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1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7829-7832, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As a result of COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 US residency MATCH was devoid of the traditional in-person interviews. Herein, we assess the impact of Virtual Interviews (VIs) on resident selection, from the perspectives of Orthopedic Surgery (OS) Program Directors (PDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 14-item survey was sent to PDs of ACGME-accredited OS residencies. Questions were designed to assess the pros, cons, and robustness of VIs compared to their antecedent in-person format. RESULTS: Forty-seven PDs responded to our survey. VIs antagonized PDs' ability to assess applicants' fit to program (76.6%), commitment to specialty (64%), and interpersonal skills (68.1%). This led to heavier dependence upon applicants' portfolios (64%). Almost all respondents (97.9%) found VIs to be more cost-efficient, saving a median of $3000 in interview-related expenses. Overall, only 8.5% of PDs were willing to conduct exclusive VIs in future cycles, compared to the majority in favor of dual formats (51.5%) or exclusive in-person interviews (40.4%). CONCLUSIONS: VIs have been an overall success, making most PDs opt for dual interview formats in future cycles. How this technology is further implemented in the future remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Physician Executives/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/trends
2.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 149(1): 130e-138e, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the first documented case of coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), the greater New York City area quickly became the epicenter of the global pandemic, with over 500,000 cases and 50,000 deaths. This unprecedented crisis affected all aspects of health care, including plastic surgery residency training. The purpose of this study was to understand the specific impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on plastic surgery residencies. METHODS: A survey of all plastic surgery residency training programs in the greater New York City area was conducted. The impact to training during the peak months of infection (March and April of 2020) was evaluated using resident education as measured by case numbers, need for redeployment, and staff wellness as primary outcome variables. RESULTS: A total of 11 programs were identified in the region, and seven programs completed the survey, with a response rate 63.6 percent. When comparing productivity in March and April of 2019 to March and April of 2020, a total decrease in surgical volume of 64.8 percent (range, 19.7 to 84.8 percent) and an average of 940 (range, 50 to 1287) cancelled clinic visits per month were observed. These decreases directly correlated with the local county's COVID-19 incidence rates (p = 0.70). A total of 83 percent of programs required redeployment to areas of need, and correlation between local incidence of COVID-19 and the percentage of residents redeployed to non-plastic surgical clinical environments by a given program (ρ = 0.97) was observed. CONCLUSION: As the first COVID-19 wave passes the greater New York area and spreads to the rest of the country, the authors hope their experience will shed light on the effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and inform other programs on what to expect and how they can try and prepare for future public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/standards , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , New York City/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24266, 2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574391

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transition to digital pathology usually takes months or years to be completed. We were familiarizing ourselves with digital pathology solutions at the time when the COVID-19 outbreak forced us to embark on an abrupt transition to digital pathology. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantitatively describe how the abrupt transition to digital pathology might affect the quality of diagnoses, model possible causes by probabilistic modeling, and qualitatively gauge the perception of this abrupt transition. METHODS: A total of 17 pathologists and residents participated in this study; these participants reviewed 25 additional test cases from the archives and completed a final psychologic survey. For each case, participants performed several different diagnostic tasks, and their results were recorded and compared with the original diagnoses performed using the gold standard method (ie, conventional microscopy). We performed Bayesian data analysis with probabilistic modeling. RESULTS: The overall analysis, comprising 1345 different items, resulted in a 9% (117/1345) error rate in using digital slides. The task of differentiating a neoplastic process from a nonneoplastic one accounted for an error rate of 10.7% (42/392), whereas the distinction of a malignant process from a benign one accounted for an error rate of 4.2% (11/258). Apart from residents, senior pathologists generated most discrepancies (7.9%, 13/164). Our model showed that these differences among career levels persisted even after adjusting for other factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are in line with previous findings, emphasizing that the duration of transition (ie, lengthy or abrupt) might not influence the diagnostic performance. Moreover, our findings highlight that senior pathologists may be limited by a digital gap, which may negatively affect their performance with digital pathology. These results can guide the process of digital transition in the field of pathology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Diagnostic Imaging/standards , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/standards , Pathology, Clinical/methods , Pathology, Clinical/standards , Bayes Theorem , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Microscopy , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Anesth Analg ; 133(5): 1331-1341, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566542

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic interrupted the administration of the APPLIED Examination, the final part of the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) staged examination system for initial certification. In response, the ABA developed, piloted, and implemented an Internet-based "virtual" form of the examination to allow administration of both components of the APPLIED Exam (Standardized Oral Examination and Objective Structured Clinical Examination) when it was impractical and unsafe for candidates and examiners to travel and have in-person interactions. This article describes the development of the ABA virtual APPLIED Examination, including its rationale, examination format, technology infrastructure, candidate communication, and examiner training. Although the logistics are formidable, we report a methodology for successfully introducing a large-scale, high-stakes, 2-element, remote examination that replicates previously validated assessments.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Certification/methods , Computer-Assisted Instruction/methods , Educational Measurement/methods , Specialty Boards , Anesthesiology/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Certification/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Computer-Assisted Instruction/standards , Educational Measurement/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/standards , Specialty Boards/standards , United States/epidemiology
5.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(9): 711-715, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496885

ABSTRACT

CoronaVIrus Disease-19 (COVID-19) had a huge impact on human health and economy. However, to this date, the effects of the pandemic on the training of young cardiologists are only partially known. To assess the consequences of the pandemic on the education of the cardiologists in training, we performed a 23-item national survey that has been delivered to 1443 Italian cardiologists in training, registered in the database of the Italian Society of Cardiology (SIC). Six hundred and thirty-three cardiologists in training participated in the survey. Ninety-five percent of the respondents affirmed that the training programme has been somewhat stopped or greatly jeopardized by the pandemic. For 61% of the fellows in training (FITs), the pandemic had a negative effect on their education. Moreover, 59% of the respondents believe that they would not be able to fill the gap gained during that period over the rest of their training. A negative impact on the psycho-physical well being has been reported by 86% of the FITs. The COVID-19 pandemic had an unparalleled impact on the education, formation and mental state of the cardiologists in training. Regulatory agencies, universities and politicians should make a great effort in the organization and reorganization of the teaching programs of the cardiologists of tomorrow.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists , Cardiology/education , Communicable Disease Control , Education , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Cardiologists/psychology , Cardiologists/standards , Clinical Competence/standards , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Education/organization & administration , Education/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/methods , Fellowships and Scholarships/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254922, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318325

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Despite mounting evidence that incorporation of QI curricula into surgical trainee education improves morbidity and outcomes, surgery training programs lack standardized QI curricula and tools to measure QI knowledge. In the current study, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a quality improvement curriculum for surgical residents. INTERVENTION: Surgical trainees participated in a longitudinal, year-long (2019-2020) curriculum based on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's online program. Online curriculum was supplemented with in person didactics and small group projects. Acquisition of skills was assessed pre- and post- course via self-report on a Likert scale as well as the Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT). Self-efficacy scores were assessed using the General Self-Efficacy Scale. 9 out of 18 total course participants completed the post course survey. This first course cohort was analyzed as a pilot for future work. CONTEXT: The project was developed and deployed among surgical residents during their research/lab year. Teams of surgical residents were partnered with a faculty project mentor, as well as non-physician teammates for project work. IMPACT: Participation in the QI course significantly increased skills related to studying the process (p = 0.0463), making changes in a system (p = 0.0167), identifying whether a change leads to an improvement (p = 0.0039), using small cycles of change (p = 0.0000), identifying best practices and comparing them to local practices (p = 0.0020), using PDSA model as a systematic framework for trial and learning (p = 0.0004), identifying how data is linked to specific processes (p = 0.0488), and building the next improvement cycle upon success or failure (p = 0.0316). There was also a significant improvement in aim (p = 0.037) and change (p = 0.029) responses to one QIKAT vignette. LESSONS LEARNED: We describe the effectiveness of a pilot longitudinal, multi component QI course based on the IHI online curriculum in improving surgical trainee knowledge and use of key QI skills.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence/standards , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Quality Improvement , Surgeons/standards , Curriculum/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
J Vasc Surg ; 74(4): 1354-1361.e4, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237797

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Integrated vascular surgery residency is among the most competitive specialties, but little is known about the applicant perspective. The coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak impacted the 2021 integrated vascular surgery residency match because of travel restrictions. We sought to better understand pre-pandemic applicant recruitment strategies, logistics of away rotations, and the residency interview process to identify areas for improvement in the application process. METHODS: An anonymous survey was sent to matched students in 2020, inquiring about motivations for pursuing vascular surgery (VS), logistic of away rotations and interviews, and factors influencing students' rank lists. RESULTS: Seventy of the 73 matched students completed the survey (95.9% response rate). The median age was 27 (range, 25-41); 32.9% were female, 91.4% were U.S. medical students, and 77.1% were from institutions with a VS training program. Factors most strongly influencing the decision to choose VS as a career were interest in open vascular procedures, endovascular procedures, perceived job satisfaction, emerging technologies, and influence of a mentor. The prospect of the job market, future salary, and competitiveness of the application process had the least impact. Of the matched students, 82.9% completed an away rotation (median, 2; range, 1-4), with 51.7% of students paying a total cost of more than $2500. Fifty percent of students matched either at their home institution or where they had performed an away rotation. Students reported application submissions to a median of 50 programs (range, 1-70) and interviewed at 17 (range, 1-28), with 40% of students paying a total of more than $4000 for interview costs. The most significant factors affecting students' rank lists included program culture, open aortic surgical volume, geography, and complex endovascular procedure volume. Tours of facilities, resident salary, and male/female distribution had the least importance. CONCLUSIONS: Successfully matched applicants in 2020 prioritized operative case volume and program collegiality when ranking programs. Despite their high cost, away rotations played an important role in the Match, suggesting that time spent at potential institutions allowed ideal assessment of factors for students. The high average number of away rotations and in-person interviews performed in 2019-2020 was limited for the 2021 Match due to coronavirus disease 2019 restrictions. Programs will have to continue developing creative alternatives or additions to away rotations and the application processes to assure continued success in future post-pandemic Match cycles.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Male , Mentors , Motivation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Specialties, Surgical/education , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Travel
12.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 147(5): 872e-874e, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198273

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The 2020 global pandemic related to the coronavirus has led to unprecedented interruptions in typical patient care and resident education. Teleconferencing software was deployed by many institutions to comply with quarantine and social-distancing regulations. To supplement the loss of clinical experience for trainees, the authors implemented a novel virtual-educational programming using virtual visiting professors and virtual grand rounds. The authors describe the two different formats and advantages such as access to multiple speakers on diverse, innovative topics and decreased financial burdens to the host program. However, the authors do acknowledge some disadvantages from lack of face-to-face social interaction/networking and the need to consider time-zone differences. Both new programs were embraced by trainees at the authors' own institution and residents/medical students across the United States and Canada and around the world. The authors believe teleconferencing should be permanently incorporated into future educational opportunities for plastic surgeons, as it provides easy access to high-quality information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Teaching Rounds/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Canada , Faculty , Humans , Internship and Residency/economics , Internship and Residency/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Students, Medical , Surgeons , Teaching Rounds/economics , Teaching Rounds/standards , United States , Videoconferencing/standards
14.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 39, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088581

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family medicine physicians may encounter a wide variety of conditions, including acute and urgent cases. Considering the limited access to diagnostic investigations in primary care practice, chest X-ray remains the imaging modality of choice. The current study assessed the competency of family medicine residents in the interpretation of chest X-rays for emergency conditions and to compare it with that of diagnostic radiology residents, general practitioners, and medical interns. METHODS: An online survey was distributed to 600 physicians, including family medicine residents, medical interns, general practitioners, and diagnostic radiology residents. The study included some background information such as gender, years in practice, training type, interest in pulmonary medicine and diagnostic radiology, and having adequate training on the interpretation of chest X-rays. The survey had 10 chest X-ray cases with brief clinical information. Participants were asked to choose the most likely diagnosis and to rate their degree of confidence in the interpretation of the chest X-ray for each case. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 205 physicians (response rate = 34.2%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 63.1% with a significant difference between family medicine and radiology residents (58.0% vs. 90.5%; P < 0.001). The COVID-19 pneumonia (85.4%) and pneumoperitoneum (80.5%) cases had the highest diagnostic accuracy scores. There was a significant correlation between the diagnostic confidence and accuracy (rs = 0.39; P < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis revealed that being diagnostic radiology residents (odds ratio [OR]: 13.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.5-67.7) and having higher diagnostic confidence (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.8) were the only independent predictors of achieving high diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION: The competency of family medicine residents in the interpretation of chest X-ray for emergency conditions was far from optimal. The introduction of radiology training courses on emergency conditions seems imperative. Alternatively, the use of tele-radiology in primary healthcare centers should be considered.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Competence/standards , Internship and Residency/standards , Physicians, Family/education , Radiography, Thoracic/standards , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Physicians, Family/standards , Pneumoperitoneum/diagnostic imaging , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Surg Res ; 264: 534-543, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare systems and surgical residency training programs have been significantly affected by the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A shelter-in-place and social distancing mandate went into effect in our county on March 16, 2020, considerably altering clinical and educational operations. Along with the suspension of elective procedures, resident academic curricula transitioned to an entirely virtual platform. We aimed to evaluate the impact of these modifications on surgical training and resident concerns about COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed residents and fellows from all eight surgical specialties at our institution regarding their COVID-19 experiences from March to May 2020. Residents completed the survey via a secure Qualtrics link. A total of 38 questions addressed demographic information and perspectives regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical training, education, and general coping during the pandemic. RESULTS: Of 256 eligible participants across surgical specialties, 146 completed the survey (57.0%). Junior residents comprised 43.6% (n = 61), compared to seniors 37.1% (n = 52) and fellows 19.3% (n = 27). Most participants, 97.9% (n = 138), anticipated being able to complete their academic year on time, and 75.2% (n = 100) perceived virtual learning to be the same as or better than in-person didactic sessions. Participants were most concerned about their ability to have sufficient knowledge and skills to care for patients with COVID-19, and the possibility of exposure to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Although COVID-19 impacted residents' overall teaching and clinical volume, residency programs may identify novel virtual opportunities to meet their educational and research milestones during these challenging times.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/methods , Specialties, Surgical/education , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/education , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Physical Distancing , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
17.
J Surg Res ; 262: 240-243, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062498

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-COV-2 pandemic created the need for social distancing and the implementation of nonessential travel bans, residency and fellowship programs have moved toward a web-based virtual process for applicant interviews. As part of the Society of Asian Academic Surgeons 5th Annual Meeting, an expert panel was convened to provide guidance for prospective applicants who are new to the process. This article provides perspectives from applicants who have successfully navigated the surgical subspecialty fellowship process, as well as program leadership who have held virtual interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/methods , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Certification/organization & administration , Certification/standards , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/standards , Fellowships and Scholarships/organization & administration , Fellowships and Scholarships/standards , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Leadership , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/organization & administration , Personnel Selection/standards , Physical Distancing , Social Interaction , Specialty Boards , Surgeons/psychology , Surgeons/standards
19.
Am J Surg ; 222(3): 473-480, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002280

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted surgical training nationwide. Our former curricula will likely not return, and training will need to adapt, so we are able to graduate residents of the same caliber as prior to the pandemic. METHODS: A survey evaluating perceptions of changes made in surgical training was conducted on surgery residents and attendings. RESULTS: Disaster medicine training has become more relevant and 85% residents and 75% attendings agreed it should be incorporated into the curriculum. Safety of family was the most significant concern of residents. Virtual curriculum was perceived to be acceptable by 82% residents and only 22% attendings (p < 0.01). Residents (37%) were less concerned than attendings (61%) of falling behind on their overall training (p = 0.04). Both groups agreed operative skills would be adversely affected (56%vs72%; p = 0.37). CONCLUSIONS: To maintain an effective surgical curriculum, programs will need to implement new educational components to better prepare residents to become surgeons of the future.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Education, Distance/methods , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/methods , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , California , Curriculum , Education, Distance/standards , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Family , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Middle Aged , Safety , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgeons/education , Surgeons/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Ann Surg ; 273(1): 109-111, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990974

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unique challenges for evaluating general surgery residency applicants to MATCH 2021. In the absence of away rotations, programs are likely to afford greater importance to objective data to stratify the applicant pool and medical students are likely to experience difficulty in thoroughly assessing each program. Virtual rotations, meet-and-greet events conducted before the application submission deadline, personality testing before extending interviews, standardized letters of recommendation, and skills testing can serve as valuable adjuncts for determining the best applicant-program fit. Finally, an interview limit which sets the bar for the maximum number of accepted interviews per applicant per specialty can offer a level playing field in the absence of time and cost limitations associated with travel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , General Surgery/education , Guidelines as Topic , Internship and Residency/standards , Pandemics , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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