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1.
Pediatrics ; 149(1)2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626689

ABSTRACT

A physician workforce that reflects the patient population is associated with improved patient outcomes and promotes health equity. Notwithstanding, racial and ethnic disparities persist within US medical schools, making some individuals underrepresented in medicine (URM). We sought to increase the percentage of URM residents who matched into our pediatric residency programs from a baseline of 5% to 35% to achieve demographic parity with our patients. We developed a multifaceted approach using multiple iterative tests of change, with the primary strategy being increased visibility of URM trainees and faculty to residency applicants. Strategies included applicant interviews with URM faculty, interview dinners with URM residents, visibility at academic conferences for URM trainees, development of targeted marketing materials, and a visiting student program supported by networking with URM residents. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of matched residents in the categorical pediatrics, child neurology, and medical genetics training programs who identified as URM. The percentage of URM residents increased to 16% (6 of 37) in 2018, 26% (11 of 43) in 2019, 19% (8 of 43) in 2020, and 21% (9 of 43) in 2021 (a four-year average of 22% URM residents; P = .0002). This progress toward a more representative residency program was met by challenges, such as pipeline concerns, the minority tax, and recruitment during a pandemic. We were able to implement small, low-resource strategies that had a large cumulative impact and could be implemented in other residency programs. Specific tactics and challenges encountered are discussed in this special article.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/education , Program Development , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Equity , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pediatricians/supply & distribution , United States/epidemiology
2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7829-7832, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As a result of COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 US residency MATCH was devoid of the traditional in-person interviews. Herein, we assess the impact of Virtual Interviews (VIs) on resident selection, from the perspectives of Orthopedic Surgery (OS) Program Directors (PDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 14-item survey was sent to PDs of ACGME-accredited OS residencies. Questions were designed to assess the pros, cons, and robustness of VIs compared to their antecedent in-person format. RESULTS: Forty-seven PDs responded to our survey. VIs antagonized PDs' ability to assess applicants' fit to program (76.6%), commitment to specialty (64%), and interpersonal skills (68.1%). This led to heavier dependence upon applicants' portfolios (64%). Almost all respondents (97.9%) found VIs to be more cost-efficient, saving a median of $3000 in interview-related expenses. Overall, only 8.5% of PDs were willing to conduct exclusive VIs in future cycles, compared to the majority in favor of dual formats (51.5%) or exclusive in-person interviews (40.4%). CONCLUSIONS: VIs have been an overall success, making most PDs opt for dual interview formats in future cycles. How this technology is further implemented in the future remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Physician Executives/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/trends
3.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1899642, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574515

ABSTRACT

Background: During the current COVID-19 pandemic, offline clinical education was mandated to suspend at the neurology department of many teaching hospitals globally, yet there is insufficient evidence regarding the preferred practice and methods for online neurology intern training course.Objective: The investigation aimed to examine whether the online neurology training course based on Small Private Online Course (SPOC) and blending learning mode can achieve a good effect and cater for interns from different medical programs and whether the learning group size affects the teaching effect.Design: The subjects were 92 students enrolled in the neurology internship at the Second Xiangya Hospital of China from 9 March to 9 August 2020. After completing the online course, the final scores and evaluation results were compared among different groups of interns, and their preference to distinct contents of the course was analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS program (version 22.0).Results: Our online course received consistent positive recognition from the interns. Ninety-nine percent of the interns recommended incorporating the online course into the conventional offline training program after the pandemic. There was no significant difference between interns from different programs concerning the final scores and course evaluation. A smaller learning group size (<15 students) could achieve a better teaching effect than a larger group size (p < 0.05). The interns preferred interactive discussions, and course contents that they can get practice and feedback from, rather than video watching and didactic lectures.Conclusions: The online neurology intern training course based on SPOC and blending learning mode is worthy of popularization in a large student base. The teaching effect of an online intern training program may be improved by limiting the group size to less than 15 students and encouraging more interactive discussion, more practice and feedback.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , China/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Group Processes , Humans , Inservice Training , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol ; 33(4): 317-323, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526205

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the need for rapid, flexible change in the delivery of care, education, and commitment to the well-being of obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents. RECENT FINDINGS: Published literature shows multiple models for surge scheduling for residency programs in other specialties. We describe our experience creating a surge schedule for OB/GYN residents that allowed for sufficient coverage of inpatient care while minimizing resident exposure and limited hospital resources, respecting work hour requirements, and plans for coverage due to illness or need for home quarantine. We also report innovative approaches to trainee education through the use of remote-learning technology and gynecologic surgery skills training in absence of normal clinical exposure. SUMMARY: Our approach serves as a model for adapting to unprecedented challenges and offers suggestions for creative transformations of traditional teaching that can be continued beyond the immediate crisis.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Simulation Training , Videoconferencing
5.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 711-715, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496885

ABSTRACT

CoronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) had a huge impact on human health and economy. However, to this date, the effects of the pandemic on the training of young cardiologists are only partially known. To assess the consequences of the pandemic on the education of the cardiologists in training, we performed a 23-item national survey that has been delivered to 1443 Italian cardiologists in training, registered in the database of the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC). Six hundred and thirty-three cardiologists in training participated in the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents affirmed that the training programme has been somewhat stopped or greatly jeopardized by the pandemic. For 61% of the fellows in training (FITs), the pandemic had a negative effect on their education. Moreover, 59% of the respondents believe that they would not be able to fill the gap gained during that period over the rest of their training. A negative impact on the psycho-physical well being has been reported by 86% of the FITs. The COVID-19 pandemic had an unparalleled impact on the education, formation and mental state of the cardiologists in training. Regulatory agencies, universities and politicians should make a great effort in the organization and reorganization of the teaching programs of the cardiologists of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology/education , Communicable Disease Control , Education , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Cardiologists/psychology , Cardiologists/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Can J Surg ; 64(5): E543-E549, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496556

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to many new provincial public health measures to reallocate resources in response to an impending surge of cases. These necessary decisions had several downstream effects on general surgery training. We surveyed the actions taken by Canadian general surgery training programs in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A mixed-methods survey was sent to all general surgery program directors to assess various domains in surgical education and modifications made because of the pandemic. Responses were quantified as proportions or qualitative narratives describing those changes. RESULTS: Most programs (13/15) recalled residents from planned rotations and redistributed them to rotations considered as core required services, including acute care surgery, trauma surgery and intensive care. Many programs also restructured their acute care surgery models to allow for a group of "reserve" residents to replace trainees who became infected with SARS-CoV-2. In terms of clinical experience, there was a reduction in both clinical and operative exposure among trainees. The reduction in clinical exposure disproportionately affected junior residents, whose involvement in COVID-19 cases was restricted. Formal educational sessions were maintained, but delivered virtually. Many programs instituted a program of increased frequency of communication with trainees. CONCLUSION: Many programs embraced using virtual platforms for teaching. The demonstrated utility of virtual teaching may lead to rethinking how training programs deliver didactic teaching and expand teaching opportunities. However, many programs also perceived a decrease in clinical and procedural exposure, primarily affecting junior residents. More information is needed to quantify the deficit in learning incurred as a result of the pandemic as well as its long-term effects on resident competency.


Subject(s)
General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Canada , Education, Distance , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Am J Surg ; 222(6): 1085-1092, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466001

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the midst of a pandemic, residency interviews transitioned to a virtual format for the first time. Little is known about the effect this will have on the match process. The study aim is to evaluate resident application processes and perceived outcomes. METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed to 142 colon and rectal surgery residency applicants (95% of total). RESULTS: A total of 77 applicants responded to the survey (54% response rate). Applicants reported high levels of satisfaction with virtual interviews but less comfort. Utilizing the mute button and using notes in a different way from face-to-face interviews were significantly associated with applicant confidence that they ranked the right program highest. A majority of applicants (73%) would recommend virtual interviews next year even if COVID-19 is not a factor. CONCLUSION: While applicants appear generally satisfied with virtual interviews, they also reported less comfort. Applicant confidence was predicted by utilizing the unique technological affordances offered by the virtual platform.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic/methods , School Admission Criteria , Self Concept , User-Computer Interface , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Ann Surg ; 274(5): e381-e382, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455427

ABSTRACT

Virtual recruitment of candidates applying into General Surgery residency during the COVID-19 pandemic presented a number of benefits and challenges. Notable benefits for candidates included financial and resource cost savings, the ability to conduct multiple interviews within short time frame, and the ability to meet more faculty members on virtual interview day. Challenges included technological difficulties, difficulty assessing culture and authenticity of in-program relationships, zoom fatigue, and inability to form relationships with co-applicants. After assessing our experiences with these benefits and challenges, the authors recommend that future recruitment cycles maintain virtual interview days with optional, nonevaluative open house days for revisit and second look opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Faculty/organization & administration , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics , Humans
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(34): e27041, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376352

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: To quantify the impact of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) on the surgical volume of residents' medical practice in Costa Rica's General Surgery Residency Program.The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a significant disruption in people's lives. Health systems worldwide have been forced to adapt to the new normal, which has posed a challenge for medical residency programs, especially in the surgical field.This transversal study includes the surgical records of all residents of the General Surgery program who worked as main surgeons at the Mexico Hospital of the Costa Rican Social Security between December 23, 2019, and June 25, 2020.As main surgeons, a total of 10 residents performed 291 pre-pandemic surgeries and 241 pandemic surgeries.When comparing the distribution of procedures performed by residency levels, it is observed that the postgraduate year -2 increased the number of procedures performed during the pandemic period (pre-pandemic 19% vs pandemic 27%, P = .028). There was no statistically significant difference between the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods in the remaining levels.When comparing the procedures by unit, a statistically significant decrease was observed in the Endocrine-Abdominal Wall Unit (pre-pandemic 18.3% vs pandemic 5.4%, P < .001). Conversely, a statistically significant increase was identified in Surgical Emergencies Unit procedures (40.0% vs post 51.7%, P = .007). No statistically significant differences were observed in the remaining the Units.The COVID-19 pandemic had no statistically significant effect on surgeries performed by residents of the General Surgery Residency Program as main surgeons in a national training center in Costa Rica. The Department's timely measures and pro-resident attitude were the key reasons for the above results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Costa Rica , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(3): 462e-474e, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on surgical training programs, reflecting decreases in elective surgical cases and emergency restructuring of clinical teams. The effect of these measures on U.S. plastic surgery resident education and wellness has not been characterized. METHODS: An institutional review board-exempted anonymous survey was developed through expert panel discussion and pilot testing. All current U.S. plastic surgery trainees were invited to complete a cross-sectional 28-question survey in April of 2020. Respondents were queried regarding demographic information, educational experiences, and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 668 residents responded to the survey, corresponding to a 56.1 percent response rate. Sex, training program type, postgraduate year, and region were well represented within the sample. Nearly all trainees (97.1 percent) reported restructuring of their clinical teams. One-sixth of respondents were personally redeployed to assist with the care of COVID-19 patients. A considerable proportion of residents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their education (58.1 percent) and wellness (84.8 percent). Residents found virtual curriculum effective and meaningful, and viewed an average of 4.2 lectures weekly. Although most residents did not anticipate a change in career path, some reported negative consequences on job prospects or fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on U.S. plastic surgery education and wellness. Although reductions in case volume may be temporary, this may represent a loss of critical, supervised clinical experience. Some effects may be positive, such as the development of impactful virtual lectures that allow for cross-institutional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Status , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
15.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 37(10): 1415-1420, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316267

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To analyze the initial impact of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on surgical skills training and performance of Pediatric Surgery Residents. METHODS: Retrospective study considering the modifications on the Pediatric Surgery Residency training from March 1st-May 31st, 2020. Exposure to OR learning opportunities was compared to the same 2018-2019 trimesters. An anonymous survey about self-perception on surgical skills development was also performed. RESULTS: Residents performed 209 procedures as leading surgeons during the 2020 trimester with a mean number of surgeries per resident of 20.9, representing a reduction of 46% and 56.8% compared to the 2018-2019 averages, respectively. Reduction in both the number and the percentage of total procedures (n: 209, 56.8%) compared to both 2019 (n: 354, 68.7%, p: 0.000272) and 2018 (n: 420, 76.1%, p < 0,00,001) showed statistical correlation with no changes in their complexity pattern. From the survey (response rate: 100%), hours dedicated to simulation-based training were highly increased. More time was spent studying, but only 60% achieved better preparation for surgery and 70% perceived a decrease in surgical confidence. CONCLUSIONS: Even though the pandemic promoted new teaching strategies and the use of simulation-based training, it drastically reduced "on-the-job" learning opportunities with potential effects on residents' performance and self-confidence during surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 33-40, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300689

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused widespread disruptions in various sectors of medicine, including medical education. Although the necessary focus has been on patient care and public safety and the long-lasting impact of COVID-19 remains to be determined, the impact on medical education warrants further attention and action. While it seems minuscule compared with the toll the global pandemic has caused worldwide, the impact on medical education, including graduate medical education, carries the potential to alter career progression and outcomes. We have assessed the effects of COVID-19 on dermatology clinics, residency education, and medical education, exploring recommendations and actions taken by governing bodies and offering additional suggestions of our own.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Certification , Dermatology/education , Internship and Residency , Skin Diseases , Accreditation , Biomedical Research , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Interviews as Topic , Personnel Selection , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/pathology , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine , United States
17.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1946237, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287910

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most graduate medical education (GME) training programs conducted virtual interviews for prospective trainees during the 2020-2021 application cycle. Many internal medicine (IM) subspecialty fellowship programs hosted virtual interviews for the first time with little published data to guide best practices.To evaluate how IM subspecialty fellowship applicants perceived the virtual interview day experience.We designed a 38-item questionnaire that was sent via email to applicants in eight IM subspecialty programs at a single tertiary academic medical center (University of California, San Francisco) from September-November, 2020.Seventy-five applicants completed the survey (75/244, 30.7%), including applicants from all eight fellowship programs. Most survey respondents agreed that the length of the virtual interview day (mean = 6.4 hours) was long enough to gather the information they needed (n = 65, 86.7%) and short enough to prevent fatigue (n = 55, 73.3%). Almost all survey respondents agreed that they could adequately assess the clinical experience (n = 71, 97.3%), research opportunities (n = 72, 98.6%), and program culture (n = 68, 93.2%). Of the respondents who attended a virtual educational conference, most agreed it helped to provide a sense of the program's educational culture (n = 20, 66.7%). Areas for improvement were identified, with some survey respondents reporting that the virtual interview day was too long (n = 11) or that they would have preferred to meet more fellows (n = 10).Survey respondents indicated that the virtual interview was an adequate format to learn about fellowship programs. These findings can inform future virtual interviews for GME training programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Internal Medicine/education , Interviews as Topic/methods , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , San Francisco , School Admission Criteria
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