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1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7829-7832, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604716

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As a result of COVID-19 pandemic, the 2021 US residency MATCH was devoid of the traditional in-person interviews. Herein, we assess the impact of Virtual Interviews (VIs) on resident selection, from the perspectives of Orthopedic Surgery (OS) Program Directors (PDs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 14-item survey was sent to PDs of ACGME-accredited OS residencies. Questions were designed to assess the pros, cons, and robustness of VIs compared to their antecedent in-person format. RESULTS: Forty-seven PDs responded to our survey. VIs antagonized PDs' ability to assess applicants' fit to program (76.6%), commitment to specialty (64%), and interpersonal skills (68.1%). This led to heavier dependence upon applicants' portfolios (64%). Almost all respondents (97.9%) found VIs to be more cost-efficient, saving a median of $3000 in interview-related expenses. Overall, only 8.5% of PDs were willing to conduct exclusive VIs in future cycles, compared to the majority in favor of dual formats (51.5%) or exclusive in-person interviews (40.4%). CONCLUSIONS: VIs have been an overall success, making most PDs opt for dual interview formats in future cycles. How this technology is further implemented in the future remains to be seen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures/education , Physician Executives/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internship and Residency/standards , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Selection/methods , Personnel Selection/standards , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Selection/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telecommunications/standards , Telecommunications/trends
3.
Can J Surg ; 64(6): E613-E614, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511844

ABSTRACT

Most institutions have mitigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on residency education by transitioning to web-based educational platforms and using innovative solutions, such as surgical video libraries, telehealth clinics, online question banks via social media platforms, and procedural simulations. Here, we assess the perceived impact of COVID-19 on Canadian surgical residency education and discuss the unique challenges in adapting to a virtual format and how novel training methods implemented during the pandemic may be useful in the future of surgical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Canada , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(3): 462e-474e, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on surgical training programs, reflecting decreases in elective surgical cases and emergency restructuring of clinical teams. The effect of these measures on U.S. plastic surgery resident education and wellness has not been characterized. METHODS: An institutional review board-exempted anonymous survey was developed through expert panel discussion and pilot testing. All current U.S. plastic surgery trainees were invited to complete a cross-sectional 28-question survey in April of 2020. Respondents were queried regarding demographic information, educational experiences, and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 668 residents responded to the survey, corresponding to a 56.1 percent response rate. Sex, training program type, postgraduate year, and region were well represented within the sample. Nearly all trainees (97.1 percent) reported restructuring of their clinical teams. One-sixth of respondents were personally redeployed to assist with the care of COVID-19 patients. A considerable proportion of residents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on their education (58.1 percent) and wellness (84.8 percent). Residents found virtual curriculum effective and meaningful, and viewed an average of 4.2 lectures weekly. Although most residents did not anticipate a change in career path, some reported negative consequences on job prospects or fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on U.S. plastic surgery education and wellness. Although reductions in case volume may be temporary, this may represent a loss of critical, supervised clinical experience. Some effects may be positive, such as the development of impactful virtual lectures that allow for cross-institutional curriculum.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Status , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgery, Plastic/education , Adult , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Distance/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/trends , Male , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Social Support , Stress, Psychological , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
5.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e412-e417, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the ACGME recommended all interviews for the 2021 residency application cycle be held virtually. Because this is major shift from neurosurgical interviews in past years, this study aims to evaluate both applicant and interviewer satisfaction of conducting interviews virtually. METHODS: For faculty, an 11-question online survey was sent to 116 United States neurosurgery training programs. A 14-question online survey was sent to 255 neurosurgery applicants. The resulting data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. RESULTS: From applicants, 118 responses were received. From faculty, 171 individual responses were received. Thirty-five percent (34.7%) of applicants agreed that they were satisfied with the virtual interview process as a whole. Although 44.5% of faculty disagreed with the statement "I would like to replace in-person interviews with virtual interviews in the future", 57.3% of faculty agreed that they were likely to implement virtual interviews in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Some things might be better assessed through in-person interviews, but there are clear benefits to virtual interviews. Future iterations of the interview process, incorporating virtual interviews, might help determine how and in which situations virtual interviews can be utilized in future residency application cycles.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Faculty, Medical/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Job Application , Neurosurgery/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/prevention & control , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Humans , Neurosurgery/education , Online Systems/trends , United States/epidemiology
8.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 609-618, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330740

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has created challenges across medicine, including in medical education, with deeply rooted impacts in the dermatology residency experience. Its effects are both acute and chronic, including: shifts to virtual education and conferences, skewed clinical experiences, negatively impacted wellness, and uncertainty in the future. As educators and mentors, it is important to recognize and address these issues so that we may remain transparent, adaptable, and engaged as we continue to build a better tomorrow for our resident trainees.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatology/education , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Patient Care Management/trends , Skin Diseases/therapy , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Social Perception
9.
Surgery ; 171(2): 354-359, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the COVID-19 virus global pandemic forced healthcare systems to institute regulations including the cancellation of elective surgical cases, which likely decreased resident operative experience. The objective of this study was to determine whether the COVID-19 pandemic affected operative experiences of US general surgery residents. METHODS: The operative experience of general surgery residents was examined nationally and locally. Aggregate Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs for 2018 to 2019 (pre-COVID) and 2019 to 2020 (COVID) graduates were compared using national mean cumulative operative volume for total major and surgeon chief cases. Locally, ACGME case logs were used to analyze the operative experience among residents at a single, academic center. Average operative volumes per month per resident during peak COVID-19 quarantine months were compared with those the previous year. RESULTS: Compared with 2019 graduates, 2020 graduates completed 1.5% fewer total major cases (1055 ± 155 vs 1071 ± 150, P = .011). This was most evident during chief year, with 8.4% fewer surgeon chief cases logged in 2020 compared with 2019 (264 ± 67 vs 289 ± 69, P < .001). Institutional data revealed that during the peak of the pandemic, residents across all levels completed 42.5% fewer total major operations (12 ± 11 vs 20 ± 14, P < .001). This effect was more pronounced among junior residents compared with senior and chief residents. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with decreased resident case volume. The ramifications of the COVID-19 pandemic for operative competency and autonomy should be carefully examined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Surgical Procedures, Operative/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Female , General Surgery/trends , Humans , Male , Quarantine , United States/epidemiology
10.
World Neurosurg ; 151: e857-e870, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297240

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a significant transformation in medical practice and training. This nationwide survey study aims to evaluate the 1-year impact of the pandemic on training of neurosurgical residents. METHODS: A 38-question Web-based survey was sent to 356 neurosurgery residents. Two hundred and thirty-five participated in the study (66% response rate), representing more than half of all neurosurgical residents in the country. RESULTS: Assignment to direct COVID-19 medical care was common (85.5%). Many of the neurosurgery residents (37.9%) were tested positive for COVID-19. Almost half of the respondents reported a decrease in work hours. Most participants (84.3%) reported a decline in total operative case volume (mean change, -29.1% ± 1.6%), largely as a result of a decrease in elective (-33.2% ± 1.6%) as opposed to emergency cases (-5.1% ± 1.8%). For theoretic education, most respondents (54.9%) indicated a negative impact, whereas 25.1% reported a positive impact. For practical training, most respondents (78.7%) reported an adverse effect. A decrease in elective surgical case volume predicted a positive impact on theoretic training but a negative impact on practical training. Research productivity was reported by 33.2% to have decreased and by 23% to have increased. Forty-two percent indicated an increase in concerns about their training and career, with a negative impact on practical training being the most important predictor. Most (57.4%) had considered extending residency training to overcome negative effects of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on neurosurgical practice and training. Effective measures should be used to mitigate these effects and better prepare for the future challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgery/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Neurosurgery/psychology , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Workload/psychology
11.
World Neurosurg ; 151: e395-e398, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-19 (COVID) pandemic has presented a significant challenge to health care providers. Neurosurgical patients are often critically ill and at particularly high risk for COVID, and the pandemic has produced ever-shifting circumstances to allow their continued care. This study explores the psychologic impact of the pandemic on neurosurgical residents at a single institution. METHODS: Residents completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomology 30 (IDS-30), two validated surveys, before and during the pandemic. PSS scores range from 0 to 40 with higher scores indicative of increased stress. IDS-30 ranges from 0 to 84 with higher scores indicating more severe levels of depression. Survey results were compared collectively among residents and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: The surveys had 19 out of 28 total responders (68%). Mean score on the PSS was 16.1 prepandemic and 14.7 during the pandemic (P > 0.05). The mean score on the IDS-30 was 14.7 prepandemic and 12.0 during the pandemic (P > 0.05). Matching the survey questionnaire results by each resident revealed an average decrease of 2.3 and 2.4 for the PSS and IDS-30, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant changes in perceived stress or depressive symptoms among neurosurgical residents during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Internship and Residency , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgery/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Stress, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(6): 645-646, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269082
16.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106717, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252595

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine how neurology departments and residency programs in the United States used virtual communication to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic, we investigated the presence and use of social media pages, virtual outreach events, and virtual internship opportunities. METHODS: Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook accounts were identified (or noted as nonexistent) for 159 accredited neurology departments and residency programs. Google searches and social media site specific searches were performed. For existing pages, the date of creation was determined and all posts on and after March 1st, 2020, were assessed to investigate the presence of virtual open house advertisements. Each program was also assessed for virtual sub-internship and elective opportunities on the Visiting Student Application Service (VSAS). RESULTS: A majority of neurology residency programs (110) had a social media presence, particularly on Twitter and Instagram. Most residency program Twitter and Instagram accounts were created after March 1st, 2020, and this was not the case on Facebook. Twitter and Instagram were used most to advertise virtual opportunities. A correlation was observed between presence and number of social media accounts and program prestige. Few programs offered virtual opportunities on VSAS for the 2020-2021 year. CONCLUSION: Neurology residency programs adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by creating residency social media accounts, primarily on Instagram and Twitter, and hosting virtual informational events. We recommend that neurology residency applicants create professional Instagram and Twitter accounts to network with programs and receive updates about virtual events. Similarly, going forward, we recommend continued social media use by neurology residency programs for applicant outreach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Social Media/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Job Application , Retrospective Studies , United States
19.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e182-e202, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has exerted a significant impact on health care workers. Recent studies have reported the detrimental effects of the pandemic on neurosurgery residents in North America, Asia, and Italy. However, the impact of the pandemic on neurosurgical training in Latin America and Spain has not yet been reported. In the present report, we describe effects of COVID-19 on training and working conditions of neurosurgery residents in these countries. METHODS: An electronic survey with 33 questions was sent to neurosurgery residents between September 7, 2020 and October 7, 2020. Statistical analysis was made in SPSS version 25. RESULTS: A total of 293 neurosurgery residents responded. The median age was 29.47 ± 2.6 years, and 79% (n = 231) were male. Of respondents, 36.5% (n = 107) were residents training from Mexico; 42% surveyed reported COVID symptoms and 2 (0.7%) received intensive care unit care; 61.4% of residents had been tested for COVID and 21.5% had a positive result; 84% of the respondents mentioned persisted with the same workload (≥70 hours per week) during the pandemic. Most residents from Mexico were assigned to management of patients with COVID compared with the rest of the countries (88% vs. 68.3%; P < 0.001), mainly in medical care (65.4% vs. 40.9%; P < 0.001), mechanical ventilators (16.8% vs. 5.9%; P = 0.003), and neurologic surgeries (94% vs. 83%; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Our results offer a first glimpse of the changes imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic on neurosurgical work and training in Latin America and Spain, where health systems rely strongly on a resident workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Critical Care , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Neurosurgeons , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Ventilators, Mechanical , Workload , Young Adult
20.
World Neurosurg ; 151: e68-e77, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164602

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical subspecialties including neurosurgery have seen a dramatic shift in operative volume in the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The goal of this study was to quantify the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on operative volume at 2 academic neurosurgery centers in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA from equivalent periods before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted analyzing neurosurgical case records for 2 tertiary academic centers from March to June 2020 and March to June 2019. The records were reviewed for variables including institution and physician coverage, operative volume by month and year, cases per subspecialty, patient demographics, mortality, and morbidity. RESULTS: Comparison of groups showed a 34% reduction in monthly neurosurgical volume per institution during the pandemic compared with earlier time points, including a 77% decrease during April 2020. There was no change in mortality and morbidity across institutions during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on neurosurgical practice and will likely continue to have long-term effects on patients at a time when global gross domestic products decrease and relative health expenditures increase. Clinicians must anticipate and actively prepare for these impacts in the future.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Academic Medical Centers/methods , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgery/methods , Neurosurgery/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , New Orleans/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies
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