hours or duties." Of pandemic-related concerns surveyed, the two greatest were "spreading COVID-19 to family/friends" and "co-residents' burnout and anxiety." A positive relationship was found between trainee satisfaction with perceived COVID-19 departmental response and comfort level of residents/fellows in expressing concerns with attending clinicians and department leadership. CONCLUSIONS: Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, trainees have experienced a variety of changes to trainee program policies and guidelines. Overall, poor communication and trainee dissatisfaction with departmental response correlated with concern of infection and anxiety/burnout. Insights garnered from this study could provide scaffolding for the best practices to reduce trainee physician anxiety/burnout for the current and future pandemics of this variety and magnitude.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr (Engl Ed) ; 69(3): 219-226, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768059

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 disease has become a priority for our healthcare system. The resident physicians training in endocrinology and nutrition (E&N residents) have been integrated into the COVID-19 teams. This study has been designed with the aim of analysing the educational, occupational and health impact on E&N residents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cross-sectional observational study via a web survey, aimed at E&N residents who are members of the SEEN, carried out in November 2020. The following data were analysed: demographic variables, number of beds in the training hospital, alteration of rotations, integration in COVID-19 teams, participation in telemedicine, scientific activity and impact on physical and emotional health. RESULTS: 87 responses were obtained (27% of all E&N residents), 67.8% women, 28.1 ±â€¯1.8 years, 60% 4th year E&N residents. 84% participated in COVID-19 teams and 93% in the telemedicine consultations of their service. Most have had their rotations interrupted. 97.7% have participated in scientific meetings or virtual congresses and a third of them have collaborated in scientific work on COVID-19 in relation to endocrinology and nutrition. Overall, 75.8% think the pandemic has affected their mood a lot or quite a lot, and 73.8% think that the pandemic has negatively impacted their training. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has compromised the training, work activity and health of E&N residents. They have been integrated both in COVID-19 teams and in the restructured activity of their departments. However, they have managed to continue their training in virtual format and have participated in scientific work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Cir Cir ; 90(2): 165-171, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1766284

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to assess the perceptions of the impact of health-care disruption due to COVID-19 on the academic training and skills of surgical trainees. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We developed a 32-question survey assessing the clinical and surgical impact of COVID-19 on surgical training programs and proposals to compensate for the decrease in surgical education. We got 453 responses of surgical trainees in Mexico City. RESULTS: Sixty-six percent of the respondents answered that their centers had converted to the exclusive attention of COVID-19 patients. Ninety-five percent reported a decrease in surgical skills learning and 91.8% reported a decrease to clinical exposure. On proposals, 75.6% reported that it is essential to take the necessary measures to recover the clinical and surgical milestones lost. In the binary logistic regression analysis, we found that the postgraduate year (≥ PG-Y3) was statistically significant factor (p ≤ 0.000) related to a favorable opinion to developing an academic contingency plan and postponing the end of the academic residency year. CONCLUSION: More than 90% of the survey respondents reported having been affected by COVID-19 mitigation strategies. Our data calls for urgent training adjustments by hospital and university program leaders to mitigate downstream educational repercussions.


OBJETIVO: Evaluar las percepciones del impacto de la interrupción de la atención médica por COVID-19 en la formación académica y las habilidades de los residentes quirúrgicos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Realizamos una encuesta de 32 preguntas, evaluando el impacto clínico y quirúrgico del COVID-19 en los programas de entrenamiento quirúrgico y propuestas para compensar la disminución de la educación quirúrgica. Obtuvimos 453 respuestas de residentes quirúrgicos en la Ciudad de México. RESULTADOS: El 66% respondió que sus centros se convirtieron en atención exclusiva de pacientes con COVID-19. El 95% presentó una disminución en el aprendizaje de habilidades quirúrgicas y el 91. 8% presentó una disminución de la exposición clínica. El 75.6% consideró fundamental tomar las medidas necesarias para recuperar las destrezas clínicas perdidas. En el análisis de regresión logística binaria, encontramos que el año de posgrado (> PG-Y3) fue un factor estadísticamente significativo (p <0,000) relacionado con una opinión favorable para desarrollar un plan de contingencia académica y posponer el final del año de residencia académica. CONCLUSIÓN: Más del 90% de los encuestados fueron afectados por las estrategias de mitigación de COVID-19. Nuestros datos exigen ajustes urgentes por parte de los líderes de programas de hospitales y universidades para mitigar las repercusiones educativas posteriores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(4): 1092-1098, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760970

ABSTRACT

An essential part of the teaching-learning paradigm is assessment. It is one of the ways to achieve feedback for the various methods that have been used to impart a particular skill. This is true of ophthalmology training, where various clinical and surgical skills are learned as part of the residency program. In preparation for residents to become proficient ophthalmologists, both formative and summative assessments are of paramount importance. At present, assessment is primarily summative in the form of a university examination, including theory and practical examinations that are conducted at the end of the three years of residency. A formative assessment can make course corrections early on, allowing for an improved understanding of the subject and the acquisition of clinical and surgical skills. Formative assessments also allow us to customize the teaching methodology considering individual residents' learning capabilities. In addition, formative assessments have the advantage of alleviating the stress of a "final" examination, which could sometimes result in a less-than-optimum performance by the residents. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to adopt new teaching methods, which has led to the adoption of changes in assessment. In this regard, we discuss the different assessment tools available, their pros and cons, and how best these tools can be made applicable in the setting of an ophthalmology residency program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Ophthalmology/education , Pandemics
18.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264921, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753191

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To identify preferred burnout interventions within a resident physician population, utilizing the Nominal Group Technique. The results will be used to design a discrete choice experiment study to inform the development of resident burnout prevention programs. METHODS: Three resident focus groups met (10-14 participants/group) to prioritize a list of 23 factors for burnout prevention programs. The Nominal Group Technique consisted of three steps: an individual, confidential ranking of the 23 factors by importance from 1 to 23, a group discussion of each attribute, including a group review of the rankings, and an opportunity to alter the original ranking across participants. RESULTS: The total number of residents (36) were a representative sample of specialty, year of residency, and sex. There was strong agreement about the most highly rated attributes which grouped naturally into themes of autonomy, meaning, competency and relatedness. There was also disagreement on several of the attributes that is likely due to the differences in residency specialty and subsequently rotation requirements. CONCLUSION: This study identified the need to address multiple organizational factors that may lead to physician burnout. There is a clear need for complex interventions that target systemic and program level factors rather than focus on individual interventions. These results may help residency program directors understand the specific attributes of a burnout prevention program valued by residents. Aligning burnout interventions with resident preferences could improve the efficacy of burnout prevention programs by improving adoption of, and satisfaction with, these programs. Physician burnout is a work-related syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment [1]. Burnout is present in epidemic proportions and was estimated to occur in over 50 percent of practicing physicians and in up to 89 percent of resident physicians pre-COVID 19. The burnout epidemic is growing; a recent national survey of US physicians reported an 8.9 percent increase in burnout between 2011 and 2014 [2]. Rates of physician burnout have also increased [3] during the COVID-19 pandemic with a new classification of "pandemic burnout" experienced by over 52 percent of healthcare workers as early as June of 2020 [4]. Physician burnout can lead to depression, suicidal ideation, and relationship problems that may progress to substance abuse, increased interpersonal conflicts, broken relationships, low quality of life, major depression, and suicide [5-7]. The estimated rate of physician suicide is 300-400 annually [8-10].


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Physicians/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mindfulness , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Sleep Hygiene , Social Support
20.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2054304, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751978

ABSTRACT

Due to Covid-19, fellowship programs could not conduct in-person interviews during the 2020-2021 interview cycle and were forced to implement virtual interviews. We conducted two nationwide surveys of residency and fellowship Program Directors (PDs) involved in the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) Subspecialty Fellowship match cycle to gain a better understanding of virtual interviews from each of their perspectives. 1) Fellowship PDs' confidence in using a virtual platform to holistically evaluate applicants during the 2020-2021 match cycle, 2) Residency PD's perception of virtual interviews and impact on their program's operations, and 3) to assess the desire of fellowship and residency PDs to continue virtual recruitment during forthcoming interview seasons. Two separate nationwide web-based surveys were administered to 1) Ob/Gyn fellowship PDs and 2) residency PDs through SurveyMonkey from July-September 2020 to assess the impact of virtual interviews form each parties' perspective. Surveys solicited demographic information, four-point Likert scale questions, and free response questions Of programs meeting inclusion criteria, 75/111 (67.6%) fellowship PDs and 67/117 (57.3%) residency PDs responded to their respective surveys. Most fellowship PDs believed that they could confidently assess applicants' professionalism (88%) during a virtual interview and (90.7%) felt confident in making a rank-order list. However, only 73.3% were just as confident in preparing a rank list after a virtual interview as they have been with in-person interviews. Most residency PDs (69.9%) believed that virtual interviews made it easier for their program to comply with duty hours, and 76.8% agreed that virtual interviews allowed their residents to accept more interviews than an in-person format. Most fellowship PDs found virtual interviews convenient. However, difficulty in observing social interaction and gauging applicant interest may be the biggest challenge moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL